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Lodge Stirling Royal Arch No. 76. Website Mailing List Volume 2 Issue 1

January 2006. The Kirkwall Scroll The Not-So-Secret Scroll – Priceless Relic or Floorcloth? An article by Brian Smith exploring the Kirkwall teaching Scroll. In Lodge Kirkwall Kilwinning No.38² in Orkney, hanging on the West Wall is the so-called Kirkwall Scroll. This fascinating article by Brian Smith, the archivist of the Shetland Islands Council explores its antiquity and shows why Andrew Sinclair got it wrong. This is probably the most factual account of the scroll! [Link] I’m always on the lookout for Masonic lectures/stories/poems; if any Brother knows one that I can use, get in touch.

Location Map

To start the New Year, the web site has a new feature. A map of the world where you can add a pin to show where you’re from. Click this link to go there.

Interesting facts…… Did you know? That when our national poet Robert Burns visited Stirling in August 1787, he stayed at Gibb’s Inn owned by a member of Lodge 76. He dined with Christopher Bell schoolmaster, also a member of Lodge 76 of whom Burns said, “A joyous fellow who sings a good song” Unfortunately there is no record of Burns every visiting a lodge in the area during his time in Stirling!

The Webmaster


Lodge Stirling Royal Arch No. 76. Website Mailing List Volume 2 Issue 2

February 2006. Count Dracula, Freemason.

Count Dracula a Freemason? Surely not. This article by Bro. Paul Rich uses this example to show how modern day writers are using weird speculations and unsubstantiated claims to try and rewrite our Masonic history. Paul explains how so much nonsense is written these days trying to make obscure connections between ‘lost Masonic secrets’ and sensational fantasies. Count Dracula? Well some people would have us believe that he is has some obscure connection with the Craft. [Link] The above graphic was designed by SRA76design.

I’m always on the lookout for Masonic lectures/articles/poems; if any Brother knows one that I can use, get in touch.

Interesting facts….. Lodge Stirling Royal Arch has met in a variety of meeting places, from the first meeting hall mentioned in the minute books in 1760 to the temple at the present day. This old picture of the Royal George Mill in Bannockburn is the Masonic Temple of Lodge Bannockburn Bruce and Thistle No. 312 where Lodge 76 meets today. This mill building was built in the 1st quarter of the 19th century when Bannockburn was famous for its tartan weaving, and it is believed that Lodge Bannockburn attended the laying of the foundation stone of this very building. 100 years later lodge 312 bought the building and converted it into a Masonic temple. If you know any other Brethren who might like to be included in the mailing list, get in touch via the mailing list page on the website.

The Webmaster


Lodge Stirling Royal Arch No. 76. Website Mailing List Volume 2 Issue 3

March 2006. The Mason’s Mallet

‘The Mason’s Mallet by Brother William Harvey J.P. is another lecture in a series of lectures given by Bro. Harvey. An emblem of power and authority, Brother Harvey has put together a very instructive article which everyone from the Entered Apprentice to the Master of the Lodge will find interesting. The original write-up about the lecture in 1920 states, ‘No more lucid and thoughtful essay on the mallet as a working tool and as an emblem of authority has appeared. Bro. Harvey knows his subject intimately and out of his great knowledge has prepared a most engaging paper.’ [link] (can any 76 member guess who the RWM is in this photgraph?)

I’m always on the lookout for Masonic lectures/articles/poems; if any Brother knows one that I can use, get in touch.

The Lodge 76 gavel…. The picture opposite shows the old gavel of Lodge 76. The following is an extract of the minute book in 1987 ‘Our Gavel was beginning to split, it was originally made from wood from the old Glasgow Cathedral, and rather that see it damaged any further, the Officebearers of the Lodge had commissioned me to have a new gavel made and present it to the Lodge, and as most of the Office-bearers were young men, one day I hope they would wield the mallet they had helped to present to the Lodge.’ (PM Willie Reid) The original gavel is now housed in the Grand Lodge of Scotland Museum for safe-keeping.

Interesting facts….. William Harvey, who was initiated into Lodge 76 in 1898, inducted Winston Churchill as an honorary Brother of the Ancient Order of Foresters. If you know any other Brethren who might like to be included in the mailing list, get in touch via the mailing list page on the website.

The Webmaster


Lodge Stirling Royal Arch No. 76. Website Mailing List Volume 2 Issue 4

April 2006. Lodge 76 medal….. La Secte des Eveilles

La Secte des Eveilles, (The Society of the Awakened) is an article that I’m sure you will enjoy reading. Again the website is lucky in that this has never before been published on the internet. It explains the ritual of an ultra secret society, if it ever existed! The graphic above should give the reader a hint of what the candidate has to endure, and we think we have it hard! [link] (the answer to last months query, the RWM in the photograph was Russell Hunter our Secretary)

I’m always on the lookout for Masonic lectures/articles/poems; if any Brother knows one that I can use, get in touch.

It might not be too well-known amongst the brethren of Lodge 76 that the Lodge once produced a medal. Until quite recently it was thought that only four of these medals existed, three with members of the Lodge and one in the Grand Lodge museum. A short time ago I came across this picture on the internet of the Lodge medal in its original box. The whereabouts of this medal is uncertain, but at one time was held by the private McCutcheon collection, it maybe that this medal is now in the possession of the Smith Art Gallery in Stirling, making a total of five. If anyone knows of the existence of any of these medals or the one pictured here, please get in touch with me.

The Webmaster


Lodge Stirling Royal Arch No. 76. Website Mailing List Volume 2 Special Issue

Summer 2006. The Masonic Ring

Brethren, Recently I received an e-mail from Brother Wull McArthur of Glesga Pals, who sent me a song called “The Masonic Ring” by American singer, Howie Damron. Probably like you, I’d never heard of this guy before, but In Ohio he’s known as a ‘musical soldier for Freemasonry’. He performs this song at Masonic functions all over America and has released the song on a CD called ‘Share the Feelin’.

This is Brother Howie’s thoughts on the song; “It’s hard not to recognise that humanity needs moral and ethical leaders who are not afraid to stand and voice their opinions on what’s right and what’s wrong in today’s society. I believe that all masons everywhere should accept this challenge with pride, remembering our oath and obligations, for we have been duly and truly prepared to do so. I asked the Great Architect of the Universe to give me the words and the wisdom to be able to take up the pen so that I may speak to and from the hearts of all Brothers and listeners through the lyrics of ‘The Masonic Ring’. Howie Damron sings in the style of John Denver, James Taylor and the like, easy to listen to, and you can read more about him at this link. To play a sample of the song click here! The format is MP3 which should play ok on windows media player. If you would like a copy of the full song, send me an e-mail, I have it in WMA, WAV and MP3 format which I can send, but I’d advise a broadband connection.

The Webmaster


Lodge Stirling Royal Arch No. 76. Website Mailing List Volume 2 Issue 5

September 2006. Cowans and Eavesdroppers

Interesting facts…..

Did you know that the word Cowan is a Scottish word and was originally used to describe a dry-stone dyker? And that the word eavesdropper is a term for a listener of private conversations. Put these two words together and you have a purely Masonic meaning that we are all familiar with. This short article by Bro. Bobby Lupess explains the origins of these words, their use in Scottish Freemasonry and how they were introduced into the Constitutions of the Grand Lodge of England. [Link]

The first recorded meeting place of Lodge 76 was in 1759 and is mentioned as ‘‘The Old Episcopalian Hall.’, this building at 56 Spittal Street started in the mid 17th century as the house of Robert Russell, provost of Stirling and later became the Episcopalian Chapel. At the beginning of the 20th Century it became a lodging house and is perhaps better known today as ‘Glengarry Lodge’, at onetime also known as the ‘Darrow Building’ built for Sir James Darrow in 1521. This old picture shows the house when it was a lodging house, after it was renovated in the 1950’s it became a council dwelling house.

I’m always on the lookout for Masonic lectures/articles/poems; if any Brother knows one that I can use, get in touch.

If you know any other Brethren who might like to be included in the mailing list, get in touch via the mailing list page on the website.

The Webmaster


Lodge Stirling Royal Arch No. 76. Website Mailing List Volume 2 Issue 6

October 2006. Stuart Masonry This title is given by Masonic historians to that system of Freemasonry which is supposed to have been invented by the adherents of the exiled House of Stuart for the purpose of being used as a political means of restoring, first, James II, and afterward his son and grandson, James and Charles Edward, respectively known in history as the Chevalier Saint George and the Young Pretender. Was Bonnie Prince Charlie, a freemason and held high office, or was he not? Probably not, although legend or tradition this fascinating article makes good reading and is taken from Mackey’s Encyclopaedia of Freemasonry. [Link] I’m always on the lookout for Masonic lectures/articles/poems; if any Brother knows one that I can use, get in touch.

Interesting facts….. The Skirrett is an instrument that acts on a centre pin, from which a line is drawn to mark out the foundation, and part of the M.M working tools. But did you know that in the American constitution, the skirrett is not used.

What’s in a number…..? Stirling Royal Arch is numbered 76 on the roll of the Grand Lodge of Scotland, but it was not always this. When the Lodge was chartered in 1759, the number assigned was 93. This was again the number in 1809. When the list of lodges was adjusted in 1816 the number was 75, and when the list was again revised in 1821, the number allocated was 71. At the last amendment in 1826 the Lodge was given number 76 which has remained to this day. If you know any other Brethren who might like to be included in the mailing list, get in touch via the mailing list page on the website.

The Webmaster


Lodge Stirling Royal Arch No. 76. Website Mailing List Volume 2 Issue 7

November 2006. The Athole Family

Freemasonry in the movies

The Athole Family and Freemasonry is an article which first appeared in the book, ‘A Treasury of Masonic Thought’ written by Bro. George Martin. Reproduced in the Lodge 76 lectures page, it traces the Dukes of Athole who were freemasons and the formation of the “Athole” lodges in England, and the feud between the “Antients” and the “Moderns” the rival Grand Lodges in England and the subsequent union of both the Grand Lodges in 1813 after the bitter hostility between the two bodies which had lasted for over 60 years. Brother Martin outlines the Masonic history from the 1st Duke up to the 8th Duke.

There are countless references to freemasonry in films, cartoons, television and music. You will all be familiar with the film “The Man who would be King”, but did you know the film “The Searchers” starring Bro., John Wayne also has a reference in it. In the scene where Wayne rides into the Comanche camp after a battle, one of

[Link]

If you know any other Brethren who might like to be included in the mailing list, get in touch via the mailing list page on the website.

I’m always on the lookout for Masonic lectures/articles/poems; if any Brother knows one that I can use, get in touch.

the dead Comanche’s is seen lying face up wearing a blue apron with the Square and Compasses on it, which can be seen quite clearly in the still shown here. Watch out for future references from the world of films and freemasonry.

The Webmaster


Lodge Stirling Royal Arch No. 76. Website Mailing List Volume 2 Issue 8

December 2006. Scottish Masonic Customs

Masonic traditions and customs within the Scottish Constitutions are quite unique from other constitutions around the world. For example the regalia of Scottish Lodges have their own distinctive colour. Regalia through to titles, bye-laws, officers, signs, work on the floor and even our harmonies are different. In this month’s article titled, Scottish Traditions and Masonic Usages, by Bro. Dato. Dr. Peter C. Vanniasingham explores these traditions and customs of the Scottish Craft. [Link] I’m always on the lookout for Masonic lectures/articles/poems; if any Brother knows one that I can use, get in touch.

Interesting Facts…… Did you know that Murray Place in Stirling is named after William Murray of Polmaise, a member of Lodge 76? The North Church seen in this picture is at the far end of the street. (The building with the buttress) Lodge 76 performed the laying of the foundation stone of the church in 1841 the year before Murray Place was laid. Before that date the area was called Spring Garden. The Lodge held their meetings in the church hall between 1921 and 1933 and the harmonies in the nearby Station Hotel. Sadly both these buildings are demolished and no longer with us.

If you know any other Brethren who might like to be included in the mailing list, get in touch via the mailing list page on the website.

The Webmaster


Lodge Stirling Royal Arch No. 76. Website Mailing List Volume 2 Bugsport Special

Summer 2006 Bugsport Special

Brethren, Lodge 76 and the Webmaster are proud to announce that we have been granted permission by Bro. Ted Bastien MM of Lodge Joseph A Hearn Lodge No 685 of The Grand Lodge of Ancient Free & Accepted Masons of Canada in the Province of Ontario to reproduce his comic strip “BUGSPORT”. Set in the imaginary town of Bugsport in the state of Maine, the inhabitants are aliens who live quite comfortably side by side with the townspeople! The main

character is Ted, who along with his family moves to the town of Bugsport, where he discovers an old box of his grandfather’s, full of Masonic paraphernalia. Ted soon decides to become a Mason! Bugsport will appear on the 76 website from now onwards, and the comic strip will change once a week normally on a Sunday. The adventures will start from the very beginning and 2 strips or so will be published each week, along with a ‘Story so far....’ The cartoon adventures of Brother Ted and Brother Don, (an alien) are an exclusive for Lodge 76 in Scotland, and we are privileged that Ted Bastien has allowed us to show it in our website. The artwork is superb and the storylines are hilarious. Throughout the comic strip there are numerous Masonic symbols represented in the background of the drawings, and part of the fun is looking out for them! This really is a scoop for the Lodge 76 website and I hope you look forward to the comings and goings in the township of Bugsport and enjoy the weekly adventures of Brother Ted. Click here to take you to the Bugsport web page. Brethren, please feel free to let others know about the Bugsport Comic Strip in the Lodge 76 site.

The Webmaster

SRA76 JAN TO DEC 2006 MASONIC MAGAZINE  
SRA76 JAN TO DEC 2006 MASONIC MAGAZINE  

The monthly masonic magazine of Lodge Stirling Royal Arch No.76 Scotland.

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