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PHARRELL FROM PRODUCING FILMS TO LAUNCHING FASHION COLLECTIONS, WE FIND O U T W H A T R E A L LY M A K E S P H A R R E L L HHA AP PP PY Y

£4  ISSUE 124  ISSN 2397-3439


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EDITOR’S WORD E

ARLIER THIS MONTH, the ‘One Love Manchester’ benefit

concert proved beyond a doubt music’s power to unify in the face of division. In normal circumstances, the idea of Katy Perry moving grown men to tears is risible, but her heartfelt performance of ‘Part of Me’ while the sun set on Old Trafford was enough to wobble even the most stiff of upper lips – especially once you realised her dress was made up of photos from the 22 victims of the Manchester Arena terror attack. Then there were the scenes of policemen skipping in circles hand in hand with young fans to Justin Bieber’s acoustic set. And if you didn’t well up at Ariana Grande being brought to tears herself after performing with the Parrs Wood High School choir – some of the children had been at the fateful concert – you might want to see a doctor about the lump of granite that’s currently sitting where your heart should be. Despite the emotional intensity, the evening was anything but sombre. Of the 50,000 guests, many were painted with pink glitter, others wearing bunny ears in tribute to Grande’s trademark look – and that was just the men. Pharrell Williams’ two anthems, ‘Get Lucky’ and ‘Happy’, embodied the joyous atmosphere, while lyrics such as “Like the legend of the phoenix – all ends with beginnings” took on a whole new level of significance. Of late, Pharrell’s addictive concoction of pop has been less ever-present on our radio stations. The cultural polymath has been busy stretching his creative muscles – working on fashion lines, and helping produce Hidden Figures, which was nominated for multiple Oscars. As this month’s cover star says, “Music brings people together. It is a force that touches people in a completely open way and reaches people wherever they are.” The One Love gig showed just that: how effective music is at shining brightness where there was darkness, and at putting two fingers up (for peace – or otherwise) at those who think they can take away our liberty. ■

square mile ISSUE 124

@SQUAREMILE_COM SQUAREMILEUK SQUAREMILE_COM THIS MONTH’S CONTRIBUTORS

DARREN KENNEDY Presenter, style entrepreneur and fashion columnist Darren Kennedy is regarded as one of the UK and Ireland’s most stylish men and top lifestyle influencers. Our new style correspondent explains how to rock this season’s more relaxed silhouettes [Turn to p37]

PHILLIP ADCOCK Phillip Adcock is a commercial psychologist and managing director of a number of human behaviour analysis companies operating in 17 countries. The author of Master Your Brain, he teaches us how to turn body language into a business advantage. [Turn to p26]

Mark Hedley, Editor, @mghedley

The Prince’s Trust is square mile’s official charity partner. Please give generously. princes-trust.org.uk

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COMPUTERS ARE WONDERFUL: WHATEVER HAPPENS, NO ONE IS TO BLAME. – Cath Tate Work Tends to Ruin Your Day is out now (Portico, £7.99)

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KAREN ANNE OVERTON Karen Anne Overton has been a songwriter and model, but recently moved into journalism. She left London for the seaside in order to focus on the finer things in life. This issue she rides a water-born muscle craft, and talks getting lucky with Pharrell Williams. [p68]

ADRIAN HAILWOOD Adrian Hailwood has more than 20 years’ experience of the luxury watch and jewellery industry and is currently a director of Fellows Auctioneers. In this issue he talks us through the world’s most powerful watch brands – and what makes them tick. [Turn to p102]

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POWER PLAYER 094

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ISSUE 124

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FEATURES 056 . DON’T STOP THE MUSIC

Meet Sacha Lord-Marchionne, the man who built a music empire from a student night, and now has plans for even bigger things. PHOTOGRAPH (JFK) by Hank Walker/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

060 . ABOVE & BEYOND

Incredible images of an extraordinary city: see Hong Kong captured from a unique – and breathtaking – bird’s-eye perspective.

068 . HAPPY NOW?

COVER FEATURE

Modern mogul Pharrell Williams takes a break from music making, philanthropy, movie production and fashion design to talk about… all four, and a lot more besides.

072 . GOING UP IN THE WORLD

From The Beatles to Richard Branson, delve into photographer Terence Spencer’s archive of remarkable images of iconic Brits.

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PORTFOLIO 016 . THE EXCHANGE 021 . ART WORK 023 . THE ANALYST 025 . POLITICS 026 . BODY LANGUAGE

EXPOSURE 031 . STYLE 034 . FATHER’S DAY 037 . DARREN KENNEDY 039 . ROYAL EXCHANGE 042 . MY WORLD 046 . #WATCHWEWANT 048 . SAILING WATCHES

POWER

SPECIAL

084 . POWER 100

093 . FITNESS 094 . JFK 102 . BRANDING 104 . MOTORS

ASSETS 109 . TRAVEL 112 . RELOCATION 115 . FOOD & DRINK 119 . GOLF 127 . PHOTO PRIZE

HOLDINGS 133 . INTERIORS 135 . PROPERTY

END PLAY 143 . EVENTS

NEWSLETTER If you enjoy square mile, then you’ll definitely be a fan of our bi-weekly newsletters. As well as great stories, they include news on our exclusive reader events. SIGN UP AT:

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PORTFOLIO

THE EXCHANGE ART WORK THE ANALYST POLITICS BODY LANGUAGE

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SUPER FLY . 021

ART by Darryl ‘DMC’ McDaniels at Hang-Up Gallery (hanguppictures.com)


THE   E X C H A N G E

THINGS TO DO AFTER THE CITY WORDS Saul Wordsworth

#99 RESTAURANT CRITIC

▽ WE ALL love food. Alongside brass rubbing and sexting it’s one of the great sensual pleasures. Think how alluring a halibut can be. Or a prawn cocktail. Cocktail even has the word ‘cock’ in it. Need I say more. To set yourself up you’ll need a mouth and a pen. Spoons and forks may come in handy; alternatively eat with your hands like John Terry. Perhaps the most famous food writer of recent times is Michael Winner. His column, ‘Winner’s Dinners’, was hugely popular across the world. To be accepted into the pantheon of food writers it is essential to paint a picture for the reader, and not one made out of baked beans. To do so you must conjure images, capture ambiences and describe in minute

WISE GUIDES WORDS Paul Evans

THE WORLD’S BEST SURFBOARDS

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detail what it feels like when an oyster slips down your throat only to slip back up again. A perennial problem for food writers is being recognised on the job and as a result receiving delicious hot food served with grace and manners rather than the usual slap in the face with a wet omelette. Such a scenario may be avoided by undergoing plastic surgery or not becoming a food writer in the first place. Anyone who’s ever spent time with a banana will know how funny food can be. Your writing should reflect this. Glory in a misshapen carrot; giggle at a scotch egg; snigger at the size of Jamie Oliver’s spotted dick. If your steak flies off your plate, lands on an elderly gentleman’s head and he mistakes it for a hat, include the episode. Just because it happens every day doesn’t make it less amusing. Finally – remember how unpredictable food writing can be. One day you’re the best thing since sliced bread. The next you’re toast. ■ For more see saulwordsworth.com

1

PERFORMANCE: BRADLEY SURFBOARDS

▷ Bradley Surfboards’ Roman is the signature high-performance model of World Tour pro surfer Leo Fioravanti [pictured] who originally hails from – you guessed it – the Eternal City. Ideal for knee- to head-high waves and suited to surfers of intermediate to pro level, the Roman offers everything that you’d expect from the best Italian sports cars: blistering speed, exquisite manoeuvring and sleek looks. Unlike a Ferrari, however, it also happens to perform in the wet – which is probably for the best. Buy off the rack in Quiksilver Boardriders stores for £555. For more info, see surfeuropemag.com


PORTFOLIO

BONUS BUS TER

SEA-DOO GTR 230 £12,669 & GTR-X 230, £13,489 BY Karen Anne Overton

▷ Superbikes may be fun, but they do come with a few drawbacks – chiefly, the fear of falling off and never getting back up again. But for the same thrills without the risks, try

2

CRUISING: GRACE ‘HERITAGE’

▷ The Phil Grace Heritage model will suit surfers who see wave riding less as a huff and puff sport and more as salt-water meditation. Legendary shaper/raconteur ‘Gracie’ has been making boards since 1969, and puts his wealth of experience into building longboards that offer the most supreme of glides. Ideal for nose-riding (standing with your toes over the front of the board, giving the sensation of walking on water like a certain bearded, sandal-wearing Nazarean), the Heritage draws on classic 1960s longboard-era design and comes as a single fin. £795. For more info, see surfeuropemag.com

PHOTOGRAPHS (L to R) by Timo; Roxy; Pierce

taking to the water on a Sea-Doo instead. Both the Octane blue three-seater GTR 230 and metallic Californian green two-seater GTR-X 230 host a supreme supercharged 230hp Rotax engine. The result is acceleration that will make your eyes water – think 60mph

These water-born musclecraft offer the perfect antidote to City stress. Hit the open sea on one and you’ll be overcome with a heady rush of adrenaline. The waves appear enormous, 30mph feels like 60mph, and as you nimbly duck and dive amid the cool foamy

in just 5.3 seconds (more than two seconds faster than the closest competitive model). Combining refined throttle response, which makes the speedo needle flutter gracefully at the lightest touch, with effortless steering, it couldn’t be easier to power up and zoom off.

3

surf, you’ll begin to wonder why they didn’t cast you in the new Baywatch. (At least, until the next time you head to the gym.) With prices starting at £12,669, there aren’t many more costeffective ways to find high-octane kicks. ■ sea-doo.com

BRITISH: LUKE YOUNG SHAPES

▷ Luke Young Shapes is based in south Devon and offers a complete range of high-spec, custom-built boards for all levels of surfer and every wave condition under the sun, or rather, relentless procession of cold fronts sweeping in off the Atlantic. From tow boards used to tame giant waves [like the one Irish-based teamrider Barry Mottershead is tackling in the photo], to highperformance shortboards, fun and retro shapes, longboards and everything between, Young’s unrivalled craftsmanship has established him at the forefront of British surfboard manufacturing. For more info, see surfeuropemag.com

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PORTFOLIO

JAMES THORNTON, CEO, INTREPID TRAVEL

▽ I STARTED my career at Thesis Asset

THE EXCHANGE

Management in Sussex. It had never been a vocational decision; following a string of internships and not much of an idea of my exact career path they offered me a job, and I started training to be an investment manager. After a couple of years, I realised making rich people richer didn’t excite me. I wanted to do something that made a difference and that I felt passionate about. My two main loves were travel and sport: I knew I wasn’t going to be the next England manager, so I turned to travel. Taking a 50% pay cut, I started as a sales manager at Intrepid Travel and knew straight away that travel was for me. Over 12 years, I grew with the company – now the world’s largest provider of adventure travel experiences – and have just been made CEO. Unlike working in finance, I feel that I can really make a difference here, not just by providing great experiences for our customers but by helping communities and our environment. We have helped to offset 200,000 tonnes of carbon emissions since 2010 and have raised over $4m for more than 70 conservation and community projects around the globe via the Intrepid Foundation. ■

ESC APE ARTIS T

For more info, see intrepidtravel.com

WIN

COMPETITION

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FRESCOBOL CARIOCA SUMMER KIT WORTH £725 ▷ Frescobol Carioca is a luxury beachwear brand that embodies the spirit and style of Rio de Janeiro. It’s all about a laid-back luxury feel taking inspiration from the shores of Brazil’s most iconic beaches. Launched in 2009 with simple, handcrafted beach bats – each one made individually by Brazilian artisans – Frescobol Carioca has grown to include not only beach wear and accessories but also casual wear that reflects an effortless, escapist, beach culture.

Frescobol Carioca has teamed up with square mile to offer you the chance to win a Summer Kit worth £725 [pictured right]. The prize includes a beach bag, a white linen shirt, sport-short Copacabana navy trunks, an orange block linen towel, and a pair of the hand-crafted beach bats that kicked off the company.

Frescobol Carioca boasts a horde of highachieving fans spanning the sporting, fashion and film industries including the likes of Leonardo DiCaprio, Andy Murray, Mario Testino, and Jamie Redknapp. If they’re cool enough for Leo, they’re definitely cool enough for you. ■ For your chance to win, go to squaremile.com

TO ENTER

Go to squaremile.com/ competitions and answer a simple question. T&Cs can be found online.

squaremile.com


PORTFOLIO

A R T WO R K

DRAW THIS WAY

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BY VICKY SMITH

STREET ART Fine art, hip hop and comics? When it comes to an exhibition with cool credentials, The Art of DMC at Hang-Up Gallery is hard to beat. Darryl McDaniels, aka the MC in Run-DMC, is also the man behind ‘Darryl Makes Comics’ Fine Art. He has created a comic bookstyle superhero, who features throughout the collection, saving the streets of NYC in a tracksuit and trainers (Adidas, of course). ■ The Art of DMC, 11-25 June at Hang-Up Gallery, 81 Stoke Newington Road, N16 8AD

hanguppictures.com

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IN IN 1934, 1934, BRITANNIA BRITANNIA DIDN’ DIDN’ T T JUST JUST RULE RULE THE THE WAVES WAVES

On October 22nd 1934, two exhausted airmen landed on a racecourse in Melbourne, surrounded by On October 22nd 1934, two exhausted airmen landed on a racecourse in Melbourne, surrounded by cheering crowds. Flying a specially-built De Havilland Comet DH-88, Charles Scott and Tom Campbell cheering crowds. Flying a specially-built De Havilland Comet DH-88, Charles Scott and Tom Campbell Black set a new record, flying the 11,000 miles from England in just 71 hours. The Bremont DH-88 Black set a new record, flying the 11,000 miles from England in just 71 hours. The Bremont DH-88 commemorates their aircraft and their achievement. Containing actual material from the record-breaking commemorates their aircraft and their achievement. Containing actual material from the record-breaking plane, the Bremont DH-88 is available now in a strictly limited edition. But it won’t be available for long. plane, the Bremont DH-88 is available now in a strictly limited edition. But it won’t be available for long.

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PORTFOLIO

A N A LYS T

HANDS FREE

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BY VICKY SMITH

GRAND DESIGNS A grand piano is a grand prospect, but if your skills don’t extend beyond ‘Chopsticks’, it’s going to be a little, well, superfluous. Unless it’s Steinway & Sons’ new Spirio, which plays itself, enabling you to enjoy performances captured by great pianists (no offence) in your own home. Until you’ve mastered Mozart’s ‘Piano Concerto 27’ for yourself, that is. ■ steinwayspirio.com

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PORTFOLIO

O PI N I O N

CLEAR THINKING It hasn’t received a huge amount of attention in the West yet, but we should all keep an eye on the One Belt One Road initiative, says IAIN ANDERSON

I HAVE A new obsession – and it isn’t anything to do with UK politics this time. We have probably all had enough of that for the time being. I’ve just been to China. In fact, I was in Beijing when the election was called. Bad timing. But as a result my new geek secret is my AQI app. Living in London, I’m surprised that I didn’t have this obsession before now. AQI – or the Air Quality Index – is one of the main topics of conversation in Beijing. It’s hardly surprising – on some days you can’t even see the buildings ahead of you. The AQI number goes through the roof sometimes, and young children have to be educated at home. It happens weekly as summer intensifies and pollution levels rise. That’s been the trade-off between high growth and health for years now. The air – literally – is filled with economic ambition.

the new ‘Silk Road’. I had heard a little about it before, but when in China the idea takes up acres of newsprint and hours of TV coverage. It is an attempt to revitalise and reawaken ancient trade routes to China which lay dormant for centuries, and it’s starting to move from rhetoric to reality. It’s about domestic ‘catch up’ for much of the rest of China with the richer, more connected eastern seaboard of the country alongside faster trade and supply chain opportunities for Chinese manufacturers. And global companies are taking notice as much as sovereign states rewiring their supply chains. Now I’m back in London, I’m hearing a lot about that from major investors. When I was in Beijing it was the talk of the town before a major summit in May bringing together almost 70 nations keen

❱❱ YOU SHOULD THINK OF ONE BELT ONE ROAD AS A GIANT INFRASTRUCTURE INITIATIVE THAT WILL LINK CHINA WITH WESTERN EUROPE

ILLUSTRATION by Mark Boardman

When I got chance to catch my breath, I wanted to know what China thought about Trump and Brexit. The honest answer is that Beijing thinks a lot more about Trump. It’s keeping an eye on Brexit but it’s more interested in global trade routes. And the US President’s decision to make a 180-degree about-turn on his views on China have totally transformed the mood there. China and the US seem to be firing up trade talks with announcements daily. But there is a really big political and economic conversation going on in China right now that dominates coverage and thinking – and receives very little airtime in the West. The so-called One Belt One Road initiative – OBOR – sometimes called

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to sign up to this mega trade connector. So what exactly is it? Stand by – it’s big. There is already talk of committing at least $5 trillion to the entire project. Billions have already been invested. And the political commitment is long-term and deep. Essentially, think of OBOR as a giant infrastructure initiative linking China with Western Europe. Countries from Poland to Bangladesh and Kazakhstan are involved. Sixteen of China’s 27 provinces have signed up – especially those in the west. The investment menu for OBOR includes transport links, energy projects, gas pipelines, ports, railways and bridges. And it is starting to happen, with billions pouring into the works. A high-speed

China-Singapore rail link is already in progress, and speeding up connectivity to Pakistan is under way, too. President Xi Jinping has talked about creating a ‘big family of harmonious coexistence’. Sounds rather schmaltzy but it’s deadly economic. And it’s going to have its own political effect, too – a new economic bloc is quietly being created through a bunch of states that will owe more to China than to the west for their future. No wonder George Osborne as chancellor was so keen on China. His former Lib Dem deputy Danny Alexander now drinks the ‘kool-aid’, too, living in China as vice-president and corporate secretary of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, a China-led initiative where the UK – much to the Americans’ consternation – decided to sign up early. Part of the dynamic of Brexit was to talk about new trading opportunities. As Brexit chatter continues, the UK government will do well to keep its eyes focused on OBOR and both the threats and opportunities it brings. It will have to: OBOR countries represent around 30% of global output and around 60% of world population. So back in London I am seeing a little clearer again. But maybe that’s illusory. I am still looking at my smartphone – made in China of course. The air quality in London is not much better than Beijing today, and hasn’t been for days. I wonder what that means for all of us. I wonder who is seeing more clearly. The politics ahead will have to decide that. ■

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PORTFOLIO

O PI N I O N

A NICE GESTURE Human behaviour expert PHILLIP ADCOCK details how understanding body language is the key to achieving success in business and beyond

HAVE YOU EVER wondered what President Trump’s handshake says about him? Firstly, he offers his hand, palm upwards. This is a sign of submission – exposing a tender part of his body, the underside of his wrists. This is intended to make the other party feel relaxed and ‘in control’. But then, as soon as hands become connected, Trump pulls the other person’s hand into him, communicating ‘Got you: you’re mine now,’ almost as if the original exposed palm was a baited trap. Then he condescendingly pats the other person’s hand as he holds it in a vice-like grip, like praising a well-behaved dog. This egocentric gesture sends a message of ‘you’re in my world, so be a good boy.’ You might not realise this, but understanding someone’s body language can help you re-frame your relationship with them and achieve success, whether in your business or your personal life.

important than what they’re saying. I’ve put together a beginner’s guide to body language to introduce some basic concepts, and provide a starting point for using non-verbal communication as a way of improving your chances of success.

FACE FACTS Our faces say so much about us – what we’re thinking, what we’re about to say, even the type of life we’ve led (those laughter lines speak volumes). Sometimes our faces tell others things we wish they wouldn’t. Did you know that how much you tilt your chin up or down is an indicator of how attractive people are likely to find you?  Researchers discovered that if a woman tilts her head back, she’s regarded as less attractive. If her chin is down, she’s perceived as being more attractive. Strangely, the same ‘head tilts’ for men had the opposite effect.  One of the most powerful non-verbal communication tools we possess is our smile. And as research has shown, we

❱❱ BODY LANGUAGE IS MORE POWERFUL THAN YOU MIGHT REALISE – 55-70% OF HUMAN-TOHUMAN COMMUNICATION IS NON-VERBAL

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have developed an advanced means of detecting what type of smile we’re looking at. In other words, put on an affected or staged smile to mask your fear or anxiety, and others will know it. Alternatively, if you exhibit a genuine smile, others will know that, as well, and feel as if they’re really communicating with you.

MIRROR MIRROR Mirroring is when the person you’re talking to picks up on your physical gestures and copies them. If someone mimics your appearance, it’s a genuine sign that they’re interested in you and wants to establish a rapport. You can use mirroring as a way to test another person’s feelings while talking to them. Change your body position to see if they follow suit – if they do, that’s a great sign. You can also flip this and use mirroring when you want somebody to think you have an affinity for them. The key is to keep it subtle, and don’t make it look too artificial. For example, adopting a similar sitting posture as the person who is interviewing you for a job or to whom you are selling something will endear them to you subliminally, so long as it’s not exaggerated enough to make them think you’re mocking them. ■

AT ARM’S LENGTH

Phillip Adcock is a commercial psychologist and

Arms and hands are another part of the body to pay particular attention to when

author of Master Your Brain: Training your Mind for Success in Life. Available now on Amazon.

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ILLUSTRATION by Mark Boardman

When we refer to body language, what we mean is the combined mental and physical means by which humans communicate with each other non-verbally. We do this by way of our body posture, physical gestures, facial expressions and even the ways in which we move our eyes. Body language is also more powerful than you might realise – research suggests 5570% of all human-to-human communication is non-verbal. So the way someone uses their body when they’re talking is more

considering body language, as they too reveal a lot about a person’s state of mind. For example, people with crossed arms are closing themselves to social influence. They’re putting up a barrier between themselves and what’s in front of them. Although there are some people who cross their arms as a habit, doing so may indicate that the person is uncomfortable with their appearance and trying to conceal it. If a person’s arms are crossed while their feet are shoulder width apart or wider, they may be signalling a position of toughness or authority. When someone’s hands are closed or clenched, it may indicate they’re irritated, angry or nervous. In fact, a number of gestures are associated with nervousness, so be mindful of them in both others and yourself as you may be conveying the wrong impression unintentionally.


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Powered by a hand-wound version of our Calibre SH21 movement, the C8 introduces a power reserve complication for the first time – when fully wound, the decorated twin barrels provide an incredible five days of power. Meanwhile, the black DLC case and altimeter-inspired date calendar match that practicality with stunningly innovative design.

Swiss movement English heart

Discover the new breed of watchmaker...

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EXPOSURE

STYLE DARREN KENNEDY MY WORLD WATCHES

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031 037 042 046

DARREN SAYS RELAX . 037

PHOTOGRAPH: Model wears Olive Ono cardigan in navy, £99; Olive funnel-neck long-sleeve Tee in ivory, £44; oliveclothing.com


DE L IVER I N G SA RTO R I AL E XC E L L E NC E clementsandchurch.co.uk


EXPOSURE

STYLE BAGS

IT’S IN THE BAG

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Whether it’s on your back or in your hand, pick a bag that’s stylish as well as practical

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LEATHER WEIGHTS

PHOTOGRAPH by David Harrison

1. Smythson Burlington Stripe Collection backpack, £995, smythson.com 2. Ted Baker Icarus slim rubberised leather document bag, £319, tedbaker.com 3. Filson Leather Field Satchel, £875, filson.com 4. Smythson Burlington small backpack, £795, smythson.com 5. Smith & Canova Winston flapover buckle detail backpack, £192, smithandcanova.co.uk

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WHO’S YOUR DADDY? 1. Christopher Ward C65 Trident Vintage Black, £650,

christopherward.co.uk

2. Dunhill Classic Leather Driving Gloves, £185, dunhill.com 3. Cubitts Ampton sunglasses, £125, cubitts.co.uk 4. Elie Saab Amande Tonka EDP, 100ml, £165, harrods.com 5. Etro ManRose EDP, 100ml, £118, libertylondon.com 6. Siphani & Co The Richmond belt, £98, sipahi.co.uk

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EXPOSURE

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7. Georg Jensen Manhattan Corkscrew, £42,

georgjensen.com

8. Johnnie Walker Blue Label (70cl) with engraving, £140,

thewhiskyexchange.com

9. Ted Baker Myle metal arm sunglasses, £120, tedbaker.com 10. Georg Jensen Wine 3-Pack including corkscrew, pourer and stopper, £110,

georgjensen.com

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PHOTOGRAPH by publinc PHOTOGRAPH larit em potinium by David vid ces Harrison blah

11. Billecart-Salmon Blanc de Blancs Grand Cru non-vintage, £60,

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12. Dunhill Engine Turn leather passport holder, £125,

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13. Dunhill Cadogan small zip folio in engine turn print, £315,

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14. Tateossian stackable bracelets, starting from £145,

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STYLE SUMMER

STYLE BIBLE Temperatures are rising, and by all means dress accordingly, but make sure you’re still dressing to impress, says Mr Porter’s style director OLIE ARNOLD

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HATEVER THE DRESS code, there’s lots to be said for making an effort and this shouldn’t change seasonally. Colleagues will respect it and clients will appreciate it, plus it helps with self-confidence in the workplace. As we head into the summer months, it is important that the type of suit material transitions from a heavier weight into a lighter, more breathable fabric which won’t leave you feeling warm and stuffy in more formal, business settings. Put away the trusty overcoat, black derby shoes and grey tones and opt for a more casual style of suit or mixed separate in lightweight cotton, linen and seersucker. This is also a time where you can really experiment with colour; the key is just to keep it simple. An airy blazer is a summer necessity, and key to dressing for business casual. This version from Dries Van Noten has been crafted in Italy from a well-balanced mix of cotton and linen that’s light but refined. Shaped with darting on the backside and featuring double vents, it has a tidy silhouette that doesn’t restrict, and patch pockets to complement its casual appeal. Wider-than-average lapels create balance as well as adding a point of difference. As the temperature rises, don’t get stuck wearing the same dull colours that defined your winter wardrobe. Experiment in the workplace with a versatile, dark-army hue like this pair of trousers by Tom Ford. Cut from lightweight yet substantial linen, they have neat front pleats and pressed creases to sharpen the clean-lined silhouette. The notched waistband ensures a comfortable, customisable fit. Finish the look with a pair of Loro Piana penny loafers, a smart-casual staple which you should add into your workwear shoe rotation. They are a fuss-free transition and come in a versatile mushroom suede which is a great alternative to have in the drier months. ■ 034

GET THE LOOK: Dries Van Noten black cotton and linen-blend blazer, £630; Dries Van Noten hunt slim-fit striped cotton-jersey T-shirt, £90; Tom Ford pleated linen trousers, £720; Loro Piana Citey Walk suede penny loafers, £690; all available from mrporter.com

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THE PERFECT FIT BESPOKE MANUFACTURED JEANS & CHINOS

TAILOR-MADE IN SWITZERLAND AND GERMANY DELIVERY IN APPROX. 14 DAYS — FREE RETURNS — FREE SHIPPING

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Auctioneers & Valuers Antiques | Jewellery | Watches

The Watch Sale Now accepting consignments for future watch auctions. With record-breaking prices achieved and a global reach, Fellows has gained the reputation as one of the UK’s leading auction houses. Get in touch now to see what your items could be worth. Rolex GMT Master reference 6542 to feature in our July sale. Estimate £20,000 - £30,000

www.fellows.co.uk/valuations Saleroom & Head Office | Augusta House | 19 Augusta Street | Birmingham | B18 6JA | 0121 212 2131 London Office | 3 Hill Street | Mayfair | London | W1J 5LA | 020 7127 4198

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EXPOSURE

STYLE THE KENNEDY FILES

TIME TO LOOSEN UP Straying away from structured lines and close-fitting forms may be intimidating, but it’s time to break free. Our new style correspondent DARREN KENNEDY tells us how to wear this season’s relaxed silhouettes

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ENEROUS AND BILLOWING fabrics, oversized shapes, and an altogether more comfortable approach to dressing: menswear has undergone something of a renaissance in recent seasons. Form-fitting and tailored pieces have long reigned supreme on the catwalk, but SS17 has replaced this comparatively restrictive aesthetic with a more relaxed and loose-fitting sartorial offering. Taking inspiration from Scandinavian minimalism and Japanese street-wear, designers such as Vetements, Jill Sander, and Wooyoungmi have all embraced volume in their most recent collections while Yohji Yamamoto and Comme des Garçons’ Rei Kawakubo have long been pioneers of the trend. However, if you’re the kind of guy who has just got his head around the skinny jean or cropped trouser, then this season’s voluminous proportions may seem more than a little daunting – but they don’t have to be. Some designer takes on this trend are overly exaggerated and daringly dramatic for an everyday look, but the inherent beauty in these more relaxed silhouettes is that, in their fluidity, they work with your body and your shape rather than against it. While there are no hard and fast rules when it comes to this trend, there are certainly some guiding lights to help you along the way. It’s all about balancing proportions as less is definitely more: both COS and British-based brand Olive Clothing has excelled at this. The trick is to keep it simple and pair the trousers with a drop-shoulder tee, and tuck it in to emphasise your waist, adding a definitive shape to the loose-fitting garments. If you’re not willing to veer too far left, but still want to give a nod to the trend, then the overshirt – inspired by utilitarian workwear – is a subtle way to embrace these new silhouettes. If you’re opting for one that is slightly oversized, keep everything else streamlined to avoid being drowned in fabric. This more relaxed approach is certainly a reaction to the years of restrictive silhouettes that have dominated the catwalks. So bid farewell to the skinny jean and opt for a look that is fresh, relaxed, and infinitely more cool. ■ For more info, see darrenkennedy.co.uk squaremile.com

RELAX INTO SUMMER: [clockwise from here] This Olive Bamboo summer overshirt (£84) enables wearers to embrace the unstructured look but still look smart; Wooyungmi is also relaxing the aesthetic with voluminous silhouettes; Cos is exploring a looser look with its tailoring.

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A question of good form. The FORM is not a watch for special occasions – it is a special watch for every occasion. It combines classic watchmaking with modern design. Alongside the three-dimensional dial, it also impresses with its ergonomic approach. Because good style is timeless, and the modern, unadorned FORM is a master of reservation – a characteristic timepiece for every point in time. www.junghans.de

www.junghans.co.uk · info@thebluecompanylondon.co.uk


EXPOSURE

SHOPPING THE ROYAL EXCHANGE

RETAIL DETAIL

SHOPPING BAG THE ROYAL EXCHANGE, LONDON, EC3V 3DG THEROYALEXCHANGE.CO.UK

Whether it’s a present for your father, your son or yourself, The Royal Exchange offers the finest of men’s luxury on the City’s doorstep

MAN ABOUT TOWN Briefcase doesn’t have to mean boring, as the Cambridge from Sage Brown shows – balancing practicality with panache, the navy vintage calf hide bag has plenty of pockets so you can stash your laptop and paperwork somewhere that’s both safe and stylish. £425.

CHURCH’S It’s a brogue, but not as you know it: the ‘Ross’ from Church’s takes the traditional style and updates it with an almost patent polished fume leather upper, and a rubber trainer sole. Dapper. £325. 28 Royal Exchange, EC3V 3LT

TATEOSSIAN ‘A sense of playfulness and free movement’ is the ethos running through Tateossian’s accessories range, and it’s perfectly embodied by the Cobra bracelet: strands of Italian leather held together by a sterling silver clasp. £235. 1/4 Royal Exchange, EC3V 3LL

SAGE BROWN FINE LEATHER: This family-run company doesn’t mess about when it comes to leather, and has spent the past 25 years sourcing only the best hides from the UK and abroad to use in its luxurious ranges. 31 Royal Exchange, EC3V 3LP

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THOMAS PINK The blue-and-white stripe print may be sophisticated, but the relaxed fit of Thomas Pink’s Tennent shirt is strictly for off-duty days. It’s made from washed linen, meaning it will become even softer with age. A bit like you. £100. 9 Royal Exchange, EC3V 3LL

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FULLY STOCKED Don’t get out to nice bars as often as you used to? We know the feeling. The key is to recreate the magic in your own home, and Georg Jensen has the kit to make that happen. From champagne bowls and ice buckets to some rather smart bottle openers and drinks shakers, when cocktail hour comes calling, you’ll be ready. Prices from £30 for a wine coaster.

GEORG JENSEN: When Georg Jensen founded his eponymous company in 1904, he wanted to create designs that were both functional and beautiful. Job. Done. 8A The Courtyard, Royal Exchange, EC3V 3LP

ORLEBAR BROWN

THEO FENNELL

LEICA

The Jack is Orlebar Brown’s most versatile swim short yet, featuring a quick-drying nylon and elastane blend for greater stretch and movement. The pitch is ‘gym to swim’, but they’ll look cool on a sun lounger, too. £95.

Keen to celebrate your Celtic heritage? Even if you haven’t got any, it’s perhaps worth assuming that somewhere down the line you do as an excuse to sport Theo Fennell’s white gold and green enamel Celtic knot cufflinks. £5,500.

The Lecia Q camera is almost as attractive as the photographs you’ll take with it, and what photos they will be – a fixed fast prime lens and 24MP full-frame sensor mean richly detailed exposures, whatever you’re shooting. £3,800.

14-15 Royal Exchange, EC3V 3LP

4 The Courtyard, Royal Exchange, EC3V 3LQ

18 Royal Exchange, EC3V 3LP

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MY WORLD SEAN GILBERTSON

THE RIGHT TIMING

Over the last decade, Fabergé has quietly rebuilt its reputation as a power player in the luxury sector. BEN WINSTANLEY talks brand history and watch innovation with its charismatic CEO Sean Gilbertson

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HEN MINING GIANTS Gemfields bought Fabergé in 2007, incoming CEO Sean Gilbertson had one clear objective: transform one of the world’s most iconic jewellers into a modern industry powerhouse. Pressure? What pressure…? Fast forward ten years and the brand is making all the right steps to fulfill Gilbertson’s ambitions. Founded in 1842 by Peter Carl Fabergé, the revered brand somewhat lost its way during the middle of the 20th century as frequent changes of ownership and dubious licensing decisions (Fabergé Barbie dolls, anyone?) impacted on the firm’s reputation for producing the world’s finest jewellery. Now in much safer hands, the Fabergé brand has been reunited with the family, and Gilbertson has created a tour-de-force watch division taking the game to the giants of horology. Celebrating Fabergé’s 175th anniversary, the CEO tells us what’s next… Over the last ten years, how have you furthered the Fabergé brand? In many respects, ten years is the blink of an eye when it comes to the development of a brand. When you think that Fabergé was founded in 1842, many people say it reached world acclaim in 1902 at the World Fair: that’s 60 years from the founding of the brand to really reaching global renown. So our ten

years have been such a fractional part of Fabergé’s history, especially when you’re dealing with a brand that celebrates its 175th anniversary this year. We originally acquired the portfolio, the trademarks and the actual property from Unilever who had a policy of issuing licences for the Fabergé name. We inherited ten different licence agreements, with an assortment of different companies doing all kinds of things: trying to make mobile phones, neck ties, obviously the manufacture of jewellery… Then you had a bizarre company in the US that made collectibles including a Fabergé Easter-egg basket, and perhaps my least favourite company who made a limited run of 2,500 porcelain Barbie dolls. So when we inherited the brand, you might say we had something of a clean-up job on our hands. It’s not so easy to get rid of licences, either, which meant we spent the first few years either buying them back, waiting for them to expire, or in some cases – where the licensees weren’t acting quite as honourably as they should have been – stopping them. The first major piece of value added was to get rid of all those licence agreements, and today we sit in the position where there isn’t a single licence out there – and control of the brand has been restored to the centre. Equally important in the first few years of our acquisition was to reunite the Fabergé family with the brand. In 1951 the family reached a settlement with a man named Sam Rubin, which gave him the rights to the name in the US, and up until 2007 they had nothing to do with the brand, so we were thrilled to convince them to come back on board. Then it was just a case of bringing out new products at the right level and the right price points, especially when it came to our very successful entry into the watch industry. I think that step-by-step approach has worked very well for us. As Donald Trump would say, “I’ll give myself an A!” Fabergé’s watch division is arguably the greatest success of the last decade. Can you tell us a little bit about it? Bringing the conceptualisation and

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development of Fabergé timepieces in-house was crucial to us, as previously it had been carried out under licence. We hired the incredibly bright Aurélie Picaud and, after a heck of a lot of hard work and finding the right partners in the watch industry for us, she was successful in winning the Grand Prix d’Horlogerie de Genève for the Lady Compliquée Peacock watch in 2015, and then did it again in 2016 for the Visionnaire DTZ. We’re hoping she can make it three years in a row with the Visionnaire Chronograph. Do you feel a sense of responsibility to the Fabergé name? Undoubtedly. I first met Tatiana Fabergé in Switzerland in 2007: she is one of the great granddaughters of Peter Carl Fabergé, and I distinctly remember walking down the stairs of the hotel to meet her and she eyed me up, and I could see that she thought, “Oh boy, here comes another swindler with a can of ideas to squander the legendary Fabergé name.” It took a couple of months for her to see that our primary objective was instead to restore dignity to it. The sense of responsibility that I feel, and I try to instil in the team, is very deeply rooted in what Peter Carl Fabergé did before 1917. It is in many respects his ethos and spirit that we’re trying to protect and conserve today. His work acts as our main inspiration: we take certain motifs or ideas and work them into fresh designs of today. What sets Fabergé apart from the rest? Many brands take themselves quite seriously, perhaps a little highfalutin, and I think where Fabergé is mentally going is that it embraces a degree of wit and humour, along with a surprise element that is synonymous with many of the objects – specifically the famous eggs – that Fabergé has made over the years. That feel-good aspect, hopefully bringing a smile to the face of the customer, is what Fabergé is really all about. I think that’s a very different approach to a lot of other brands. Many people bang on about design and craftsmanship, which are obviously very important, but in this day and

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EXPOSURE

age for any of the top brands that is a given. Of course Fabergé has exceptionally high levels of craftsmanship, but there are other aspects that are more unique to the brand – in particular, our reputation for making objets d’art. The DTZ was a huge success last year; how did the project come about? The DTZ was an amazing project. I like to joke that the secret to its success was everything about it was wrong: nothing followed the conventional approach. Everything was upside down, back to front and not as you’d quite expect it to be. That unexpected element of surprise, with an item that allows you to discover the project over time, makes it something very exciting. We worked on the movement with JeanMarc Wiederrecht and the team at [movement specialists] Agenhor. The watch has a hole running straight down the middle from the top to the bottom, which is so fundamentally and radically different to anything we’ve seen in the watch industry before. Also, whereas almost all watches have the automatic winding rotor on the back of the watch – so you have to take it off and turn it upside to see a partial 120-degree rotor that then flip flops around – this one is on the front of the watch, and has a 360-degree rotor. Again, that brings that element of fun to the wearer as you can actually see the rotor of the watch spinning around as you move your wrist. It has a degree of retro-chic about it, with its solid robust good looks. It also gives the impression of a power watch without being ostentatious or over the top. It’s so ground breaking and such a wonderful machine; it’s a pleasure to wear it every day. You’ve followed up the DTZ with the Visionnaire Chronograph – is it an equally innovative and exciting watch? One of the early complications of mechanical watches was the chronograph, but the fundamental basis for that mechanism hasn’t changed in a century. Until now. The original chronograph approach brings with it a number of fundamental problems: for

PORTRAITS by Ciaran McCrickard

The Visionnaire Chronograph has a real level of horological significance. People have really sat up and taken notice squaremile.com

example, if you picture a chronograph, you typically have three independent dials for the hour, the minutes and the seconds. Because they’re independent, they have to be quite small to fit on a single watch phase, which means legibility is a problem. The second important problem is in the clutch mechanisms that have been designed to date in that you actually require a reasonable amount of force on chronographs to get them to start, stop and flyback with the reset button. In that process, there’s quite a lot of meshing together of gears that has to happen in order for that to take place, and very often there is a movement in those gears whereby you’re going to lose a quarter or half a second, which kind of

defeats the purpose of what the chronograph is all about: accurately measuring time. We’ve again teamed up with movementspecialists Agenhor to create the watch, this time with a chronograph module housed in the centre of the watch and viewed through a single subdial. It’s been in development for ten years: when we unveiled it just before Baselworld this year, it was like setting off a depth charge below the world’s horological feet. It has that level of historical significance. People have really sat up and taken notice. Are there any stumbling blocks for the luxury sector in the near future? I think what’s interesting is we’re emerging ➤

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➤ from two or three years of watch sector hell and jewellery sector misery. You had the three big customers taken out by one event or another: the Russians were taken out of the market by a combination of the oil price and the Ruble, Middle Eastern customers were taken out by the oil price, and the Chinese were taken out by a little bit of stockmarket volatility but also the anti-corruption, anti-bribery drives. If you take those three customer bases from the market, that’s any luxury brand’s worst nightmare. I think those troubles are now firmly behind us. We’re definitely already seeing the green shoots of spring return to the jewellery sector. And, while I don’t want to get ahead of myself here, I’d make the same call for the watch business, notwithstanding the fact that even in January the watch exports year-on-year, January-to-January, were down 8-9% again. From a business that was cranking out $2.2bn a month, I think we’re down at approximately $1.4-1.5bn at the moment. However, I think that sector has turned, which we see in the development of many of the luxury goods share prices, and even in the share prices of Swatch and Richemont – the two guys most heavily involved in the watch business – that are now up compared to where they were 12 months ago. We’re helped by the fact that many of the stock markets are performing so well. The US markets are performing phenomenally well: everybody is very hopeful that Mr Trump is somehow going to bump up everything to do with luxury. I think for the next two years at least these changes will contribute to slightly better trading conditions for us all. I think we may see less spending on very expensive items, by which I mean in excess of $500,000. I do think that market has changed fairly fundamentally, and therefore for many of the brands today you do see that they just aren’t cranking out those really big pieces. Of course, there’s still a market for them – there are people who do spend that kind of money – but as a general trend I’m not sure I see that market coming back quite as easily, with the only exception being top-end gemstones.

It’s not enough to just come up with another movement, you’ve got to do something that’s mechanically marvellous 044

What innovations do you believe the watch industry needs to take notice of? It’s going to be interesting to see how the watch sector develops because I think you have to be willing to do things fundamentally differently to take a new approach. It goes without saying you have to be highly creative, but you can’t just come up with another movement someone has done before – I don’t think that’s enough. You’ve got to do something – like a Peacock – that is mechanically marvellous; or something that’s composed differently to anything before – like the DTZ; or something that takes a whole new approach to a particular problem, like the Visionnaire Chronograph. I also think that the watch industry has

been used to mark ups, which have certainly been very healthy and I wouldn’t necessarily say that is justified. I do think that many of the watch collectors, or people observing the space, will find that generally those margins come down now and that they will offer better value to the people buying them. Another observation I’ve had, which I think is important to the development of the watch business, is that rarity drives value. You cannot crank out 150,000 watches a year and expect them to maintain their value, or to become investable pieces – and therefore a combination of the provenance, the heritage, the story and the rarity of the pieces is what underpins their long-term value. ■ For more information, see fabergé.com

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Simplicity. Perfection. #WallpaperTV Discover more: lg.com/uk/lgoled

Picture on Wall Design Perfect Colour on Perfect Black Dolby Vision and Atmos


EXPOSURE

WATCHES INSTAGRAM

#WATCHWEWANT Every Wednesday, we post our favourite wrist candy to the @squaremile_com Instagram account. Get in on the action: share your watches with #watchwewant

SCHOOLING THE FIELD The Montre Ecole is Laurent Ferrier’s homage to fine watchmaking of the 19th Century. Its neoclassical design – seen in the rounded-off edges of the 40mm stainless steel case – is modelled on the very first wristwatches, which were converted from pocket watches. Its clean lines and minimalist dial embody this elegance.

ALL IN GOOD TIME Laurent Ferrier has watchmaking in his blood: the son and grandson of watchmakers, he spent three decades working as Patek Philippe’s creative director before branching out on his own in 2008. It’s no surprise that this pedigree shines through in his timepieces, which all exhibit the hallmarks of purist watchmaking. Naturally, the pieces are already highly collectible. williamandson.com

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PROMOTION

THE HANDS-ON APPROACH: The creative process begins on paper, and the rest of the manufacturing continues by hand from start to finish. Cutler and Gross’s aesthetic blends British heritage with Italian craftsmanship.

An Eye for Detail Luxury eyewear brand Cutler and Gross creates unique handcrafted spectacles and sunglasses. The founders were pioneers in their field – and the products remain as stylish now as ever before.

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N A WORLD of grey suits and black brogues, bold eyewear is one of the best ways to make a style statement in the City. If you’ve struggled to find the perfect pair so far, then it’s time for a trip to luxury eyewear specialist Cutler and Gross. Co-founder Tony Gross once said: “It’s nice if glasses can be sexy and mysterious. People who need glasses don’t have to feel separated from glamour.” It’s fair to say the brand embodies this ideal to this day. Since 1969, the brand has provided the best of British craftsmanship with a selection of bold and beautiful designs, creating a frame for every face. The brand’s eyewear was initially handmade by legendary frame maker George Smith – his wife, Frances, hand-dying all the lenses. Now they are created by hand in the company’s own factory in Cadore, Italy, ensuring complete control over the quality of

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the product. As well as being the benchmark for optical excellence, Cutler and Gross is also a pioneering brand. Founders Graham Cutler and Tony Gross were the first to introduce optical frames as a fashion accessory at a time when they were primarily considered for their medical function. The innovation proved revelatory, and immediately established the brand’s stylistic credentials to the world. This success can be attributed to the

•• As well as being the benchmark for optical excellence, Cutler and Gross is a pioneer

founders: a formidable duo, Cutler brought patience, an incredible eye for detail, and ruthless practicality to their design solutions, while Gross infused the glasses with high fashion appeal and glamour. Above all, quality craftsmanship has always remained the mission statement. To quote Graham Cutler: “If you buy a handcrafted pair of glasses or sunglasses, you want to see the tiny inaccuracies, the straight, raw edges of the plastic, the pins – they give character, make them unique to the wearer.” With three London stores in Spitalfields, Knightsbridge and Marylebone, the unique Cutler and Gross experience is on your doorstep. Each frame takes four to six weeks to produce, a testament to the dedication of the craftsmen. If you need a pair of glasses, there is really no excuse to go anywhere else. ■ For more info: cutlerandgross.com

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JUST ADD WATER: [from left to right] The Omega Speedmaster X-33 Regatta Chronograph (£3,920) blends analog hands with a digital display, and has a special Regatta function which keeps track of the critical five-minute countdown before race time. omegawatches.com The El Primero Sport Land Rover BAR Team Edition (£6,700) is equally ocean ready, combining Zenith’s iconic chronograph movement with 200m water resistance and a carbon-fibre-coated rubber strap for added endurance. zenith-watches.com

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EXPOSURE

WATCHES AMERICA’S CUP

PHOTOGRAPHS by David Harrison

The momentum for sailing watches is building every year. With the 35th America’s Cup taking place this summer, the tide is especially high squaremile.com

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Bespoke design, made with integrity.

enquiries@sw-jewellery.com +44 (0) 20 7490 0665


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PHOTOGRAPH by publinc larit em potinium vid ces blah

MOTION OF THE OCEAN: Panerai’s renown for dive watches means that its knack for also producing excellent and robust sailing watches often goes unnoticed. Take the Luminor 1950 Regatta (£13,850) for example: it has both an in-house flyback chronograph movement and a regatta complication (five-minute countdown to race time) for all your sailing needs. panerai.com

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SAIL OF THE CENTURY: Bremont’s relationship with the America’s Cup is into its third year, and its latest offering shows just how seriously the brand takes the illustrious sailing event. The elegant AC35 (£16,995) is encased in rose gold, and features a dial engraved with a pattern that resembles the ‘Auld Mug’ America’s Cup trophy. This being the 35th America’s Cup, the watch is limited to 35 pieces. bremont.com


SAVE UP TO 50%

DESIGN SALE Save up to 20% now on our furniture and accessories to order and make unmissable savings of up to 50% on our clearance and ex-display items. Within the store, you will find our skilled design consultants providing a free interior design service. Our interior design team will be delighted to meet you to discuss any of your needs and assist you with any of your challenges.

Battersea Reach I Finchley Road I Harrods I Notting Hill I Tottenham Ct Road I Guildford I Kingston I boconcept.com


FEATURES

SACHA LORD-MARCHIONNE HONG KONG PHARRELL WILLIAMS TERENCE SPENCER

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LIFE’S A BEACH . 060

PHOTOGRAPH by City Patterns #11: Heatwave by Tugo Cheng (bluelotus-gallery.com)


FEATURES

Don’t Stop the Music SACHA LORD-MARCHIONNE IS THE MAN BEHIND SOME OF EUROPE’S BIGGEST AND BEST MUSIC EVENTS, AND THERE’S LOTS MORE TO COME, FINDS JESSICA PHILLIPS

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N THE FIRST year of the Warehouse Project,

a close friend of its founder Sacha LordMarchionne asked him for a favour. This friend happened to head up A&R for Sony, and he wondered if one of his artists could play on the bill for New Year’s Eve. “The bill was fully booked, but they begged and begged,” recalls Lord-Marchionne. “So, we put him on from 9-10pm. Doors opened at 9.30pm, so for the first half hour he didn’t realise he was playing to a venue that wasn’t even open. We paid him £200 and argued over his train fare because he came first class, and we never agreed on a first-class ticket.” That guy was Calvin Harris. Lord-Marchionne had flunked out of school with two Us and an E at A-level. He began – and then swiftly departed – a job working on a market stall in Manchester. His reason for leaving? The 5am start. Twenty-three years later, this is now the time he finishes his ‘day’ job. As co-founder of the Warehouse Project and Parklife festival, his nocturnal existence is the legacy of two decades spent at the forefront of the British music scene.

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Growing up in Manchester during the zenith of alternative rock and acid house, Lord-Marchionne found himself tangled in the rave-influenced music scene, and spent most of his time listening to The Stone Roses instead of his school teachers. But while his friends from Manchester Grammar School left for university, Lord-Marchionne would decide to follow a different path. When more than 500 people turned up to a friend’s midweek birthday party, LordMarchionne capitalised on his local knowledge and passion for music: “I actually approached The Hacienda and said, ‘Look, you’re closed on a Monday, here’s the idea, this is what I want to do,’ and they went with it.” This move laid the foundations for an empire, which has since proliferated through his home city and overseas. His first Hacienda night took place on 4 July 1994. He spent the following decade organising student nights across Manchester, before regurgitating mainstream music became a chore. In 2006, he co-founded the Warehouse ➤

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CROWD CONTROL: [clockwise from here] Parklife Festival, set up by Lord-Marchionne in 2010; revellers dance to Chemical Brothers at last year’s event; Ice Cube was one of Parklife 2016’s headliners; crowds at a Warehouse Project night.

➤ Project, a series of phenomenally successful club nights held in Manchester between September and New Year’s Day. Other projects quickly followed. Parklife has grown to become the nation’s largest non-camping festival, celebrating dance and electronic music. And Croatia’s Hideout Festival, a fiveday alternative music extravaganza held on Pag Island, has sold out every single year since its conception in 2011. But at the beginning, there were no sellouts, famous artists, or international stages – just

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a man with a handful of flyers operating on the fringes of the law. “When I first started [promoting events] I’d get into my car with a bucket of paste and put posters up on walls and try my very best to avoid the police. Now it’s just a click of a button.” Social media has revolutionised the promotion of live events, but Lord-Marchionne aims to ensure it doesn’t detract from the personal experience he prides himself on delivering. “You can tell when somebody is just sat behind a desk and has scheduled a load of tweets to go out at certain times. It’s so boring. You need to rip up the rulebook and engage.” This approach has proved successful, with Parklike now a viable competitor to the likes of Glastonbury and Reading. As the public face of the brand, his profile has elevated alongside his business, which has brought its own challenges. “If I’m being really honest, everyone thinks it’s an amazing job, and it is an amazing way to make a living, but it can be a bit of a nightmare. If I go out I can’t relax. You get pestered quite a lot.” His recent holiday

proved a prime example. “I was sat on the beach wearing one of our T-shirts, and this Italian waiter came running over and started talking to me for two hours about Marco Carola. I just wanted to say, ‘Leave me alone.’” Before expanding into its current incarnation as a peripatetic club night, the Warehouse Project started as a onevenue catalyst for prison raves. “The opening night of the Warehouse Project was a fucking nightmare because it was at Boddingtons Brewery. It was right next door to Strangeways Prison. We had Public Enemy playing for us, and within ten minutes I had the governor on the phone screaming at me because the whole prison was literally raving.” It’s an anecdote today, but at the time he found himself subject to intense scrutiny. “I had environmental health all over me. Literally camping out.” In 2006, the Warehouse Project was found solely responsible for an increase in drug taking at Strangeways Prison. “It was really serious. I was made to sit in front of every statutory authority in Manchester.”

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PHOTOGRAPH Sby (Parklife main) Ollie Millington/Getty; (Chemical Brothers crowd and Ice Cube) Jon Super/Getty; (Warehouse Project) Shirlaine Forrest

Over the years, the Warehouse Project has flitted between venues, and is currently held beneath Manchester Piccadilly station. Yet trouble has followed. In 2012, Souvik Pal, aged 18, was ejected from a Warehouse Project event on suspicion of drug use; his body was found in nearby Bridgewater Canal 22 days later. The following year, clubber Nick Bonnie took a bad ecstasy pill and subsequently died in hospital. Although Lord-Marchionne was not directly responsible for either incident, the deaths still play on his mind. “It’s obviously an awful, awful tragedy for the families and you think about these things a lot. You wonder if you could have done anything better, and the answer is simply no. We do everything by the book. We pay for police on the door, we have sniffer dogs, more than enough security and paramedics on site, and give out free drinking water. Every single thing you can do we do.” Even before these high-profile reminders, he was a leading advocate of drug awareness and testing in clubs. “I am extremely vocal about my thoughts on drugs and drugs testing, which I think is scant in my experience of the industry.” He believes licensed premises are key to starting an important dialogue and enforcing preventative measures. “The intelligent people have adult conversations about recognising that it’s there and say, ‘With that in mind, what do we do to ensure it’s here in a safe environment? How do we educate people?’ And the unintelligent people just say, ‘It’s illegal, let’s just ignore it, so be it.’” He remains a proud Mancunian: “I do think that Manchester is one of the greatest cities in the country.” (What of London? “You just don’t get the friendliness that you do in Manchester.”) As a result, he tries to keep the heart of his business where he knows best. “We get offers all the time and we’ve done one-off events at Matter [in the O2] and in Ibiza, but quite a lot of the time it doesn’t feel right. It’s hard to explain. Manchester is our home, and this is where we feel comfortable.” This dedication hasn’t gone unnoticed. “What’s really funny, is the school that I went to – that almost backdoored me, that was ashamed of me – invited me back last year to give a talk about being an entrepreneur.” But his inner teenager dictated the terms. “I refused to do the talk unless they made me a prefect first, and they did. Weirdly, they’ve got a picture of me in the school hall of fame. I’m three to the left of Ben Kingsley, who played Gandhi.” But to pigeonhole Lord-Marchionne as a party-planning, house-music enthusiast would be a mistake. He describes his ideal evening as a night in with a takeaway watching back-toback Coronation Street. He makes his money

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promoting house and techno music, but he listens to The Smiths, Morrissey and David Bowie. “I don’t choose to listen to that kind of music. I understand the journey that it can take you on when you’re listening to the music for four, five hours, but if I just want to listen to four or five tracks, there are no lyrics; it doesn’t say anything. You could say that David Bowie’s ‘Life on Mars’ lyrics don’t make sense, but they definitely paint a picture.” His standout live performance isn’t from a world-famous DJ but a legendary producer. “Nile Rodgers was playing ‘Let’s Dance’, ‘Like a Virgin’ and ‘Wild Boys’. It wasn’t until I got home that I found out that he wrote all those for Bowie and Madonna and Duran Duran. His final track was ‘Le Freak’. Johnny Marr came on to play guitar, and I just stood there in awe thinking that this was a little bit of history.” Even as a don of alternative music, Lord-

Marchionne isn’t immune to the charm of the guilty pleasure. “I was really completely and utterly blown away by the new Harry Styles track, ‘Sign of the Times’. I was so disappointed in myself. I asked people in the office if they’d heard it and they looked at me like I’d committed murder.” Next on the agenda is “putting on the best gig ever.” Vocalising this vision, LordMarchionne explains, “I don’t think it would just involve artists. There would be a lot of creativity surrounding it as well. A bit like a carnival with an event.” When we spoke, he was focusing on this year’s Parklife. The 2017 lineup might not include Mr Harris, but it has attracted the likes of Carl Cox, Fatboy Slim and Jess Glynne. Not bad for a man who couldn’t hold down a job at a market stall. ■ To donate to the We Love Manchester Emergency Fund, go to redcross.org.uk

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ABOVE & BEYOND THIS IS HONG KONG AS YOU’VE NEVER SEEN IT BEFORE. PHOTOGRAPHERS ROMAIN JACQUET-LAGRÈZE AND TUGO CHENG GIVE US THEIR UNIQUE PERSPECTIVE

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CITY PATTERNS #1: FREEDOM: by Tugo Cheng. While many Hongkongers would prefer to pay and swim in the public swimming pools, others may just find more freedom swimming in the iconic Victoria Harbour free-of-charge. The image reveals the patterns of the cityscape of Hong Kong and, at the same time, the patterns of different lifestyles.

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CITY PATTERNS #4: Six Feet Under: by Tugo Cheng. The planning of cemeteries in Hong Kong carries many similarities to a Garden City with roads and green belts set in the signature highdensity of the city. From God’s-eye perspective, the dwellings of the living and departed may not look too different.

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CITY PATTERNS #14: Oil: by Tugo Cheng. In the northwest region of Hong Kong, the oil storage tanks at power stations are painted with huge Chinese characters – ‘oil’ – which are discernible from miles away.

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VERTICAL HORIZON #99, HONG KONG, 2015: by Romain Jacquet-Lagrèze. The blocks on the bottom, right and top are all part of the same building, an 18-storey private residential block from the 1960s that has become an iconic spot on Hong Kong island. On the left is a more modern and tall building reaching almost into the low clouds passing above.

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HONG KONG UPSIDE DOWN: An exhibition of both artists’ work runs until 24 June at the Blue Lotus Gallery, 1606 Chai Wan Industrial City, Phase 1, 60 Wing Tai Road, Chai Wan, Hong Kong; bluelotus-gallery. com; tugocheng.com; romainjl.com

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HAPPY NOW? FASHION DESIGNER, PHILANTHROPIST, INNOVATOR AND MOVIE PRODUCER… THERE’S NOT MUCH PHARRELL WILLIAMS CAN’T DO. BUT AT THE HEART OF IT, MUSIC STILL MAKES HIS WORLD GO ROUND, SAYS KAREN ANN OVERTON

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F YOU’RE A person who finds there’s never

PHOTOGRAPH by Corina Marie Howell/Contour by Getty Images

enough hours in the day to do everything, perhaps you need to be more like Pharrell Williams; he not only covers the workload of around seven reasonably accomplished men, but he does so in immaculate style. Naturally, like most Hollywood types, Williams can count on his team of helpers, but unlike other celebs who will glibly endorse anything for a wad of cash, the popstar’s plethora of projects are all intrinsic to his own distinct – and high-calibre – lifestyle. Take his advisory and investor role at burgeoning tech start-up MIXhalo. Founded by Incubus guitarist Mike Einziger, the company aims to transform the way we listen to live music by developing a way to distribute sound to the audience that claims to be even better than what the musicians hear on-stage. See also his YouTube channel ‘I am OTHER’, which has grown into a multi-media creative collective and record label. Having built up his brand, it’s fair to say that attaching Williams’ mononym alone to

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a product is enough to guarantee a certain level of attention, but not necessarily success. So is it down to luck, or just inherent artistic talent? “A lot of it is a gift, but without discipline you’re never going to get anywhere. I’m lucky in that I’ve always felt free to do what I wanted, and the few times I’ve been in situations where I’ve been obliged to work within constraints that were imposed by others, I’ve decided to quit those projects,” says the 44-year-old firmly. “I’m very precise when it comes to knowing what I want to do creatively. I can’t work according to parameters that are laid down by other people – that just doesn’t work for me. I need to follow my own instincts and I’ve learnt that that is always going to take me where I want to go as an artist.” The term ‘genius’ may be thrown about a lot these days, particularly in an industry which often sees men branded as brilliant while women are cast simply as their pliant puppets, but in a time where our musical heroes are dropping like flies it feels ➤

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HATS OFF TO HIM: [this image] Pharrell’s love of hats isn’t restricted to his Vivienne Westwood number; [opposite, clockwise from top left] with Cara Delevingne at the iconic Chanel Metiers d’Art Collection show; speaking at the Palm Springs International Film Festival Film Awards Gala earlier this year; with Willow Smith, Karl Lagerfeld and wife Helen Lasichanh at Chanel’s 2016 Paris Fashion Week show.

➤ appropriate to pin the title onto someone like Williams who has come from humble beginnings to rise and conquer. Born in the Virginia Beach resort city in Virginia, he is the eldest of three sons of Pharaoh Williams, a handyman, and Carolyn, a teacher. It was at a seventh-grade summer band camp that Williams met his Neptunes collaborator Chad Hugo: two unassuming, young and geeky musicians – Williams a drummer, Hugo a tenor saxophonist – who would go from playing jazz standards to producing some of the biggest hits of the 21st century including Britney Spears’ ‘Slave for You’, Snoop Dogg’s ‘Beautiful’ and Kelis’s ‘Milkshake’. Though hardly the most rock’n’roll

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coming-of-age tale, Williams’ past has proved mythical enough to garner the attention of Fox, which has purchased the rights to Atlantis – a ‘Romeo and Juliet-style story’ inspired by his childhood. No doubt hoping to emulate some of the enormous success Lionsgate has enjoyed with La La Land, Atlantis will have a musical element and will be the studio’s second project with Williams following acclaimed hit Hidden Figures, which he produced and scored. Based on the story of three brilliant black female mathematicians who made a major contribution to NASA and the US space programme in the 1960s, Hidden Figures was nominated for three Academy Awards – including Best Picture – along with a Golden Globe nomination for the soundtrack which Williams co-composed with the legendary Hans Zimmer. “I was very proud to help get the film made and tell the story of these amazing black women – Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson – who were also pioneers in an era where segregation was still in effect and blacks had to struggle for their place in society,” explains Williams. “I’m so glad that this film has been able to point out that there are so many talented women out there and especially those who

have made important contributions to mathematics and engineering.” Sincere as this statement seems, it may not be the sort of thing one expects to come out of the mouth of a hip-hop star whose music videos often feature a bevy of scantily-clad babes – in N*E*R*D’s appropriately-named ‘Lapdance’, for example, or his comeback collaboration with Robin Thicke, ‘Blurred Lines’, which took that genre staple to the extreme. Regardless, when earlier this year the 11-time Grammy winner and his model and designer wife Helen Lasichanh announced the arrival of triplets to join their eight-yearold son Rocket, Williams proved where his priorities lie. Indeed fatherhood has revealed his softer side – on 2010’s Despicable Me soundtrack he snuck in a tribute to his young son with the track ‘Rocket’s Theme’. When it comes to parenting, Williams says he is “tender and strict” and encourages his son to “discover for himself who he wants to be and what he would like to do in life”. As for the somewhat unusual name, “We named our son Rocket for a thousand reasons, but one of the big ones was to name him after a man-made machine that is meant to soar,” Williams beams. “But it was also a way of

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I think we’ve got a good solid six tracks that are like, ‘Whoa, what was that? Play that again’

PHOTOGRAPHS by (main) Richard Bord/Getty; (Metiers d’Art) Stefanie Keenan; (Palm Springs) Charley Gallay/Getty; (Chanel) Rindoff/Le Segretain/Getty

paying tribute to Elton John’s ‘Rocket Man’ and Herbie Hancock’s ‘Rockit’ – they are two of my favourite musicians.” Meanwhile, Williams has been expanding on his philanthropic endeavours, building a $35m afterschool centre in his home town of Virginia Beach, along with his From One Hand To AnOTHER Inc foundation which strives to provide educational tools and motivational support for underprivileged kids. And of course, not forgetting his recent appearance at a Humane Society gala where he blew guests’ minds by auctioning off backing singer spots for his performance that night. “I’m not a huge activist, but I try to be a participant and play my little part,” he says with a shrug. “I don’t think there’s any reason for anyone to inflict harm on anyone else. I want to help, to create a society where we can all support each other and love each other.” His priorities may have changed, but the singer is still as sharply dressed as ever. Weeks before the birth of his three new children, a time when most fathers would be preparing to wipe vomit off their lapels, Williams was showing his off on the Chanel catwalk at Paris Fashion Week in a natty tweed and black pearl combo. Having long accessorised with the French fashion house’s iconic costume jewellery, Williams was seen as the perfect choice to become the first male to appear in a handbag campaign for the brand, with head honcho Karl Lagerfeld saying he wanted to show that the bag can be “worn in many different circumstances”. Though hardly a ground-breaking campaign, Williams undoubtedly brings a much-needed edge to a house too often associated with Russian socialites. And let’s be honest, if anyone can convince men that it’s OK to rock a man bag, it’s Pharrell. “Fashion is great. As a performer, you’re on stage wearing a lot of different outfits and there’s always been that connection for me. I love fashion and I love the way fashion helps people express their individuality,” he explains. “It’s great when I see people come up with their own looks and I especially love it when I see someone wearing something I’ve designed

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and matched it with other designers’ creations. That’s where the real power and excitement of fashion comes into play and you see people creating their own style and identity.” With his slender frame and androgynous flair, Williams has long been a poster boy for the geeky, Japanese-inspired, streetwearmeets-tailoring style often worn by the more intellectual and alternative rap stars. And long before Tyler The Creator launched his Golf Wang brand, Williams had founded the Billionaire Boys Club and Ice Cream with Japanese icon and founder of A Bathing Ape, Nigo. He also has a long-running collaboration with Adidas, which included last year’s extremely popular Pharrell x Adidas NMD Human Race trainers – Williams recently sent sneakerheads wild when he teased three infant-sized pairs of the shoe on Instagram. With so many strings to his bow, it’s difficult to know how to refer to this prodigious polymath: musician? Designer? Visionary? “Music is my main interest and passion,” he insists. “It’s meant so much to me and it’s still very important to me. I love exploring fashion and other things, but music will always be my primary focus.” It’s just as well, considering he is currently reported to be working on a new N*E*R*D album for a projected summer release, along

with collaborating with Justin Timberlake on the 20/20 pop star’s forthcoming LP, his first in four years. As always, his enthusiasm when working with other people shines through. “Song-wise, I think we’ve got a good solid six tracks that are like, ‘Whoa, what was that? Play that again.’ I would pay Justin a huge compliment to say he’s just discovering who he is now,” he says. “If you’re able to really screenshot your own vulnerability, and frame it properly, and colour-correct it, then it becomes something that every human can relate to. And I think Justin is in the place where he’s mastering that right now.” Success can turn the nicest man on Earth into a monster, but all evidence suggests that Williams remains a sincere, generous and hardworking artist. Perhaps it’s because he knows all too well how it feels to be in the shade of failure: there was a period between his solo album In My Mind and Daft Punk’s ‘Get Lucky’ where his profile was considerably flagging. Or perhaps it’s because he simply believes in the power of his art. “Music brings people together. It is a force that touches people in a completely open way that reaches people wherever they are and at any time,” he concludes, adding: “I am deeply grateful that I am able to make music that reaches out to people all over the world.” ■

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SIR RICHARD BRANSON, 1985: Branson is sitting in his bath on his canal boat in Little Venice. Spencer also photographed him on his farm in the English countryside. Here, Branson would have ‘open house’ at weekends, so any of his staff could go there to swim, ride, play tennis and relax.

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GOING UP IN THE WORLD RAF FIGHTER, WAR PHOTOGRAPHER, FRIEND OF THE RICH AND FAMOUS… TERENCE SPENCER ENJOYED ONE HELL OF A LIFE. SEE FOR YOURSELF AT A NEW RETROSPECTIVE

T PHOTOGRAPHS by Terence Spencer/Camera Press

ERENCE SPENCER MAY have spent half a lifetime photographing the rich and famous, but his own remarkable life stood comparison with any of his subjects. Born during a Zeppelin raid in 1918, Spencer flew Spitfires for the RAF during the second world war, and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Croix de Guerre for his airborne heroics. After the war, Spencer managed to find a job that kept him at the centre of the action. He became a photographer for LIFE magazine, documenting major events and crises in areas of conflict across the globe. And you act like working in finance is a risky gig. Spencer went on to capture 1960s Britain in all its rebellious glory, photographing a range of subjects, from the decade’s icons

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to the person on the street. Spencer jokingly suggested this proved the most dangerous period of his life. After escaping numerous conflicts unscathed, the photographer claimed: “The only time I was ever hurt was when I was attacked by Paul McCartney after I discovered his hideaway in Scotland.” Now Proud Camden is exhibiting the work of this remarkable man. Terence Spencer: A Lasting Impression delves into Spencer’s extensive archive to show one of the most thrilling periods of British history through his own incomparable lens. With portraits of everyone from Muhammad Ali to Marianne Faithfull, this retrospective should prove suitable swinging. Go and pay your respects. Terence Spencer: A Lasting Impression is on at Proud Camden from 1 June-20 August 2017, proud.co.uk

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ROBERT PLANT, 1976: Here the Led Zeppelin lead singer is walking through his own farmland in Herefordshire. Plant trained to be a chartered accountant, but only lasted two weeks. Audit’s loss was music’s gain.

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SIR ROGER MOORE, JAMES BOND COLLECTION, 1987: The late Sir Roger Moore, with himself as 007 on the wall behind. Moore smoked cigars in a number of his roles – including Bond – although Tony Curtis persuaded him to give up cigarettes in 1971.

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THE SMITHS, 1985: This photograph of The Smiths was taken in their mid-1980s pomp, the year the band recorded their only UK number one album, Meat Is Murder. Johnny Marr and an uncharacteristically winsome Morrissey dominate the foreground.

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THE BEATLES, 1964: Spencer toured with the Beatles for six months, during which time he helped Ringo with his own photography collection (as well as amassing more than 5,000 negatives). He was introduced to the band by his daughter, a huge fan.

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MARIANNE FAITHFULL: When Spencer shot Marianne Faithfull, she was living on low funds in London. Spencer’s wife accompanied him on this shoot – and took Marianne to Boots to buy some make-up before the photoshoot started.

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PHOTOGRAPH by Stanley Tretick/Historic Image Licensing (9 September, 1960: a sea of hands surge toward John F Kennedy in LA.)


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EVERY YEAR, WE MEASURE UP THE CITY’S MOST INFLUENTIAL PEOPLE. FROM FINANCIAL POWER HOUSES TO YOUNG PRETENDERS, CHECK OUT WHO’S MOVING UP, WHO’S MOVING DOWN, AND WHO’S MOVED IN… PROFILES BY SAFI THIND

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

THE CRITERIA: In order to make it into the Power 100, your primary workplace must be in the UK. The list is not based around wealth, but rather on those who innovate, regulate and elevate – influencers who lead the way for others to follow.

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POWER

100

CHERYL POTTER

Partner, Head of Consumer, Permira Last year: 99

99

BARBARA JUDGE

Chairperson, Pension Protection Fund; Chair of the Institute of Directors; Chair of the Energy Institute, UCL Last year: 98

98

PETER HARRISON

CEO, Schroders New entry

97

MARK RIGOTTI

CEO, Herbert Smith Freehills New entry

96

ANDREW PARMLEY

Lord Mayor of London New entry

95

SIMON COLLINS

UK Chairman and Senior Partner, KPMG Last year: 95

94

PAUL PESTER

CEO, TSB Last year: 94

93

JEAN STEPHENS

92

STEVE COOKE

Global CEO, RSM International New entry

Senior Partner, Slaughter & May New entry

91

ARPAD BUSSON

Executive Chairman, Gottex Fund Management Last year: 44

90

SUSAN BRIGHT

Regional Managing Partner, Hogan Lovells New entry

89

BILL WINTERS

Group CEO, Standard Chartered Last year: 90

88

DAVID HARDING

Founder and CEO, Winton Capital Management Last year: 77

87

SIR GEORGE IACOBESCU

86

ALEX WILMOTSITWELL

85

KURT BJÖRKLUND AND TOM LISTER

Chairman and CEO, Canary Wharf Group Last year: 86

President for EMEA, Bank of America Merrill Lynch Last year: 84

Co-managing Partners, Permira Last year: 83

SACHA ROMANOVITCH

84

Taking over as the first female CEO of a major accountancy firm was only the start of Sacha Romanovitch’s ambitions. At 47 she is offering a new vision for the finance business. Her vision includes crowd-sourcing new business ideas, allowing lower-ranked staff to join board meetings, and introducing a more even-handed pay structure. To wit, she has capped her own salary at a maximum of 20 times the average firm salary – a fraction of the 149 times average across FTSE 100 firms. A devotee of India, yoga and meditation, she works from home in Devon on Fridays, and has brought an altogether more pastoral side to this traditional City business.

CEO, GRANT THORNTON

CRISPIN ODEY

Founder, Odey Asset Management Last year: 28

83

STEPHANIE FLANDERS

Managing Director, Chief Market Strategist for the UK and Europe, JP Morgan Last year: 82

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81 82

ROLLY VAN RAPPARD

81

SACHA ROMANOVITCH

Co-founder, Co-chairman, CVC Capital Partners Last year: 69

CEO, Grant Thornton New entry

80

DARREN WESTLAKE

79

CRAIG DONALDSON

Cofounder and CEO, Crowdcube Last year: 81

CEO, Metro Bank Last year: 80

78

IAIN ANDERSON

Executive Chairman, Cicero Group Last year: 85

ICON KEY NEW ENTRY SAME AS 2015 UP FROM 2015 DOWN FROM 2015

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•• JAMES LUPTON CBE HAS JUST ADDED ANOTHER FEATHER TO AN ALREADY CROWDED CAP

77

CAROLYN FAIRBAIRN

Director General, CBI Last year: 88

76

DAVID BLUMER

Head of EMEA, BlackRock Last year: 79

75

SIR WIN BISCHOFF

Chairman, Financial Reporting Council; Chairman of JP Morgan Securities plc New entry

74

CLARE WOODMAN

Global Chief Operating Officer of Institutional Securities, Morgan Stanley Last year: 78

73

MICHAEL AND YOEL ZAOUI

68

GILES ANDREWS

Co-founder, Executive Chairman, Zopa; Chairman, MarketInvoice Last year: 75

67 66

KAMAL AHMED

65

GEMMA GODFREY

Founder, Rokos Capital Management New entry

Founder and Executive Chairman, Fenchurch Advisory Partners New entry

69

ROBERT CHOTE

Chairman of the Office for Budget Responsibility Last year: 72

086

57

Chairman, Greenhill Europe; Chairman, Lloyds Banking Group’s non ring-fenced bank Last year: 87

55

JEREMY HEYWOOD

Cabinet Secretary, Head of the Civil Service Last year: 29

NOREEN DOYLE

Chair, British Bankers’ Association; Chair of the Board of Credit Suisse International New entry

64

KATHLEEN BACON

Cofounder and CIO, Egerton Capital Last year: 66

61

ANDERS BOUVIN

President and Group Chief Executive, Handelsbanken UK Last year: 65

60

NIGEL WILSON

Group CEO, Legal & General Last year: 64

SAME AS 2015 UP FROM 2015 DOWN FROM 2015

54

ANTHONY HABGOOD

Chairman, RELX Group; Chairman, Court of the Bank of England Last year: 59

53 52

MARTIN GILBERT

JON CUNLIFFE

Deputy Governor for Financial Stability, Bank of England Last year: 57

51

JAYNE-ANNE GADHIA

CEO, Virgin Money Last year: 68

50

SAMIR DESAI

JOHN A RMITAGE

NEW ENTRY

Co-founder and CEO, Aberdeen Asset Management Last year: 58

Co-founder and CEO, Funding Circle Last year: 45

62

ICON KEY

JAMES LUPTON

56

CHAIR OF NON RING-FENCED LLOYDS BANK James Lupton, CBE, chairman of Greenhill investment advisers Europe and Conservative Party co-treasurer, has just added another feather to an already crowded cap with his appointment as chairman of Lloyd’s Banking group’s non ring-fenced bank. One wonders when he will have the time to manage it given he is already on the boards of the Grange Park Opera, FW de Klerk’s Global Leadership Foundation and the British Museum. Also, if you’ve watched The Night Manager, you may have noted the lavish estate that features as the lair of ‘the worst man in the world’ – billionaire arms dealer Richard Roper, played by Hugh Laurie. If you wondered who actually owns the sprawling property – said to be Spain’s most expensive – wonder not: it’s Jim’s.

MARK KLEINMAN

City Editor, Sky News Last year: 56

49

JIN CHEN

CEO and Managing Director, ICBC UK Last year: 48

48

ZANNY MINTON BEDDOES

47

MICHAEL HINTZE

Editor-in-Chief, The Economist Last year: 55

Founder, CEO and Senior Investment Officer, CQS Last year: 54

46

MIKE WELLS

Group CEO, Prudential Last year: 53

45

WILLIAM RUCKER

CEO, Lazard London New entry

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PHOTOGRAPH by (Luke Ellis) Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg

70

MALIK KARIM

Head of Capital Markets, UKFI Last year: 61

JAMES LUPTON

Founder and CEO, Moo.la Last year: 71

63

71

58

OLIVER HOLBOURN

56

Economics Editor, BBC Last year: 70

72

CHRIS ROKOS

Chairman, Brunswick Last year: 63

Co-founder, CEO and Chief Risk Officer, Marshall Wace Last year: 60

Managing Director, HarbourVest Last year: 67

Co-founder, Chairman, CIO, Marshall Wace Last year: 76

SIR ALAN PARKER

IAN WACE

Founders, Zaoui & Co Last year: 89

PAUL MARSHALL

59


POWER

44

LIONEL BARBER

Editor, Financial Times Last year: 51

43

ROLAND RUDD

Founder and Chairman, Finsbury; Chairman, Business for New Europe; Treasurer, Britain Stronger in Europe Last year: 50

42

HANNEKE SMITS

CEO, Newton Investment Management New entry

41

KEITH SKEOCH

CEO, Standard Life New entry

40

CHARLES JACOBS

Senior Partner, Linklaters New entry

39

LORD ROTHSCHILD

Founder and Chairman, RIT Capital Partners Last year: 42

38

STEVE VARLEY

UK & Ireland Chairman, EY New entry

37

SADIQ KHAN

Mayor of London New entry

36

BEN BROADBENT

Deputy Governor, Monetary Policy Committee, Bank of England Last year: 39

35

MARTIN SORRELL

Founder and CEO, WPP Group Last year: 38

34

PETER HORRELL

Managing Director for the UK, Fidelity Worldwide Investment Last year: 34

33

PETER MARTYR

Global CEO, Norton Rose Fulbright Last year: 33

32

LUKE ELLIS

CEO, Man Group New entry

31

KEVIN ELLIS

Chairman and Senior Partner, PwC New entry

30

DAVID GAUKE

Financial Secretary to the Treasury New entry

29

ROSS MCEWAN

CEO, RBS Last year: 19

28

JAMES BARDRICK

Country Officer for UK, Citigroup Last year: 27

27

EDWARD BRAHAM

Senior Partner, Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer New entry

26

TIDJANE THIAM

CEO, Credit Suisse Last year: 26

32 LUKE ELLIS CEO, MAN GROUP

•• TEN YEARS AGO, LUKE ELLIS GAVE UP HEDGE FUNDS TO START A SELFSUSTAINABILITY LIFESTYLE, BUT HE’S BEEN LURED BACK squaremile.com

How similar is running a hedge fund to feeding pigs? Luke Ellis, new chief executive of Man, the world’s biggest listed hedge fund, knows. Ten years ago he gave up his job at fund of hedge funds FRM to start a self-sustainability lifestyle, nurturing his own fruit and livestock. But all good things come to an end and he was lured back to finance by old friend Emmanuel Roman. Ellis was already being earmarked as future Man CEO when he began to rebuild the company’s fund of fund business, and six years later the prophecy has come true. With assets up 10% this year, he appears to be making the job appear a lot more straightforward than growing your own.

087


OPERAT IONS ANALYS T NURSE

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POWER

17

DAVID SPROUL

Senior Partner and CEO, Deloitte UK Last year: 18

16

INGA BEALE

CEO, Lloyd’s of London Last year: 16

13

15

XAVIER ROLET

CEO, London Stock Exchange Last year: 17

14

ANDREA ORCEL

President of Investment Bank, UBS Last year: 37

SAM WOODS DEPUTY GOVERNOR, PRUDENTIAL REGULATION, BANK OF ENGLAND

Bespectacled, bike riding, Kiwi-born Sam Woods may not immediately appear a City warlord but he is certainly a powerful man. As well as his deputy governorship, he heads up the PRA, which he joined in 2013 after ten years at the Treasury, and was one of those responsible for devising the ring-fencing rules for UK banks’ retail and risk-taking divisions. Apparently a fan of Nando’s in Vauxhall, where he’s often to be found munching corn on the cob, Woods is now unravelling the bank’s position on Brexit. With Charlotte Hogg, who had seemingly been groomed for the top post, resigning in March, could he be the next Governor when Mark Carney exits in 2019?

13

7

JOHN CRYAN

6

DANIEL PINTO

4

Prime Minister, UK Last year: 10

CEO, Deutsche Bank Last year: 11

3

Corporate and Investment Bank CEO, JPMorgan Chase & Co. Last year: 6

5

ANTONIO HORTA-OSORIO

Group CEO, Lloyds Banking Group Last year: 12

THE PRIME MINISTER

MARK CARNEY

Governor, Bank of England Last year: 3

2

THE CHANCELLOR

Chancellor of the Exchequer, UK Last year: 8

1

RICHARD GNODDE

CEO, Goldman Sachs International Last year: 9

SAM WOODS

Deputy Governor, Prudential Regulation, Bank of England & CEO of PRA New entry

12

FRANCK PETITGAS

Global Co-head of Investment Banking, Morgan Stanley New entry

11

JES STALEY

Group CEO, Barclays Last year: 7

10

ANDREW BAILEY

CEO, FCA Last year: 32

25

SIMON LEVINE

Global Co-CEO, DLA Piper International New entry

24

WIM DEJONGHE

Senior Partner, Allen & Overy New entry

PHOTOGRAPH by (Sam Woods) Jason Alden

23

NATHAN BOSTOCK

21

SIMON ROBEY

Co-founder, Partner, Robey Warshaw Last year: 36

20

MICHAEL SPENCER

Group CEO, NEX Last year: 21

19

NEIL WOODFORD

CEO, Santander UK Last year: 23

Head of Investment, CEO and Founder, Woodford Investment Management Last year: 20

22

18

MATTHEW LAYTON

Managing Partner, Clifford Chance Last year: 22

squaremile.com

JOHN MCFARLANE

Chair, Barclays; Chair, TheCityUK New entry

9

STUART GULLIVER

Group Chairman, HSBC Last year: 15

8

MARK BOLEAT

Chairman, Policy and Resources Committee, City of London Corporation & Deputy Chairman, TheCityUK Last year: 14

ICON KEY NEW ENTRY SAME AS 2015 UP FROM 2015

5

ANTONIO HORTA-OSÓRIO GROUP CEO, LLOYDS BANKING GROUP

Horta-Osório is the great City survivor. Last year was a shocker for him: he had a £3m pay cut, was caught in a liaison with academic Wendy Platt, and his bank suffered a slump in share value. But despite all of this, it doesn’t eradicate the impressive work he had achieved in the preceding years – taking on the City top job that no-one wanted, and converting a £3.5bn loss in the year he joined to a pre-tax profit of £4.2bn last year. Indeed, rumours continue to fly that the Portuguese banker is in the running for the top job at HSBC ahead of Stuart Gulliver’s forthcoming retirement. Now that the government has sold its remaining shares in Lloyds Banking Group – a landmark moment for the banking sector – it feels like Horta-Osório’s mission is complete.

DOWN FROM 2015

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A H E AT H R O W V I P E X P E R I E N C E D E D IC AT E D E N T R A N C E P R IVAT E H OS T E XC L U S I V E S E C U R IT Y E X P E R IE N C E CHAUFFEUR PLANE

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POWER

RICHARD GNODDE HAS TAKEN THE EXCLUSIVE REINS AT GOLDMAN SACHS INTERNATIONAL. THE QUESTION REMAINS: WHAT DIRECTION WILL HE TRAVEL IN?

A

PHOTOGRAPH by Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg/Getty Images

S SMOOTH AS he is well connected, Richard Gnodde took over as sole chief executive of Goldman Sachs’ international operations last winter, following the departure of co-CEO Michael Sherwood. This marked a significant step change for Wall Street’s most iconic bank. Football-loving Sherwood enjoyed a shotgun-in-your-face type of approach, whereas rugby fan Gnodde is very much a 0.25 Beretta whispered between the eyes – altogether a silkier touch. Gnodde may take the bank in a more openarmed direction – he honed his diplomatic demeanour while rising up through the ranks in the mannered world of M&A. The 56-yearold, 6ft 4in South African joined Goldman in 1987, and set about building the bank’s operations in Germany and Europe before going to Asia where he was named co-head of investment banking in Japan, and made partner in 1998. Moving to Hong Kong in 1999, he became president of Goldman’s Asia franchise and helped it secure access to China’s securities markets. He had solidified his reputation as a rainmaker on a global scale. Returning to London in 2005, Gnodde was named Goldman International’s co-CEO just a year later. It was a fruitful time for him, allowing him to expand his reputation among

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Europe’s dealmakers. The most notable of his successes was advising steel titan Lakshmi Mittal in his takeover of Arcelor in 2006. And he stockpiled a fortune somewhere between £100m and £135m along the way. He still counts Mittal as a friend. Other friends are said to include ex-Bank of England Governor Mervyn King and former BP chief Lord Browne. Of course, Goldman’s spotless facade has been tainted in recent years. The bank – once known as one of the supreme houses of rectitude – found its reputation besmirched by the CDO misselling saga in the credit crisis. More recently, the business has been dealing with the 1MDB Malaysian corruption scandal, which broke last year, as well fighting claims that it missold derivatives trades to the Libyan

•• SECURING ACCESS TO CHINA’S SECURITIES MARKETS, HE SOLIDIFIED HIS REPUTATION AS A GLOBAL RAINMAKER

government – a tangled affair with allegations of death threats and prostitutes. And an even bigger shake-up for Gnodde to deal with right now is in Goldman’s relationship with London. Earlier this year Gnodde announced the bank would be looking at fallback options to protect itself against Brexit. For the 6,000 employees currently working in London, this means relocation – there has already been a start to move to Frankfurt and Paris and the shoring up of other bases across Europe. With his past experience building Goldman in Europe the exodus is perhaps fitted to Gnodde’s urbane experience. In time it may lead to a growing diaspora of Goldmanites into the further flung of Europe’s other financial capitals. But how Gnodde feels about it is another question. There is no doubt about Gnodde’s affection for London. Outside of his work he is on the board of trustees of the Kew Foundation, the Tate Museum advisory group and gives money to the Royal Opera House. And the move has been downplayed – in March Gnodde said that most things will continue to operate as they are today. So while the diplomat is extending the bank’s reach to fit in with a new European culture, whether Goldman becomes bored of London is another matter. ■

091


P O RM FO RM FO RS SF E IEC RCS PIE I RC RP M

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POWER

SEAT OF POWER DON’T SETTLE FOR ANYTHING LESS THAN THE BEST IN YOUR PURSUIT OF FITNESS – STAY WAY AHEAD OF THE GAME ON THIS NEW BIKE

LIFE CYCLE

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Technogym’s Recline Personal recumbent bike challenges every preconception you might have about fitness equipment being purely functional – sure, it’s a nifty piece of keep-fit kit, but it also incorporates a personalised entertainment console, and striking design by Antonio Citterio. It even has Skype so you can link up with your trainer, and offers the ability to race a friend in a virtual environment. ■ £8,900; technogym.com

093


STAND UP FOR YOUR RIGHTS IN HONOUR OF OUR POWER ISSUE, BEN WINSTANLEY LOOKS BACK TO A TIME WHEN THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES WAS GENUINELY THE MOST POWERFUL MAN ON THE PLANET

G

OD BLESS AMERICA? God help it, first.

In the year of our Trump 2017, US citizens are burdened with a president flouncing towards impeachment faster than a speeding Nixon heading to the Watergate complex. ‘The worst-treated world leader in history?’ Diddums to you, Donald. Like Star Wars’ Emperor Palpatine, our very own yellowhaired Sith Lord is dismantling the Senate from within and wrangling greater power for

094

Greatness’. He was A New Hope to Trump’s The Empire Strikes Back. Norman Mailer, renowned American novelist and journalist, followed Kennedy in the final months of his campaign. Mailer hadn’t voted in 12 years, but seeing how the presidential hopeful reached the people convinced him to hand in his ballot paper once again. Weeks before the polls opened in November 1960, Esquire published the writer’s pro-Kennedy treatise, ‘Superman Comes to the Supermarket’. The essay redefined political reporting with Mailer’s frank, first-person voice identifying Kennedy as the “existential hero” who could awaken the nation from its postwar slumber and conformist Eisenhower years. Mailer’s early example of New Journalism, republished by Taschen on the centennial of President Kennedy’s birth, comes alive in this illustrated edition. In the coming images, follow in Mailer’s footsteps en route to Kennedy’s iconic victory. History awaits. ➤

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PHOTOGRAPH by Hank Walker/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

•• JFK WAS IDENTIFIED AS AN ‘EXISTENTIAL HERO’ WHO COULD AWAKEN THE NATION FROM ITS POSTWAR SLUMBER

himself. Simply put, Capitol Hill and the White House have fallen to the Dark Side – and either James Comey, Sally Yates, the FBI, the CIA and British intelligence are all involved in a political conspiracy on an unfathomably large scale or this POTUS is bogus. Even a gaggle of Republicans, keen to be on the right side of history, are clearing their throats to dispute, while Ladbrokes’ slashed odds (4/5 as of 1 June) of impeachment in Trump’s first term tell their own story. There’s a disturbance in the Force… Roll back to 1960 and political power had a very different face. John F Kennedy – all Hollywood good looks and optimism for a brighter American future – was on the campaign trail to transform the totalitarianism of 1950s USA into a free republic. Unlike Trump’s pledge to ‘Make America Great Again’, he saw a nation that was ready to embrace change for the better – for social progression, space exploration and power to the people. His 1960 campaign slogan says it all: ‘A Time for


POWER

PHOTOGRAPH by blah

CHAIRING THE MEETING: 25 April, 1960. JFK’s precarious stance as he gave this speech in rural Logan County might well be a metaphor for his campaign’s position in the State of Ohio. Aside from any personal reasons that voters there might have for viewing him suspiciously, he also faced hard opposition and subterfuge from other presidential contenders.

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095


POWER

JACKIE OF ALL TRADES: 19 October, 1960. Thirtyone-year-old Jacqueline Kennedy was magnetic on the campaign trail. While her travel had been limited owing to her pregnancy, she reemerged on an important swing through NYC, culminating in a parade down 5th Avenue.

PHOTOGRAPH by Henri Dauman/daumanpictures.com

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097


GOODWOOD REVIVAL

“A

ack in time” b p e t s l a c i m ag

8 • 9 • 10 SEPTEMBER


POWER

SUPERMARKET SWEEP: April 1960. Kennedy’s appeal as an everyman was built in part by giving open access to photographers from magazines such as Life to capture quotidian moments from his campaign, like a jaunt through a West Virginia grocery store. KING OF THE HILL: 20 January, 1961. In the VIP section at Kennedy’s inauguration at the US Capitol, Kennedy confers with outgoing President Dwight Eisenhower, while incoming and outgoing Vice Presidents, Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon, speak.

PHOTOGRAPH by Hank Walker/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images; Paul Schutzer/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

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099


POWER

SUPERMAN A new edition of Norman Mailer. John F Kennedy. Superman Comes to the Supermarket is out now for £29.99. To commemorate the centennial of Kennedy’s birth, this no-holds-barred portrait of Kennedy on his path to the White House includes 300 photographs that bring the campaign and the candidate’s family to life. taschen.com

100

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PHOTOGRAPH by Estate of Jacques Lowe

POWER BALLOT: 8 November, 1960. Bobby and Ethel Kennedy vote in Hyannis Port. After years of crisscrossing the country and taking the measure of thousands of Americans, it all came down to pulling the lever in the voting booth. The rest is history.


POWER

BRAND AND DELIVER WHAT’S IN A NAME? WHEN IT COMES TO WATCHES, QUITE A LOT ACTUALLY… ADRIAN HAILWOOD EXPLORES HOW AND WHY BRANDING HAS BECOME SO IMPORTANT IN THE WATCH INDUSTRY

T

HE WATCH INDUSTRY tends to portray itself as an artisan craft with an emphasis on human expertise, a world away from the FMCG brands that we might find on a supermarket shelf or at an electronics retailer. Of course, the truth is that, in a world where most of the products really do much the same thing and many of them actually share the same innards, branding is king. These are the stories that marketing departments tell us of past achievements, innovations and associations that we connect with – or don’t – which make us a Patek Philippe, Rolex, Omega or Seiko kind of buyer. However, power wasn’t always with the watch companies. Early wristwatches and many pocket watches bear the name of the retailer rather than that of the now wellknown watch brand. In the days before mass advertising, watch buyers would take advice from their local jeweller as to which watch best suited their budget and requirements. It was the rise of print advertising that allowed watch companies to speak directly to the consumer and so build their brand

•• ROLEX IS AT THE TOP OF THE PILE FOR THE SECOND YEAR RUNNING, BEATING LEGO AND DISNEY 102

presence; early Rolex ads urged buyers to ‘Ask for Rolex by name’, to ensure they weren’t fobbed off with any old maker. Rolex was a master of the marketing message; the achievement of the first ‘A’ Chronometer certificate from Kew for a wristwatch made every owner feel that their watch would be just as accurate, despite the weeks spent preparing the test pieces. The wearing of the Rolex Oyster watch by Mercedes Gleitze during her second ‘vindication’ swim of the English Channel would be used in advertising for years afterwards to attest the water resistance of Oyster cases. Decades later, brand messages have been developed through the associations forged by the use of watches, whether it’s going to the moon, racing cars, or exploring oceans. It is arguable that the ‘brand value’ is the most important commodity that the watch companies own, creating preconceptions and expectations well in advance of a purchase. Human nature being what it is, we are less likely to change our mind once we have made a decision to ‘adopt’ a brand. In the list of most valuable brands in the world, watch companies are not heavily featured. Interbrand’s 2016 Global Top 100 includes no watch-only brands. Even Switzerland – the home of luxury watchmaking – has Nestlé and Nescafé above Rolex. Lower down the Swiss list, watch companies redeem themselves claiming 16 of the top 50 places. The order is interesting: Rolex, Omega and Patek Philippe are the top three as expected, but Breguet places above both Vacheron Constantin and Audemars Piguet, while Tissot

and Longines beat IWC, TAG Heuer, Hublot and Breitling, proving that headline-grabbing PR doesn’t always translate into brand strength. The power of a wristwatch brand to impact us personally is demonstrated when you turn to consumer perception. The 2016 UK Superbrand list puts Rolex second only to our national airline British Airways, while the most recent survey of the world’s most reputable companies in the eyes of the customer has Rolex at the top of the pile for the second year running, beating the likes of Lego, Disney and Google. This is particularly good news for Rolex, those inveterate masters of the marketing message, and it demonstrates that those accessories we wear next to our skin have a propensity to get under it, too. ■ For vintage watches, see fellows.co.uk

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Formex Watches cost a fraction of the price of comparable Swiss watches. Why? Our customer can try on and buy directly with the manufacturer. Find out more #betweenyouandus at www.formexwatch.com


DIRTY DOZEN I

F YOU LIKE your muscle cars technically straightforward with none of that turbo or supercharged carry-on, you’ll love the Aston Martin Vanquish S. But make the most of it, as it will be the last of the normally aspirated V12s from Aston. From now on, you’ll be getting engines with a turbo, or two, bolted on. At first glance, the Vanquish S is actually a bit odd in many respects because its main competitor is, well, another Aston – the new DB11 to be precise. However, once you’ve driven both cars you realise that they’re very different. The DB11 is ultra-modern in every respect, while the Vanquish S harkens back to the previous generation Astons. That’s no bad thing – the Vanquish is a stunning-looking car. This latest model has been given a few styling tweaks, which make it even more aggressive yet actually improves the aerodynamic features of the car. The suspension has been revised to not only sharpen handling but also improve the ride. Bearing in mind that this is a 200mph, 0-60mph-in-3.5 seconds supercar, the ride is uncannily smooth. Even at town speeds you’re not at risk of losing any fillings. You can adjust the dampers to ‘sport

•• FIRING-UP THE VANQUISH S ISN’T SUBTLE – YOU’LL WAKEN SLUMBERING RESIDENTS IN THE NEXT COUNTY 104

mode’ which tightens the handling, but the car is extremely refined in normal mode. As with all Aston Martins, the soundtrack from the engine and exhaust is an absolute joy. This latest V12 595bhp has the most glorious burble at tickover. Suddenly, waiting at traffic lights becomes something to look forward to. Firing-up the Vanquish S isn’t subtle – you’ll waken the slumbering residents in a neighbouring county. Press D on the centre console (no levers for the eight-speed auto, just buttons), drop the handbrake (yes, it’s a manual parking brake) and head off on an adventure. When you get onto the open road, the Vanquish settles into a relaxed cruise – it’s the ideal grand tourer. However, floor the throttle and the car hurls itself at the horizon. The noise and acceleration are outstanding. Roadholding levels are staggering. Put it this way: your courage will run out long before the car’s ability to hang on does. You’ll need to be doing something incredibly stupid to get into trouble. The interior is a work of art. It has spider’s web stitching all over the place. OK, some of the electronics – like the sat nav screen – look a bit dated, but everything else is gorgeous. With a 6.0-litre V12 engine, it will suck juice at a rate of knots. Aston Martin reckons the Vanquish S will do a shade over 21mpg. You’ll be lucky – or, at least, very restrained. However, with a starting price of £199,950, we suspect you’ll be able to stretch to filling the tank. The Vanquish S may be the end of the line for ‘traditional’ Astons, but it is still a remarkable, wonderful piece of machinery and art. The Vanquish S is arguably one of the most handsome Astons ever built – and certainly one of the most accomplished. ■

ENGINE

5.9ltr V12

0-62MPH

3.5 SECS

ASTON MARTIN VANQUISH S

THE DAYS OF NATURALLY ASPIRATED V12S ARE NUMBERED. ASTON MARTIN PAYS TRIBUTE, SAYS GRAHAM COURTNEY

POWER (BHP)

592

@7,000RPM

TORQUE

465 LB FT

TOP SPEED

201 MPH

COST

£200k OTR

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POWER

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105


ASSETS

TRAVEL RELOCATION FOOD & DRINK GOLF PHOTO PRIZE

. . . . .

109 112 115 119 127

THE WRITING’S ON THE WALL . 109

PHOTOGRAPH: Street art in Santa Monica


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TRAVEL SANTA MONICA

KEEP PALM AND CARRY ON

Santa Monica’s relaxed charm makes it a perfect base from which to explore LA, but there’s a lot to enjoy in the town itself, says Ten Group’s ALEX DALZELL , and you’d be silly not to embrace its laid-back vibe

I

T CAN BE hard to tell where Los Angeles

ends and Santa Monica begins, but there are a few tell-tale signs that’ll show that you’ve made it. Life along this coastal stretch ticks at a much slower pace; the beach is far more important than business; and the restaurants, bars and hotels are long-established, down-toearth and far less swayed by the ever-shifting trends. It’s the perfect base for exploring Los Angeles, but if you’re tempted to keep it local, Ten Lifestyle’s Alex Dalzell pinpoints the best places to eat, drink, party and sleep.

EAT Compared to some districts, this northern neighbourhood doesn’t attract that much attention from LA’s countless camera-wielding

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tastemakers; but that’s not to say you can’t eat well – you just have to dig a little deeper. And it’s well worth it when the reward comes in the shape of places like Cassia. Part grand French brasserie and part modern Asian eating house, it’s a collision of cultures and flavours that’s been masterfully executed by chef-to-the-stars Bryant Ng. If you struggle to bag a reservation but are willing to wait for a spot on the terrace, pop next door for a glass of Ynez Valley grenache and a plate of local amberjack crudo at Esters. You’ll notice that ‘local’ features heavily on every menu across town and, while everywhere tries its best to pinpoint provenance, nowhere betters Belcampo Meat Co. Everything on the menu is bred, slaughtered and butchered

at their farm in the hills overlooking LA and the enormous slabs of steak can’t be beaten. Farm-to-plate cooking is also a big deal over at Fig, a sun-soaked garden restaurant just steps from the beach; and Tar & Roses, which is back on the scene after a fire, has one of the most approachable menus in the area. Old-time Santa Monica residents will always point you in the direction of Michael’s – it’s had its fair share of ups and downs but is riding high thanks to the deft touch of young-gun Miles Thompson. Whipping up dishes like yellowtail fish with barley miso and white chocolate, it was a risky appointment, but his brave combinations work – as the month-long waiting list attests. Other old-guard favourites include Valentino – which has kept pace with ➤

109


ASSETS

➤ Italian game-changers like LA-darling, Bestia – and the epic burgers at Father’s Office.

DRINK Burgers, doughnuts and fusion sushi – if a new trend is sweeping through London, chances are high that it took root in Los Angeles. The next big thing to land from the West Coast? Farm-to-glass drinking. It’s all down to one bartender: Vincenzo Marianella. He’s one of LA’s cocktail greats and at his buzzing Santa Monica hangout Copa D’Oro he selects seasonal produce from farmers’ markets to blend into his drinks. Expect smoked blueberries, bergamot mint and the odd fiery burst of jalapeño in the mix. Most cocktail connoisseurs will stop-off at The Tasting Kitchen on the borders of Venice. The bartenders take a much more simplistic approach to their drinks but it’s no less impressive – head honcho Justin Pike is a master of the three-ingredient cocktail. Try the barrel-aged Negroni to see what we mean. For wine, it’s got to be the living room feel of Bodega. By day, the café-cum-bar attracts legions of coffee snobs and freelancers, but at sundown the laptop lids are closed and the wine begins to flow. It’s a solid list of Californian varietals and staff will be proud to impart their wisdom. Their passion and knowledge is rivalled by the crew over at Sonoma Wine Garden, which also happens to have one of the best outdoor areas in town.

TAKE A DIP: [clockwise from here] Stay at the Fairmont Miramar for a slice of Santa Monica’s history as well as a great pool and beachside location; The Bungalow bar’s garden; vintage seaside vibes abound throughout Santa Monica’s streets.

PARTY

Nightlife in Santa Monica is much more downto-earth than the lofty heights of Hollywood 110

on the retro theme, but the crowd doesn’t seem to care – this is one of the liveliest and most welcoming spots in the neighbourhood. The drinks are strong and well-made (which may have something to do with that warm welcome) and the beachfront location can quickly turn a lunchtime drink into an all-day session. There are more theme-bar fun times to be had over at the nautical bedecked Chez Jay. It’s a charming spot and once you’re ensconced in a red leather booth with an ice-cold beer and round of steamed clams, you’ll see why it’s been a no-frills favourite for more than 50 years.

SLEEP There’s no doubt that you’ll want to make the most of the beach while you’re here, so it pays to stay at the Fairmont Miramar Hotel and Bungalows, which is just steps away from the beach, pier and promenade. The hotel is part of Santa Monica’s history – a grande dame that

has sat on its bluffs for more than a century. A 136-year old fig tree is the spiritual centre of the resort – and provides the inspiration for its restaurant, Fig, which serves up wood-fired dishes made from locally sourced ingredients. There are three places to stay here: the Ocean Tower offers sweeping views of Malibu, and embodies mid-century style; The Palisades suites have a residential atmosphere inspired by local culture and lifestyle; and then there are newly appointed bungalows – reflective of Santa Monica’s beach community, hole up in one of these and you’ll feel like a local. The hotel’s site was once the land of US senator John Percival Jones – co-founder of the town of Santa Monica. No doubt he’d be pretty impressed with how far the city has come. ■ Hotel review by Alex Watson. Ten Lifestyle Concierge is the world’s largest lifestyle concierge provider, with professional lifestyle managers based around the globe. For info: 0845 020 5270; tengroup.com

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PHOTOGRAPH by (The Bungalow) Tiffany Rose Photography

It’s only 15-minutes’ drive from Beverly Hills (OK, maybe quadruple that in rush hour) but nightlife in Santa Monica is much more downto-earth than the lofty heights of Hollywood. There’s one place where you can channel that level of glamour and that’s Onyx on the roof of the Shangri-La hotel. The décor is a bit strange – a mash-up of 1980s glam and Rat Pack-era Vegas – but you’ll be too distracted by the 360-degree views to care. Arrive at least an hour before sunset for the best chance of bagging an outdoor table. To get acquainted with the locals, head to The Bungalow. Dripping in vintage memorabilia and 1970s styling, it has gone a bit overboard


A member of the exclusive Leading Hotels of the World since 1988, the hotel is one of the most prestigious five-star luxury hotels in Portugal, set in an unrivalled location with exceptional views, overlooking the Ria Formosa’s tidal lagoon and the Atlantic sea, the iconic Hotel Quinta do Lago is the ultimate Algarve experience for leisure or golfing. From the hotel’s lush gardens, guests have walking access to a golden sandy beach and to many relaxing nature trails, which you can leisurely enjoy by foot, bicycle or horse riding. Just minutes from the hotel, golfers of all levels can find seven of the Algarve’s best 18 hole golf courses. Dining in the hotel’s Brisa do Mar restaurant is an experience on its own, with a mesmerizing sunset as a backdrop that perfectly complements the fresh flavours of the traditional Algarvian cuisine, carefully prepared by chef Gerhard Pölzl. Experience a unique hotel and exclusive service in an atmosphere of tranquillity and natural beauty.


FACING TAX: Before you head to new shores, it’s important to sort out any historical tax liabilities you may have in your current country of residence. It’s also worth bearing in mind that when (or if) you leave your new country of residence, exit taxes may apply.

OFFSHORE RELOCATION

TALKING ’BOUT A RELOCATION

Relocating to another country can have its benefits, financial and otherwise, but there are important tax laws to bear in mind before you make the move. PHILIP MARCOVICI outlines the crucial things to consider

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LAY BY THE rules or get out. These are the only choices wealth owners have – the third choice of staying connected to a country by residence, domicile, citizenship or otherwise and hoping that no one will find out is simply not an option in a world of growing transparency and one where tax laws are increasingly and more aggressively enforced. Tax laws are laws, and there is no choice but for compliance with them. Getting out means sorting out any historical tax liabilities, and then moving on to exiting a tax system and finding a new one, and ideally a more favourable one, to become subject to. Given the upcoming automatic exchange 112

of information between countries, many countries are moving to ensure that there are reasonable means for taxpayers to regularise their historical tax affairs, recognising that this will increase revenues and help ensure longer-term tax compliance. This represents an opportunity to review the current situation and make some strategic decisions.

GETTING OUT Once historical tax issues are addressed, and the wealth owner is clearly playing by the rules, he or she can consider the important question of whether ‘getting out’ is a good option. Mobility, and taking advantage of the ease

with which a wealth owner can move from one country to another, is an important element of not only tax planning, but the achievement of a number of other objectives that he/she may have. The reality is that different countries have different tax rules, and where someone lives (and in some cases, where one holds citizenship or is domiciled) may drastically affect tax exposures. Apart from tax, residence choices will affect the question of what information which government will hold about a wealth owner’s income and assets – an important issue in a world where challenges to wealth are only increasing, and where it is not always safe for

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ASSETS

The first step in mobility is the question of how to exit the country you are currently connected to information about wealth to be in the hands of governments. Such information can fall into the hands of criminals such as kidnappers or be misused politically or otherwise. Those looking at mobility almost always begin by asking the wrong question – how long do I need to spend in Monaco or the Bahamas or wherever to be a resident there? The reason that this is the wrong question is because the key first step is to work out how to exit the country you are currently connected to, whether by residence, domicile or citizenship or a combination of these. A growing issue relevant to leaving the taxing jurisdiction of a country is the question of whether exit taxes apply. An increasing number of countries impose an exit tax on those who give up taxable residence (and in the case of the US, citizenship or long term ‘green card’ status), often through a deemed sale of assets at fair market value on the date of departure. Canada, for example, has long had an exit tax that operates this way. A resident who leaves the country is taxed on their departure on the basis of their being considered to have sold their assets when they leave. If the individual owns appreciated assets, exposure to capital gains taxes thereby arise. Where exit taxes apply and there are rules that deem the sale of assets on departure, it’s useful to consider an exit when asset values are low, such as during an economic downturn. In a wealth-owning family, it’s also relevant to consider the younger generation of the family undertaking mobility planning before and not after they come into wealth. Once planning in relation to leaving a country has taken place, the question arises as to where the wealth owner can go. Sometimes a related question is where a wealth owner can obtain a second or further citizenship. When mobility planning is undertaken, there are often many choices regarding where a wealth owner can move to. Obvious tax advantaged choices include jurisdictions that impose no tax at all, such as the Bahamas or Dubai. Other choices can include countries that impose tax on a territorial basis, such as Hong Kong or Singapore, where a resident (or nonresident) only pays tax on their

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locally sourced income, not on worldwide income. Jersey, with its proximity to the UK and France, is an interesting option, and its territorial approach to taxation is attractive for wealth owners. There are also a number of countries, such as Switzerland and others, that offer special ‘deals’ on taxation for specific groups of taxpayers. Italy offers special tax incentives for ‘non-domiciliaries’ – an attractive option for many. In all these cases, care needs to be taken in planning one’s affairs to reflect the way in which one’s new country imposes tax, and it is critical to consider planning on a ‘preimmigration’ basis – taking steps before one becomes a resident of the new country. Demand in relation to mobility is on the up, resulting not only in more in the way of exit taxes, but also greater difficulty in obtaining resident permits in desirable locations, as well as higher costs for those seeking to take advantage of tax-attractive locations. Interestingly, there is much in the way of planning that an individual can undertake before a move to even what may be perceived as being a high tax country. Here preimmigration planning again comes into the picture, and a variety of approaches, sometimes involving use of trusts and other wealth-planning ‘tools’ becomes relevant. In very simple terms, for a retiring couple, for example, some simple steps can reduce tax dramatically before a move to a new country. Gifting assets to children, directly or through structures, if properly done may result in the assets no longer being owned, meaning tax in relation to income earned on those assets will be avoided in the new country of residence. Citizenship is available in a number of circumstances, and a good starting point is often to consider what citizenships may be available as a result of family history or religion. A number of countries have laws that consider the children and further descendants of a citizen to be a citizen. So if your mother or grandfather was born in a particular country, you may find that you are eligible to become a citizen of that country. In fact, you may already be a citizen, and need only prove your right to obtain a passport as proof of that citizenship. There are also countries that, in effect, sell citizenship. This is often achieved through investment and other programs, and in some cases the countries involved are even members of the European Union, affording their citizens freedom of movement within Europe and wide access to visa-free travel to many countries. Other countries require a considerable period of physical residence before citizenship can be obtained, and this includes countries like

Australia and Canada. But unlike the US, these are countries where once citizenship is obtained, if one is not resident, there is no exposure to worldwide taxation – whether a citizen or not, tax only arises on locally sourced income if one is not resident there. In the longer term, it is likely to become more and more difficult to obtain and keep second, third and further citizenships. Like in the area of mobility, where there are an increasing number of countries that impose exit taxes and whose residence and related rules are getting tougher and tougher, it is likely that more countries will seek to limit the circumstances in which second, third and further citizenships are permitted. For now, however, multiple citizenships can be an important safety net for wealth owning families, and not only from a tax perspective. ■ Philip was a partner of Baker & McKenzie, and practiced in the area of international taxation throughout his legal career. In 2013, he received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society of Estate and Trust Practitioners. marcoviciasia.com

JERSEY BY JONATHAN HUGHES, PARTNER AT OGIER

The traditional arguments for relocating to Jersey used to revolve around unspoiled beaches, sunshine, and low tax rates. Today, those arguments still hold true – but more and more the things that are swaying people towards living in Jersey are about the lifestyle, the entrepreneurial culture and the availability of quality property. In recent years, the island has reformed HNW tax arrangements to be even more attractive – there are no capital gains or inheritance taxes, with a minimum annual contribution for new residents of £125,000 (the first £625,000 of worldwide income is taxed at 20%, and the balance taxed at 1%).

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The Leading Global Network of Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management Institutes

TURN YOUR PASSION INTO A CAREER Whether you’re a beginner, a keen cook, or looking to turn your hobby into a career, Le Cordon Bleu London is sure to have the perfect course to suit your needs. Providing the finest culinary and hospitality education, the school offers a wide range of programmes from gourmet workshops, certificates and comprehensive Diplomas in everything from cuisine, pâtisserie and culinary management, through to wine and nutrition, taught by renowned Master Chefs, lecturers and wine experts. Your culinary adventure begins here.

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FOOD & DRINK REVIEWS

WORD ON THE STREET

GINZA ONODERA As first impressions go, Ginza Onodera is a bonafide head turner. Walking through the surreptitious entrance to London’s latest Japanese restaurant is to step onto the set of an elegant film noir – luxuriating in marble and monochrome – and all the better for it. The sizeable £2.5m makeover by interior designer Yosei Kiyono is not Onodera’s only strength, but it serves as a fine introduction to the restaurant’s particular brand of culinary extravagance. A tome-like menu weighty with tempura, sushi, teppanyaki and much more besides navigates Japan’s diverse cuisine with great dexterity. Highlights of our meal included a delicate tartare of turbot dusted in umami-boosting bottarga (cured mullet roe), small bites of sweet shrimp, and shiitake mushroom shovelled into mouths via discs of raw yellow beetroot, as well as caviar-topped scallops shrouded in ponzu jelly slurped out of ornate shell-like crockery. It’s delicious, assured cooking – and proves Onodera is more than just a pretty face.

The latest restaurant from Spanish chef David Muñoz has arrived in London. MAX WILLIAMS samples the unique delights of Street XO

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OW FOR SOMETHING completely different –

and we really do mean different. Spanish chef David Muñoz has won three Michelin stars through his Madrid restaurant DiverXO, and now he brings his unique culinary stylings to Mayfair in the form of Street XO (pronounced ‘show’). The result is likely to bring the punters flocking, and leave culinary purists scratching their heads. One suspects Muñoz desires to do both. Street XO isn’t so much a restaurant as an experience. The basement interior is a cacophony of bright colours: orange tables clash with yellow walls, a purple fish hangs above a neon-striped bar. You feel as though you’ve descended into a particularly bullish art gallery, more Shoreditch than Mayfair.

Street XO aims to give you an evening you’ll remember long after the bill has been paid squaremile.com

But that’s largely the point: Street XO is determined to give you an evening you’ll remember long after the bill has been paid. Take the cocktails. One is served in a replica human heart. Another comes in a glass the size of a fishbowl. My Smoker USA – made with aged rum – takes a literal interpretation to ‘letting off some steam’. It’s completely delicious, stiletto-sharp in the kick. Don’t read too much into the ‘Street’ moniker: this is not the type of cuisine you would encounter down your local market. The Pekinese dumplings, lashed with strawberry hoisin, resemble a Jackson Pollack and taste like a dream. Even better is the steamed club sandwich, filled with ricotta and crab, topped with a quail’s egg. It makes one wonder how Muñoz might interpret, say, a ploughman’s lunch or the humble sausage roll. Street XO is more than a little ridiculous, and knows it. But there is something rather joyous about the whole evening – from the extravagant decor to the mad-scientist cocktails, this is a restaurant with a real sense of fun. The open-minded will have a blast. ■ Street XO, 15 Old Burlington Street, W1S; 020 3096 7555; streetxo.com

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Unleash your adventurous side

RAFTING / HYDROSPEEDING / KAYAKING / HOT DOG SESSIONS / LIVE MUSIC / BAR & CAFÉ

Lee Valley White Water Centre - The ultimate destination for white water adventures 03000 030 616 gowhitewater.co.uk


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2. HERETAT MONT RUBI GAINTUS ‘ONE NIGHT’S’ ROSÉ 2015, PENEDES, CATALONIA Rosé has enjoyed a decade of growth and we can’t seem to get enough of Provence’s heavily marketed big brands. But this is something rather more captivating: made from the rare indigenous sumoll grape, this is packed with abundant summer berry fruit, backed by a bone-dry and super-crisp palate, and is equally at home on the picnic rug or on the table. £15.95 jeroboams.co.uk

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3. MOSS WOOD CHARDONNAY 2015, MARGARET RIVER Most famous for its legendary cabernet sauvignon, Moss Wood also turns its hand to a rich yet finely chiselled chardonnay that puts many more expensive Burgundies to shame. Full bodied, yet with great freshness and poise, this is a classy and elegant wine for the table. £27.50 jeroboams.co.uk

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1. BOUZA TANNAT ‘B6’ PARCELA UNICA 2014, MONTEVIDEO Uruguay doesn’t register on most people’s wine radar and £32 may seem a lot of money for a step into the unknown, but this ‘out-malbecs’ malbec as a wine for barbecues. Tannat originates in the same part of France as malbec, and has a similar richness of dark fruit and tannin. This is one of Uruguay’s finest examples. £31.95 jeroboams.co.uk

WINE SUMMER

PHOTOGRAPH by David Harrison

WINE OF THE TIMES We asked the experts at Jeroboams to pick out four wines to broaden both your palate and your horizons this summer

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3 4. GUSBOURNE BRUT ROSÉ 2013, KENT Made from 100% pinot noir at one of England’s finest estates, the 2013 Gusbourne rosé is more than a match for the best champagnes, with the added glow of supporting a small British company. This is full of delightful red berry fruits backed by hints of cranberry and boasts a rich, creamy palate and fine fresh finish. £39.95 jeroboams.co.uk

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GOLF

in association with

THE PLAYER CHARL SCHWARTZEL

PHOTOGRAPH by Getty/ Andy Lyons

Golf may be brimming with young talent and world beaters aplenty, but 2017 is shaping up to be the year of the comebacks. Sergio Garcia, beleaguered by tournaments past, broke his Major duck in April against all the odds; Ian Poulter, who barely held onto his 2017 PGA Tour card after being plagued by injuries for the last few years, rocketed to an astonishing T-2 at The Players Championship (colloquially known as ‘the fifth Major’); and then there was the curious case of Billy Horschel whose out-of-the-blue victory at the AT&T Byron Nelson in May was his first since capturing the FedExCup in 2014. Whether it’s returning from injuries, personal issues or simply a drop in form, a number of players yet to realise their full potential are returning to the fold this year – just in case the young guns thought they’d have it all their own way. Who’s next for a reprise, you might be asking. Step forward 2011 Masters champion Charl Schwartzel. Six years ago at Augusta National, the South African birdied the final four holes of the tournament on his way to a maiden Major victory and the hallowed Green Jacket. Following his success, many expected Schwartzel to follow in fellow compatriot Gary Player’s footsteps and add to his Major tally in the future, but such heady heights have eluded the 32 year old. Things may be about to change, however. After his first win on the PGA Tour last year at the Valspar Championship, the golfer carried his form into 2017 and finished third at The Masters in April – his best finish in a Major since his victory. Schwartzel’s talent has never been in question: his shot-making ability, touch around the greens and tendency to drain clutch putts when it matters most make him a danger to any leaderboard. No, the South African’s challenge has been to overcome the mental hurdles that come with expectation and increased notoriety. It’s taken a while, but he might have found the missing puzzle piece. Pass that crown: there’s a new comeback king ready for his coronation. ■

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GOLF EQUIPMENT

DESIGNATED DRIVER

TOP 3: SUMMER SHOES BAG YOURSELF A PAIR OF TRAINER-LIKE GOLF SHOES FOR STYLE AND COMFORT

The Ping G Driver isn’t the flashiest or most technological club to hit the shelves in the past year, but its performance is second to none

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ECCO COOL, £220 ++ ECCO and GORE-TEX have created these fully weather-proof, highly breathable shoes. Retro trainer stylings give them a touch of Marty McFly, too. ecco.com

ADIDAS ADICROSS PRIMEKNIT, £79.95

FAIRWAY GAME

PHOTOGRAPH (ECCO COOL) by Hanne Fuglbjerg

When it comes to drivers, players of all standards need a club they can rely on. Enter Mr Dependable, the Ping G Driver. Ridges on the rear are modelled after a dragonfly’s wing to save mass and increase moment of inertia, but forget about that. What’s important is this club excels at forgiveness, while offering distance comparable to the anything else at the top end of the market. It doesn’t get much better than that. £299; ping.com

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++ Lightweight and versatile thanks to a woven Primeknit upper, these spikeless golf shoes bring a touch of class to your on-course style. adidas.co.uk

NIKE AIR ZOOM 90 IT, £140 ++ The iconic trainer, first created in 1987, makes its way onto the golf course. Great comfort and grip mean performance is never compromised either. nike.com


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THE COURSE CENTURION CLUB, HERTFORDSHIRE

If this handsome track looks familiar, that’s because it recently hosted the European Tour’s inaugural GolfSixes event – golf’s equivalent to Twenty20 cricket. Guarded by tall pines for the first five holes, the course opens up across rolling terrain at the testing 460-yard par four sixth hole. Water hazards will keep scores honest, but the clever green complexes are a danger unto themselves. Back at the brand-new clubhouse postgame nutrition comes in the shape of the Michelin-starred Galvin brothers’ menu. centurionclub.co.uk

COMPETITION

WIN AN OVERNIGHT STAY FOR TWO AT STOKE PARK WORTH £1,000 – INCLUDING 18 HOLES OF GOLF AND A FINE-DINING MEAL

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good night’s rest and consider yourself fully rejuvenated. Is that too much to ask for? We think not – which is why we’re giving you the chance to win exactly that. During your overnight stay at Stoke Park, a short 35-minute drive into Buckinghamshire

from central London, you’ll have plenty of time to downshift into the slow lane for a change. Tee it up on the championship golf course, enjoy an evening at the excellent Humphry’s restaurant and then hit the hay in your very own suite. There. That’s better.

TO ENTER

Go to squaremile.com/ competitions and answer a simple question. T&Cs can be found online.

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PHOTOGRAPHS by (Centurian) Kevin Murray; (Stoke Park) David Cannon/Getty

When you’re piecing together the components for a perfect British getaway, there’s a few boxes that need to be ticked. Firstly, you need to find yourself a palatial country house befitting of the lush countryside in which it will, naturally, be situated. Next, you need a leisurely pursuit to occupy your day, and a lavish meal to work up an appetite for in the evening. Cap things off with a


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GOLF NORTHERN IRELAND

LETTING NATURE TAKE ITS COURSE Northern Ireland will host some of the largest golf events in Europe over the next few years, including The Open in 2019. BEN WINSTANLEY heads to the Emerald Isle to see how preparations are going

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UNLUCE ROAD UNFURLS along a perimeter of jagged white cliffs to the east of the Northern Irish town of Portrush. It’s raining heavily, and the sky is a similar brooding grey to the basalt columns in nearby Giant’s Causeway. You join us at the most scenic point on the route: to our right, the crumbled ruins of Dunluce Castle – House Greyjoy to Game of Thrones fans – emerge from their rocky camouflage on a promontory 50 feet above the frothing Atlantic crashing against the shore. Snapping us out of our rapture, a speeding car overtakes us, narrowly avoiding a head-on collision with a vehicle coming the other way. Drama is befitting of any pilgrimage to a course on The Open rota, but I could do without the heart palpitations heading onto the first tee. 124

The route slopes down towards the beach, and through the mist and duneland, the familiar sight of a golf course takes shape among the undulating landscape next to the shore. Royal Portrush, host of The Open in 2019, is stunning from afar but up close the swathe of links terrain, which will soon play host to the largest sporting event to come to the country in decades, is a feral beauty that entices challengers into her clutches: “This,” as locals in the nearby pubs will tell you, “is how golf was meant to be played.” It hasn’t been an easy journey to bring The Open back to Northern Ireland and Royal Portrush – both hosting the prestigious competition for the first time since 1951 – but the course has passed the R&A’s expectations for

an Open venue with flying colours. Renowned golf course architects Martin Ebert and Tom Mackenzie, whose recent transformation of Trump Turnberry has received plaudits worldwide, were tasked with renovations to Harry Colt’s 1932 design and the work to create two entirely new holes on the Dunluce Links. By the time we step onto the 420-yard parfour 1st hole, tournament preparations have entered their final stages, with just the brandnew 7th and 8th holes – occupying a sensational spot of land at the foot of a gigantic dune – not yet ready for play. The new holes are replacing arguably Portrush’s only weakness, the current 17th and 18th holes, which will instead be used to accommodate the spectator village and infrastructure throughout The Open.

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Say your prayers to the golfing gods – in the swirling wind, par on this hole feels like eagle

PHOTOGRAPH by (main) David Cannon/Getty Images; (trophy) Charles McQuillan/R&A; (beach) Rob Durston

Back on the course, the first fairway is a narrow target from the tee. Long grass just off the fairway is an omnipresent feature on this track – and its greatest defence, with the course having the fewest bunkers (62 in total) on the Open rota. Drive straight, shoot low. Simple. As we get to the meat of Mackenzie and Ebert’s changes, we roll through the lengthened par-five 2nd, now playing a hefty 577 yards into a new green complex, and make our way towards the coast and the signature 5th hole. With the green teetering spectacularly on the edge of the cliff, this 403yard left to right dogleg is a real highlight. To the left of the 5th green, a giant dune keeps watch over the brand-new 7th and 8th holes. Scoping out the terrain revealed a highly appetising 572-yard par five that plays down into a valley and narrows towards a bunkered green before doubling back on itself for a 435-yard par four that looks likely to be one of the toughest challenges on the course. Players must take an aggressive line to a slanting fairway for the easiest approach to the green, mindful to avoid the severe dune bank along the left-hand side, ready and willing to punish any errant drives: this is a hole where majors will be won and lost. Combined with the 5th and tricky 191-yard par-three 6th, this run of four holes is an inviting prospect whether you’re viewing on TV or playing it in the flesh. It’s worth noting, too, that all four par threes were preserved in their original format, their shape and form already considered perfect in every way. Around the turn, the 15th and 16th holes are score wreckers disguised by their beauty. The former begins with an uphill blind tee shot that requires a perfect line over impenetrable rough – knowing your yardage is all important here if you wish to find the centre of the fairway, doglegging from right to left – but the difficult drive is worth it once you reach the crest of the hill and one of the highest points on the golf course. To see the rolling coastal landscape laid out in front of you is one of the best sights in European golf. The next hole, known by locals as Calamity Corner, is a 230-yard uphill par 3 that more than lives up to its ominous name. Danger

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front and right makes this one of the most pressured tee shots on the course. Say your prayers to the golfing gods – in the swirling wind, par feels like an eagle. To put it another way, when my slightly under-hit shot clung on for dear life at the front of the green, the post-round Guinness in the modern clubhouse tasted better than I could ever have imagined. Royal Portrush isn’t the only golf course gaining momentum in 2017. From 4-9 July, the stunning duneland of Portstewart Golf Club’s Strand course will play host to the Dubai Duty Free Irish Open – and what a course for the best players on the European Tour to use as their warm up for The Open later that month. Down on the beaches of Portstewart Strand, Game of Thrones fans visit one of the TV programme’s most recent filming locations, but the best fight scene here is our golfing party doing battle with one of the finest front nines in world golf a few metres away. Standing on the first tee is a humbling experience – before you, huge dunes act as intimidating guards of the serpentine fairways winding at their feet. The sensational par-

four 1st, surely one of the best opening holes anywhere, plays downhill left to right. My group quashes its first-tee jitters and sets up birdie opportunities. Our confidence is short lived, though. If the 1st is stunning, the 2nd is simply breathtaking: thread your drive between two dunes the size of office blocks, and you’ll be left with a 160-yard iron shot to an uphill tapered green guarded by more dunes. It’s tough, but worth every bit of challenge. It continues in this manner for a further seven holes – dodging green giants, dipping over hollows and challenging every feature of our game. This is rollercoaster golf, with a set of clubs your only safety harness to its twists and turns. The draw of a big tournament has brought with it much-needed improvements to the back nine, too. A Dr Jekyll to the front nine’s Mr Hyde, it has more of a parkland feel as it opens up along the River Bann inland. It’s a serene nine holes, bringing you back to earth after the wild front nine. Meet the diamonds of the Emerald Isle…. ■ For more info, see ireland.com; buy tickets for the DDF Irish Open at europeantour.com

KEEPING IT GREEN: [Clockwise from main] The iconic 5th hole at Royal Portrush, with Dunluce Castle behind; Portstewart’s 2nd is a firm but fair test; Portstewart Strand was a filming location for Game of Thrones; the Claret Jug at Royal Portrush.

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The Great British Club

Founded in 1908, Stoke Park is Britain’s leading Golf and Country Club set within 300 acres of Founded in 1908, Stoke Park is Britain’s leading Golf and Country Club set beautiful parkland. Members join to take advantage of the unique combination of the traditions of within 300Members’ acres ofclub beautiful parkland. joinentertaining to take advantage of an exclusive and the best of today’sMembers sporting, leisure, and hotel facilities a very friendly environment. the unique combination of inthe traditions of an exclusive Members’ club and Championship hole golf entertaining course having undergone major refurbishment and theWith bestouroficonic today’s sporting,27leisure, and hotel facilities in a very our award winning facilities perfect for all the family, Stoke Park is the ultimate choice... only 30 friendly environment. minutes from Central London. With our iconic Championship 27 hole golf course having undergone major refurbishment and our award winning facilities perfect for all the family, Stoke Park is the ultimate choice... only 30 minutes from Central London.

www.stokepark.com For Membership Enquiries please contact our Membership Team on 01753 717179 or email membership@stokepark.com Stoke Park, Park Road, Stoke Poges, Buckinghamshire SL2 4PG


ASSETS

PHOTOGRAPHY PRIZE 2017 IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

THE PRIZE WORTH £2,730

WHETHER YOU’RE A DIE-HARD LENSMAN OR A CASUAL INSTAGRAMMER, ENTER THE SQUARE MILE PHOTOGRAPHY PRIZE 2017 FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN A LEICA

C

ALLING ALL CITY snappers: the square mile

PHOTOGRAPH by publianc larit em potinium vid ces blah

Photography Prize is back. This year, it’s sponsored by Leica – the world’s most prestigious camera manufacturer – and the prize is better than ever. The concept is simple: you send us photos of the City, and our judging panel will decide which is the best. The winner takes home a brand new Leica TL as well as a Vario-ElmarTL 18-56 mm lens – worth £2,730 in total. Please send your photographs, with the subject header ‘Photo Prize’, as high res as possible to photo@squaremile.com. If they’re really large files, send them via WeTransfer. Each entrant is allowed to submit a maximum of 20 photos. The subject matter can be anything you like as long as it’s shot in the City of London or Canary Wharf. ■ The deadline for entries is 12 September 2017. The

The Leica TL is the only system in its class that combines groundbreaking design, craftsmanship and instinctive use. The camera is crafted from a single block of aluminium, and features a CMOS sensor with 16.5 million pixels, a highresolution touch screen, and a simple layout with just four physical controls. The prize also includes the Leica Vario-Elmar-T 18-56 mm lens – a superb all-round lens that lets you capture richin-detail, high-contrast photos that are sharp from edge to edge and corner to corner, even in unfavourable light.

leica-camera.com

winner will be announced in the November issue.

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Corner House, Sun House, The Barn, Skydeck and The Hide

The Spa


NewShow Show New Apartment Apartment launching launching 21stJune June 21st Come and visit to view Come and visit to view inspired interiors with inspired interiors with exceptional attention to exceptional attention to detail at FiftySevenEast, detail at FiftySevenEast, offering a range of 1, 2 and offering a range of 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments, 3 bedroom apartments, each with their own private each with their own private outdoor space and open outdoor space and open plan living areas. plan living areas.

Prices from ÂŁ565,000* Prices from ÂŁ565,000* Register your interest: Register your interest: 020 3818 8819 020 3818 8819 events@taylorwimpley.com events@taylorwimpley.com for further details please visit: for further details please visit: fiftyseveneast.com fiftyseveneast.com

Selling Agents Selling Agents Computer generated image is indicative only. *Price is correct at time of sending to press. Computer generated image is indicative only.Plot specific. *Price is correct at time of sending to press. Plot specific.


HOLDINGS

INTERIORS . 133 PROPERTY . 135

IT’S HIP TO BE SQUARE . 135

PHOTOGRAPH: Residence balconies at Gabriel Square (gabrielsquare.com)


HOLDINGS

DESIGN MASTER & DYNAMIC

SPEAKERS’ CORNER Speaker specialist Master & Dynamic has joined forces with design maestro Sir David Adjaye, and the results will make you sit up and face the music

SOUND AND VISION While emitting sound is undeniably a speaker’s primary function, as something that sits prominently in your home, the way it looks is crucial, too – there’s no point blasting that carefully compiled playlist of Zeppelin rarities out of something that doesn’t look properly rock’n’roll, is there? Enter: Master & Dynamic’s new MA770 wireless speaker, designed in conjunction with renowned architect Sir David Adjaye to ensure the speaker looks as good as it sounds.

BREAKING THE SOUND BARRIER The MA770 is a musical heavyweight in both senses of the word: It’s sonic credentials include woven kevlar long-throw woofers and a titanium tweeter powered by 100w of Class D amplification. And it’s made of a proprietary concrete composite – the first of its kind – which helps produce a purer sound. Master & Dynamic CEO Jonathan Levine comments: “The MA770 reinforces scale and prominence, and its design and use of premium materials enhance its beauty.” £1,600 from masterdynamic.co.uk

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see  more  on

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VIEWS TO

INSPIRE

Blake Tower is London’s hidden secret in Zone 1. With superior specification, a concierge service and the surrounding green space of the Barbican Estate. • Zone 1 location • Designed by Conran & Partners • Forthcoming Crossrail 2018* at Farrington Station • Close to London’s Square Mile • Parking available A collection of 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments

Prices from £745,000

DESIGN FOR LIVING

*

Source: www.tfl.gov.uk. Details correct at time of press. Photography is indicative only.

To book an appointment please call 0203 553 6227

www.blaketower.com


HOLDINGS

PROPERTY LONDON

MILLION-POUND QUESTION You have £1m (or so) to spend on your next move up the property ladder: what will that get you in and around London? For those north of the river, your trio is below, and for those in the south, turn the page… RUSSELL GARDENS MEWS KENSINGTON, W14 Fancy living in the Royal Borough? Of course you do, it’s one of London’s most desirable neighbourhoods, and for just over £1m you can buy this two-bedroom maisonette in a pretty cobbled mews close to Holland Park. Having recently undergone a refurbishment and extension under the guidance of awardwinning architect Danielle Petteno, the property provides contemporary living in a traditional setting, with high ceilings and roof lights creating a bright and open space.

THE NORTH FACE: [clockwise from here] Russell Gardens Mews in Kensington could be yours for just over £1m; buy a slice of interior-designed space in West Hampstead; a contemporary new home at Gabriel Square just minutes from St Albans’ train station.

Price: £1.2m; Savills Mews, 020 3430 6605

COTLEIGH ROAD WEST HAMPSTEAD, NW6 This three-bedroom apartment arranged over the entire first and second floors of a period conversion has been interior designed, so you can move into a space that’s ‘ready to go’. It’s likely that you might not be spending too much time in it though, as you’ll be living so close to the shops and restaurants on West End Lane. When you are at home, there’s a stand-out open-plan kitchen and living room forming the focal point of the property. Price: £1m; Savills Hampstead, 020 7472 5000

GABRIEL SQUARE ST ALBANS For around the £1m mark, it’s also worth casting your net further afield. We plumped for St Albans, regularly voted one of the best places to live in Britain. Five minutes from the train station is an impressive new development – Gabriel Square – arranged around a landscaped urban garden at its centre. Developer Meyer Homes has partnered with leading international architectural and design practices, Benson & Forsyth and Conran & Partners, to design a collection of contemporary townhouses and apartments. Each features state-of-the-art kitchens by Poggenpohl, and reflects the clean architecture with a simple material palette and elegant detailing. They also benefit from bespoke bathroom designs with custom vanities from Laufen and brassware from Crosswater. Townhouses from £1.2m; gabrielsquare.com ➤

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HOLDINGS

MIGRATING SOUTH: [clockwise from here] For £1m in Battersea you get to write Mountford Mansions in your address; open-plan living on Bramford Road in the sought-after Tonsleys in Wandsworth; £1m in Putney buys you the ground floor of this substantial house.

➤ MOUNTFORD MANSIONS, BATTERSEA PARK ROAD BATTERSEA, SW11

BRAMFORD ROAD, THE TONSLEYS WANDSWORTH, SW18

HAZLEWELL ROAD PUTNEY, SW15

This duplex apartment’s location alone – within a beautiful Grade II listed building close to Battersea Park – makes it instantly attractive. That’s before you’ve even considered the property’s spacious living area, which includes two bedrooms, impressive vaulted ceilings and a large roof terrace. Investing in this area now is a savvy move – the nearby Nine Elms development is set to change the face of SW11 entirely, bringing with it a huge array of new amenities, as well as the total regeneration of the iconic power station and a new Tube station (due to be in place by 2020). Money well spent? We think so.

The Tonsleys is a popular area in the heart of Wandsworth. And when we say popular, what we mean is that when properties go on the market here, there’s usually a list of hopeful wannabe buyers in place before you can say ‘potential to extend into the side return and close proximity to excellent local schools’. This pretty four-bedroom house illustrates why homes in the area are in such high demand: it’s been seamlessly extended to provide accommodation that’s ideal for family life, and there’s also plenty of space for entertaining. In the original part of the house there are still noticeable period features, such as the fireplace and cornicing, and there’s also lots of storage space throughout, which might sound boring but as well all know, is pretty essential. Oh, and yes, it is indeed close to local schools, as well as Wandsworth Town rail station and Old York Road, where you’ll find buzzy restaurants, handy shops and a superb pub. Development of the nearby ex-Ram Brewery site is set to make this part of town even more sought-after than it is already.

While it might not get you the entire house, for just shy of a million pounds you can buy this attractive three-bedroom, ground-floor apartment in Putney that has been kitted out in a pretty spectacular fashion. The property has been extensively refurbished by the current owners and interiors are immaculate, with wooden floorboards throughout much of the home, and interior-designed living spaces with plenty of wow factor. A particularly impressive feature is a large, open-plan living/kitchen/ dining space with French doors opening onto a private 50ft garden with a decked area. There’s a void underneath the decking which has the potential to be extended (subject to planning permission), so there’s the option to enhance the living space even further. Location-wise, the home is close to Putney train station, within easy reach of East Putney Tube station, and close to an eclectic array of bars, restaurants and pubs. Putney Heath is a short stroll away, and you can walk down to the river easily, too. ■

Price: £1.2m, Savills Wandsworth, 020 8877 1222

Price: £999,950, Savills Putney, 020 8780 9900

Price: £1.15m, Savills Battersea Park, 020 3402 1900

••

Investing in Battersea now is a savvy move – the Nine Elms development is set to change the face of SW11 136

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WATERFRONT ONE OF THE BEST CONNECTED RIVERSIDE DESTINATIONS IN LONDON ROYAL ARSENAL WOOLWICH

CANARY WHARF 8 MINUTES*

LIVERPOOL STREET 14 MINUTES*

BOND STREET 22 MINUTES*

HEATHROW 50 MINUTES*

Royal Arsenal Riverside is an outstanding riverside location, with an ever expanding range of residents’ amenities. It is ideally situated for the forthcoming on-site Crossrail station and London City Airport, which is just 7 minutes away.

Call 020 3582 7789 to register your interest

|

www.royalarsenalriverside.co.uk

Computer generated image is indicative only. Photography depicts Dial Arch Square at Royal Arsenal Riverside. Prices and information correct at time of going to press. *Approximate travel times for Crossrail taken from Royal Arsenal Woolwich. Source: www.crossrail.co.uk

www.royalarsenalriverside.co.uk Proud to be a member of the Berkeley Group of companies

Manhattan, 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments Prices from £442,500


Anna, Aged 25 Occupation: Fitness instructor Now a home owner with East Thames


W I T H Y O U E V E R Y S T E P O F T H E W AY

At East Thames we’ve made it simple for you to get onto the property ladder. Shared Ownership gives you the chance to part-buy/part-rent your home over a period of time that suits you and your budget. It’s not just for key workers so whatever your occupation, we are with you through every step of your purchase. So if you are a first time buyer and think you can’t afford to buy, think again!

B E C A U S E H O M E S M AT T E R www.east-thames.co.uk


A N I NS P I R I NG P L AC E TO CALL HOME Fish Island Village offers all the excitement of the city and all the luxury of a waterside setting.


VIBRANT. AUTHENTIC. ECLECTIC.

You’ll find everything you need within this waterside community. With an eclectic mix of 1, 2 & 3 bedroom modern apartments, innovative workspaces and fantastic travel links to the city and beyond, it’s the ultimate place for like-minded people to live, socialise and collaborate.

D I S C OV E R M O R E fishislandvillage.co.uk 020 3906 1950 #madeinhackneywick Computer generated images are indicative only. Terms and conditions apply, please speak to a Sales Advisor for further details on Help to Buy.


+ TO ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION PLEASE CALL ON 020 7819 9999

Seeking: Single Eligible Gentlemen Bowes-Lyon Partnership is an exclusive London matchmaking agency. We offer a discreet and bespoke dating service for busy, successful and refined people. For a limited time, we are offering COMPLIMENTARY MEMBERSHIPS to eligible gentlemen, to introduce to our successful and attractive female members. Please call 0207 152 6011 or email emma@bowes-lyonpartnership.co.uk www.bowes-lyonpartnership.co.uk


END PLAY

squaremile.com  |

squaremile.com  |

EVENTS

COMP

Win a day of a lifetime at Blenheim Palace

Diary session: Summer events BANKS & BROKERS GOLF CHAMPIONSHIP

SALON PRIVÉ

Kent, 19 October

Blenheim Palace, 31 August-2 September

If you love golf and fancy a unique networking opportunity, the Banks & Brokers Golf Championship 2017 should pique your interest. Open to CEOs, bankers, brokers and the money-making elites of the financial and corporate sectors, the event allows you to beat your colleagues and competitors on the green.

Salon Privé is a luxury automotive garden party unlike any other, where the best supercars and classic cars are displayed against the backdrop of Blenheim Palace. With world-class hospitality packages, champagne on tap, soft jazz playing in the background and some of the rarest cars on the planet, it’s become a Season favourite.

For more info: banksandbrokersgolf.com

For more info: salonpriveconcours.com

CARTIER IN MOTION

FESTIBOWL

Design Museum, 25 May-28 July

Finsbury Square, 28-30 June

Cartier in Motion explores the creativity of Cartier watchmaking from a design perspective. Curated by Sir Norman Foster, with the determining role of societal changes at the turn of the 20th century in mind, it examines the birth of the modern wristwatch amid upheavals in art, architecture, and traditional lifestyles.

Combining lawn bowls with contemporary music, Festibowl is modernising one of Britain’s oldest sports. Offering a sociable atmosphere, a fully stocked bar and some of London’s best street food, this is the place for casual corporate gatherings with a retro twist. Tweed and red cords are optional.

For more info: cartier.co.uk

For more info: festibowl.co.uk

squaremile.com

B

LENHEIM PALACE WAS bequeathed to

John Churchill by Queen Anne to mark his victory at the Battle of Blenheim, and would subsequently become the birthplace of Sir Winston himself. Get on intimate terms with this historic building by entering our exclusive competition. Blenheim Palace is offering a private tour of the Palace’s state rooms and private apartments, where the Marlborough tapestries and the Long Library can be found. The prize includes a three-course meal at the Orangery restaurant, cream tea, and a luxury hamper. The winner will also receive a Privilege Card, which provides unfettered access to the Unesco World Heritage Site’s park and gardens for a year, and a 15% discount in all on-site shops, restaurants and cafés. To enter, go to squaremile.com/competitions

SEE MORE ONLINE

Go to squaremile.com/ events for complete listings of upcoming events and parties occurring in the City and beyond.

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+ TO ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION PLEASE CALL ON 020 7819 9999

The Bar at Chamberlain’s Restaurant, Leadenhall Market A perfect place to meet for cocktails, lunch or dinner Restaurant chamberlainsoflondon.co.uk

– |

Bar

Private Dining

0207 648 8690

|

Terrace

reservations@chamberlainsoflondon.co.uk

tion a d n u o F s Royal Parkhon Half Marat e one finish lin Four parks,

er 2017

Sunday 8 Octob Sign up now

nspcc.org.uk/royalparks 020 3772 9720 running@nspcc.org.uk £1 registration fee

Enter discount code ROYALPARKS1 for an exclusive £1 registration fee when you sign up online.

Photography by Daniel Hambury.

09/06/2017 09:32

© 2017 NSPCC. Registered charity England and Wales 216401 and Scotland SC037717. J20161422.

chamberlains_hp_sm124.indd 1


squaremile

ESSENTIALS

+ TO ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION PLEASE CALL 020 7819 9999

ANDREW & COLE

BUGS VINTAGE

@andrewandcole W: andrew-cole.com

@bugsvintage W: bugsvintage.com

VERO WATCHES

BRANCH INNOVATION

Andrew & Cole Ocean wear is a brand presenting a new way of comfort and style for men with its innovative lining without the net. This allows you to do summer activities all day! Visit andrew-cole. com for eye-catching and comfortable swimwear.

With a unique “bowl” shaped design that allows the watch to sit lower and hug your wrist better than many mechanical watches, VERO Watches build, test, assemble, and warranty all watches in their workshop in Portland, Oregon USA. Built to last with 100% US case and dial production, Swiss movement, and French hands. Every watch comes with 3 straps and works great for any occasion. @verowatches VERO Watch Company

These vintage canvas duffle bags are available in tan, green and navy. They are just one of a verity of items Bugs Vintage have available ranging from traditional handmade razors, timeless men’s clothing and handmade leather goods.

The story of the branch is three years in the making and began with one very simple idea. We wanted to create a clean and simple device that held a tablet and meant we could watch hands (and stress) free. Since then, we have worked hard to overcome language, knowledge and geographical barriers to create our first consumer-ready product. It contains more than 70 uniquely designed and specially crafted parts that slot together to create a stylish accessory we love to call ‘branch’.

209 MARE

HOTIN

W: 209Mare.com @209Mare 209Mare

@hotinfrenchriviera W: hotin-frenchriviera.com

KORPIMAAN KYYNEL

CLAAN

The Iconic 209 Mare Beach Blazer re-writes the rules when it comes to men’s luxury beachwear thanks to its cashmere-like bamboo towel lining which allows you to go from beach to beach club without missing a beat. This summer stand out in a sea of turtle-printed swim shorts and conquer the beach in art-deco inspired luxury.

A premium vodka - KORPIMAAN KYYNEL® is making Finnish distilling heritage part of modern urban life. The name translates as ”tears of the wild forest” a euphemism for moonshine which was distilled for hundreds of years deep in the heart of the Finnish forest. The taste is smooth, the aroma is elegantly fresh yet malty with a hint of rye. Sip it alone or enjoy it with your favorite cocktail.

“Savoir-Faire”, Elegance, Luxurious and provocative are the key qualities to explore the Hotin French Riviera universe. The French Maison create and mystify incredible swimsuits, 100% Made in France, characterized by a high visual quality but also by the silver padlock, here to symbolize the chastity belt and to adorn each product.

W: korpimaankyynel.com @ korpimaan_kyynel

A masterclass in men’s luxury beard care. Seeking more, we were inspired to find and capture the elusive ourselves – the ultimate, the exquisite and the eternally memorable. We set out with passion, mindfulness and attention to detail. Partnering with artisans to blend fragrances and the purest natural oils for over a year – not only to create the finest, most alluring masculine elixirs but embodying them with timeless depth. Our beard oils are handcrafted in England, in small batches, to exacting standards. W: claan.co.uk

BARROR OF LONDON

DAN HENRY

BarrorLondon @barrorlondon W: barrorlondon.com

W: danhenrywatch.com

Our Weekender polo is one of our three button placket polo shirts in 100% cotton pique with colour on the cuff, hem and placket. The pique allows for a more breathable fabric allowing for a more comfortable wear. Which makes it ideal for relaxing weekends, a round of golf or for smart-casual wear.

What if you could have a watch with vintage design aesthetics but without the wallet-incinerating price tag? And - even better - designed by someone with vintage watch DNA in their blood? Watch collector extraordinaire Dan Henry has turned watchmaker with models that fuse cues from Breitling, Omega and other twentieth century classics with modern materials and accurate, high-quality movements.

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BEST JOB IN THE WORLD see  more  on

squaremile.com

William Fox-Pitt It’s a tough job but someone’s got to be… an Olympic Equestrian. The legendary William Fox-Pitt takes us over the fences

I

WAS BORN INTO an equestrian family.

My mother was very into racing, and bred and sold racehorses. I was always surrounded by horses, and it was something I grew to enjoy as I grew up. I didn’t always think that I was the greatest rider; I wasn’t ambitious. I just enjoyed horses.

MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT was my first victory at The Land Rover Burghley Horse Trials in 1994. My first four-star victory: four star is the top level of the sport. I was quite young but I was up against all the pros who’d been winning for years. It made me realise I’d achieve something.

WINNING A MEDAL in London was very special. Although my personal result wasn’t as good as I’d dreamt, it was still a real thrill to get a medal in front of my home crowd.

I SPENT TWO weeks in a coma after a fall in 2015. I lost my sight, I lost balance, and I lost a lot of perception. I was very lucky I made it back for Rio. But I didn’t suffer. I think everyone around me suffered – there was a stage at which they didn’t know whether I’d be anything other than a vegetable.

I ALWAYS THOUGHT I was going to Rio. Nobody else did, they just didn’t want me to be disappointed. But my sight came back, my senses recovered, I was able to ride OK. Having an incentive helped me heal. I LOVE WORKING inside the horse’s brain. Yes, you could say it’s hard work, but even the tough moments aren’t dull. ■ To read the full article, go to squaremile.com

SEE MORE ONLINE For more ‘Best Jobs in the World’ go to squaremile.com. Know a contender? Email max.williams@squaremile.com

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2:49PM

The moment you wanted to pause time. Fairmont The Palm is the perfect family destination for your next holiday in the sun. With remarkable architecture, six world class restaurants, four temperature-controlled swimming pools, a breathtaking private beach, exciting water sport activities and a supervised Kids Club we put your family first every day.

For reservations and more information regarding our family offers please call +971 4 457 3388 or email palmdubai@fairmont.com


Square Mile - 124 - The Power Issue  

Square Mile Magazine - Issue 124 - The Power Issue

Square Mile - 124 - The Power Issue  

Square Mile Magazine - Issue 124 - The Power Issue