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SUndergraduate tephen Renard Portfolio


“This world is but a canvas to our imagination.” Henry David Thoreau


ConStrata

Phenomenal Transparancy Pavillion

Pop Op

Thierry Mugler Pavillion

Hell Boy

Cliff House

Erosive Formation


ConStrata

Barcelona, Spain

Spring 2013 Professors: Miguel Roldan, Jordi Mansilla Partner: Joshua Walker

Project Description:

ConStrata is defined as “with layers�. This project is a surgical intervention of a market and public space for the rejuvenation of a site in the Barcelonetta neighborhood. The main idea was to create visibility where there was none, and accentuate it where it currently exists.


Operative Map: To

enhance the surprisingly low

visibility of our site, we identified

20

points.

centroids of nearby public spaces, and

10

10

from

pedestrian traffic nodes and mapped high/low visibility areas when facing our site.

We

then

applied a response to each condition, meant to attract visual attention, and thus attendance, to our market.

Public Space: High Visibility

Public Space: Low Visibility


Four Systems: We

identified a unique response

to each visibility condition from the operative mapping

process

which

would

combine

to

enhance the visual interest of previously ignored or under-utilized space.

The result is a visual draw

toward the market, particularly through the new elevated footbridge, and the creation of two servant spaces, the

Pavilion and the Plaza.

Traffic Nodes: High Visibility

Traffic Nodes: Low Visibility


C

Market: A traditional Barcelona Market, idealized as a plaza covered by sails and structure, rather than an enclosed building.

A

Plaza: Beside a museum and cafe, a grove of preexisting trees supports sails, creating a casual, comfortable plaza for vendors.

B

Pavilion: The

previously empty plaza overlooking

the marina was an oversized sidewalk, now a place for social gathering and vending.

A

C

B

Section CC


Market Entrance

Section AA


Pavillion

Elevated Foot Bridge

Section BB


Plaza


Phenomenal Transparancy Pavillion College Station, Texas

Fall 2012 Professors: Sarah Deyong Published: Essay featuring my third-year project on phenomenal transparency.

Sarah Deyong and Craig Babe, “Colin Rowe’s Double-Edge: ‘Program: Fact or Fiction?’” Theory by Design, Architectural Research Made Explicit in the Design Teaching Studio, eds. Els De Vos, Johan De Walsche, Marjan Michels, and Sven Verbruggen (Antwerp, Belgium: Artesis University College, 2012), pp. 131-136.

Project Description:

The Phenomenal Transparancy Pavillion is a promenade experience. One must walk around it to fully grasp the concept of Phenomenal Transparency as well as walk through and inside the project itself. The project is confined to 25’ x 25’ x 35’, yet in three strategic areas, it breaks through this boundary, denying the previous rules with the desire for a new language of its own.


Section AA


Plan One


Plan Two


Pop Op

College Station, Texas

Fall 2012 Professor: Gabriel Esquivel Partners: Ryan Taylor, Erin Templeton, Dylan Weiser, Erica Duran, Kara Kewetz, Patrick Scott, Kathy Xiao, Jorge Cruz, Roberto Jaimes, Lyly Huyen, Emily Knapp, Catlan Fearon Featured: SuckerPunchDaily

Project Description: This

project was inspired by

Op Art,

a twentieth century art movement and style in which artists

sought to create an impression of movement on an image surface by means of an optical illusion.

Passive

elements consisting of composite laminates were produced with the goal of creating

lightweight, semi-rigid, and nearly transparent pieces.

The incorporation of active materials comprised

a unique aspect of this project: the investigation of surface movement through controlled and

SMA wiring SMA wiring and Arduino.

repeatable deformation of the composite structure using the integration of composite materials with

technology.

Pop Op

utilizes


Key

F1

CHANNEL 00

Copper Wire

CHANNEL 01

Copper to SMA connection Flap Cut Line

F3

CHANNEL 03 CHANNEL 04

F7

CHANNEL 05

F4

CHANNEL 06

P4C1

P1 P3

P2

P4

CHANNEL 07

P4C2

F5

CHANNEL 08

P4C3

F6

CHANNEL 09

P4C4

CHANNEL 10

F8

CHANNEL 11

P3C1

F9

CHANNEL 12

P4C5

P9C1 P9C2 P9C3 P7C1 P7C2 P10C1 P10C2 P10C3 P10C4 P10C5 P10C6 P10C7 P8C7 P8C6 P8C5 P8C4 P8C3 P8C2 P8C1 P3C1 P3C2 P3C3 P4C1 P4C5 P4C3 P4C6 P4C2 P4C4

F2

CHANNEL 02

CHANNEL 13

F3

CHANNEL 14

P3C2 P4C6

CHANNEL 15

F6

F1

P3C3

P8C2 P8C1

F5 CH15

CH14

CH13

CH06

P8C3

CH12

CH01 CH11 CH02

P8C4

CH10

F9

CH09 CH03

CH05

CH07

CH08

P8C5

P7

F8 P8C6

Front Front

P8C7

P10

P7C2 P7C1 P10C3

Thermostats 4’x8’ Masonite

P10C6

P10C2

P11

P10C5

4’x8’ Masonite

9"

9"

F7

Back Back

8 21 " 3 21 " 8 21 " 3 21 " 3"

Panel A Panel A

3 21 " 3 21 " 16'-6" 16'-0" 16'-6"

Panel B Panel B

3"

3"

16'-0"

3"

8'-0" 8'-0" 8'-0"

6"

8'-0"

9"

P10C1

5"

P9

P9C3

5"

P9C2

P8

5'-1"

P9C1

P10C7

2 - 2”x4”s 8’ each 2 - 2”x4”s 8’ each Thermostats

5'-1"

F2

P10C4

Panel A Panel A

Panel B Panel B

9"

F4

P5

CH04

A

8'-0"

A

6"

8'-0"

1"

CH00

1"

P6


Thierry Mugler Pavillion

Soho, New York City, New York Fall 2011 Professor: Gabriel Esquivel

Project Description:

This Project is a high end fashion Boutique for Thierry Mugler, which will be located in Soho, New York on the corner of Canal and Hudson Street. It is a project which caters towards the new age in Fashion and Architecture Culture. It looks forward to the new styles in fashion through Thierry Mugler and the revolutionary building materials that are available at present. Even though the building uses Carbon Fiber and ETFE Glass for the building materials, it does not only look towards the future, but reflects on parts of the past and really presents itself in a new way. The

exterior shell is based on a previous prototype design, but instead of interweaving the strands to

itself, they strand to multiple prototypes.

Each “main body” is strategically placed to form the shell of The web of strands conform the entirety of the project and wrap around the program of the project. In every place that one goes, they experience a new affect that complements the fashion that is being sold. the building.

The

project, while inspired by the

Art Nouveau sensibility, in turn misbehaves and becomes bad and The strands that make up the shell can be referred to as “Straps” recalling the idea of “bondage”. This body is explained as the archaic form of Architecture that holds up this new form of building material. This archaic form is strapped down and bonded to the ground. These straps are tightly bound around a now void space, thus the form of the outer shell. This archaic form of Architecture hardcore.

is denied existence and is now only used in the construction portion of the progressive movement of architecture.

Many

people believe that as one life dies, another begins and replaces the old one.

This

explains the death of the archaic form and the beginning of the way architecture will be in this new form.


4

1

7

Section AA


5 SECOND FLOOR 3 GROUND FLOOR 2 6 Couture Showroom - 1 Lobby - 2 Gallery One - 3 Gallery Two - 4 Cafe - 5 Auditorium - 6 Storage - 7


4

2

3

6

5

1

Ground Floor

Entrance - 1 Couture Showroom - 2 Lobby - 3 Mens Changing Room - 4 Womens Changing Room - 5 Auditorium - 6


4 3

2

1 1

1 - Entrance 2 - Gallery One 3 - Gallery Two 4 - Auditorium

Second Floor


Entrance

Couture Showroom

The

coloration of the interior is meant to

reinvent the red carpet feeling, and to produce an integration of the culture of architecture to the culture of fashion via the ground.

This

“red

carpet�

project addresses the idea that we

can continuously reinvent the red carpet feeling by recreating it so that it runs throughout the entirety of the project.

Gallery One

Gallery Two


Hell Boy Bryan, Texas

Fall 2013 Project Lead: Chris Paulk Partners: Troy Hassman, David Gardner, Nesrine Mansour First Place: Peoples Choice Award Monumetal Competition

Project Description: Hellboy

“Come Hell or High Water�. The Fireman will rescue the endangered The competition allotted three weeks and 500 pounds of scrap metal to design a Monumetal Sculpture by any means available. is based on the idiom

no matter the cost and will prevail.


Cliff House

Las Vegas, Nevada

Spring 2012 Professors: Roland Snooks, Gabriel Esquivel Partners: Adrian Cortez, Zach Hoffman, Rafael Vazquez, Andrew Horne, Tyler Nagai, and Lyly Huyen. Featured: Kokkugia, Studio Roland Snooks, Sucker Punch Daily

Project Description:

The Cliff House is an experiment in composite fiber architecture operating in extreme conditions. The project is a collaboration between Kokkugia and the Mitchell Lab at Texas A&M that explored agent-based behavioral design methodologies operating across the scales of form, structure, and composite fiber. Designing through agent-based behavioral strategies encodes design intent within individual elements that interact at a local scale to give rise to the emergence of complex order at the macro-scale. Applying this methodology to a composite fiber house enables the local scale to be reduced to a sub-material level. This increase in the population of agents generates greater intricacy and intensive emergent affects. The geometry of the Cliff House is not discrete or reducible - instead, geometry negotiates complex behaviors such as structure and ornament, generating emergent characteristics that shift throughout the project.


Step One

Section AA

Step Two

Step Three


Step Four

Step Five

Step Six


Plan One


The

site for the house was chosen to test the

capacity

of

composite

fabrication

in

extreme

structural situations to resist both wind and static loads.

Although an argument for composite fiber

construction is frequently premised on the desire for structural optimization, the use of composite material in the

Cliff House

is a negotiation of

structural necessity with more esoteric aesthetic, formal and tectonic intentions

- it is the expressive

nature of these formations that is of interest.

The

translucency of the composite material is

exploited to reveal the embedded networks and emergent hierarchies of structural strands.

The

composite skin registers the ripples of bifurcating and converging strands that blur the distinction between structure and ornament.

The

strands

shift from a networked surface to tentacles that etch their trajectories into the cliff-face.

These

tentacles, attach to the cliff partly out of

structural necessity but also from the desire for continuity and to blur the edge of the object

–

a strategy for diffusing the object into its

environment. hybrid

There

The

between

relationship sets up a strange

rock

and

composite

strand.

is an ambiguity as to whether the strands

are growing through the existing cracks in the rocks, or whether the cracks have been made for the strands.

This condition is neither geological

nor synthetic; instead it sets up a tension between the two.

Plan Two


Physical Model


Erosive Formation Austin, Texas

Fall 2013 Professor: Mark Odom Partner: Zach Hoffman

Project Description: The

natatorium takes on water’s way of changing from a body that is shaped by its container, to a

body that begins to form its own environment. form and circulation.

Our

Through

turbulent erosion, it begins to establish

natatorium is meant to have a regional relation to

icon that develops a relation between the

East

and

Western 6th Street

Austin,

becoming an

and providing a reason to

transition between the two areas.

The

natatorium is oriented to allow minimal sunlight during

Austin’s

hot summers, while allowing

light to pass through in the winter.

Minimal glazing is placed in the western façade while only heavily The east and northern facades have the most glazing to receive the natatorium. These openings are formulated through slits and

shaded glazing is placed in the south. adequate lighting throughout lightwells on the roof.

The

natatorium utilizes a multitude of sustainable technologies which allow it to function more

efficiently.

The primary method is through involutions, which are repeated throughout the natatorium and apartments. The involutions first act as a water storage device by collecting rain water into a cistern. The water is then channeled through grooves on the roof. The involutions also allow light to enter the bottom, darker floors through the use of diffusion. Reflective copper skin covers a large portion of the ceiling, which reflects part of the light cast on the natatorium. To avoid being too reflective, the copper skin is treated through sanding and heavily insulated to avoid overheating.


Step One

Step Two

Step Three

Step Four

Step Five

Step Six


Section AA


Section BB


B

A A

B

Site Plan


LEGEND 1 LOBBY 2 BAR/RESTAURANT 3 OFFICE SPACE 4 UNDER-POOL TUNNEL 5 BATHROOM 6 KITCHEN 7 HVAC 8 CHILLER/BOILER 9 STORAGE 10 APARTMENTS

1 1

LEGEND 1 LAP POOL 2 DIVING POOL 3 BLEACHERS 4 LOCKER ROOM 5 BALCONY

8

9

6 5

3

1 2

5

3

3

4

10

4

5

2

Plan 0

2

1

4

7

Plan 1

Plan 2

South Elevation

North Elevation


East Elevation VERTICAL BRACING

CONNECTION DETAIL - TUBES

STEEL TUBING - 1.5’ BOLTED CONNECTIONS COPPER CLADDING STEEL TUBING - 1’ VAPOR BARRIER STEEL TUBE - .5’ INSULATION INTERIOR CLADDING

INSULATION VAPOR BARRIER DRYWALL

SOCKET

STEEL TUBE - .5’

SOCKET LOCATION

PLASTER FINISH

COPPER CLADDING

STEEL TUBE 1.5’ SILL PLATE

PLASTER FINISH

CONCRETE SLAB

COPPER CLADDING

VAPOR BARRIER

STEEL TUBE - 1’ BOLTED CONNECTION CONCRETE

INSULATION

GLASS BRACE

CONCRETE FOUNDATION WALL

TILING

CONCRETE FOOTING

ROOF/WALL/FLOOR DETAIL CONNECTION DETAIL - STEEL TO CONCRETE

STEEL TUBES

FOUNDATION/WALL/FLOOR DETAIL


West Elevation


The

interior has a cave like affect, which carries

the idea of erosion throughout the entirety of the project.

This

provokes the imagination and

desire to explore within.



Stephen Renard Undergraduate Portfolio