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SARAH QI-YING CHAN

2013 - 17


SARAH QI-YING CHAN Masters of Science in Planning Candidate

ABOUT I am a hardworking and self-motivated 24 year old who takes academics seriously, but also finds the time to enjoy the small things in life. One of the most invaluable lessons I’ve taken away is that our built form represents the cultural values we collectively hold, meaning a critical assessment of our social, political, and environmental trends is essential to building better cities. I’ve always been interested in how land use planning and urban design shape the quality of spaces in which we live, and how stakeholders can collectively work together to create urban solutions. Outside of school, I have a passion for music, which I enjoy playing and composing. Though I am not sure what the future holds for me, or why I had been given these specific passions, I hope to keep developing my professional and personal skills to serve the people in Toronto, my home and a city that I love.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS PROFESSIONAL

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CAMPUS PLAN

ACADEMIC

OLD OTTAWA EAST ELMVALE SHOPPING CENTRE POCKET OTTAWA

COMPETITION

REVIVE - OGDEN PARK PAVILLION TAKE2 - CITIES OF TOMORROW

MISCELLANEOUS BAGAN WORKSHOP MUSIC SKETCH

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14 20 26

30 36 38 40

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12

10 6

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3 4

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8 11 1 5

2

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PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CAMPUS PLAN Team member in leading consultant team, Urban Strategies Inc. Supervising Partner: Warren Price Sept 2015 - Nov 2017 Full report online: https://campusplan.princeton.edu/current-campus-plan

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POTENTIAL PROJECTS & INITIATIVES CAMPUS-WIDE 1. Washington Road Streetscape Enhancements 2. Lake Carnegie Landscape 3. East-West Campus Connector 4. North-South Campus Connector

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EAST CAMPUS 5. Residential College Sites 6. Diagonal Walk 7. Frist/Guyot/McCosh Node; Wilson College, Eno Hall, 1915 Hall Sites 8. Dillon Gym Expansion 9. Potential Residential Mixed-use 10. New Space for Engineering and Environmental Studies 11. East Campus Entry 12. Enhancements behind 185 Nassau Street & William Street

The Princeton University Campus Plan is a framework for the future growth of the school to accomodate the University’s values, challenges, opportunities and goals. It was initiated in 2014 with a comprehensive strategic planning process of which Urban Strategies Inc. was the leading consultant team under the leadership of partners Warren Price and Cyndi Rottenberg-Walker. After three years of collaborative work, a flexible, revisable framework was created, which takes into consideration the short-term and long-term goals of the

LAKE CAMPUS 13. Lake Campus Walk 14. Tiger Lane Crossing & Transit Hub 15. Academic Partnerships, Innovation Space, Administration and Housing 16. Athletics 17. Parking 18. Campus Meadow LAKE CAMPUS 19. Landscape & movement improvements 20. Cycling connection improvements to main campus & Forrestal Village 21. ReCAP Facility Potential building Longer-term opportunity site Campus connectors

University. The planning framework focuses on the short-term development, with guidelines specifically written for a tenyear horizon, but with the intention of providing opportunities for growth over a thirty-year period. This meant that though the majority of new development over ten years can be accomodated through the central and east campus, all of Princeton’s university lands were considered, and guidelines were given as to growth in the West Windsor lands south of Lake Carnegie, and the satellite campus of Forrestal.

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NORTH-SOUTH CAMPUS CONNECTOR

.

au St

EAST-WEST CAMPUS CONNECTOR

Nass

CENTRAL CAMPUS

1

EAST CAMPUS LAKE CARNEGIE

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Ca na l

Fa c

ul

ty

Rd

.

3

LAKE CAMPUS

Elm

t.

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de xan Ale

D&

R

4

Ti

ge

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n.

Dr.

WASHINGTON ROAD

NODE POTENTIAL BUILDING LONGER-TERM OPPORTUNITY SITE

The campus plan is divided into four general campuses: the Central Campus west of Washington Road and north of Lake Carnegie, the East Campus east of Washington Road and north of Lake Carnegie, the Lake Campus south of the lake, and the university’s satellite campus of Forrestal. In the framework, projects are introduced at two different scales, one being campus-wide projects and the other being more specific projects realizable within a ten-year horizon. Two of the campus-wide projects have the intent of creating opportunities and incentives for the growing population to build community through the introduction of two key corridors: The East-West Campus Connector, and the North-South Campus Connector. These are highlighted by ‘nodes’ at strategic locations, which provide settings, amenities and services to encourage serendipitous and planned encounters between students, staff, and visitors. The two remaining campus-wide projects recognize the need to enhance and reinforce the character of two significant features of the campus: Washington Road and Lake Carnegie. The expansion of the campus south of Lake Carnegie places the lake as the geographic center of the campus,

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EXISTING MOVEMENT CORRIDOR ENHANCED MOVEMENT CORRIDOR NEW MOVEMENT CORRIDOR

with Washington Road acting as the connecting seam. The strategy to integrate the Lake Campus also includes the introduction of a new pedestrian and cycling bridge, which would lead to a new innovation, partnership and athletics facilities. Additionally, this would be integrated into the regional bicycle and sidewalk networks. The role that I played in this project consisted of being a team member in developing and creating a series of concepts and drawings for the university systems, including landuse, movement, infrastructure, and landscape design. A number of drawings and considerations were also made in the development of precincts across the university, where a significant amount of consideration was given to smaller sections of the university. These included how land use and key elements can facilitate key social interactions or charactter of the precinct. I also took part in 3D modelling and editing renders. The second aspect of the work I did was the collection and manipulation of GIS data, which changed as the campus plan developed. These involved monitoring and ensuring development targets set by a matrix were met.


LANDSCAPE SHARED-USE PATH TRAVEL PATH SIDEWALK SPORTS FIELD DEVELOPMENT SITE

18’

11’

11’

8’

1. WASHINGTON ROAD SECTION

Development on Frist Lawn integrating campus open space

Relocate existing service drive to create continuous pedestrian connection

WILSON COLLEGE

WILSON COLLEGE

2. FRIST/GUYOT/MCCOSH NODE SECTION

18’

11’

11’

3. EAST CAMPUS DRIVE SECTION

Pedestrian walk and spill-out zone creating active building frontage

Multi-use path through landscape as part of NorthSouth connector

Stormwater treatment landscape

Seating area along athletic field

4. LAKE CAMPUS WALK SECTION 7


CAMPUS ORGANIZATION The organization of the campus has evolved through generations of growth reflecting on the expanding mission of the University. The primary academic and research areas have grown outward from Nassau Hall, primarily to the south and east. A substantial amount of residential lies along the western edge of the campus, with graduate student housing expanding southwards. Likewise, athletic lands are gradually moving southwards to the Lake Campus as the campus expands. The landscape structure of Princeton features a complex interaction of landscape types, which come together to create a sense of place. These include natural landscapes, linear landscapes, campus open space, and historic/ culturally-significant landscapes. With nearly 80% of Princeton’s faculty, staff and graduate student commuters living within 15 miles of the campus, the planning framework seeks to enhance existing connections and create new ones to accomodate all types of movement.

LAND-USE FRAMEWORK PRIMARILY ACADEMIC PRIMARILY RESIDENTIAL PRIMARILY ATHLETICS

LANDSCAPE FRAMEWORK NODE KEY MOVEMENT CORRIDORS HISTORIC CAMPUS CORE PRIMARY PEDESTRIAN CONNECTION EXISTING CAMPUS OPEN SPACE PROPOSED OPEN/LINEAR LANDSCAPE NATURAL LANDSCAPES

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MOVEMENT

PEDESTRIAN EXISTING PRIMARY ROUTE ENHANCED PRIMARY ROUTE

CYCLING EXISTING SHARED LANE MARKINGS PROPOSED SHARED LANE MARKINGS PROPOSED BIKE LANE EXISTING PATH PROPOSED PATH RECREATIONAL TRAIL PROPOSED TRANSIT HUB

TRANSIT EXISTING NON-UNIVERSITY BUS ROUTES POTENTIAL ADDITION TO REGIONAL TRANSIT DINKY RAIL EXISTING TIGER TRANSIT PROPOSED EXTENSION TO TIGER TRANSIT EXISTING TRANSIT HUB PROPOSED TRANSIT HUB

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WILSON COLLEGE

DILLON GYM EXPANSION

RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES

RESIDENTIAL MIXED-USE CORRIDOR

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NEW FACILITIES ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL FACILITIES

NEW PARTNERSHIP, INNOVATION SPACE

NEW ATHLETIC FACILITIES

CAMPUS MEADOW

DEMONSTRATION CAMPUS PLAN & PROJECTS

*not all building footprints/parcels shown in drawing to be implemented

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The proposal for Old Ottawa East aims to revive the community’s cultural identity by celebrating its history and identifying the site’s assets in order to re-connect back to Ottawa’s urban fabric. In response to a relatively isolated yet historically rich site that consists almost solely of a heritage building (Deschatelets), the Old Ottawa East plan aims to unite the community by introducing eastward connections through the site from Main Street to the Rideau River, the site’s most beautiful and community-building asset. By turning the Allée into a pedestrian walkway, two pedestrian axes are formed, intersecting at the heart of the project: an adaptedreuse of the Deschatelets into a community centre by the riveredge.

OLD OTTAWA EAST Professor:Benjamin Gianni Term: Fall 2014

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With continuous feedback and consideration from community members, city planners, and other professionals, six character areas were developed in the proposal: the Oblate Allée, the Urban South, the Park Edge, the Great Lawn, the Community Pavilion, and the Residential North. The majority of the development is residential, with mixed-use development flanking Main Street and the Oblates Avenue. In keeping with sustainability objectives, the proposal also uses a combination of stormwater systems. These include bioswales along the north side of the Oblates Avenue, green roof integration on the mixed-use buildings, and a constructed wetland at the end of the Community Pavilion. Old Ottawa East becomes a fully-integrated enhancement of the existing neighbourhood, drawing inhabitants and visitors to the river’s edge along a series of beautiful open spaces.


SITE ANALYSIS

EXISTING TRANSIT

PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION

VEHICULAR CIRCULATION

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SECTIONS

TYPOLOGIES TOWER A x3

1. LOOKING EAST DOWN ALLÉE

Total Units: 457 Parking: Underground Footprint: 44 594m2

stormwater drainage 25m pedestrian allée

2. COMMUNITY PAVILION & STORMWATER SYSTEM

constructed wetland for stormwater

3. LOOKING NORTH THROUGH THE URBAN SOUTH

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bioswale underground filtration


TOWER B x3

MIXED-USE A x3

MIXED-USE B x2

TOWNHOUSE x67

Total Units: 345 Parking: Underground Footprint: 34 854m2

Total Units: 187 Parking: Underground Footprint: 15 482m2

Total Units: 120 Parking: Underground Footprint:14 049m2

Total Units: 67 Parking: Back Laneway Footprint:14 049m2

STACKED TOWNHOUSE x100 Total Units: 200 Parking: Back Laneway Footprint: 33 154m2

TOWER C x1 Total Units: 86 Parking: Underground Footprint: 9 054m2

6 1

5

2

4

3 1

THE OBLATE ALLÉE

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THE PARK EDGE

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THE COMMUNITY PAVILION

2

THE URBAN SOUTH

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THE GREAT LAWN

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THE RESIDENTIAL NORTH

RETAIL/RESIDENTIAL MIXED-USE

LOW-DENSITY RESIDENTIAL

HIGH-DENSITY RESIDENTIAL

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1 - HERITAGE ALLÉE

2 - GREEN PAVILLION

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3 - THE GREAT LAWN

4 - PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE

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3

2 17


The Elmvale Strip revitalizes an outdated strip mall into a vibrant mixed-use community, complementing both the existing neighbourhood and supporting future population and transit growth. It’s achieved through the compelling vision of a green pedestrian corridor linking four community anchors throughout the site, promoting movement, community bonding, and safety throughout the site. Through an analysis of the existing condition and zoning designations, this design proposal was formulated through identifying opportunity and constraint features. While a minimal strategy was developed, the project was ultimately made possible through relieving the restrictive constraint on eastern edge of St. Laurent Blvd., where accessibility

THE ELMVALE STRIP Professor: Yves Gosselin Term: Winter 2014

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into the site was impossible due to the bus-excepted route. An elevated transit route provides the opportunity to shift the main vehicular egress east, opening up the centre for a pedestrian green corridor flanked by mixed-use residential typologies. Crenellations with changes in elevation are put throughout the site at significant key locations, namely, the ends of the strip, in front of the community centre, and in front of the densest residential cluster. These are social and amenity anchors meant to foster community bonding throughout the site. New east-west pedestrian bridges address the lack of connectivity to the site, linking to the community centre, and ultimately to the existing neighbourhoods. The once over-parked and under-utilized space is transformed into a thriving community, marking an important intersection of three major roads.


SITE ANALYSIS Existing site as major transit hub...

located within Ottawa’s early neighbourhoods...

with restricted accessibility on both edges

DESIGN FORMATION

1 EXISTING SITE

2 ELEVATED TRANSIT ROUTE

3 BLOCK FORMATION

4 GREEN CORRIDOR

5 ANCHORS & LANDSCAPE

6 PEDESTRIAN BRIDGES

7 BUILDING FORM

8 PARKING STRATEGY

Two parcels, one vehicular egress

Beautiful pedestrian green corridor to replace vehicular egress

Mixed-use residential to front onto corridor Townhouses to front onto existing

Entry via St. Laurent Blvd. becomes possible - no longer inaccessible

Corridor anchored by two main nodes with landscape fluctuations in size/ elevations at important nodes

Adequate parking to be hidden behind Strategic parking garages beside anchors

Vehicular movement only east-west Main vehicular egress gets pushed out

Creation of east-west pedestrian movement from transit hub

9 DENSITY

Residential towers mark transit hub locations Tower at south and office at north to mark significant ends of corridor

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PLAN 1. LIBRARY 2. OFFICE 3. MIXED-USE RESIDENTIAL 4. TOWNHOUSES 5. PARKING GARAGES 6. GROCERY STORE (EXISTING) 7. COMMUNITY CENTRE 8. RESIDENTIAL 9. PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE 10. NEW ELEVATED TRANSIT 11. SITE ANCHOR AREA 12. LANDSCAPE NODE CRENELLATION 13. LANDSCAPE BUFFER

12 11

5

1 2

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3 3

12 9 11

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MINIMUM INTERVENTION STRATEGY

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3

Re-distributing existing mall parcels on existing site to promote connectivity

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9. NEW PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE CONNECTIONS ALONG TRANSIT HUB

12. GREEN CORRIDOR CRENELLATIONS AT MAJOR NODES

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SOUTHERN INTERSECTION

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NORTH ANCHOR: LIBRARY AND OFFICE NODE

PEDESTRIAN CONNECTIONS ACROSS GREEN CORRIDOR

ELEVATED TRANSIT FOR ACCESSIBILITY IMPROVEMENT

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STUDYING OTTAWA’S SPECULATED FUTURE - WHY CONSIDER PARKING SPACES? DOWNTOWN AS STRONG MUNICIPAL INVESTMENT

DOWNTOWN AS ECONOMIC DRIVER

OFFICE FLOOR AREA VS. OVERALL OFFICE SPACE LAND DISTRIBUTION

MUNICIPAL INVESTMENT POTENTIAL

OFFICE SPACE DISTRIBUTION

18% OF MUNICIPAL PROPERTY TAX REVENUE FROM DOWNTOWN ($.136 B)

43 % DOWNTOWN

DOWNTOWN REST OF OTTAWA

Opportunity to invest in the abundant surface parking lots

57% REST OF OTTAWA

Areas under-utilized in close proximity to LRT where property values will increase.

DOWNTOWN AS EMERGING RESIDENTIAL ADDRESS

Ottawa’s Central Area is forecast to grow from 371 000 sq.m. to 1.11 million sq.m. in residential floorspace

With obesity rates increasing over the last 30 years, every km walked per day drastically 25% IN THEIR 20S decreases this. Liveable downtown spaces will reap not only vibrancy, but better health

41% of pedestrians walk for health reasons

1.44 MILLION SQ.M. OF OFFICE SPACE DOWNTOWN CURRENTLY 126 720 SQ.M. VACANT 374 400 SQ.M. PROJECTED WHERE TO ACCOMODATE? 247 680 SQ.M. NEEDED

Or four 16-storey parking towers of 30m x 30m

SURFACE PARKING ACCOUNTS FOR 62 160 SQ.M. OF DOWNTOWN VOID SPACE, THAT IS 25% OF NEEDED SPACE

Pocket Ottawa is a research-based honours project that is a part of “The Third City” - Ottawa’s first urban lab that studies the unexplored facets of Ottawa, analyzing the data and coming up with strategies to address present and future issues. The project first started out a rigorous study on the voids in Ottawa’s downtown core, which consisted mainly of parking voids. Looking at ten different urban development plans over the past 12 years commissioned by the city, it became clear that these parking voids are ineffective and did not promote many of the city’s goals, including: encouraging more residential living downtown, preserving visual integrity of Parliament Hill and of civic views, improving pathway connections while meeting requirements of built space/ parking, and re-programming under-utilized space to be flexible and affordable.

Professor: Roger Connah Term: Fall 2015

One main issue is the incompatibility of Ottawa’s streetscapes to current transportation nodes, with very little space designed for the emerging transit, and current cycling/pedestrian nodes. An exercise on zoning and a study done shows that there is more parking than what is required, proving that these spaces are redundant and wasteful of its prime location. With an emerging LRT line and the autonomous car coming to market within 5 years, a strategy is needed to address these voids. Pocket Ottawa is a proposal to address the projected residential and office needs (according to growth projections)5 through a phased strategy of parking. These consist of flexible parking structure at critical downtown locations, designed to adapt into other uses over time. This will open up space for current needs, while not compromising future needs for space. It also is formulated to anticipate the decline of the car’s presence downtown, supported by city objectives and also from expert projections on when car ownership will become obsolete due to the autonomous car.

Work published in “The Third City, Sketch for an Urban Laboratory”, 2015 vertigoOUrban, VERTIGOPRESS

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Which looks like this when re-configured into 16 levels

64% of cyclists choose this transportation mode primarily for health reasons

35% EMPLOYMENT INCREASE

POCKET OTTAWA

It has approximately 1918 parking spots

LIVEABLE SPACES FOR BETTER HEALTH

25% INTERNATIONAL MIGRANTS

POPULATION 2031 PROJECTION - FROM 10 900 TO 20 000; 300% INCREASE

10 cars

There’s around 62, 160 sq.m. of parking, which looks like this when grouped together

DOWNTOWN AS PROMOTING HEALTH

46% DOWNTOWN POPULATION INCREASE

POPULATION 2011

JUST HOW MUCH PARKING IS IN DOWNTOWN OTTAWA?


STUDYING OTTAWA’S PARKING VOIDS

OTTAWA’S PARKING VOIDS

BUT ACTUALLY, HOW MUCH PARKING DO WE NEED? ARE WE MEETING THE DEMANDS? ~100 PARKING SPOTS

1859

9062 1136

8052

EXISTING REQUIRED PARKING PARKING

The 62,160 sq.ft. of parking lot area takes up prime development and ceremonial land. EXISTING PARKING > REQUIRED PARKING AS PER ZONING BY-LAWS. IF THIS WAS CHICAGO, TWO MARINA CITIES CAN EASILY ACCOMODATE EVERYTHING

CHANGING TRANSIT AND STREETSCAPE

OTTAWA’S STREETSCAPE TYPICAL STREET DOWNTOWN OTTAWA

TRANSIT 23% SIDEWALK 30% CAR 47% 300 M RADIUS LRT ENTRANCE LRT STATION LRT LINE

EXISTING REQUIRED PARKING PARKING

2011 & 2031 MODE OF DOWNTOWN TRANSPORT BIKE 4%

BIKE 5%

TRANSIT 52%

TRANSIT 57%

SIDEWALK 11%

SIDEWALK 13%

CAR 33%

CAR 25%

THE MAJORITY OF STREETS DOWNTOWN CURRENTLY DO NOT ACCOMODATE THE SHARED MODE OF TRANSPORTATION, NOR DOES IT ACCOMODATE THE PROJECTED FUTURE TRANSPORTATION MODES

THE AUTONOMOUS CAR QUESTION DESIGNING FOR A CARLESS FUTURE?

With the inevitable presence of the autonomous vehicle coming to cities, are parking spaces relevant? Addressing the voids in Ottawa’s downtown core means designing for adaptable uses that recognize that parking may not be required. Essay “This is not a true story, at least not yet. Are we sure?” about the autonomous car published in Building 22, 2016 Edition

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RE-IMAGINING SPACE

URBAN STRATEGY TEMPORARY STRUCTURES WITH MULTIPLE USES 1

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2 3

7

4 5

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1. Pedestrian linkage to precincts 4. Structure Roof as linkage to trail 2. Recreational usage 5. Vehicle access on Cliff St. 3. Structure no higher than escarpment 6. Linkage to Ottawa River Trail

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7. Facade to enhance surroundings 8. Elevator Shaft 9. Ottawa River Pathway

PRECINCTS PARKING SURFACE POTENTIAL

The minimum size of motor vehicle parking as determined by the City of Ottawa is 2.6m x 5.2m, meaning each spot has a minimum of 13.52 sq.m. or 146 sq.ft.

Promotes pedestrian movement while restricting vehicular access

Meaning a singlebedroom unit can fit in less than four of the minimum-sized parking spots. 450 sq.ft.

Pedestrian Route Vehicular Route Pedestrian Footbridge

Parliamentary & Judiciary Triads Creation of Pedestrian Connection

And a small office can fit within ten parking spots. 1460 sq.ft.

Security Screening Allows security screening to be spread evenly across site

Parking structures to work with natural escarpment to protect views

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0-20m above sea level 20-35.5m above sea level 35.5m+ above sea level


3 ADAPTABLE PARKING DESIGN ELEMENTS TO INCORPORATE FLAT FLOORS

GOOD FLOOR TO CEILING HEIGHT

LOADING CAPACITY FOR FUTURE USE

TOTAL AREA DEVELOPABLE ON PARKING VOIDS IS 116 616 SQ.M. WITH A FLOOR AREA OF 6 386 SQ.M.

STRATEGIC SITE 1

STRATEGIC SITE 2

ALBERT ST. & LYON ST.

SLATER ST. & O’CONNOR ST.

12-storey parking garage to accomodate for current conditions, residential zone and the projected 6% population increase - 570 spots Current lot to be future development

SITE 1 AREA ACCOMODATION POTENTIAL

8-storey parking garage to account for all 809 spots in site (CBD) and its projected 6% growth in 20 years Existing parking area open to future development

SITE 2 AREA ACCOMODATION POTENTIAL

Red buildings are potential developments on existing parking to accomodate for the projected 300% residential floor area growth; area two blocks from future LRT

STRATEGY BREAKDOWN Parking surfaces get absorbed into one parking garage designed to be adaptable for other future uses

As population and economic growth increases, and the autonomous vehicle takes prominence, these designated voids will develop incrementally to meet city needs, without sacrificing car accomodation

Red buildings indicate potential developments on existing parking that is adequate to accomodate the projected 26 000 employee increase

Eventually, a carless, integrated community will form with careful policy and urban design guidelines

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Done in a team of three, the Uplift Project is a visionary design project to revive Lester Park by using the landscape of Utah as its main inspiration. It draws elements from Utah’s land, and seamlessly incorporates it with the existing elements of the park. Nestled within thehe heart of the city of Ogden, the new reinvigoration of Lester Park caters towards all age and cultural groups, strenghtening the sense of community while addressing social and physical needs.

not only includes vital neighbourhood space, but also contains a community greenhouse to address its food desert designation. Its usability throughout winter is offered by its accessible/flexible roof design and partitions. Health and play are encouraged through tailored playgrounds, catering to the physical capabilities of children and seniors. Heritage can be celebrated through the gardens, the landscape, and the interior arches of the pavilion.

We have introduced three main design areas out of a focus to meet sustainable and educational responsibilities: the Utah Gardens, the Pavilion, and the Playgrounds. Each space holds a responsibility to community members. The Pavillion

With the wide array of activities and reconnections to the existing library and historic streets, the park becomes an engaging and inspiring space.

THE UPLIFT PROJECT - OGDEN PARK PAVILLION AIA Utah Young Architects Forum July 2016

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DEVELOPMENT CONCEPTION

1. POSSIBILITIES

2. PLANNED ADDITIONS i. parking lot ii. landscaping

3. DIAGONAL SHAPE i. New Allee link to Library

4. VIEWS I. Wasatch Mountain Range

5. NATURE INTEGRATION I. Retention of Trees

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PAVILION AXONOMETRIC

VEGETATED AREAS RAINWATER CISTERN ELECTRICAL + STORAGE MECHANICAL + STORAGE

1. UNFOLDING COVER FOR SUMMER & WINTER USE

2. COMMUNITY GREENHOUSE TO ADDRESS FOOD DESERT & LOW INCOME AREA

ENTRANCE 3. FLEXIBLE STAGE PARTITION

PAVILION INTERIOR LOUNGE

11. UTAH GARDENS

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5. PAVILION ENTRANCE

7. ROOFTOP TERRACE

3. STAGE PARTITION


24TH STREET

PROPOSED PLAYING FIELDS

NEW BATHROOM

E OF AG ROTOR O S POND PT & /ESTANQUE M M ROCK RA O ELEMENTOS N L RO SCULPTURES DE ROCA A I / NUEVA PASARELA NEW WALKWAY NEW WALKWAY TR ICA ES TR A ED C EL PROPOSED : P : ELE AR S E UTAH GARDENS PA OV W VA UNFOLDING AY AB ELO UE UNFOLDING ROOF B /N KW ROOF L AY A E KW EVENT SPACE L W OF AG A STAGE / W W RO OR EVENT SPACE ESCENARIO W PARA NE NE PARTITION TO ST EVENTOS STAGE P PANELS / & EMBEDDED M M DE PARTITION PANELES RA OO STREAM IN DIVISION PANELS AN R ROCK RI AL T S IC DE TR PE EC E: : EL PARQUE PROPOSED V PROPOSED OPEN INFANTILCHILDREN’S O W AB ELO PAVILION PLAYGROUND B LA W NE

NEW CHANGE ROOM

NE

W

K LANDSCAPED AL W W INTERIOR PODS NE MECHANICAL & F GE STORAGE ROOM UNFOLDING ROO RA ROOF O TO PT &S M M RA OO N IA AL R PARQUE PARARLAS IC PERSONAS MAYORES ST PROPUESTO DE HAN E : P EC E OV : M AB LOW BE

RE SA PA

AY W

LK

NE A W W W WALKW AY NE /

NENUEV W A PA WA SAR LK ELA PROPOSED WA SENIORS’ Y PLAYGROUND

PARQUE PARA LAS PERSONAS MAYORS EXISTENTE

EXISTING SENIORS’ CENTER

MADISON AVENUE

NEW WALKWAY

NEW WALKWAY / NUEVA PASARELA

JEFFERSON AVENUE

LA RE SA PA

AY W

VA UE /N

AY W

VA UE /N

K AL W

AY KW AL W

EXPANSIÓN DE LA CA BIBLIOTE PROPOSED TA PROPEUS LIBRARY EXPANSION

LANDSCAPED INTERIOR PODS/ POD INTERIOR SEATING AJARDINADO

ESTACIONAMIENTO EXISTENTE

EXISTING PARKING LOT

25TH STREET LEGEND/LEYENDA LEGEND SITE BOUNDARY BOUNDARY/ LIMITES DEL SITIO SITE PROPERTY / PROPERTYPARCEL PARCEL

BRANCH OPENING BRANCHCOLUMN/SKYLIGHT COLUMN/SKYLIGHT OPENING COLUMNA RAMA/ABERTURA DE TRAGALUZ

MOBILEFOOD FOODKIOSK KIOSK/ QUIOSCO DE COMIDA MOBILE

PARCELA DE PROPIEDAD

EXISTINGTREE TREE/ ARBOL EXISTENTE EXISTING

SEATING/ ASIENTOS SEATING ROCK ROCK/ ROCA

TREE TREETO TOBE BEREMOVED REMOVED/

ARBOLES PARA SER RETIRADOS

NEW ELEMENTS: 1. UNFOLDING COVER 2. GREENHOUSE 3.STAGE PARTITION 4.PAVILION INTERIOR 5. ENTRANCE

4. OPEN PAVILION INTERIOR

2. GREENHOUSE

6. PAVILION LOUNGE 7. ROOFTOP TERRACE 8. NEW ALLÉE 9. SENIOR’S PLAYGROUND 10. CHILDREN’S PLAYGROUND

9. SENIORS’ PLAYGROUND

11. UTAH GARDENS 12. PLAYING FIELDS 13. PAVILION ENTRANCE 14. GARDEN WALKWAY 15. PLAYING FIELDS

10. CHILDREN’S PLAYGROUND

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SPECIFIC DEMOGRAPHIC PLAYGROUND ELEMENTS

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WALKING TRACK

SYCAMORE NETS

WHEELCHAIR SWING

Low impact excercise designed to improve range-of-motion for seniors

Features a stateof-the-art series of netted tree trunks for children’s recreation

Enables those with physical disabilities to participate in park recreational activities


8.

9.

15.

7.

2.

4.

UTAH GARDENS Modelled on Utah’s National Parks, it’s a microcosm of Utah’s dynamic landscapes. It’s a space for relaxation, enjoyment, and educating visitors about Utah’s diverse ecosystem.

MONUMENT VALLEY

ARCHES NATIONAL PARK

CAPITOL REEF NATIONAL PARK

LAKE POWELL/ ZION NATIONAL PARK

BRYCE CANYON NATIONAL PARK

GRAND STAIRCASE ESCALANTE NATIONAL CENTRAL PIVOT IRRIGATION As green sitting spaces

CANYONLANDS NATIONAL PARK

EMERALD LAKE GREAT SALT LAKE

BONNEVILLE SALT FLATS

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COST ANALYSIS UNIT DESIGN OPTION A Single Suite 30 m2

BUILDING CODE MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS: Living/Dining/Kitchen/Sleeping for more than 2 people: 22.55sq.m. Living/Dining/Kitchen/Sleeping for 2 people and less: 13.5sq.m.

PROPOSED UNIT > MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS Shared amenities within development to redundant space within units and to foster community bonding

OTTAWA DEMONSTRATION SITE

DESIGN FACTORS FOR OPTIMAL UNITS Design-to-value

Kit of Parts

Green Building

The Take2 Project is a winning entry for an Ontario-wide ideas competition held to address issues of large cities. The proposal offers a strategy towards affordable housing, looking not only at the built form and unit design, but at site opportunities (re-using brownfield sites), zoning policies, homelessness and low-income population demographics, and sustainability for both built and social infrastructure. Done in a multidisciplinary group consisting of an engineer, a business, an urbanism, and two architecture students, the proposal was an integrated approach that studied the impacts of zoning, current policy towards homelessness, and feasibility. It aimed at addressing the issue of affordable housing with the goal of spreading awareness of homelessness through design, and at a policy change to pull tenants out of poverty. A demonstration applying these changes was shown in Ottawa.

TAKE2 - CITIES OF TOMORROW Large Urban Mayor’s Caucus of Ontario (LUMCO) People’s Choice Winner May 2015 Full proposal online: https://issuu.com/sqychan/docs/take2_cities_of_tomorrow

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The elements explored and addressed include site opportunities, where the proposal studies how to optimize existing brownfield sites through zoning by-law changes. It also includes new unit design configurations to reduce cost while maintaining liveable standards. These are embedded within an a community with specific social services in proximity, recognizing the specific needs for families/ peoples of low-income (including health, job searching, and community building). Lastly, a new policy framework was proposed to make home-ownership possible for low-income tenants, allieviating the #1 barrier to attaining wealth. The successful implementation showcases to the public how careful planning can save tax-dollars, while successfully reintegrating its tenants to a satisfactory quality of life


OTTAWA SITE DEMONSTRATION

DEMONSTRATION PLAN BREAKDOWN 1. RESIDENTIAL - AFFORDABLE HOUSING 2. PARKING STRUCTURE 3. RESIDENTS REHAB/MEDICAL CENTRE 4. RETAIL 5. JOBS PROGRAM OFFICE 6. FRONT DESK/HOUSING ADMIN

7. KIDZONE FOR RESIDENTS 8. COMMUNITY RECREATION 9. RESTAURANT 10. EDUCATION CENTRE 11. 20M-WIDE SHARED COMMUNITY GREENSPACE

OPTIMIZING SITE THROUGH ZONING BY-LAWS EXISTING SITE & ZONING

PROPOSAL IN MODIFIED ZONING

EXISTING SITE

EXISTING SITE MAXIMUM ZONING CAPACITY

SITE AFTER ZONING CHANGES

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The ICOMOS/UNESCO workshop was a part of a directed studies abroad trip overseas to Bagan, Myanmar. The intention of the trip was to provide proper heritage documentation eventually leading to a UNESCO heritage site designation. A number of methods and equipment were used, including laser scanning, total station, and drone photography. Photogrammetry was my responsibility. The technique consisted of setting up a number of target points within a projected coordinate system (GIS). After these were georeferenced, these target points were physically placed directly on temple Loka-Hteik-Pan. Afterwards, a series of RAW pictures were taken with overlapping target imagery and edited for lighting. Using Photoscan, these raster images were combined and converted into a BIM cloud model via the technique of photogrammetry, generating a high-quality model of the temple and its existing temples. A further analysis of the character defining elements was done according to the NARA grid to fully capture the heritage value of the temple.

BAGAN HERITAGE DOCUMENTATION Professor Guidance: Mario Santana, Mariana Esponda Program: Photoscan Pro ICOMOS Workshop, May 2016

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BIM-CLOUD GENERATED PHOTOGRAMMETRY FACADES 1

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2 1

5

1

5 9

9 8

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TEMPLE LOKA-HTEIK-PAN EAST FACADE 1:200

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TEMPLE LOKA-HTEIK-PAN WEST FACADE 1:200

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CHARACTER DEFINING ELEMENTS ANALYSIS (NARA GRID) 1 CORNER STUPAS: Usually

4 SIKHARA: AKA square tower, it’s

7 YAR-MA-LAT-NYO: These fingers

standing on the 4 corners of the temple, they represent Buddha’s to-be supporting the present Buddha inside

the main stupa on the terrace of the temple, visually dominating the corner stupas with a decorate center part

of Yar-Ma reflect early legends of an Early Bagan period of a prince warrior

2 TERRACE: Located on the upper

5 NAT-LAN: An axial niche that acts

8 SCREENED WALL: Screened wall

level of the temple, which is the foundation of the sikhara - its hierarchy symbolizes the steps to enlightenment

as the stairway to the upper stupa, restricting worship of the main stupa to specific groups of people

with 17 cross-shaped openings to diffuse light and protect the sanctuary from the sun

3 HTI: AKA the umbrella, it’s located

6 STEPPED BASE: Is a recessed

9 CRENELLATION: A discontinuous

on the main square tower (sikhara)

base where a series of rectangular bricks bulge - this protects the temple from precipitation

parapet on the upper level of the temple that is a traditional construction technique used for draining rainwater

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This is the most personal piece in my portfolio. It’s a work where both drawing and music are integral parts to the project as a whole. The link provided below opens to the music recording webpage. Being an introvert, music has always been my favourite way to express myself in a nonverbal manner. The piece you hear began as fragments I would play at night, and then later consolidated after months. Its content is based off my current life, where I translate my experiences, hardships, and joys into music. Likewise, the drawing illustrates these experiences, and are symbolic visualizations of the music composition. The piece is called “Wandering” -- I realized that one of my favourite activities is to walk beside people. It could be to anywhere: to class, to an event, or to grab a coffee. Walking alongside someone else is an activity that exists between being a necessity and an unnecessity, anchored by the commonality of a destination. But then what does it mean when there is no destination? When I wrote this, I was reflecting on those who I’ve walked with, intentionally or unintentionally, and who I’ve left behind or have yet to walk with. It’s a statement of who I am at this moment. in time.

MUSIC SKETCH: WANDERING Composed, Performed, and Drawn November 2016 Program/Medium: Logic Pro X, Adobe Photoshop drawing with Wacom Tablet Original Recording Online: https://soundcloud.com/sarah-chan-39445313/wandering

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End of Portfolio. Thank you for reading.

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