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£4  ISSUE 123  ISSN 2397-3439

ED ED WESTWICK EXCLUSIVE

W H Y T H E G O S S I P G I R L S TA R H A S S W A P P E D T H E U P P E R E A S T S I D E F O R E I G H T I E S E S S E X


Prices from

£99,990

Monthly payments from £1,275* Representative 5.9% APR Based on Overfinch Range Rover TDV6 Vogue

Vehicle Price: £99,990.00. Deposit: £9,990.00. Balance to Finance: £90,000.00. Period: 49 Months. Monthly Instalment: £1,275.00. Final Instalment / GFV (includes £10 option to purchase fee) £44,787.50. Total Amount Payable: £115,977.50. 5.9% APR Representative. Representative example is based upon an annual mileage of 6,000 miles per year. With Personal Contract Purchase (PCP) you have the option at the end of the agreement to return the vehicle and not pay the Final Payment. If the vehicle is in good condition and has not exceeded the allowed mileage you will have nothing further to pay. Excess mileage charges of 14p per mile for any excess mileage up to 4,999 miles pa and 28p per mile for any excess mileage exceeding 24,500 miles. You also have the option to settle the agreement in full or partially at any point in the agreement. Autobrokers Ltd and Overfinch Finance Ltd are authorised and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority. Finance is subject to status and only available to applicants aged 18 and over resident in Mainland UK and N.Ireland. This finance offer is available from Black Horse Limited, St William House, Tresillian Terrace, Cardiff CF10 5BH. Vehicle pictured is an Overfinch Range Rover 5.0L Supercharged LWB for illustration purposes. All information is correct a time of print 31.04.17


The Overfinch Range Rover Discover more at overfinch.com

T: 03330 063 083 E: sales@overfinch.com A: 151-153 Park Road, St Johns Wood, London NW8 7HT


GREAT BRITISH DESIGN 1 9 1 3

H AW E SA N D C U R T I S .CO.U K

S I N C E

J E R M Y N ST, OX FO R D ST, B R OA D ST, C A N N O N ST, LO N D O N WA L L , T H E S H A R D


EDITOR’S WORD I

MAY BE BIASED (I am), but the City is the coolest place in

London right now. I admit, there was a time when that statement would have been frankly risible. When we started this magazine 12 years ago, the most exciting venue in the Square Mile was Abacus – a favourite for ‘bag a banker’ nights. Here, you’d end the evening with, at best, a pounding headache, at worst, an STI. As for fine dining, you’d have two options: (1) One Lombard St, and (2) going for seconds at One Lombard St. Since then, the City has undergone a culinary revolution. From sky-high dining at Jason Atherton’s City Social to the tasting-menu sensation HKK, a decent plate of grub is no longer hard to find here. But members’ clubs and late-night venues? Slim pickings – until recently. Last year’s opening of the £25m Devonshire Club kicked off proceedings: the 58,000sq ft venue includes three bars and two lounges, a health club and even a blow bar. (Nothing to do with cocaine. Apparently.) Then M Restaurants – already a haven for carnivorous foodies – opened up its M Den, which offers a private cinema, a games room and a wagyu bar menu. And now there’s the new Club at Ten Trinity Square, the height of old-world glamour – think: cigar lounge, billiards room and a wine bar in association with Château Latour. But all of these feel like precursors to the main event: the opening of The Ned last month. London-based Soho House & Co and New York’s Sydell Group have teamed up to create this 252-room hotel and members’ club. The former Midland Bank HQ has been transformed via a £200m renovation. There are eight different bars and restaurants – and that’s before you include Ned’s Club, which has a rooftop pool, a spa and hammam, and a late-night bar. The latter used to be the bank’s original vault – the inspiration for Fort Knox in Goldfinger. You enter through a 20-tonne door and then are surrounded by its 3,800 safety deposit boxes. But my favourite spot here is the spa’s subterranean pool, which used to be a bullion vault. Just watch out for gold diggers. After all, the City hasn’t changed that much. ■

Mark Hedley, Editor, @mghedley

– Cath Tate Work Tends to Ruin Your Day is out now (Portico, £7.99)

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@SQUAREMILE_COM SQUAREMILEUK SQUAREMILE_COM THIS MONTH’S CONTRIBUTORS

GERVAIS WILLIAMS As managing director of Miton Group, and one of the most prescient commentators in the City, Gervais Williams has a natural ability to anticipate market trends and this has stimulated much of his writing. This issue, he asks what you need to succeed. [p25]

DUNCAN MADDEN Duncan is a self-confessed sun and sea addict who loves city life only as long as he can escape it – often. He writes for Escapism, Sunday Times Travel and Esquire among others. This month, we sent him off to Montenegro to hang out with the ‘Have Yachts’. [p110]

The Prince’s Trust is square mile’s official charity partner. Please give generously. princes-trust.org.uk

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SHE HAD PERFECTED THE ART OF THE ALLDAY LUNCH HOUR.

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IAIN ANDERSON Iain Anderson is co-founder and Executive Chairman of Cicero Group. He has worked with a range of politicians, as well as advising FTSE 100 and Fortune 500 companies. Right now he’s rubbing his hands with glee at the prospect of another general election. [p26]

GRAHAM COURTNEY Graham Courtney is a lifelong petrolhead, and drives a different car every week, but wouldn’t know how to fix one. This issue he takes the mighty Morgan Aero 8 for a test drive – a car so delightfully British its exhaust note may as well play ‘God Save The Queen’. [p84]

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IN IN 1934, 1934, BRITANNIA BRITANNIA DIDN’ DIDN’ T T JUST JUST RULE RULE THE THE WAVES WAVES

On October 22nd 1934, two exhausted airmen landed on a racecourse in Melbourne, surrounded by On October 22nd 1934, two exhausted airmen landed on a racecourse in Melbourne, surrounded by cheering crowds. Flying a specially-built De Havilland Comet DH-88, Charles Scott and Tom Campbell cheering crowds. Flying a specially-built De Havilland Comet DH-88, Charles Scott and Tom Campbell Black set a new record, flying the 11,000 miles from England in just 71 hours. The Bremont DH-88 Black set a new record, flying the 11,000 miles from England in just 71 hours. The Bremont DH-88 commemorates their aircraft and their achievement. Containing actual material from the record-breaking commemorates their aircraft and their achievement. Containing actual material from the record-breaking plane, the Bremont DH-88 is available now in a strictly limited edition. But it won’t be available for long. plane, the Bremont DH-88 is available now in a strictly limited edition. But it won’t be available for long.

Mayfair Boutique · 29 South Audley St, London, W1K 2PE · Tel: +44 (0)207 493 5150 Mayfair Boutique 29 Courtyard, South Audley St, London, 2PE · EC3V Tel: +44 City Of London Boutique · 12 ·The Royal Exchange,W1K London 3LQ(0)207 · Tel: 493 +445150 (0) 207 220 7134 City Of London Boutique · 12 The Courtyard, Royal Exchange, London EC3V 3LQ · Tel: +44 (0) 207 220 7134


COVER STORY 070

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ISSUE 123

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FEATURES 058 . CHARLIE HUNNAM

062 . GUITAR HERO

EXPOSURE

070 . ED WESTWICK

030 . STYLE 034 . FRAGRANCES 039 . ROYAL EXCHANGE 041 . MY WORLD 042 . BACKPACKS 045 . #WATCHWEWANT 048 . BASELWORLD

Photographer Ed Caraeff shares his iconic images of Jimi Hendrix’s wildest moments, including that guitar-on-fire shot COVER FEATURE

From the Upper East Side to Essex – actor Ed Westwick is back in the UK to star in a brand-new series that sees him assuming the role of charismatic bad boy once again

076 . STONY FACED

When it comes to the next-big-thing in watches, the word on everyone’s lips is ‘grey’

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018 . THE EXCHANGE 023 . ART WORK 025 . INVESTMENTS 026 . POLITICS

BRITISH

SPECIAL

084 . MOTORS 086 . THE BRIT PACK

095 . WATCHES 096 . FOOD 098 . UK TRAVEL 102 . ART

ASSETS 110 . MONTENEGRO 117 . PUB AWARDS 119 . DRINKS 121 . GOLF 129 . PHOTOGRAPHY PRIZE

HOLDINGS 137 . PENTHOUSES

END PLAY 143 . EVENTS 145 . WORLD’S BEST JOB

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PHOTOGRAPH (main) by David Ellis; (Hendrix) by Ed Caraef Photograph

The new King Arthur is in a reflective mood as he discusses mastering the art of sword fighting, making friends with David Beckham, and why he has no time for regrets

PORTFOLIO


55 Jermyn Street, London, SW1Y 6LX | 24 Brook Street, London, W1K 5DG

www.johnsmedley.com


PORTFOLIO

THE EXCHANGE ART WORK INVESTMENT POLITICS

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IMAGE: ‘Point of No Return’ (2015) 110cm x 130cm; acrylic on aluminium composite; plusonegallery.com


THE   E X C H A N G E

THINGS TO DO AFTER THE CITY WORDS Saul Wordsworth

#98 FOOTBALL COMMENTATOR

▽ JOHN MOTSON! Martin Tyler! Disgraced misogynist Andy Gray! Just three of the famous names that have filled the commentary box with wit, wisdom, insight, intelligence and free crates of lager courtesy of Carling. Commentators rely on a distinguishing feature to single them out. Notable traits include being tanned (Gary Lineker), scary (Roy Keane), shouty (Jonathan Pearce), boring (Alan Shearer), tiny (Michael Owen), giggly (Ian Wright) and dead (David Coleman). Mark Lawrenson tried humour but ran out of jokes. If you want to go down in history say something memorable during a big game. Kenneth Wolstenholme achieved this during the 1966 World Cup final with his famous line,

WISE GUIDES WORDS James Smurthwaite

THE WORLD’S BEST MOUNTAIN BIKES

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“There’s people on the pitch, they think it’s all over, but it isn’t quite, there’s still about twoand-a-half minutes to go, plus three minutes of injury time, maybe four.” Other famous observations include, “There’s no such thing as a must-win game and this is one of them.” Football commentators have one thing in common, besides being football commentators, and that’s the ability to think on their feet despite sitting down. Anything can happen in a match – goals, fouls, fish on the pitch, go-go dancers, even corners – so a pundit’s job is to keep calm and say what they see. Women are a common feature of today’s commentary box. They have a different view of the game to men – and are generally less likely to be sexist, racist or Robbie Savage. Speaking non-stop is a breeze, especially if you’ve taken lots of drugs. Just remember not to swear, spit, sneeze, faint, pant, pause, wet yourself or ask what the offside rule is. ■ For more see saulwordsworth.com

1

BEST ALL-ROUNDER

▷ Is there a mountain bike that can do it all? Climb up the hills like a mountain goat and descend faster than a scalded cat? Enter: the Trek Slash. When you’re ascending you feel the benefits of massive 29-inch diameter wheels, a featherweight carbon-fibre construction and a telescopic seatpost that can be raised or lowered for maximum efficiency. Point it downwards, though, and you’ll be thankful for all 160mm of its suspension as well as a near-perfect frame geometry and a penthouse-level spec of parts and tech. In mountain biking they call this a ‘quiver killer’ – the only bike you’ll ever need. For more info, see dirtmountainbike.com

PHOTOGRAPHS by Laurence Crossman-Emms


PORTFOLIO

BONUS BUS TER

FITTIPALDI MOTORS EFZ, £TBC WORDS Jack Donne

▷ Remember those doodles of supercars you drew when you were about ten years old? Yeah – they were nothing like this, were they? But then

2

BEST DOWNHILL BIKE

▷ If you want to get from the top to the bottom of a hill as fast as possible then there are few bikes more capable than the Specialized S-Works Demo 8. The bike features a unique, asymmetrical, fully carbon-fibre frame that houses a rear shock custom built by Moto GP legends Öhlins. The bike has 203.2mm of suspension travel that tames the bumpiest tracks. If you want proof, look no further than Aaron Gwin who piloted it to the 2015 Downhill World Cup title. It’s an instantly eyecatching and uncompromising machine. There really isn’t anything better when the going gets rough. For more info, see dirtmountainbike.com

you didn’t have the help of the world’s most distinguished car design house, Pininfarina – unlike Emerson Fittipaldi. When it came to designing his dream car, the double F1 world champion

To complement the Italian styling, German racing outfit HQA AG were employed to look after the business end. It’s fitted with a bespoke-built normally aspirated 4.8litre V8 delivering 592bhp that revs up to 9,000rpm.

decided that only the best would do. Fortunately for him, Pininfarina cut ties with Ferrari a few years back, giving its designers plenty of time to create this: the Fittipaldi Motors EF7 Vision Gran Turismo.

3

What makes this all the more impactful is the car’s kerbweight of just 1,000kg. That’s 585kg less than a LaFerrari. Want to get behind the wheel? Well, you’ll need to get a PlayStation and a copy of Gran Turismo. ■

BEST E-MOUNTAIN BIKE

▷ If all that pedalling sounds too much like hard work, then you need to get on board the e-mtb trend. Basically, you take a standard mountain bike then add a lithium battery and a 250-watt motor so you can ride further, harder and faster – in most people’s mind a win-win. This is relatively new technology so there are plenty of duds around but you can’t go wrong with the Merida eOneSixty 900E, proven to be more rugged than most e-mtbs. You may not have heard of Merida but it’s one of Taiwan’s biggest companies and actually owns nearly half of Specialized. Our kind of electric dream… ■ For more info, see dirtmountainbike.com

019


PORTFOLIO

JOHN SMEDLEY

▽ WHAT DOES it take to become Britain’s most

THE EXCHANGE

iconic knitwear brand? For starters, you need to be called John Smedley. The eponymous company was passed down through no fewer than four generations of John Smedleys as it continued to pioneer the way we produce quality garments – and while much has changed since then, the brand’s commitment to quality materials remains the same. Fast forward some 230 years and you’ll still find John Smedley knitwear being fashioned in its Lea Mills factory in Derbyshire. Dating back to 1784, it’s the oldest manufacturing factory in the world, handcrafting pieces like the Wembury: a long-sleeved Henley shirt perfect for the stylish dressed-down look. Drawing on the classic Henley shirt from Smedley’s 1930s long johns, it’s made from lightweight and breathable 100% Sea Island Cotton to ensure you always feel as cool as you look. Nowadays the hallowed label is the proud holder of a Royal Warrant, but its greatest stamp of approval comes from the modern gents who continue to fill their wardrobes with its British-made style staples two centuries in the making. ■

BR AND WATCH

John Smedley Wembury, £140. For more info, see johnsmedley.com

WIN

COMPETITION

020

YOUR UNIQUE CHANCE TO WIN £750 TO SPEND WITH BRITISH CLOTHING BRAND SUNSPEL ▷ We’re offering one lucky winner £750 worth of Sunspel clothing to help get their ultimate summer wardrobe underway. Here’s your chance to build a modern, elegant and elevated summer wardrobe from classic jersey T-Shirts, smart polo shirts, swim wear, shorts, delicate dresses and lightweight shirts, or take your pick from luxurious knitwear, sharp tailoring and sophisticated accessories, too.

Founded in 1860, Sunspel is an authentic English heritage brand that makes exceptional quality everyday clothing from beautiful fabrics. Iconic products include the earliest English T-Shirt, the original English boxer short and the Riviera polo shirt, as seen on

Daniel Craig as James Bond in Casino Royale. Sunspel still has its own factory based in Long Eaton near Nottingham, where clothing is crafted from the world’s finest quality cotton, as well as five stores in London’s most prestigious areas.

TO ENTER

Go to squaremile.com/ competitions and answer a simple question. T&Cs can be found online.

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Were there to be only one Tonda Métrographe

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WATCHES OF SWITZERLAND 155 Regent Street, 47-51 Brompton road Heathrow Terminal 5


www.zenith-watches.com

LEGENDS ARE FOREVER


PORTFOLIO

A R T WO R K

NIFTY

see  more  on

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BY VICKY SMITH

PRETTY IN PINK

ARTWORK : Safety Blanket II, acrylic on panel, by Tom Martin

The notion of money making the world go round inspires artist Tom Martin’s hyper-photographic paintings. From his paper money globes to ‘Safety Blanket II’ [pictured here], he strives to show how cash is king, and the ease with which we lose sight of what’s more important. See more at his show Perpetual Motion at Plus One Gallery from 17 May-10 June. ■ plusonegallery.com

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the pure essentials of watchmaking, elevated to the level of art.

www.grand-seiko.com


PORTFOLIO

I N V E S T M EN T

A CONSIDERED APPROACH How should investors best navigate this period of change in economic policy? GERVAIS WILLIAMS says it’s time to be a lot more selective

AS CHANGES IN the political climate forewarn us of equally significant shifts in economic policy, the big challenge investors face is how to best navigate this period of volatility. Can you get away with a modest trimming to the portfolio tiller – or does it demand something more radical? The global financial crisis led to interest rates dropping to emergency levels and the introduction of quantitative easing. Yes, this may have prevented a depression, but despite sustaining these radical policies for nearly a decade thereafter, overall world growth remains firmly in the slow lane. Therefore, we shouldn’t be surprised that social attitudes have hardened over recent years – the electorate has grown to favour almost anything over the status quo. We didn’t vote to leave the EU because of animosity with our continental cousins. And US voters didn’t elect Trump because he is a model US citizen.

But now because our collective attitudes have changed, we can expect an equally significant trend change. For example, going forward the penalty for being just ‘average’ will become so much more costly for investors. Because when the next significant economic setback comes, we won’t be able to resort to cutting interest rates from 5.75% to 0.5%. And with bond yields already at ultra-low levels, we can’t reach for any more ‘shock and awe’ should central banks resort to quantitative easing again. So the key danger for investors is that individual or more wide-ranging setbacks could be marked by a more long-term loss of capital. And it’s best to ponder this before rather than after the event. One implication is that index funds may not be as well suited to the new

❱❱ WHEN THE NEXT SIGNIFICANT SETBACK COMES, WE WON’T BE ABLE TO RESORT TO CUTTING INTEREST RATES FROM 5.75% TO 0.5%

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environment. It stands to reason that when equity markets are good, index funds deliver attractive returns. But the problem with these passive funds is that they are insensitive to stock-specific risk. And should the penalty for averageness become more costly, then this just isn’t the time to invest in index funds. Why consider holding funds with no conviction in their 8% holdings? Successful investment strategies will need to continue to pick out the individual

The Retreat of Globalisation: Anticipating Radical Change in the Culture of Financial Markets by Gervais Williams is out now.

squaremile.com

ILLUSTRATION by Mark Boardman

For much of the last three decades, markets have been so good that investors have made attractive returns by merely participating in them. Some stocks did a little better, and some a little worse. Some markets outperformed others. But generally returns have been excellent all round. Yes, equity prices have suffered sizeable setbacks, but generally these were reversed soon thereafter. Overall, investors haven’t had to worry about long-term downside risk if they stuck to their guns.

companies with the best upside, but they will also need to ensure these companies have plenty of downside resilience too. In the future, investors will need to be a lot more selective to be successful. Every stock in our portfolio will need to generate a return, especially if market indices stagnate like the wider world economy. Selecting holdings on the basis that they are overweight or underweight relative to the mainstream indices is running out of road. And with Trump in the White House, business generally will become a more politically charged arena as well. As the world moves beyond globalisation, adopting investment strategies that are well positioned for the future isn’t just about sustaining attractive returns for clients at a time when world growth is more limited. The success of these strategies will also be measured in the more wide-ranging and important metrics of additional employment, better domestic growth and extra tax take for governments. All investors will need to be a lot more commercial about their stock picking in future. ■


PORTFOLIO

POLITICS

SPOILER ALERT All bets are off – the result of the upcoming general election is a foregone conclusion, says IAIN ANDERSON

AS YOUR RESIDENT political geek, I admit it: I’m loving it. I know, I know – most ordinary mortals met the news that Theresa May had called an early general election with a groan. But c’mon guys, an election is also the City’s dirty pleasure. The gyrations of political risk provide opportunities to make money, don’t they? OK, so this election might be a little different. I don’t think I am sticking my neck out to make this firm prediction: Theresa May will be returned as premier on a whopping majority. I was trying to get away from it all when the election was called, and about to board a flight when my phone lit up with calls and emails from excitable markets anoraks asking for some initial intelligence. Sat in Beijing airport, let me tell you what I told them about this general election. For first, the public has already made its mind up about Jeremy Corbyn. It did this within days of him being elected Labour leader back in 2015. Simply put for millions

not. In fact, voters came to the same view about Iain Duncan Smith as Tory leader. Regardless of the policies, no one – other than some political obsessives on the hard left – can see Corbyn as prime minister. Secondly, what’s the point in UKIP anymore? That’s the question that huge numbers of their former supporters are asking. They too have a leader that just can’t cut it. The huge amount of Tory support that bled out to UKIP over the Cameron years is already going ‘home’ to the Conservatives. For example, Douglas Carswell – the former Tory MP that defected to UKIP and then became briefly an independent MP – has said he is going to back the Tories. In Wales, the Tories are riding high because there was a majority for Brexit and large numbers of former UKIP voters are hearing and liking Theresa May’s approach to leaving the EU. What about the Lib Dems? They will do well in small pockets of the country. In southwest London their deeply pro-

❱❱ I DON’T THINK I’M STICKING MY NECK OUT TO MAKE THIS FIRM PREDICTION: THERESA MAY WILL BE RETURNED AS PREMIER ON A HUGE MAJORITY

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remain in the EU single market message will resonate. So expect Vince Cable to potentially make a Lazarus-like return – and Ed Davey has a good chance there, too. But they won’t make the breakthrough in their former heartland of southwest England because of that UKIP vote collapse. It’s just not going to the Lib Dems. So I have been continually telling City boardrooms for months that the temptation for Theresa May to call an early election was just too deep. By Easter, following the

squaremile.com

ILLUSTRATION by Mark Boardman

of patriotic Labour supporters – he is the man who wouldn’t sing the National Anthem. The tabloid front page of Corbyn mumbling his way through the words is seared on voters’ minds. And the Labour manifesto 2017 is set to be compared to the 1983 one – and that was called the longest suicide note in history. While politics has utterly changed since the days of Michael Foot and many of Labour’s policies actually do resonate with voters, once again their leader does

triggering of Article 50, the prime minister made the correct calculation that there would never be a better time to seek her own personal mandate and ditch much of her predecessor’s agenda. You will have seen the backdrop to all the prime minister’s campaign appearances so far – ‘strong and stable government’. It’s a message that cuts through to breakfast tables. You want Theresa May not Jeremy Corbyn. The whole Theresa May mantra since she first stood on the steps of No 10 in July 2016 has been to talk about policies designed to create a ‘country that works for everyone’. So the Tories’ message in this election is set to be deeply consumerfriendly. Did you spot that commitment to home energy price caps – ironically a policy that germinated under Ed Miliband when he was Labour leader? That’s designed to hit that sweet spot. ‘A better deal for ordinary Britons’ is the message for 2017. Of course, as you read this we will all be digesting the likely electoral disaster for Labour that will be the local government elections in early May. Another reason why the PM called her election. Another perfect backdrop for the Tories’ campaign. Labour may really panic. Talk of a Lib:Lab pact to reduce the Tories majority will be back in the headlines. But it will be too late. Sorry to all you City traders. General election 2017 – move on – nothing to see here. Although you might just want a spread bet on the size of the Tory majority. ■


Conduit Street j o h nv a r v a t o s . c o m

Vintage Trouble, 2017 K ings Theatre, Brooklyn, N Y


EXPOSURE

STYLE FRAGRANCES MY WORLD BACKPACKS BASELWORLD

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PHOTOGRAPH: Bell & Ross BR V2-94 Black Steel; bellross.com


EXPOSURE

STYLE SUMMER COATS

STYLE BIBLE

It’s that awkward time of year when whatever you wear, the weather seems to disagree. You need a lightweight jacket, says CHRIS ELVIDGE

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An exclusive and discreet haven in the heart of the city. Eight offers two venues with lounge bars, intimate private rooms and roof terraces with spectacular panoramic views of the city skyline. Available for conferences, private dining, parties for up to 500 guests and weddings.

GET THE LOOK: Eidos Knitted Cotton Sweater, £215; Isabel Benenato painted linen overcoat, £565; Dries Van Noten Perkins linen And cotton-blend drawstring trousers, £255

PHOTOGRAPH by Magdalena Wosinska

HAT SHOULD A man wear when it is no lightweight and boxy enough to be layered longer cold, but not yet warm? This, comfortably over a tracksuit jacket and shirt. in a nutshell, is the eternal dilemma This overcoat by Isabel Benenato is detailed of dressing for spring in the United Kingdom. with black paint for an artfully distressed look; When it’s neither coat weather nor it’s been crafted in Italy from breathable linen T-shirt weather, but something in between, and left unlined for lightness. Wear this jacket on top of a sweater, like it demands a flexible approach, focused on a smart combination of layers. Think unlined this oatmeal cotton example by Eidos. It has coats that you can easily shrug on and off to a tactile handle, chunky ribbed trims and is suit the conditions; knitwear that keeps you slit through the sides to relax the slim fit. warm, but doesn’t stifle you; and jackets light Be sure to update your utility pieces enough to layer over a sweatshirt without seasonally, starting with these trousers from leaving you looking like the Michelin Man. Dries Van Noten. Cut from a lightweight linen Accordingly, we suggest making room in and cotton blend, they’re finished with an your wardrobe for jackets, coats and cardigans elasticated drawstring waist for comfort – in lighter,Eight more Squaremeal_aw.pdf flexible fabrics. and they finish off the relaxed look perfectly. ■ 1 10/03/2017 15:12 Thin jackets boast the advantage of being To buy all the items mentioned, see mrporter.com


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R OV E AN D

D O N ’ T P AY F O R H I S T O R Y. M A K E I T.

PRICES FROM ÂŁ280

D A N I S H D E S I G N B Y A B O U T V I N TA G E Only few stand the test of evolution, and yet the classic timepiece has done exactly that. With a vision to be relevant today, tomorrow and beyond, our focus is to make simple yet spectacular timepieces for the everyday gent. For us, Vintage is not just a reference of style - it is the journey to becoming it. The journey will take you through eventful moments to occasions that change your whole perspective. We hope that one day your watch will make you look back at it all.

Collection by Skov Andersen w w w. a b o u t - v i n t a g e . c o m

S H O P / F R E D E R I K S B E R G A L L E 8 K L D . / 1 8 2 0 F R E D E R I K S B E R G / I N F O @ A B O U T- V I N T A G E . C O M / + 4 5 5 0 7 1 5 0 5 5


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EXPOSURE

COLLECTIONS CAD & THE DANDY

THE MEASURE OF A MAN

Independent tailors Cad and the Dandy know what’s important: high-quality tailoring without breaking the bank. Speaking of which, these ex-City boys know a thing or two about the Square Mile and how to dress its inhabitants

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BANKING ON STYLE Ex-bankers James Sleater and Ian Meiers left the City in 2008 to establish one of the youngest and most exciting tailors in London. Operating out of both Savile Row and The City, Cad and the Dandy focuses on providing high-end bespoke tailoring without the heavy price tag to match. Suiting up never felt so good.

SUIT YOURSELF When it comes to bespoke tailoring, Cad and the Dandy has all the bases covered. Prior to your appointment choose from hundreds of design permutations, including a vast library of fabrics and stylish linings, your custommade suit will then be constructed by hand in the tailor’s workshop before it’s fitted to your exact spec in store – a piece that suits you in every sense of the word.

GET THE LOOK: Nothing says quality British tailoring quite like a three-piece – and this navy Cad and the Dandy example is no exception. Cityready sartorial elegance fully bespoke for £1,900. For more information, see

cadandthedandy.co.uk

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FRAGRANCES SS17

FREEZE STYLE

Temperatures may be rising, but that doesn’t mean you have to lose your cool – here are the best fragrances for smelling fresh this summer 034

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EXPOSURE

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5 HAVE AN ICE SPRAY: 1. Valentino Uomo Acqua EDT (125ml) £70.50, selfridges.com 2. Jimmy Choo Man Ice EDT (100ml) £64, theperfumeshop.com 3. Czech & Speake Oxford & Cambridge cologne spray (100ml) £100, selfridges.com 4. Creed Erolfa EDT (75ml) £185, selfridges.com 5. Prada Luna Rossa Carbon EDT (100ml) £66.50, theperfumeshop.com 6. Hugo Boss Bottled Tonic EDT (100ml) £62, hugoboss.com

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EXPOSURE

BREAKING THE ICE: 1. Acqua di Parma Colonia Ebano EDC (180ml) £219, harrods.com 2. Narco Rodriguez For Him Bleu Noir (100ml) £60, theperfumeshop.com 3. Issey Miyake Nuit D’Issey Bleu Astral EDT (125ml) £60, theperfumeshop.com 4. Dunhill ICON Elite EDP (100ml) £77, harrods.com 5. Montblanc Emblem Absolu EDT (100ml) £68, theperfumeshop.com

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PHOTOGRAPHY by David Harrison

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DE L IVER I N G SA RTO R I AL E XC E L L E NC E clementsandchurch.co.uk


EXPOSURE

SHOPPING THE ROYAL EXCHANGE

RETAIL DETAIL

SHOPPING BAG THE ROYAL EXCHANGE, LONDON, EC3V 3DG THEROYALEXCHANGE.CO.UK

The latest luxury items available at the Royal Exchange, including a range of photography classes for all abilities at the Leica store

A LOT TO LEICA... Good news for the City’s aspiring photographers: the Leica Store City at the Royal Exchange is offering a wide programme of Leica Akademie photography training courses and workshops for those keen to hone their skills behind a lens. Snap up this opportunity quick. Leica Store, 18 Royal Exchange, EC3V 3LP

HERMÈS Sometimes inspiration can be surprisingly simple. In 1991, Henri d’Origny sketched a square inside a rectangle and thus designed the Cape Cod watch. The latest version, fresh from Baselworld, has a black DLC case and a matt black dial. 12 Royal Exchange, EC3V 3LL

SEARLE & CO Leonard Cohen sang of a bird on a wire; Samuel L Jackson battled snakes on a plane. Emulate those two legends by purchasing a butterfly on a ring. A pink diamond butterfly on a ring, to be exact. 1 Royal Exchange, EC3V 3LL

INSTANT SATISFACTION: The Leica Sofort (£230) is the first ever instant camera from Leica. Available in a choice of cool, contemporary colours – mint, white and orange [pictured] – it even has a selfie mode.

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LULU GUINNESS Show you’ve got the love – and the style – with this leather handbag from Lulu Guinness. With two internal compartments and a centre zip compartment, these really are a safe pair of hands. 23 Royal Exchange, EC3V 3LP

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TURNBULLANDASSER.COM/VELOCITY LONDON 71-72 JERMYN STREET

4 DAVIES STREET

23 BURY STREET NEW YORK 50 EAST 57TH STREET

WORLD TRADE CENTER


EXPOSURE

MY WORLD TUMI

BEST-CASE SCENARIO New Tumi creative director Victor Sanz has luxury luggage design in the bag. TOM POWELL learns about the company’s acquisition by Samsonite, the power of social media, and how to pack for a business trip

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EET VICTOR SANZ: the exuberant innovator behind New Jersey-based luggage brand Tumi. Sharply dressed and very well travelled after almost 15 years designing, reimagining and road-testing the living hell out of cases, he certainly knows a thing or two about travelling in style. Sat in the brand’s flagship store on Regent Street, Sanz shares his thoughts on the changing world of business travel, how the company has changed since its takeover by Samsonite last year and why you should never pack loud colours when you’re going on a work trip.

LEADER OF THE PACK: Victor Sanz was appointed Tumi’s creative director in October 2016, and says the brand has never been stronger.

WHAT’S CHANGED IN BUSINESS TRAVEL SINCE YOU FIRST JOINED TUMI BACK IN 2003? In the past, your case was just this black box that helped you haul stuff from A to B, but these days fashion, design, architecture and engineering are becoming more and more interwoven. Down the runway you’re seeing clothes that look like product design, and product design that looks more like fashion design. For us, it’s all about the way we tune into our customers’ needs and frustrations, whether it’s materials, functionality or making something beautiful to break up the monotony of sitting in an airport terminal for hours.

HOW DO YOU GO ABOUT BUILDING A BAG FOR THE MODERN BUSINESSPERSON?

PHOTOGRAPH by Bryan Derballa

I look at our customers now and I call it ‘from the boardroom to the bar’: you should be able to walk into the boardroom and not feel embarrassed by the bag you’re wearing, and with that same bag, you should be able to go to meet your friends after work and not be embarrassed and want to hide it away. In 2017, business doesn’t stop at 5pm or 6pm – business continues. Whether it’s cocktails or an event afterwards, we don’t have the luxury to run back home; we just slide from one thing to another, to another. That’s the person’s lifestyle, so let’s try and perfect that journey.

HAS LAST YEAR’S SAMSONITE TAKEOVER CHANGED THE WAY YOU WORK AT TUMI? For us, it’s been business as usual, except now we have this amazing opportunity to continue to grow the brand alongside a huge team of

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like-minded people. It’s great, because now we’ve suddenly got loads more eyes in the world to look at things like new materials or changes to airline regulations to work out a way to make our customers’ journey as easy and hiccup-free as possible.

HOW HAS SOCIAL MEDIA CHANGED TRAVEL? The days of carrying around bulky laptops are over and our bags have quick-access pockets for tablets and smartphones, but beyond that we’re looking more and more outside of our industry to see what’s happening in the world. For us, social media is awesome because it gives us an immediate, interactive insight into

what our customers are doing, how they’re travelling and where they’re going – it means we’re always discovering hot new locations and better understanding people’s needs.

WHAT ARE YOUR TOP PACKING TIPS? Lay out everything you think you’ll need, then cut it in half: that’s your start. Then make sure your palate’s nice and simple, especially if you’re travelling for business – if you go for a caseful of blacks, whites and neutrals you’ve got more colour matches for every kind of event. It sounds like a cliché, but when you travel a lot for work, less is more. ■ For more information, see tumi.com

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BACK TO BASICS: 1. Gladstone 23 Backpack in Air Force green, £950, gladstonelondon.com 2. Coach Modern Varsity campus backpack in sport calf leather, £650, uk.coach.com 3. BOSS Elegance backpack in blue leather, £750, hugoboss.com 4. Bennett Winch backpack in olive, £395, bennettwinch.com 5. Tumi CFX Southington backpack, £1,095 uk.tumi.com

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PHOTOGRAPH by David Harrison

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EXPOSURE

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STYLE BACKPACKS

BACK IN ACTION Whether made from leather, canvas, or even carbon fibre, backpacks have never been more fashionable. Here are our five favourites…

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Seymour III, made on last 373, is further enhanced by hand polishing and burnishing, creating an unforgettable English patina MADE IN ENGLAND | SINCE 1879

LONDON

JERMYN STREET BURLINGTON ARCADE KNIGHTSBRIDGE ROYAL EXCHANGE CANARY WHARF

BIRMINGHAM

COLMORE ROW BURLINGTON ARCADE, NEW ST

NEW YORK 11 EAST 55TH STREET

CROCKETTANDJONES.COM #MADETOBEWORN

BRUSSELS RUE DE NAMUR

PARIS

LA MADELEINE BOULEVARD RASPAIL LE MARAIS


EXPOSURE

WATCHES INSTAGRAM

#WATCHWEWANT Every Wednesday, we post our favourite wrist candy to the @squaremile_com Instagram account. Get in on the action: share your watches with #watchwewant

MEISTER DYNAMITE The Neo Plus is Meistersinger’s latest example of sleek German watchmaking. It features doubledigit numerals and a circular date window at six o’clock, all on an elegant domed ivory dial. It’s built for the day to day, whether you’re in the office or on the town. £1,195;

meistersinger.com

THE HAND OF TIME

PHOTOGRAPH by publinc larit em potinium vid ces blah

While the Münsterbased brand perfectly encapsulates minimalist Bauhaus watch design, its biggest selling point is the single hour hand on its timepieces. Meistersinger’s unique philosophy takes inspiration from the tower clocks of the Middle Ages – and hopes to encourage its wearers to live in the moment, rather than watching the, er, clock.

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As watchmakers, we make very small components ďŹ t into very limited space. At Formex, we just managed to ďŹ t our entire boutique in your smartphone. Discover and Shop Online #betweenyouandus

www.formexwatch.com


#betweenyouandus means that we design, develop and manufacture our watches and sell them directly to you. With no retailer in between, Formex is the direct point of contact in all stages of buying and owning a watch. This allows us to create exactly the customer experience we want you to have and provide an incredible value for money. Our AS 1100 pictured above, a Swiss Made Valjoux 7750 Automatic Chronograph made of stainless steel, titanium and carbon-ďŹ bre with our patented case suspension system is available at ÂŁ1110.-, including VAT and all taxes & duties, speedy shipping, 30-day free return and a 3-year warranty. Find this and other Formex timepieces now exclusively in our Online Store.


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PATEK PHILIPPE

WATCHES BASELWORLD

WRIST & REWARD Reporting from Baselworld – the biggest watch event on the planet – BEN WINSTANLEY examines the key timepieces for every style and budget 048

The watch industry’s fascination with timepieces of the past has continued in 2017 – and Patek Philippe’s latest watch is a perfect example of how to get retro right. Celebrating 20 years of the Aquanaut, often overshadowed by its cousin the Nautilus, the Swiss giants have created the Aquanaut Jumbo 5168G. Sporting an embossed night-blue dial in a new larger 42.2mm case, this is Patek at its preppy-chic best. £27,990; patek.com

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EXPOSURE

NOMOS

OMEGA

JUNGHANS

The Ahoi Neomatik is design-focused Nomos’s answer to a dive watch. First released in 2013, it gets a major update this year in the form of a smaller 36mm size and a DUW 3001 calibre ultra-thin automatic movement. Certainly worth the plunge. £2,990; nomos-glashuette.com

More than a decade after the Railmaster slipped off its roster, Omega has revamped its utilitarian favourite for a new generation. Buy it for the vertically brushed steel dial and herringbone strap, keep it for the in-house Master Co-Axial chronometer movement. £3,600; omegawatches.com

Bauhaus watch design is once again at the centre of Junghans new collection, which draws inspiration from the world of design and shape. Form A is the automatic of the line-up, and proves that while form may be temporary, class is permanent. £830; junghans.co.uk

LONGINES

One of the most talkedabout watches of this year’s Baselworld is also one of the prettiest: Longine’s Heritage 1945. The vintage-inspired 40mm automatic owes its good looks to a brushed copper-treated dial, and the alternating Arabic numerals and silvery cabochons on its balanced display. But its incredible value might be most attractive of all. £1,350; longines.com

PHOTOGRAPH (Patek Philippe) by Jean-Daniel Meyer

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ZENITH

ANONIMO

BREITLING

The iconic El Primero movement, first created in 1969, is the bedrock upon which Zenith was built – and in 2017 the Swiss brand finally has a rightful heir. The Defy El Primero 21 is a chronometer-certified 1/100th of a second chronograph, with a hand that covers a full rotation of the dial per second. Housed in a 44mm openwork ceramicised case, it really makes us tick. £9,900; zenith-watches.com

Celebrating its 20th anniversary in 2017, the Italian watchmaker is marking the occasion with a new camouflage chrongraph in its Militare Alpini series. A subtle guilloché camo pattern is the star attraction on the engraved dial, while the 43mm cushion case is made from a bronze alloy designed oxidise over time to further enhance the robust vintage effect. CHF 5,250; anonimo.com

In development since 2009, Breitling’s Navitimer Rattrapante is well worth the wait. The Swiss brand’s first in-house split seconds chronograph, Breitling joins only a small handful of elite brands in producing one of the most elegant complications in horology from scratch. With a classic Navitimer aesthetic, available in either a limited 250-run 18ct red gold or steel, it looks the part, too. £10,460; breitling.com

TAG HEUER

TUDOR

FREDERIQUE CONSTANT

First designed in 1966, and rebooted for 2017 after a public vote, the Autavia Ref 2446 is a Heuer classic. Perfect for today’s vintage-obsessed watch buyers, the original was worn by Formula 1 champion Jochen Rindt. Its reverse panda dial showcases a three-register chronograph, while a wide and bold 12-hour bezel adds to its masculine appeal. Perfect at-the-wheel wristwear. £3,900; tagheuer.com

Tudor hasn’t disappointed in following up the triumph of last year’s Black Bay Bronze. The new Black Bay Chronograph is a beauty, with aesthetics faithful to Tudor automotive chronographs of the 1970s. But best of all is what’s inside: adapting Breitling’s B01 movement, Tudor has created a robust column-wheel chronograph caliber MT5813 for a price that’s almost too good to be true. £3,220; tudorwatch.com

Frederique Constant has a habit for creating gorgeous complications at absurdly low prices – and its first in-house flyback chronograph is no exception. Six years in the making, the new FC-760 calibre measures seconds and up to 30 minutes at nine and three o’clock respectively, while the elegant guilloché dial also houses a date function at six o’clock for even more bang for your buck. £3,750; frederiqueconstant.com

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EXPOSURE

HARRY WINSTON

When it comes to ambitious watches utilising the world’s finest materials, few match Harry Winston’s eye for the avant-garde. The Project Z11 continues this trend with a case made from Zalium – a zirconium-based alloy, with origins in the aerospace industry. Its modern openwork design flips the simple date functionality on its head to create something out of this world. £POA; harrywinston.com

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ROLEX

Rolex has created a moonphase timepiece for the first time since the 1950s. In the horological world, this is big news. The watch in question, the Cellini Moonphase, is as dressy and elegant as they come, but the kicker is that the moon cycles should be accurate for the next 122 years. The ideal watch for any besuited lycans out there, then. ÂŁ19,650; rolex.com

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EXPOSURE

LOUIS ERARD

HUBLOT

GRAFF

Louis Erard has perfected the art of blending modernity and classicism in its latest model, the Excellence Guilloché Regulator Power Reserve. At the centre of the silver-toned guilloché dial are two sub dials for hours and minutes, with a power reserve indicator at nine o’clock. Its minimalist aesthetic, along with its excellent price point, contribute to an appealing entry-level dress piece for all tastes. £1,795; montres-louiserard.ch

Avante-garde design is nothing new to Hublot fans, but the Swiss brand’s latest Big Bang Unico GMT delivers on the practical front, too. Beneath the openwork dial, you’ll find an inhouse caliber HUB1251, with fully integrated dual time zone complication, but it’s the easy-to-read day/night disc used to indicate whether it is AM or PM in the second time zone that will appeal most to stylish travellers. £16,500; hublot.com

When it comes to glamorous timepieces, English-based diamond specialist Graff proves why you shouldn’t do things by halves. The striking MasterGraff Minute Repeater is available in both non-diamond and diamondset versions, it features a minute repeater complication alongside a flying tourbillon. Mother-of-pearl bridges and an openwork dial blue smoked acrylic only add to its charm. £POA; graffdiamonds.com

BREGUET

FABERGÉ

RAYMOND WEIL

Breguet’s 2017 novelty – the Marine Équation Marcante 5887 – is a rare example of the equation of time complication. This basically acts as a mechanical sundial, measuring time according to the position of the sun. In addition to this, it also boasts a tourbillon and perpetual calendar. Next time you’re late to your next meeting, just explain that your still running on solar time. £161,300; breguet.com

Few watches compare with Fabergé’s Visionnaire Chronograph in the style and innovation stakes. Teaming up with famed movement specialists, Agenhor, the brand has created the revolutionary automatic calibre 6361 – aka the AgenGraph. In place of three sub dials, the chronograph is read through one central dial. Departure from the norm rarely looks this good. CHF 39,500; faberge.com

While Raymond Weil’s collection of music-inspired watches has continued to grow in popularity, behind the scenes the Swiss manufacturer’s R&D department has collaborated closely with Sellita to produce the brand’s first in-house movement. The result is the Freelancer Calibre RW1212, a watch that proudly shows off its new interior through a skeletonised bridge. £2,875; raymond-weil.com

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EXPOSURE

SEIKO

Seiko has faithfully recreated its first ever dive watch, the Ref 6217 diver, from 1965. While its retro aesthetics are identical, inside a selfwinding movement brings the timepiece into the modern era with a 60-hour power reserve. Limited to 2,000 pieces, we suggest you dive in before it’s too late. £3,750; seiko.co.uk

BLANCPAIN

ORIS

BELL & ROSS

First seen on the Blancpain Mil-Spec 1 in 1957, the watertightness indicator on this vintage timepiece makes for one of the most unique launches this year. Taking its design cues from the brand’s earliest combat-issued dive watch, this is one for the collectors. £10,310; blancpain.com

The Aquis dive watch is Oris at its best: quality watchmaking at an excellent price. A mechanical dive watch with 300m water resistance, the 2017 update boasts a sleek ceramic bezel and a more refined silhouette, perfect under a cuff or over a wetsuit. £1,400; oris.ch

Believe it or not, the iconic Bell & Ross square case shape has never made it into a dive watch – until now. Powered by a self-winding mechanical movement, this professionalgrade diving instrument is water resistant to 300m for all your aquatic adventure needs. £2,800; bellross.com

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Smile all the stay in the Maldives

Your fantasy of a laid-back, desert island paradise is about to come true. The freshly-renovated LUX* South Ari Atoll brings an entirely original vibe of coastal, beach house chic holiday. Yes, it’s the Maldives - but not as you know it. MAURITIUS

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FEATURES

CHARLIE HUNNAM JIMI HENDRIX ED WESTWICK STONY FACED

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WHAT YOU LOOKIN’ AT? . 070

PHOTOGRAPH by David Ellis


FEATURES

Fit for a King AS SONS OF ANARCHY STAR CHARLIE HUNNAM PREPARES TO SWAP SHOTGUNS FOR SWORDS IN GUY RITCHIE’S RE-IMAGINING OF KING ARTHUR, HE SHARES HIS THOUGHTS ON FIGHTING, MISSING OUT ON FIFTY SHADES AND BEING BUDDIES WITH BECKHAM. BY KAREN ANNE OVERTON

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HARLIE HUNNAM DOESN’T like hype, isn’t too fond of Hollywood, and isn’t one to brag. He is also very up-front about the fact that director Guy Ritchie initially showed zero interest in casting a rugged and beardy blonde as the eponymous monarch in the upcoming King Arthur: Legend of the Sword. And when asked how he came to land what is arguably his biggest role to date, he simply shrugs: “Fuck knows, because he didn’t want to see me. He wanted nothing to do with me!” But the 36-year-old, who in his own words is “a likeable guy”, set to winning over the

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Snatch filmmaker on a visit to his London home. “I got to his house, sat down with the man, and we just talked and talked. After 90 minutes, I realised we had been talking exclusively about the California medical marijuana initiative,” says a bemused Hunnam, in a style rather reminiscent of a Guy Ritchie voiceover. “I thought ‘go with it, he’s still talking with me’. We went on for another hour or so, and when I left I thought, ‘Shit – we never said a thing about Arthur!’” Ritchie, however, instinctively knew he had the right man for the job and called the affable actor ➤

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FEATURES

➤ the next day to offer him the lead role. The film promises to be a raucous re-imagining of the fabled classic, and rather than the traditional Camelot culture of valour, Hunnam is playing Guy Ritchie’s Arthur – a cheeky everyman, raised in the slums, unaware of his royal lineage until he drags the legendary sword from a stone. “It’s no accident that the studio picked Guy as the man to realise this vision,” says Hunnam. “This is one of the oldest stories, so for him to take it and create this fresh, brittle outlook in his very signature way – very punchy, gritty, cheeky – just excited me from the first time I heard he was doing it.” With a stellar supporting cast including Djimon Hounsou, Eric Bana and Àstrid Bergès-Frisbey, along with Jude Law as the disgruntled and tyrannical crown-stealer set on foiling Arthur’s claim to the throne, and Peaky Blinders star Annabelle Wallis, it looks like Ritchie could have a hit to rival his equally outlandish interpretation of Sherlock Holmes. David Beckham also makes an appearance as a knight – his second role in a Ritchie flick following a brief cameo in The Man From UNCLE – and while Hunnam says he personally wasn’t star-struck, having “never been a football man”, others on set weren’t so impervious to the ex-England captain’s charms. “The film crew in particular, the

gaffers, the electricians… all those boys, they’re these butch, manly men, but they all turned into 15-year-old girls at a Justin Bieber concert because Beckham was on set,” Hunnam jokes. “I was like – pull yourselves together!” Despite the chaos he caused, Hunnam is only complimentary about the footballing legend himself, admitting it was easy to see how he became such a celebrated sportsman. “There was a work ethic and determination, because he wasn’t just there to have a laugh – he was determined and serious about doing a good job,” he explains. “He’d been working with an acting coach, which speaks volumes about his work ethic and shows that nothing happens without hard work.” The big question, though, is would he consider himself to be buddies with Becks now? “I’d be quite friendly with him,” he says with a cheeky grin. “He’s not on speed dial, but I’d definitely have a drink with him. He’s a great guy.” For Hunnam, who has spent much of the last decade filming the dark and deeply serious crime series Sons of Anarchy, knighting up was a thrilling change of pace. “This was honestly one of the very best experiences – just for pure fun and adventure and really letting go – that I’ve ever had on a film set,” says the enthusiastic Geordie. “Guy would say to me, ‘Before we do this, the one thing I really want from you is to show up every day and have fun because if we’re having fun, the tone is where we want it to be and the audience are having fun, too.’” Those unfamiliar with Sons of Anarchy – the hugely popular, edgy and violent American series following the lives of a close-knit outlaw motorcycle gang in California – may instead remember Hunnam from his breakout role in 1990s gay drama Queer as Folk. Shot when Hunnam was a skinny and disarming 18-yearold, he won over male and female fans alike with his pretty-boy features and cocky teenage swagger. Several high-profile film roles followed like Cold Mountain and Children of Men, but it was his turn as a football hooligan in Lexi Alexander’s Green Street that garnered him the most attention. Unfortunately, though, it was for the wrong reasons as film and footie

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PHOTOGRAPH (suit) by Samir Hussein/WireImage

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I was just trying to keep up with all these burly, beefy guys around me – they were everywhere

fans alike mocked his dubious cockney accent. He hit headlines once more in 2013 when he was cast and then withdrew (no pun intended…) from playing Christian in Fifty Shades of Grey, owing to conflicting film schedules with Guillermo Del Toro’s Crimson Peak. Hunnam has since said that it was “the worst professional experience” of his life, but that he simply couldn’t make it work. When asked how he now feels about missing out on such a lucrative role, the handsome star shrugs and says, “I have no regrets, really I don’t. This will sound so high-falutin and wanky, but I really do try to force myself to live in the present and not to project happiness on past or future events.” Compared to his peers, Hunnam is a bit of an anomaly. Like his King Arthur alter ego, he has a sense of honour that is unexpected – and at times rather unhelpful when pursuing such a cutthroat career path. For example, his decision to shoot Crimson Peak over Fifty Shades despite Del Toro having months to recast and it being a much smaller role. Hunnam’s reasoning? Because he had given the cult Mexican filmmaker “his word”. He also pretty much shuns the Los Angeles party circuit, living on a ranch outside of Hollywood with his partner of 11 years – Morgana McNelis – and crumples and blushes at the slightest mention of any flattery. But perhaps it is these perceived flaws that ingratiate Hunnam to the likes of Guy Ritchie, a man who also lurks on the edges of ‘the scene’ and directs his films like a maniac with a can opener, lifting the lid on conventions and delving deep to find what’s behind the narrative – an ethos Hunnam appears to share. “Arthur is a very big, glossy, commercial film, but at the heart of it, Guy and I were really trying to explore some interesting things about the human condition,” muses Hunnam. “About what it requires to overcome fears and trust our sense of hope. That’s what the story of Arthur is, overcoming those personal hurdles, in order to rise to the challenge of conquering the insurmountable odds of becoming the king of England and fighting in this incarnation, in a literal sense, the demon at the castle walls.” Both metaphorically and physically Hunnam is a monster presence on screen, having bulked up from his naturally slender frame to become appropriately foreboding and ripped. “I was just trying to keep up with all these burly, beefy guys around me. They were literally everywhere. I couldn’t let the side down – I was King-fucking-Arthur! So I turned it up, got up to about 180 and that is not easy to carry around!” he says with a smirk, before adding, “I’m nothing like a lot


STEELY-EYED: [this image] Hunnam as King Arthur, who gains his rightful regal position after pulling a sword from a stone; [left] looking sharp at the The Lost City of Z premiere in London earlier this year.

of my characters, particularly ones I’ve played recently. Physically, I’m so far removed and I feel comfortable being slimmer. Not this freakish, abbed-out gym dude!” Hunnam may have found fame as a teenager, but his obsession with acting came long before that, after watching adventure films as a boy – particularly John Boorman’s Excalibur. And while the actor seized his chance to fight, lead an army into battle and ride a horse with abandon on screen, there were aspects of the process that were less enthralling in reality. “Sword fighting requires immense preparation which is very labourintensive; it’s not as fun as it looks as a kid,” he says, shaking his head. “It’s also a lot more

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mental than it is physical, oddly. The final scene is maybe seven minutes long, but you need to learn 700 or 800 beats, and know how that goes in succession in the dance. I found

Sword fighting requires immense preparation; it’s definitely not as fun as it looks as a kid

myself quite obsessed with running those sequences over and over.” What is evident is that Hunnam has the swagger, charm and most importantly balls to claim his rightful place in Hollywood, but the question is whether he wants to. Unlike his regal alter-ego, Hunnam is in full control of his own destiny. “I’m in the best position I’ve ever been in career-wise, in terms of the opportunities that are being given to me,” he says. “But I feel more neurotic now than I ever have, because of all these fucking decisions I have to make all the time. There are now stakes to what decisions I make, but fuck that – there shouldn’t be. I can’t handle that in my life!” ■ King Arthur: Legend of the Sword is out on 19 May.

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The Axeman Cometh GUITARIST. REBEL. ICON. NEARLY 50 YEARS AFTER HIS DEATH, THE LEGEND OF JIMI HENDRIX CONTINUES TO GROW. THESE PHOTOGRAPHS BY ED CARAEFF SHOULD EXPLAIN WHY

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N 1967 A young photographer named

Ed Caraeff attended The Monterey Pop Festival. The likes of Janis Joplin, Simon and Garfunkel, and Otis Redding were on the bill, although a German photographer advised Caraeff to “save some film for this Jimi Hendrix cat.” It proved sage advice: Caraeff’s shot of Hendrix setting fire to his guitar would become the defining image of the great musician, and one of the most famous photographs of the 1960s. “I was so close to him I could feel the heat from the flames.” Caraeff would shoot several more Hendrix gigs, chronicling Jimi’s journey from electrifying young guitarist to musical icon.

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Now these photographs – and the stories behind them – are collected in the book Burning Desire: The Jimi Hendrix Experience Through the Lens of Ed Caraeff. Depicting Hendrix and the band both onstage and off, it’s a thrillingly intimate portrait of one of the greatest musicians of the 20th century. Caraeff went on to create album covers for numerous artists – including Elton John, Tom Waits and Dolly Parton – and his photography is included in the permanent collection of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. Yet he remains most closely associated with Hendrix: indeed, the Monterery shot is the only photo to be used twice on the cover of Rolling Stone. ■

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TWISTED FIRESTARTER: One of rock music’s most iconic images is created as Jimi Hendrix literally ignites his guitar at the 1967 Monterey pop Festival. “The time I burned my guitar it was like a sacrifice. You sacrifice the things you love. I love my guitar.”

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SEALED WITH A KISS: The Jimi Hendrix Experience headlines the Hollywood Bowl in 1968. Excited fans leapt into the moat that separated the band from the audience. Water splashed a stage covered with electronic equipment, but thankfully nobody was harmed.

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FOLLOWER OF FASHION: Hendrix cultivated a flamboyant personal style typical of the late 1960s. “The hipsters all dressed like that,” recalls Ed Caraeff. “The brighter, the better.” This photo was taken in Anaheim, California, 1968 – the year after the Summer of Love.

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THRASHING IT OUT: A year before headlining the Bowl, the Experience supported folk band The Mamas & The Papas at the venue. This appearance proved less successful, as Hendrix’s rebellious stylings alienated the folksy audience. “Los Angeles was hard on us,”admitted bassist Noel Redding. “We died a death at the Bowl. The Mamas & The Papas’ folk-rock type crowd were the very opposite of our own followers.”

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HEY SINGER MAN: Hendrix shared a bill with The Animals at the Anaheim Convention Center, 1968. Eric Burdon, lead singer of The Animals, told Hendrix that he was embarrassed his band were closing the show, as Hendrix was clearly the superior performer. Burdon’s bandmates were not pleased. Yet the hedonistic lifestyle was starting to take its toll on Hendrix. Reviews of the Anaheim gigs were poor. BUY THE BOOK: Burning Desire: The Jimi Hendrix Experience Through the Lens of Ed Caraeff is out now (ACC Editions, £29.95)

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ED WESTWICK HAS MADE A SPECIALITY OF PLAYING CHARISMATIC ANTIHEROES. THE BRITISH ACTOR TALKS TO MAX WILLIAMS ABOUT PAST ROLES AND FUTURE AMBITIONS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID ELLIS GROOMING BY REBECCA RICHARDS squaremile.com

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E

D WESTWICK IS a bad man. Consider

the charge sheet. He’s seduced and manipulated every woman with a pulse in the Upper East Side of Manhattan. He stabbed a rival’s best friend in Verona. He was briefly a serial killer, then a ferocious Cuban gangster terrorising the East End. Now he sells double glazing. Oh, Westwick is bad news alright. But then the devil always gets the best lines. If you’ve ever watched Westwick on screen – big or small – you’ll know a good line isn’t wasted on him. Most famously as Chuck Bass in the wildly popular TV series Gossip Girl, purring bon mots such as “Whoever said that money doesn’t buy happiness didn’t know where to shop” while draped in a $1,000 scarf. There are worse ways to make your name. He should enjoy some zingers in his latest project. Written by Damon Beesley, co-creator of The Inbetweeners, White Gold portrays the cutthroat world of double glazing sales in 1980s Essex. Westwick is Vincent Swan: charismatic, amoral and fiercely on the make – “a bit of an animal”, according to the actor. “He’s definitely kind of the alpha male, leads the pack, is driven by his ambition. He wants more, and he doesn’t care how he gets it.” Swan is more rogue than villain, but his blind ambition leads down some dark avenues. “There’s some pretty deplorable behaviour,” confesses Westwick, before adding wryly, “I sound like a nun right now.” He gives an example of such behaviour – “Am I allowed to reveal this?” he asks his publicist. It’s indeed pretty deplorable – the type of act puerile teenager Jay from The Inbetweeners would boast about but be unable to pull off. But I won’t reveal any more – I wouldn’t want to make you blush. Speaking of Jay – as well as Beesley, Inbetweeners alumni James Buckley and Joe Thomas star as Swan’s colleagues, both sporting questionable facial hair. According to Westwick, the humour is similarly raunchy but viewers should expect more dramatic, complex storylines than tended to be found in the superbly adolescent E4 comedy. “Everything people loved about The Inbetweeners, they’re going to see within this, and then there’s a lot of new elements as well.” For Westwick, it was a case of right show, right time. He’d never properly done ‘straight comedy’, and both he and his agent were immediately attracted to the script. “We thought it was pretty hilarious, and a really interesting move.” He’s a relaxed presence, Westwick, with a dryness of humour that verges on the sardonic, and a languid delivery one might reasonably describe as a drawl. His arrival in

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the square mile studio prompts an excitement among the female staff usually reserved for rock stars or Second Comings. Although he dons the threads for our photoshoot, his body sports an impressive array of ink – most notably a topless woman on his upper right arm. “This was a girl who was already there,” he says of the lady in question. “I got 1936 tattooed [underneath her] because my grandmother won a contest called Miss Lovely Legs 1936. So my grandmother’s topless on my arm,” he deadpans. (Westwick deadpans a lot.) One of the refreshing aspects of interviewing him is the sense of a hinterland: that there’s a lot more that interests Ed Westwick than simply being Ed Westwick. His answers are always considered, and often migrate into unexpected areas. You can sense his mind moving as he speaks. So ask his favourite writers and he replies, “Hemingway”, then describes the book he’s currently reading – Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil by John Berendt – and then that book’s setting of Savannah, Georgia segues into a meditation on the Deep South. “There’s that charm about the south that I really, really quite love. I’ve been lucky enough to visit some of the cities, but from reading the book I want to go to Charleston, and I want to go to Savannah. These kind of old-world Southern cities that are perhaps kind of the same as they were 100 years ago.” Similarly, bring up the possibility of James Bond – “You wouldn’t say no to that, would you?” he murmurs. “You wouldn’t say no…” – and soon you’re discussing the evolution of the spy series into the 21st century. “As a society we’ve developed with technology and stuff like that, the world has become a more complex place, therefore the stories have become more complex. We, as people now, either love violence or hate it.” There is violence aplenty in his other TV series of 2017, a spinoff of Guy Ritchie’s Snatch. As with the original film (and all early Ritchie) the action concerns an eclectic cast of East End chancers – Hasidic Jews, gypsy boxers, loquacious cockneys – crossing and double-crossing one another while attempting to make a dishonest buck. Westwick is Cuban gangster Sonny Castillo, over from Miami to take care of the mob’s nefarious London interests. In the trailer he fires a machine gun after Rupert Grint while sporting a kimono and a perm. It looks a blast. “I did that one because I was such a fan of the film,” says Westwick. “I was like, I need to be involved in this show. It’s so well written – Alex De Rakoff [the show’s creator and

director of Dead Man Running] has brought the world alive again in such a fantastic way.” Although his hair swerves the 1980s in White Gold, the Snatch perm was actually Westwick’s idea: “I looked in the mirror and I went, how am I going to pull this off? So I went, give me a perm. That’ll do it. So I’ve got a perm – slightly blackened – and one of those little beards. I look like Drake.” The machine gun must have been a bonus? “It’s always a plus. Especially when you’re wearing a dressing gown.” Of course, Westwick’s big break came on TV. Gossip Girl chronicled the lives of a clique of stunningly attractive teenage socialites and their many indiscretions, normally involving each other. Unlike its more wholesome predecessors, such as One Tree Hill, the show wallowed in its immorality – ‘Every Parent’s Nightmare’ boasted a poster for Season Two – and displayed a relish for conspicuous consumption that would make Jay Gatsby swoon. It ran for six seasons of increasingly lurid storylines before finally ending in 2012. As malevolent playboy Chuck Bass, a teenage Mephistopheles whose thirst for hedonism was matched only by his appetite for self-destruction, Westwick won fans around the world. (4.5m of them follow his Instagram.) Did he ever worry Chuck would cast a shadow over the rest of his career? “Worry’s not the right word,” he begins, speaking more thoughtfully than ever, “because that’s not something to worry about. It’s an interesting challenge, but never one I ever thought about too much. At the end of the day I was very young – I was 25 when we finished it. You know you’re going to change visually, you’re going to mature, and you’re going to learn different things. “In most cases I’ve done the things I wanted to do that I felt were going to depart from [Gossip Girl] anyway. Of course there’s been other things down the road that I would have loved to have got that I haven’t got, things that may have helped earlier, but it’s fine. Where I’m at right now I’m very, very happy. “You’ve got to do things you love, right? ➤

You’ve got to do the things you love, right? Especially in this game, or it will start to show squaremile.com


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➤ Especially in this game, because if you start doing the things you don’t particularly love then it will start to show. I don’t want that.” He starred in Chalet Girl with Felicity Jones – “She’s an incredible person, an incredible actress” – of Star Wars: Rogue One fame. Has he explored the blockbuster route? “Of course. I work in a very competitive industry, and there’s been loads of things that I would love to have been a part of, and either was too busy or I didn’t get the job or whatever. That’s just what happens.” He’s still frequently recognised as Chuck Bass, and will be for a few years yet. The likes of Netflix have ensured the popular TV shows of old can be consumed by new generations – a point Westwick raises. “People can enjoy that show ten years down the line. I haven’t seen any of it in a long time but I mean it’s got to be somewhat timeless – it’s not dated or anything just because it started ten years ago.” He notes how the central concept of Gossip Girl – a mysterious blogger who updated young New Yorkers on the latest juicy scandal – anticipated the rise of social media and the impact of the mobile phone. “It was actually ahead of its time in a way.” What Westwick doesn’t mention – and only occurs to me after our interview – is that another modern phenomenon was foreshadowed by Gossip Girl. The obsession with wealth, the glitz and glamour, the Manhattan setting, and yes, the debauchery and sexual transgression – the show might as well be Trump: The Teenage Years. Inevitably the show ran out of inspiration long before the end. In the final episode Gossip Girl is revealed to be aspiring writer Dan Humphrey, a choice laden with implausibility. Did the cast know of this twist in advance? “No, I think they made it up on the last day,” says Westwick cheerfully. “Nobody cared at that point. So it was literally eenie, meenie, miney mo, I think. So there you go.” Would he be open to a reunion? “I don’t think so. I think we had a lovely, lovely time, we were very, very lucky to get that run, and we enjoyed it and it meant an immense amount. I think people have moved on. But saying that, I’m a fan of Friends. Who doesn’t want to see a Friends reunion? From my audience-member side, I’d want to see it. But when you’re involved in it, and it’s your work, and that was that… It’s funny.” He trails off but the insinuation is clear – let the past be. So then what of the future? When interviewing an actor like Westwick, established as a name but still relatively early into his career, it’s always interesting to

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venture into the hypothetical. For example, who would be his dream co-star? “I’d love to work with Gary Oldman, that would be awesome. I’m a massive fan of Gary Oldman. Very cool guy.” Romantic lead? “Meryl Streep. She’s fantastic. If I had to just pick someone I wanted to work with... Nah, I don’t know. I don’t know. I don’t want to say someone and then run into them and be freaked out.” Director? The answer is immediate: “I would love to have worked with Anthony Minghella.” British director and screenwriter Anthony Minghella died of a haemorrhage in 2008. A teenage Westwick appeared in Breaking and Entering, which proved to be Minghella’s final film as a director. “I’d have loved to have worked with him again. What a talent. His films are some of my favourites – Cold Mountain, The Talented Mr Ripley.” The choice isn’t solely down to Minghella’s artistry. “It’s more, you want to see someone again who was so significant in your life. Because it happened so early on [in Westwick’s career]… You just kind of wish you might have been able to work with him again.” Unprompted he volunteers Martin Scorsese as an alternative – “you’ve got to go with your big favourites like Scorsese, haven’t you?” – and later cites Hong Kong director Wong KarWai (In The Mood For Love, 2046) as another inspiration. But the conversation returns to Minghella, and the experience of filming Breaking and Entering with the likes of Jude Law, Juliette Binoche, Ray Winstone. “It kind of set the tone for me. These people were so nice, people at the top of their game, and it just kind of set a benchmark. “It was a very important lesson that was instilled in me at a young age, and it gave me a sort of compass upon which to work from. A professional standard perhaps…” For a few seconds his mind seems to drift before snapping back into the room. “But that’s not going to be able to happen again, is it?” he says briskly. “Marty, if you’re listening…” He leans into the voice recorder. Acting isn’t Westwick’s only creative pursuit. He fronted rock band The Filthy Youth and, more recently, has been putting pen to paper – although, like many aspiring writers, he’s coy on the specifics. “Little bits and pieces but not anything that’s considered a significant amount of work or I’d put in a specific category. I’ve got a couple of things that I’m developing – films and some other content – that I’m not really sure exactly what it fits into. “It’s an area that fascinates me. I’m a big fan of the written word – particularly how writing

I would have loved to have worked with Anthony Minghella again. What a talent and developing stories changes from, say, a book or a short story into a script or a play or something like that. It’s something that I think helps as well when you’re an actor, trying to understand the writer’s words. The more you can understand where the someone’s coming from, the more it helps you to become embedded in a piece of material.” There is also a passion for travel, as you might have surmised from his fascination with the Deep South. “I have already done quite a bit of travelling, but it’s not a tiny world. There’s a lot of places that I want to go to.” He’s off to Venice on the Orient Express, and also wants to ride the famous old train to Russia at some point in the future. Trains even permeate Westwick’s personal TV tastes. “I’ve been watching a lot of Michael Portillo doing the railways. That’s a very nice programme, isn’t it? Quite gentle. I like it.” It’s a pleasingly unexpected citation, as is his response when I ask him what type of show he’d like to present. “I thought what Tom Hardy was doing was quite interesting. Did you see him reading children’s books?” (He’s referring to CBeebies Bedtime Stories, a programme which has attracted the likes of Hardy, David Tennant and James McAvoy to lull the nation’s toddlers – and their mothers – to sleep.) “I really like it. So I’ll read you a book, kiddies.” Children’s narrator aside, the next few years should be big ones for Westwick. He’s too talented an actor not to land a major film role, especially as he turns 30 and reaches the prime years for a leading man. Or perhaps he’ll find another vehicle in what he terms “the golden age of television” – the next smallscreen epic from the likes of HBO or AMC. After more than a decade in the industry, Westwick knows the merits of the long game. “It’s an uncertain career path, but that’s also the exciting thing about it as well. Every year is different. I’ve had quiet years, I’ve had packed years, and I’m sure it will be the same as long as I choose to do this.” The future looks golden for Westwick. The bad boy’s done good. ■ White Gold will be shown on BBC2 in May.

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PHOTOGRAPH: Somewhere That Matters by Simon McCheung (2012). Edition of 25. Each image £800. Courtesy of the artist and Beaux Arts London; beauxartslondon.uk


BRAWN IN BRITAIN BRITISH CRAFTSMANSHIP AND THE LATEST TECHNOLOGY MAKE MORGAN’S AERO 8 A SPECIAL DRIVE, SAYS GRAHAM COURTNEY

D

EPENDING ON YOUR age you’ll either

remember Monty Python’s Flying Circus as one of the most surreal and iconic TV series of your lifetime – or you may have just discovered it on Dave. Either way, Python fans young and old will recognise the recurring sketch where the camera sweeps across rolling hills or along a windswept beach to eventually focus on John Cleese, usually wearing a suit and sitting behind a desk as per a TV newsreader. After a bit of a pause he’d announce: “And now for something completely different,” at which point a sketch about people hitting each other with fish would begin. Well, here’s something completely different: the Morgan Aero 8. The Aero 8 was unveiled at the Geneva Motorshow. Jaws dropped. There are still the classic, unmistakable Morgan lines, but there is also a sense of menace. Thankfully, it still follows the sort of nutcase ethos behind most Morgan cars. Loads of power, lots of noise, snug cockpit, wind in the hair, flies in the teeth. Brilliant. Morgan cars are a rare sight. The factory at Malvern in Worcestershire now builds

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DRIVE TIME: British watch brand Christopher Ward has teamed up with Morgan to produce a series of three watches, each fitted with an in-house movement. Our favourite is the £2,250 C1 Morgan Aero 8 Chronometer, with its dials echoing the car’s cockpit instruments. The only catch is you have to own (or have owned) a Morgan to buy one.

1,300 cars a year which, for Morgan, is revolutionary. It used to be one a week. Despite its cottage-industry credentials, do not for one minute assume that the Morgan Aero 8 is like driving a museum exhibit. How does this grab you? Under the bonnet there’s a thumping BMW V8 4.8 litre, 367bhp engine. Bearing in mind that this Morgan is built on an aluminium chassis, you presumably won’t be surprised to read that the Aero 8 is quick for the simple reason that the engine hasn’t got a lot of weight to chuck around. 0-60mph takes 4.5 seconds, and the top speed is 170mph. The six-speed manual gearbox (an auto ’box is an option… but not for ‘real’ Morgan drivers) is light and direct. Is it an involving drive? You bet. Morgan doesn’t bother with a load of clever electronic driver aides. They’re for wimps. However, gone are the days when powerful Morgans used to bite back and fling you into the nearest hedge. They’re now much more civilised and hugely rewarding to punt along. The sound is glorious, too, especially if you opt for the side exit exhausts. Which, of course, you will. The interior is smart and beautifully executed. The mohair hood stows beneath the boot lid which rises up like a clam. You can opt for a solid, coupé roof but when the sun’s out you’ll instantly regret it. The Aero 8 is Morgan at its very best. You get the traditional hand-crafted workmanship, but you also get the latest technology in the oily bits. It’s £94,665 of exclusivity. If you’ve never enjoyed the thrill of driving one, we’d suggest you get in touch with your local dealer. If you can find one, that is. Chocks away, old bean. ■

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ENGINE

4.8 V8

0-62MPH

4.5

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POWER (HP)

367

@6,300RPM

TORQUE

490 NM

TOP SPEED

170 MPH

COST

£94,665 OTR

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THE BRIT PACK 2017

OUR ANNUAL ROUND-UP OF GREAT BRITISH CRAFTSMANSHIP IS BACK – RANGING FROM INTRICATE JEWELLERY TO EPIC SUPERYACHTS

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RANGE ROVER VELAR

Range Rover’s newest model – the Velar – is a masterpiece in minimalism. The marque’s DNA is clearly there in the exterior design cues, such as the blacked-out window columns, but it’s more stripped back than ever before. Inside, the streamlining continues. Gone are the chunky instruments of old, instead there’s a new infotainment system with two ten-inch touchscreens ensuring there’s barely any switchgear left to clutter the cockpit. Although it’s pitched as the most car-like in the maker’s portfolio, it still comes with all-wheel drive as standard, and Land Rover’s epic Terrain Response 2 technology. So should you drift into rougher territory, you’re still covered. There are six engine options ranging from an entry-level 2.0-litre four-cylinder Ingenium diesel unit with 178bhp up to a supercharged 375bhp V6 petrol engines – the latter will propel the Velar from 0-60mph in 5.3sec. The name Velar comes from the Italian for ‘veil’ or ‘cover’ – and had previously been used as a codename for the original prototypes of the first Range Rover in the 1960s. But there’s nothing retro about this one – it’s the most modern Range Rover yet. Prices from £44,830; landrover.co.uk

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BE SP OK E TA I L OR I NG S U IT S F ROM £ 6 0 0 MOR N I NG S U IT S F ROM £ 9 0 0 SH I RT S F ROM £150

W W W. C A D A N D T H E D A N D Y. C O . U K 020 7434 4344 . 020 7273 1975 @ C A DA N D T H E DA N DY

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BEST OF BRITISH

ON WATER PRINCESS V58 YACHT

PHOTOGRAPH by Mark Bramley

They may be capable of taking you all over the world, but Princess yachts are actually made in Plymouth, and the British brand’s latest offering to the high seas – the V58 – does nothing to dent the company’s stellar reputation for producing some seriously sleek ships on UK shores. The elegant and powerful 60ft V58 – which sleeps up to six people – has a large padded sunbathing area and main deck with a barbecue, so passengers will be kept happy while you guide it through the Med at speeds of up to 38 knots (depending on engine size). For more information see: princess.co.uk

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ON HOLIDAY

TURNBULL & ASSER BOWES BLAZER Turnbull & Asser has more than 130 years’ experience of fine British craftsmanship. This wool and silk Bowes blazer in a soft pastel blue check is perfect for spring. You’ll be in fine company – the brand has a royal warrant from the Prince of Wales. £895; turnbullandasser.co.uk

ASPREY LEATHER BACKGAMMON BOARD What could be more civilised than a game of backgammon? A game of backgammon played on an English saddle leather board from one of the UK’s oldest luxury brands, that’s what. Even if you’re not victorious in the game, you’ll feel like a winner. £3,500; asprey.com

SUNSPEL SWIM SHORTS

NEW & LINGWOOD ETON LOAFERS Timeless and classically elegant, this shoe takes its name from the college where it was born. No need to keep it doggedly traditional, though – the midblue aniline calf suede adds a subtle modern twist to the Eton’s otherwise classic loafer characteristics. £325; newandlingwood.com

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Founded in Nottingham in 1860, Sunspel is an enduring presence in the British fashion industry. It’s the brand responsible for introducing boxer shorts to the UK back in the 1940s, and is also behind the development of some pretty innovative fabrics, the latest of which has been used in these new swim shorts. The clever and fast-drying performance fabric is lined with a superfine mesh to provide maximum comfort as well as a refined appearance. In typically British style, however, what it can’t promise is sunshine. Sorry. £120; sunspel.com

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A MAN IN ACCIA ROL I HA S BEEN ON ‘T HE ROSEMARY DIET’ FOR 1O O YE A RS. T ELL H IM IT’S A FAD.

The people of Acciaroli, Italy, eat rosemary everyday, from when they’re young until they’re old. Very old. Evidence strongly suggests this helps them stay illness free and in turn, enjoy such long lives. The UK’s best botanical scientists use a combination of techniques to obtain the extract in No1 Rosemary Water. This results in all the correct amino acids and flavonoids being present, to help you enjoy a long, healthy life too.

To find out more about the benefits of rosemary and order your Rosemary Water visit rosemarywater.com


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DRESSED UP GRAFF CARISSA EARRINGS Founded in London in 1960, Graff has been dazzling the world for nearly 60 years. Its Carissa collection was inspired the gardens of the Delaire Graff Estate in Stellenbosch, South Africa, which abounds with wildflowers including the delicate Carissa – Greek for ‘beloved’. These breathtaking earrings combine a total of 10.72 carats of sapphires and 3.82 carats of diamonds. £POA; graffdiamonds.com

BURBERRY DK88 TOP HANDLE BAG

Named after the house code for the brand’s signature honey-coloured gabardine fabric, Burberry’s DK88 bag collection has been created to reflect the same spirit and attitude as its iconic trench. The range is made from Burberry’s new Trench Leather, embossed with a pattern that reflects the distinctive twill finish of the cotton used to make the classic coat. Pictured here is the Top Handle bag, and it’s set to become another British design icon: its classic silhouette is a nod to the brand’s long-standing fashion heritage, while an oversize lock and sturdy top handle add contemporary flourishes. ■ £1,695; uk.burberry.com

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BOODLES DIAMOND CUFF Boodles’ latest sparkling collection, the Poetry of Landscape, is inspired by Britain’s natural beauty. To capture a sense of the natural scenery that defines the UK, designers have used overlapping lines studded with both round-brilliant and Ashokacut diamonds, which is a pretty good way to represent the beauty of Britain if you ask us. £POA; boodles.com

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A dive watch capable of being waterresistant to 600m needs to be constructed from the finest materials available. That’s why we’ve made this Trident: limited to 316 pieces – a celebration of the premium 316L steel alloy used in its bezel and case – and with a vibrant matte orange dial, the Trident 316L LE will stand out anywhere.

Swiss movement English heart

Discover the new breed of watchmaker...

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EXCEPTIONALLY FAST BEAUTIFULLY DESIGNED ITALIAN ICON

Sound familiar? Typical top speed for a cruising motor yacht is 35-40mph. For a Pershing however, it’s 45-50mph. As shapely as a Maranello supercar, and with an interior worthy of a Milanese designer apartment, it’s no wonder Pershings are known as the Ferraris of the sea. Except for one thing, they’re a bit more powerful: 1,600hp to 10,400hp.

www.venturaeurope.com Ventura UK 47a South Audley Street Mayfair London W1K 2QA Tel +44 (0)20 7495 2330 mail@venturaeurope.com CP


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BRITISH REVIVAL WHAT’S IN A NAME? WHEN IT COMES TO BRITISH HOROLOGY, QUITE A LOT AS IT TURNS OUT... ADRIAN HAILWOOD EXPLAINS WHY SMITH IS THE ONE TO LOOK FOR, AND ALWAYS HAS BEEN

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HIS COLUMN HAS always sought the long view with regard to watches and when it comes to ‘Best of British’ there is a delightful symmetry in that the past and present as both come down to a man named Smith. The last time Britain had a home-grown mass-production wristwatch manufacturer was in the brief period between the end of the second world war and 1970. This was when Smiths was making high-grade movements at its factory in Cheltenham but as with many things in British industry, the history is much more convoluted than that. Smiths began as Samuel Smith (later & Son), a jeweller based in Elephant & Castle in 1851. Its trade was in diamonds, clocks and watches. At this point the watches were either Englishmade but usually Swiss imported with the shop name applied to the dial. Samuel Smith was soon to see the branding possibilities of watch retailing over and above jewellery and secured a supplier of high-quality watches that allowed him to achieve good results at the Kew Observatory trials and then publicise the fact in the Guide to the Purchase of a Watch. Competition from the USA and Switzerland led Smiths to develop new areas of expertise and the booming automotive industry was the perfect opportunity to use its precision engineering in a more profitable direction. Vehicle and later aircraft instruments including

•• WHEN IT COMES TO ‘BEST OF BRITISH’ THE PAST AND PRESENT BOTH COME DOWN TO A MAN NAMED SMITH squaremile.com

speedometers, became the mainstay of the business with watches dwindling to nothing. It was wartime necessity that drove Smiths back to watchmaking. Aware that Britain was over-reliant on both Germany and Switzerland for horological supplies, Government funds were used to re-ignite watchmaking R&D. Starting from scratch with scant supplies was tough, and although a GSTP pocket watch was produced by 1942, it was only after the war’s end that wristwatches were achieved. The demands of the military for precision and durability forced Smiths to produce highquality movements. The lack of the kind of skilled labour available in Switzerland led to a different kind of excellence, that of tooling over assembly. The design of the movement parts in Smiths watches allowed them to be assembled by a relatively un-skilled workforce; an example being the attachment of bridges to the dial plate which used self-centring posts to locate the parts exactly. With balance springs and jewels all being sourced in the UK, these were British watches down to the last screw. The 1950s saw ever-increasing quality of wristwatches available to the civilian market culminating in Britain’s only mass-produced automatic wristwatch in 1959, but the timing was all wrong for Smiths. A combination of poor sales, cheap imports, the loss of the Empire markets, reliance on government funding and the arrival of quartz saw the end of watch-making at Smiths by the early 1970s. Fast forward to the present and wristwatches are again being made wholly in Britain. Roger Smith, the only apprentice of the late George Daniels and a serious innovator in his own right, creates watches that are the antithesis of mass production. Since 2001, Roger Smith has not only put British wristwatches back on the global map but has (to mix a metaphor) carved out his own tiny niche right at the top of the tree.

Having mastered the 32 trades that make up the Daniels Method to allow the creation of an entire watch by hand by an individual, Roger has moved onto serial production, although serial still means that less than a dozen watches leave the studio annually. Each piece is a work of both art and craft with a level of detail and finish that seems wrong to call handmade but is too perfect to come from a machine. The Series 4 [above], Roger Smith’s latest creation, is his most complex, showing a triple date and moon phase. While the multitude of dial features add to its decoration, complexity is not the goal for this watch; instead clarity and simplicity are key. To achieve this, Smith has removed the pointer date hand, and replaced it with a unique ‘travelling aperture’ that highlights the relevant day. If Britain’s wristwatch heritage is to match that of its pocket watches we need a little of both Smiths. Certainly we need the craft and innovation of Roger and his team to create something highly desirable but we also need something of the Cheltenham Smiths, not compromising the Britishness but making the watches a little more accessible. ■ For more information, see fellows.co.uk

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BEEFING UP THE MENU

MICHAEL REID, EXECUTIVE CHEF OF M RESTAURANTS, IS A MAN ON A MEAT MISSION: TO BRING THE BEST BRITISH BEEF TO THE CAPITAL, SAYS BEN WINSTANLEY

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T ALL STARTED with semen from Blackmore

bulls,” Michael Reid casually tells me in between strips of Highland Wagyu beef. “And an egg, of course.” If the 40-day aged ribeye mid-chew in my mouth wasn’t ephemerally tender, I could have choked. Don’t get me wrong, I’m just as interested in the genetics of cows as the next guy (ahem), but in the sleek setting of M Restaurant’s Threadneedle Street dining room, you might say I was caught unawares. Then again, all love stories – even those of a meat lover – have to begin somewhere, and this one starts with the prized embryos of David Blackmore’s 100% full-blood wagyu beef in Australia. If Reid isn’t a household name just yet (recent TV appearances on Great British Menu, Saturday Kitchen and Sunday Brunch won’t hurt), his role in M Restaurant’s rise from neat concept to genuine contender for London’s most stylish restaurant chain has been crucial. Reid was a prolific stagiaire in some of the world’s best restaurants, but it’s his knowledge and passion for beef that has contributed most to his and M’s rising stocks. While a cynic might sniff at ‘just another steakhouse’, one

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look at the bovine ageing in the restaurant’s meat room is enough to show how deeply Reid cares about his product. It took the chef four months and hundreds of tastings to assemble his steak list from the world’s greatest producers of beef, but the result is London’s best selection: the aforementioned Blackmore wagyu sirloin – “the best wagyu in the world, bar none,” Reid says – Kobe beef fillet from Japan and Botswana ribeye to name a few cuts. Now, wondering where all that bull semen ended up? (Stop giggling at the back.) The answer is Highland Wagyu in Perthshire – the passion project of Mohsin Altajir and Martine Chapman. The beef duo met at

Blackmore in 2011, and purchased seven of famed Australian cattle breeder’s full-blood wagyu heifers, two bulls and the embryos to start their own herd. Fast forward six years and you’re looking at Britain’s best and most valuable beef product – it’s Reid’s prized steak, and what I’ve joined him to taste. “When you drink a glass of great red wine, there’s this depth of flavour: it coats your palate and you get none of the bad tannins,” Reid explains, as we slice through buttery portions of aged ribeye and rump cap. “It’s the same with wagyu. The low quality stuff hasn’t had the same level of care, it just tastes fatty and oily – there’s no flavour there.” Other than Blackmore genetics, the secret to Highland Wagyu’s success comes from handfeeding its herd for up to 36 months with seaweed and Omega 3. It creates exceptional marbling of fat typical in the best wagyu, which in turn gives the meat its buttery, sweet and succulent texture. The proof is in the eating. It isn’t just delicious, though – this is also exceptionally rare beef: the tiny Scottish outfit slaughters just a single 100% full-blood wagyu head a week, and Reid gets the whole thing. Fighting off competition from the likes of Hawksmoor, Reid convinced Altajir and Chapman to choose M as the only restaurant in the world to serve Highland’s finest through his ingenious secondary and offcut-centred recipes. Bone marrow popcorn arrives at the table, then wagyu biltong, then wagyu reuben sliders – it’s an eye-opening, belt-testing feast, but my stomach isn’t complaining. “I’m working on a wagyu kebab next,” Reid smirks. I’m getting meat sweats just thinking about it. ■ For more information, see mrestaurants.co.uk

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BY APPOINTMENT TO HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN PHARMACIST & PHARMACY SUPPLIES LONDON

BY APPOINTMENT TO HRH THE PRINCE OF WALES CHEMIST LONDON

SPECIALISTS IN SOAPS, SKINCARE AND SHAVING SINCE 1790 29 St. James’s Street London SW1A 1HB w w w.drharris.co.uk 020 7930 3915


WALK THIS WAY WALK FROM CUMBRIA TO YORKSHIRE? NO PROBLEM, OR SO SAFI THIND THOUGHT BEFORE ATTEMPTING THE EPIC TREK

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HE COAST-TO-COAST WALK is certainly a

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being utterly alone with unspoilt nature. If only my feet weren’t so sore. I check my Henry Stedman – the authoritative guide to the trek – which tells me that it’s half an hour to the youth hostel I’m staying at. It’s three hours later that I’m finally lying on the top bunk at the Ennerdale Water YHA with my legs feeling like they’ve been sledgehammered. Sleep is peripatetic, broken frequently by a man who snores like a comedy bear. If I thought this was going to be a doddle, I was wrong.  The second day is flat out different to the first. When I wake there’s a sliver of sun in the sky and a cooling mist on the face. I’m revived by a full English breakfast – the first of eight I will have this trip – and bundle off into the wilderness. Going further into the Lake District things start to get distinctly wilder. The landscape is steep and wet. I come upon Honister slate mine, drenched in mizzle up in the hills before I’m trotting down into the beautiful valley of Borrowdale, where it suddenly changes again from ruggedness to tinkling charm. This is quintessential Lakes, ➤

•• HOW HARD CAN IT ACTUALLY BE…? THREE HOURS IN AND MY BACKPACK IS ALREADY STARTING TO CUT

PHOTOGRAPH by blah

journey to remember. Forget the Inca Trail – the greatest trek that you never knew existed is right here on your doorstep. The English coast-to-coast route was invented by noted walker and writer Alfred Wainwright in 1973. It starts on the west coast – St Bees in Cumbria – takes in nearly 200 miles of contrasting, rugged, steep, bucolic, boggy English countryside through three national parks, and ends in Robin Hood’s Bay in north Yorkshire. In the spirit of personal development, I’ve loaded up my backpack with camping accoutrement and set myself a ten-day target to do it in. I’ve been warned that it won’t be easy. The terrain is tough in places with lots of ups and downs. And my ten-day aim is aggressive – Wainwright suggests 14 to 21 days. Yet heading up onto the red rocky cliffs of St Bees overlooking the Irish Sea, my face nipped by a cool breeze, having dipped my toe in the water and snatched a pebble to deposit on the other side, I remain confident. I mean, how hard can it actually be? Three hours in and I’m sweating buckets; the straps on my backpack are already starting to cut. The walk begins up 90m-high red sandstone cliffs overlooking the sea before descending into the ruggedness of the Lake District. The first afternoon is testing, particularly the hour-long ascent up Dent Hill that feels like going straight up a mountain – which is pretty much what it is. This is followed by a descent to Ennerdale Water, a long, flat lake stretching for miles like a sheet of corrugated iron. There are no people here. It feels quite unearthly

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BEST OF BRITISH

PHOTOGRAPH by blah

HEAD FOR THE HILLS: Ravenseat in the Yorkshire Dales marks the half-way point of the 200-mile long Coast to Coast walking route.

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SPIRITUAL GUIDANCE: [clockwise from here] When Whitby Abbey is visible from the moors, you know you’re near the end of the trail; the walk starts at St Bees on the Cumbrian coast; overlooking Lowther Valley from Knipe Scar; Borrowdale Valley in the Lake District.

➤ with its slate-cottaged hamlets, wooded hills, quaint red telephone boxes and newly shorn sheep grazing in fields beside gamboling lambs. Speaking of lamb, the Langstrath Country Inn in Stonethwaite has one of the most delectable slow roasted shoulders of lamb you’ll ever come upon – bliss it was in that dawn to be alive to eat one, as Wordsworth might have said. Wordsworth also wrote of the “unsurpassable beauty and variety” of the Lake District mountains and indeed contrasts

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are what this walk is really all about. Both the terrain and the weather are constantly changing. The Lake District in particular is filled with up and down cresting peaks and monumental valleys, spectacular tarns and rolling hills, wind, rain and sun all in one day. Walking to Grasmere, I feel like I’ve been put through a carwash. But it’s the next stage – 13 hours from Grasmere to the village of Shap – that promises to be particularly tough. The steep hills and the long, arduous route past Haweswater Reservoir are rocky and jointwearing. The mist makes it hard to see. At some point I fall into a river. I lose my way on the mammoth 780m Kidsty Pike. By the time I stagger into Shap, cursing like a bedraggled John Wayne, I’m empty. Margaret, the owner at the B&B, described as intimidating in the guidebook (which is utterly inaccurate, I will say) tells me that it was a long walk. I agree. But the Lakes are now behind me, she says. It’s all plainer sailing from now on. She’s wrong.

FROM THE LAKES TO YORKSHIRE The experience of the walk is coloured by the conviviality of the people you pass. There’s nothing like a friendly hello or a jolly, crinkleeyed smile as you’re walking along, decrepit with weariness, to motivate you. There are also the wine-soaked conversations at the end of the evening with fellow trekkers. I’ve met people from all over the world – Holland, Germany, the US, Switzerland, Australia – some coming here for the second or third time. They all say there’s something unique about this walk, landscapes you won’t find elsewhere, the contrasts and, of course, the country living. Just don’t do it with blisters. As far as feet go, I think the worst is behind me because I’m now in God’s country, the Yorkshire Dales, where stony paths are replaced by heather and gorse. Sure, it misses some of the savagery of the Lakes but it most certainly has its own charm. The walk from Keld to Gunnerside is the most lovely stretch I’ve been through so far, bustling with wildlife,

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•• SKIRTING DOWN THE FINAL FEW MILES BY THE CLIFFS I FEEL LIKE AN INTREPID ADVENTURER AND WILD MAN

PHOTOGRAPH (St Bees Head) by Brian Sherwen; (Lowther Valley) by Dave Willis; (Borrowdale Valley) Alex Hare

winding rivers and golden meadows. But while the Dales is noted for its bucolic landscape it also has a dark underside – bogs. It gets tremendously muddy, I’m warned. Sure, I say. But at least it will be soft for the feet. I’m right. It’s soft. Very soft. Step after sinking soft step, in fact. The words: “If you’re going through hell keep going” repeat in my mind as I trudge through the muddy moor housing the Nine Standards prehistoric stones. At some point I plunge up to my waist. In a panic I wonder if I will end here, stuck in the mud like the Tollund Man, forever frozen. I don’t die but manage to revive myself with a cream tea and an orange juice at Ravenseat Farm a few hours later. On the subject of food, there’s some amazing stuff to be had on this walk. Visit the organic bakery in Reeth for exceptional coffee and cake. And whatever you do don’t miss Lord Stones, the only eating place on the way to Blakey Ridge in the moors. It has one of the nicest bacon sandwiches I’ve ever eaten in my life, dripping with butter, that will have you drooling, walk or no walk.  There are also some rather lovely churches en route. St Edmund at Marske is a particular little beauty while the one in Bolton-on-Swale has a memorial to Henry Jenkins – said to be 169 years old when he died – where you’ll find drinks and chocolate bars for the price of an honest donation when you’re really desperate. Having crossed the Yorkshire Dales, I enter my third national park – the North York Moors. It’s another contrast. The path is darker, more foreboding and the stages start to get grindingly long. My feet are bad but it’s the mind that starts to rebel here. Motivation suffers, particularly over the long final stretch towards the isolated Lion Inn at Blakey Ridge, trudging on a disused railway track. Feeling a little sorry for myself I decide to ditch my tent and lighten the load. It helps me through to my final destination, the village of Grosmont, the last stopping point before the sea. That evening I stay in the relative unfettered luxury of the Periwinkle room at the Grosmont House bed and breakfast. I mull over the fact that I’m now only six hours from my final

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destination. I think about the 180-odd miles I’ve covered so far (not including retraced steps) and in a happy daze I fall asleep and my aches and pains seem to disappear entirely. The next day begins with another steep climb, but today all is made beautiful by the presence of the sun. From the top of the moors I get a view of Whitby Abbey lying ruined on the side of the coast, framed by huge clouds massing over the sea. Skirting down the final few miles by the cliffs I feel like an intrepid adventurer and wild man. I let out a victory cry as I rush into picturesque Robin Hood’s Bay, which is all tumbledown houses and tight cobbled lanes.

After being in solitary for so long it is a bit of a shock to be in the company of so many people once again. I feel a little self conscious in the city streets, me – nature man coming out of the fields – now with tourists and holidaymakers. The camaraderie and solitude of the wilds is now long gone. No one here to wave you a friendly hello. Once more into civilisation where you’re another face to the girl behind the chip counter. Some words of Wainwright come to me: “You are made to soar, to crash to earth, then to rise and soar again.” Sure. Life goes on. ■ For more information and to plan your trip, see visitengland.com

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THIS IMAGE: ‘Call of Duty’ by Mitch Griffiths, oil on canvas. Courtesy of the artist and Halcyon Gallery. RIGHT: ‘Running Women’ and ‘Running Men’ by Julian Opie (2016), screen print, editions of 50. Both images courtesy of the artist and Alan Cristea Gallery, London.

PHOTOGRAPHS: (Griffiths) by Luke Unsworth; (Opie) by FXP Photography

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THE HERE AND NOW FROM HYPER-REALISM TO FINE-ART PHOTOGRAPHY, BRITAIN’S CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS ARE LEADING THE WAY. MELISSA SCALLAN DESCRIBES FIVE OF HER FAVOURITES

MITCH GRIFFITHS British hyper-realist artist Mitch Griffiths produces perfect renditions, covers serious – often historic or political – subjects, creates thoughtful compositions steeped in symbolism, uses a single light source to create highlights and shadows, positions his subjects against deep dark backgrounds and paints in oils. In doing so, he creates stunning images echoing the works of old masters. But Griffiths’ narratives are wholly contemporary and include the power of brand names. He also investigates patriotism and identity, explores society’s fixation with appearance, and reflects on the current refugee crisis. By setting ‘Call of Duty’ against a backdrop of burning oil fields with oil dripping from the soldier’s fingers, Griffiths challenges western military involvement in the Persian Gulf and questions the morality and motives for going to war. Commenting on the propaganda used in war to identify the perceived enemy as religion, Griffiths modified the sight of the rifle to resemble the Islamic star and crescent. The personal struggle of the soldier – as well as his role in the conflict – is reflected in his stance and open hand, while the Wilfred Owen tattoo seared into his neck acknowledges the horrific reality of war.

bold colours are the hallmarks of British multidisciplinary artist Julian Opie. Early inspiration came from male and female lavatory signs resulting in stylised line drawings of single figures, distinctly posed, with feet missing and separate circular heads. However, in 2013, while waiting at the school gate, Opie observed the passers-by and how much more interesting they looked than his models: these people talked on phones, smoked cigarettes, carried bags and were purposeful. His work shifted. As seen in the Runners series, Opie’s recent portraits are often of groups of people

presented in detail. They have accessories – earphones, beards, glasses, hats; clothes and footwear have logos and branding; oblivious to being observed, their postures vary as they stride forth; their carriage and bearing imply that some are fitter than others. Although they remain faceless, Opie manages to capture the small nuances and traits in his characters that make them human. Opie’s work can be found in museum collections including the National Portrait Gallery, the Tate, New York’s MOMA, and Deutsche Bank’s German HQ. For more information, see alancristea.com ➤

For more information, see halcyongallery.com

JULIAN OPIE Graphic images of thick black outlines and

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THIS IMAGE: ‘Happy Hour’ by Simon McCheung (2015), C-Type matt photo paper print, 28 x 28 inches. Edition of 25. Courtesy of beauxartslondon.uk

➤ SIMON McCHEUNG Having parents who emigrated from Hong Kong to a deprived part of Cleethorpes in the late 1970s led to a sheltered childhood for photographer Simon McCheung. Rarely being allowed out, he daydreamed and imagined life elsewhere; however, it is that desire to escape that has significantly informed his work.

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Enchanted by his first visit to Tokyo in 2015, McCheung also saw the downside of living in the city – long working hours, minimal annual leave, extortionate cost of living – and that people simply assumed brave faces and got on with life. ‘Happy Hour’ symbolises the few hours of the night when it’s possible to go out and escape from normal life before it’s time to

get up again: “No matter how crazy life is, how stressful your job is, you can always find peace somewhere. Even if it’s a flat cold road.” ‘Insomnia’ reflects the exhaustion from working long hours and the desire to fall into a deep sleep – even if it is on slabbed concrete: “I didn’t care where I was. All I wanted was to escape.” His fatigued body propped up ➤

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– reflects Luxton’s fascination with the sea. Resin, however, has its challenges: it can harden too quickly, or not set at all; it can bleed – resulting in a brown painting; and it must be painted on a flat canvas but raised on breeze blocks otherwise the cascading resin will weld it to the ground. But this doesn’t faze Luxton, who is excited by its unpredictability. For more info, see degreeart.com

JONATHAN YEO

THIS IMAGE: ‘Nebula No. 1’ (2016): By Claire Luxton, £3,850; courtesy of the artist and degreeart.com ABOVE RIGHT: ‘Kevin Spacey as President Underwood’ (2015): By Jonathan Yeo.

➤ by the wall, but sliding inexorably towards the pavement, is beautifully conveyed in this highly impactful composition. The surreal ‘Somewhere That Matters’ was taken on the empty, bleak sand dunes of Cleethorpes and reflects McCheung’s childhood wish to be elsewhere. The umbrella – a homage to Mary Poppins, the video that he regularly watched as a child – and the birds symbolise his ‘getaway’ (“My ticket to fly anywhere I want”) that will take this solitary figure somewhere – anywhere – that matters more than this. For more information, see beauxartslondon.uk

CLAIRE LUXTON Turquoise-haired multidisciplinary artist

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Claire Luxton (born in 1991) graduated from Goldsmiths with a BA in fine art in 2014. This painter/sculptor/photographer experienced such demand for her work that just nine months after graduating she became a fulltime artist, has already delivered one solo show, and is planning another. Having a father who makes model steam engines, Luxton is entirely practical: she makes her own Perspex scrapers, creates corrosive liquid to weather steel, and personally welds the panels of her large sculptural installations. ‘Nebula No. 1’ is a beautiful painting of colour, depth and movement, which includes Luxton’s signature blues, blacks, greys and golds. The use of resin as a medium – with its fluidity, merging of colours and glossiness

Growing up with a father as an MP means that artist Jonathan Yeo is comfortable around characterful, powerful, well-known people – an important attribute for a portraitist whose subjects include politicians, actors and royalty. Actor Kevin Spacey – having played Richard III and the US President – is arguably all three. Commissioned by the Smithsonian to paint Spacey, Yeo presents him in character: as Frank Underwood, the Machiavellian fictional president of the USA from House of Cards. Capturing Underwood’s menacing nature, Yeo depicts him large and threatening, fist clenched and foot poised to kick. The Smithsonian houses the only complete collection of presidential portraits outside of the White House and it rightly anticipated the acclaim it would receive for blurring reality and fiction when it came to displaying the work. A short film of the unveiling of the portrait was released to promote the fourth season of House of Cards. Underwood addresses the viewer directly, telling us his character is less the noble Lincoln, and more the diabolical Booth, Lincoln’s assassin. Jonathan Yeo has a collaboration with British furniture maker Linley that’s planned for summer this year. For more information, see jonathanyeo.com and instagram.com/jonathanyeo ■

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TRAVEL PUB AWARDS DRINKS GOLF PHOTOGRAPHY PRIZE

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THE FULL MONTE . 110

PHOTOGRAPH: Elevated view over Kotor’s Stari Grad (Old Town) and The Bay of Kotor in Montenegro by Doug Pearson (AWL Images)


TRAVEL MONTENEGRO

IT’S THE FULL MONTE

On the shores of Europe’s southernmost fjord, DUNCAN MADDEN discovers a Montenegro rich in investment, history and vineyards

DOCK OF THE BAY: Sunset over Boka Bay, seen from the Regent Porto Montenegro hotel terrace. The bay, a Unesco site, is now attracting a new wave of tourists thanks to recent investment and the development of the Porto Montenegro marina complex.

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M

Y HAIR FLAILS in the wind as we skim

PHOTOGRAPH by publianc larit em potinium vid ces blah

and bounce across the water, foamy spray coating my sunglasses. Our speedboat – a Riva, no less – speeds like a polished wooden bullet from inlet to bay, from sleek marina to spectacular coastline. Tiny islands inhabited by lone monasteries flit close by. High above, ancient Roman, oriental and Byzantine settlements cling to precipitous rocky hillsides. Agave, mimosa, oleander and pomegranate plants bring a Mediterranean flavour to the landscape. I could be cruising the 1950s French Riviera or skirting one of Italy’s famed lakes, a playboy heading for a fabulous lunch with a whole host of beautiful people. But I’m not. I’m in Boka Bay on the Montenegrin coast. A drowned river canyon not far from the Adriatic Sea, this imposing mountainous landscape is often called the southernmost fjord in Europe, and it’s not what I had expected at all. I came for the wine, but I’ll stay for the scenery. We are heading for lunch, though – quayside in the baroque town of Perast at the much-lauded Conte hotel and restaurant. I saunter from boat to table (precisely three steps) and order a fine local rosé and platter of plump, fresh seafood to gorge on, but no one bats an eyelid at this grandiose entrance. It’s just another day in this Unesco-protected corner of wealthy southeast Europe. It’s a stirring first impression of a country with a recent history that could only be described as tumultuous. Formally independent for only 11 years, much of Montenegro’s tourism was crippled by the Yugoslav wars in the 1990s but it has bounced back with impressive alacrity. Nowhere is that more evident than in Porto Montenegro, the purpose-built marina complex that feels more like an exclusive suburb of some benign, wealthy US city. Pristine, prefab shops, bars and restaurants line the perfectly groomed walkways, vast opulent yachts and motor cruisers bob serenely in hundreds of berths built to cater to any size of floating pleasure palace, and at the far end the Regent hotel rears majestically over everything – an architectural tribute to the area’s 400 years under Venetian rule. It’s a grand vision and a hefty investment in the area – more than €420m so far. It speaks volumes of the Dubai-based investors’ confidence in its geographic and historic appeal, in its spectacular scenery, opportunities for adventure (there’s sailing, skiing, hiking, rafting and much more all within day-tripping distance) and the fine regional food and wine. ➤

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YACHT CLUB: [this image] Superyachts docked at the Porto Montenegro marina; [below] the Porto Montenegro Yacht Club pool – a flashy spot where you can soak up the last of the day’s rays.

With 11.5 million vines, Cemovsko Field is the biggest single site vineyard in Europe ➤ The nectar of the gods in particular is starting to enjoy a boom as individuals and industry both look to capitalise on the fertile grounds and fine weather needed to create a damn good vranac, merlot or chardonnay. I head to Castel Savina, an idyllic family-run winery perched high on the mountainside with eye-popping views across the bay of Kotor. Wine master Zoran had disappeared on an impromptu fishing trip, so his knowledgeable wife Gordana guides me through their 17 years of effort paying homage to the original winemakers of 18th century Venetia who tilled the same soil, blanketing the landscape in vines and the odd monastery for good measure. It’s a spectacular endeavour with vines twisting between swimming pool and tennis court up to the door of their sprawling villa. Cellars are stuffed with gleaming metal vats and the smell of souring grape juice lingers in the air. I wonder how commercially effective such a homely operation can be as I chat to Gordana (who was particularly enthused by my presence, excitedly telling me how square mile was her “London bible” for the many years she lived in the city post-war before her return home). But when the wine tasting comes, my fears evaporate – the smallest vineyard in Montenegro Savina may be, but each of the four wines it produces is superb, the merlot a particular highlight. From one end of the scale to the other, a two-hour trundle south of Tivat to a converted airfield on the outskirts of capital city Podgorica, Cemovsko Field is the biggest

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single site vineyard in Europe. And when I say it’s big, I mean it’s vast, leviathan, gigantic. Built in 1963 and planted upon continuously ever since, it covers 2,310 hectares and houses around 11.5 million vines – in one field. The drive through is spellbinding, and climbing to the roof of a building at its epicentre feels like climbing to a ship’s crow’s nest in an endless sea of greens and browns, waves of vines perfectly groomed to the horizon in every direction. I feel drunk and I haven’t had a single drop. Yet. “We produce around 17 million bottles of wine a year under the Plantaze label, mostly for the domestic and regional markets,” explains local guide Maria in response to our open-mouthed silence. “Oh, and 95% of the grapes are handpicked by around 2,000 workers. Now, to the Sipcanik cellars…” Equally spectacular, the Sipcanik cellars are the perfect place for the grapes to settle, ferment and mature. Huge man-carved caves sit directly under the vines, the eerie gaping entrances betray their original purpose – as underground bunkers where the Yugoslav Air Force hid its planes from enemy attack. As

we enter, the balmy afternoon temperatures plummet to a cool 18 degrees and the sunlight fades into gloom, soon replaced by strip lights illuminating thousands of vast oak barrels stretching endlessly into far-reaching tunnels. We wander over to a banquet table that could easily seat 100 and settle to taste the fruits of their labour. The offering is prodigious – international grapes like sauvignon blanc, cabernet sauvignon, merlot, marselan and more, but it’s the indigenous vranac and krstac grapes that steal the show. The unpronounceable crnogorski sauvignon is an award-winning floral white, the vranac barrique an oaky, toasty dry red that goes perfectly with the prosciutto and manchego we’re offered in a heroic if faltering bid to maintain our sobriety. I taste them all and I like them all, yet they’re all criminally hard to find on British shores. Until that changes, I guess you’ll just have to visit and try them for yourself. ■ For more information on the Regent Hotel, see

regenthotels.com. See castelsavina.me for info on Castel Savina, and plantaze.com to find out more about the Plantaze vineyards.

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JUST AD D WATER

Call us 24/7 on 0330 100 3180 or go to mrandmrssmith.com/summer to find and book your perfect summer stay.


PROMOTION

Royal treatment Mark Twain’s famous pronouncement that Mauritius was created first as a blueprint for heaven still stands more than a century later – and the Royal Palm certainly does this idyllic island justice

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AURITIUS IS RINGED by the cobalt waters of the Indian Ocean, stunning coral reefs and crystalline lagoons. Its beauty and potential were first spotted by Beachcomber Hotels in 1952 when the company cherry-picked the most breathtaking locations for the first of its eight hotels here. Its flagship hotel, the Royal Palm, was the first in the Indian Ocean to become a member of the Leading Hotels of the World – and remains the most prestigious address in Mauritius. Situated on an idyllic stretch of Grand Sable beach, this tropical haven oozes elegance and first-class service. The attention you receive from the staff (who outnumber guests three to one) is warm and friendly rather than ceremonious, while your suite – with its beautiful wooden furniture made by local artisans – demonstrates the hotel’s thoughtful charm. Each suite has a sea-facing balcony or terrace screened by palms and looks out towards Grand Baie (‘bay without end’). Just a stone’s throw from the resort, the fishing ‘village’ has become a popular hub for visitors, with plenty of shops, restaurants and

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nightlife. There is also a great choice of sea adventures departing from the bay. You could take a ride in a submarine, try your hand at deep-sea fishing, or simply take a meandering tour around the pretty northern islands of Gabriel, Serpent or Gunners’ Quoin. Further afield, you might want to take a stroll around the lush Pamplemousses Botanical Garden with its spectacular pond of giant Amazon lilies, or head south to the Casela Nature Park to zoom down a zipline under a lush forest canopy. Back on your sunlounger in the Royal Palm’s own tropical gardens, you could while away a few moments deciding which of the three superb restaurants to choose. The island’s cultural diversity is reflected in its cuisine with French, Creole, Chinese and Indian flavours influencing the delicious Mauritian fusion of dishes. You could spoil yourself with an indulgent treatment at the spa or dip a toe into the new infinity pool. But unlike many idyllic locations where there is little to interrupt the daily routine of sunbathing and swimming, the

Royal Palm has a swathe of both gentle and more energetic sports to enjoy, many of which are included in the price of your stay. Aside from tennis, squash or gym sessions, there’s waterskiing, windsurfing, snorkelling, kayaking and trips in a glass-bottomed boat. There’s even a Royal Palm speedboat with the promise of a picnic on a nearby island. The hotel’s own dive centre offers PADI instruction and fabulous diving safaris. The Royal Palm also welcomes children – a refreshingly open attitude not often shared by upmarket resorts. It’s no wonder that 50% of the guests here are returning clients. Once you’ve found your own piece of heaven, why would you want to go anywhere else? ■

Reader Offer: Book 30 days in advance and save 20% on accommodation costs. Call Beachcomber Tours on 01483 445 685 or visit

beachcombertours.uk

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A CLUB FOR THOSE WHO

LOVE AND LIVE THE CITY! A 12-seat screening room, pool table, cocktail bar, lounge, work/meeting space, complimentary breakfast 360 days a year and no stuffy Soho dress codes... M DEN - OPENING MARCH 2017. M, 60 THREADNEEDLE ST, LONDON To find out more about M DEN Threadneedle St and its sister venue M DEN Victoria St, email stacey@mrestaurants.co.uk Special 20% Introductory Membership discount for Square Mile readers - £800 per annum. Please quote ‘SM20’.


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IN ASSOCIATION WITH

FOOD & DRINK PUB AWARDS

THE PUB AWARDS 2017 WINNER

You’ve drunk the pints and cast your votes, now the only thing left to do is announce the first winner of the inaugural Square Mile Pub Awards… Ladies and gentlemen, raise your glasses to Galvin HOP

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HAT DOES IT take to be the best pub in the City? The answer is to change with the times. Out of all our finalists, Galvin HOP is the perfect example of how much the Great British pub has evolved from the primitive ale houses of old. Opening its doors in early 2016, HOP is the first foray into the pub game by the Michelin-starred Galvin brothers – and their share of 20% of the votes, shows they’ve hit the nail on the head. From the unpasteurised Pilsner Urquell keeping thirsty City types hydrated after hours to their refined take on British pub fare, the

PHOTOGRAPH (Harrild & Sons) by Jarek Kotomski

HOP is the perfect example of how far the Great British pub has come since its origins squaremile.com

Galvins haven’t tried to reinvent the wheel, merely perfect a winning formula. Unfussy and lacking in pretention, this bistro-cum-boozer is as polished a pub experience as you are likely to find anywhere in London. The cherry on the top? Aside from slick interiors and a heavenly deluxe hot dog on the bar menu, you can’t argue with being able to order pub grub straight to your office desk, with a little help from Deliveroo, of course. While Galvin HOP illustrates how the demands on the modern boozer are changing, honourable mention goes to close runners-up, The Craft Beer Co and The Black Friar – two pubs at opposite ends of the spectrum. In second place, The Craft Beer Co does exactly what it says on the tin – and does it very well indeed – while The Black Friar is a historic real ale pub that’s stood the test of time. The truth is, though, the square mile awards only go to show the pub is alive and well in 2017… We’ll drink to that. ■

BEST FOR SPIRITS SOUTHERN COMFORT AWARD

Pubs are not just havens of craft beer and real ale, which is why we teamed up with Southern Comfort to find the City boozer with the best spirits selection, too. Harrild & Sons is not only one of the most handsome pubs on our list, but its subterranean cocktail bar, 5CC, is a mustvisit should your drinks taste lean towards interesting Prohibition-style concoctions.

For info on all the finalists, see squaremile.com

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S I ZZLIN G S U M MER BBQS AT...

WHAT’S THE DEAL? A cocktail on arrival, a delicious three course BBQ dinner and entry to The Club after 10pm HOW MUCH?

From £55 per person

WHEN?

Friday and Saturday nights, May - September 2017

BOOKINGS:

Phone: 0207 368 3960, email: francesca.zanni@roofgardens.virgin.com

Terms and conditions apply. Subject to availability. The Roof Gardens, 99 Kensington High Street, London W8 5SA www.roofgardens.virgin.com/club |

@theroofgardens


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FOOD & DRINK GIN

FIVE-STAR ATTRACTION A blend of five botanicals foraged in the Scottish Highlands adds a touch of Gaelic charm and flavour to Caorunn small-batch gin

LOCAL SPIRIT Caorunn is a smallbatch gin handcrafted in the Scottish Highlands. Alongside six traditional gin botanicals, it’s infused with five locally foraged ones: dandelion, heather, coul blush apple, bog myrtle and rowan berry. It’s the last ingredient that gives the gin its name: the word Caorunn comes from the Gaelic name for rowan berry, which grows wild within a five-minute walk from the distillery. ■

WH0’S WHO

HIGH FIVE: Caorunn’s ingredients inspire its striking bottle, which has five sides to represent its five local botanicals. £27, waitrose.com

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Celebrities and wine don’t always mix. Just try Fergie’s ‘Fergalicious’ red blend and you’ll see what we mean. However, when Roger Daltrey decided to team up with Champagne Charles Orban to make his eponymous cuvée the results proved rather more compelling. Limited to a run of just 10,000 bottles, it has already picked up 90 points from the discerning Wine Spectator and a prestigious Vinalies Internationales Gold Medal. It’s made up of the traditional champagne grape trinity of chardonnay (40%), pinot noir (45%) and pinot meunier (15%). Although it’s nonvintage, the majority are from 2012 with a 20% of reserve wines. The champagne (£95) was created to celebrate The Who’s 50th anniversary and Daltrey’s career as a singer and actor, spanning more than 50 years. A fitting tribute to the man who sung ‘My Generation’… ■ eminent-life.com see  more  on

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GOLF

in association with

THE PLAYER SERGIO GARCIA

PHOTOGRAPH by David Cannon/Getty Images

Oh Sergio Garcia, is there a sportsman alive who we bleed for more? To see the Spaniard claim the green jacket at The Masters was to witness one of the greatest sporting stories ever told. El Niño burst onto the scene as a precocious teenager in 1999, beaten by a stroke into a superb second place at the USPGA by Tiger Woods at his best. The heir apparent to Seve Ballesteros, everybody wondered when the young Garcia would fulfil his destiny – and then the clouds came. Foiled again by Woods on the final day of The Open in 2006 (this time finishing T5), we watched through open fingers as he went on to miss an eight-foot par putt on the 18th in 2007’s Open, and subsequently lose a playoff against Padraig Harrington. Murmurs of doubt crept through his supporters, which only grew louder as another squandered victory came at the USPGA in 2008 after finding water on the 16th. The loyal still believed: surely it was a matter of time? But with Shakespearean introspection, Sergio stood before the TV cameras at the 2012 Masters and confirmed the fears: “I’m not good enough. I don’t have the thing I need to have. I’ve come to the conclusion that I need to play for second or third place.” Sergio, the greatest player never to win a major, had admitted defeat. Five years later, he would return to Augusta National to prove himself wrong. Leading after three rounds in this year’s Masters, he held his nerve as playing partner Justin Rose applied the pressure and took the lead. We’d seen it before, hadn’t we? Not this time. Garcia rallied: a miraculous par save at 13 was followed by a birdie at 14, and a stunning eagle at 15 clawed the Spaniard back into contention. A putt to win on the 18th came and went (some things never change), and then on the second playoff hole against Justin Rose, our fingernails bitten to oblivion, Garcia did what few still believed he could. In went the 12-foot putt, up went the arms. Major success was his at long last. After exercising his demons, will victory prove to be like London buses? ■

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GOLF USA

A BIRDIE’S EYE VIEW

Inspired by The Masters? Augusta National is out of reach for most, but these amazing American golf courses are yours for the taking…

PEBBLE BEACH CALIFORNIA

PHOTOGRAPH by Joann Dost

There are plenty of courses around the world that proclaim to be ‘the Pebble Beach of…’ but in reality few, if any, hold a candle to the original. Laid out across several rugged headlands in California’s Carmel Bay, this par 72 offers the complete on-course experience: incredible ocean views, stunning riskreward holes, testing tactical shots, and lightning fast greens. The 106-yard seventh and the 543-yard 18th are arguably the most iconic par three and finishing hole in world golf, but choosing a favourite is near impossible with so many magnificent holes in a single round. pebblebeach.com

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STREAMSONG FLORIDA

PHOTOGRAPH by Laurence Lambrecht

Far away from the Sunshine State’s gaudy theme parks lies one of the most innovative resorts in world golf. Ninety minutes southwest of Orlando, Streamsong’s 36 holes are located on the site of a former-phosphate mine in a massive 16,000-acre property. If this sounds incidental, it isn’t: phosphate is mined by gouging huge trenches, while the sandy spoils are left in dune-like piles. The trenches eventually fill with water, and native grasses grow over the mounds. The result? A wild and dramatic setting for two sets of pioneering non-interventionist golf architects to play god. The Red by Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw, and Tom Doak’s Blue represent the most exciting use of wasteland since… well, ever. streamsongresort.com

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2017 OFFICIAL HOSPITALITY PROGRAMME Widely regarded as one of the most prestigious tournaments in golf, the BMW PGA Championship has been held on the iconic West Course at Wentworth Club every year since 1984. This year we have refreshed and expanded our offering of official hospitality packages, which will enable you to find the perfect facility to entertain clients, colleagues, friends or family at this excellent event.

Green on 18

The Clubhouse

Moët Pavilion

For the first time ever, clients will be able to purchase packages in the Championship Pavilion overlooking the 18th green, a facility renowned for providing the best greenside views of golf anywhere in the world.

The backdrop for many of golf’s greatest events, including The Ryder Cup in 1953. Guests are hosted in the stunning Ballroom, which is the ideal base for a break from the on-course action.

The informal offering in the heart of the Championship Village is ideal for those looking for a relaxed but vibrant atmosphere.

PRICE MATRIX Day

Date

Green on 18

Clubhouse

Moët Pavilion

Wed

24th May

Fri

25th May

£499

£399

£299

26th May

£499

£399

£299

Thu

Sat Sun

27th May 28th May

£399 £399

£299 £299

£129

£199 £199

Prices are per person excluding VAT (currently 20%)

For further information on the official hospitality programme or to book, please: - Call: 01344 840 681 - Email: enquiries@europeantourhospitality.com - Visit: http://bmwpgachampionship.europeantour.com/hospitality/


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WHISTLING STRAITS WISCONSIN

Golf architect Pete Dye is a sadist who puts players through more pain than any other designer on the planet – and, boy, do we love it. On the western edge of Lake Michigan, the defining characteristic of this par 72 is, surprisingly, not the frequent coastal dangers but the 1,000plus bunkers that blanket the turf at every twist and turn of the dramatic track. Errant shots will result in a lost ball or a sandy landing; stay straight and there’s plenty more danger eager to double your score. Even in the face of such torture, players need only step onto the staggeringly beautiful par-three 17th – its views of Lake Michigan, the steep drop-off to the left of the green, the bunkers and sand dunes – to realise it’s all worth it. ■ americanclubresort.com

PHOTOGRAPH by David Cannon/Getty Images

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TAKE TO THE TRACK

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PHOTOGRAPHY PRIZE 2017 IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

PICK UP A CAMERA, TAKE A PHOTO OF THE CITY, AND ENTER THE SQUARE MILE PHOTOGRAPHY PRIZE 2017: YOU COULD WIN A £2,730 LEICA FOR YOUR EFFORTS

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HIS YEAR’S square mile Photography Prize

PHOTOGRAPH by publianc larit em potinium vid ces blah

is sponsored by Leica – the world’s most prestigious camera manufacturer. This means the prize is better than ever: a brand new Leica TL as well as a Vario-Elmar-TL 18-56mm lens – worth £2,730 in total. The concept is simple: you send us photos of the City, and our judging panel will decide which is the best. The subject matter can be anything you like as long as it’s shot in the City of London or Canary Wharf. Please send your photographs, with the subject header ‘Photo Prize’, as high res as possible to photo@squaremile.com. If they’re really large files, send them via WeTransfer. Each entrant is allowed to submit a maximum of 20 photos. Happy clicking! ■ The deadline for entries is 12 September 2017. The

THE PRIZE WORTH £2,730 The Leica TL is the only system in its class that combines groundbreaking design, craftsmanship and instinctive use. The camera is crafted from a single block of aluminium, and features a CMOS sensor with 16.5 million pixels, a high-resolution touch screen, and a simple layout with just four physical controls. The prize also includes the Leica Vario-Elmar-T 18-56 mm lens – a superb all-round lens that lets you capture rich-in-detail, highcontrast photos that are sharp from edge to edge and corner to corner, even in unfavourable light. leica-camera.com

winner will be announced in the November issue.

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HOLDINGS

ROOM AT THE TOP . 137


Take time to explore What would you do with an extra hour a day? Live at 250 City Road and stroll home in 15 minutes, leaving you more time to enjoy city life – from a plethora of art galleries, designer boutiques, bars and restaurants to new green spaces, state of the art gym, swimming pool and fitness terrace. 1, 2 & 3 BEDROOM AP ARTMENTS Prices from £885,000 MARKETING SUITE Open daily 10am - 6pm - Late night opening on Thursday until 8pm and early closure on Sunday at 4pm Sales & Marketing Suite, Old Street, London EC1V 2QQ Register your interest now CALL: 0203 603 6886 EMAIL: 250CITYROAD@BERKELEYGROUP.CO.UK

www.250cityroad.co.uk Proud to be a member of the Berkeley Group of companies

Prices correct at time of going to press.


CGIs Indicative only and subject to change. *London St Pancras Travel times taken from thetrainline.com and Google Maps 2017

L AUNCH ING

1 3 M AY 2 0 1 7 R E G I S TE R YO U R INTEREST NOW

E XC E P T I O N A L DESIGN INTERIORS BY C O N R A N + PA R T N E R S

APART MENTS FROM £ 4 7 5 , 0 0 0

TOWNHOUSES FROM £ 1 ,1 9 5 , 0 0 0

G A B R I E L S Q U A R E .C O M

NEW HOMES IN ST ALBANS • New 3 and 4 bedroom family homes set around a landmark garden square • 1 and 2 bedroom apartments and duplexes • Distinctive, bold architecture and landscaping • Private roof terraces, balconies and gardens • Secure underground parking • Kitchens by Poggenpohl • Control4 Smart Homes Technology • Less than 5 minutes walk to St Albans City train station • Journey time to central London from 18 minutes* C O N TAC T:

01727 226 881 info@gabrielsquare.com


HOLDINGS

PROPERTY PENTHOUSES

THE VIEW FROM THE TOP When it comes to buying a property in London, the only way is up. And up. And up again. Because when you want to take full advantage of living in an iconic city, a penthouse apartment is the obvious choice

H

OW DO YOU fancy waking up and opening

your blinds onto a view of Tower Bridge, St Katharine Docks marina, the City and the Tower of London? Yep, we quite like the idea too, which is why London Dock has caught our eye. The new development by St George occupies a previously untapped 7.5-acre site in Wapping and overlooks the City and all its landmarks, as well as the Thames and, if you’re in a penthouse apartment, way beyond, too. More than just a residential development, London Dock is set to become a destination in its own right, complete with a cultural quarter, new outdoor spaces, and places to eat and drink. Buying a property in one of the smart new blocks means access to a range of hotel-style leisure facilities including a gym, swimming pool, sauna and steam room, a squash court, visual golf suite and private screening room. At the top-end of properties available are the London Dock penthouses: elegant, high-spec spaces that set a new benchmark for sky-high living. The apartments overlook Gauging Square – a new public piazza – as well as the City skyline beyond, and have been designed with entertainment in mind: large balconies and terraces provide alfresco dining areas, kitchens have integrated Gaggenau appliances, and there are bespoke media units with HD TVs and iPads to wirelessly control audio-visual, air conditioning and lighting. Thoughtful and sophisticated interiordesign schemes are bright and contemporary, with timber floors and antique bronze detailing to provide an overall aesthetic that’s classic and timeless, much like the views.

EMBRACE YOUR SURROUNDINGS: Even the bathrooms in London Dock’s penthouses are designed to make the most of the view; kitchens come with integrated appliances and floorto-ceiling windows; penthouses have large balconies and terraces.

Prices for penthouses start from £2,199,950. For more information, call 020 7971 7880, or visit londondock.co.uk

••

More than just a residential development, London Dock is set to become a destination in its own right squaremile.com

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HOLDINGS

THE LAST WORD IN STYLE: [clockwise from here] Interiors at Beau House have been conceived by luxury design specialists Oliver Burns; stylish design extends out to the terrace; the penthouse’s kitchen.

BEAU HOUSE, SW1 If you’re looking for a handmade shirt or signature scent, you head to Jermyn Street, and thanks to the arrival of a new residential development by Dukelease, you can now find the best in London living there, too. Without a doubt one of London’s most stylish new addresses, the Beau House development is a collection of seven elegant, sophisticated apartments situated in former offices on the iconic and quintessentially British stretch, and has the unique appeal of providing high-spec, modern accommodation in one of London’s most covetable and heritagerich postcodes. The jewel in its crown is a penthouse that elevates standards of design-led property to unprecedented new heights.

••

The penthouse at Beau House elevates standards of design-led living to unprecedented new heights 138

The 3,000sq ft, two-floor penthouse has been designed by luxury interior specialists Oliver Burns, and is a suitably chic space for an area synonymous with British fashion. The luxurious residence features distinguished hallmarks of architecture and interior design, with a gilded coffered ceiling, doors with bronze inlay detail and a sculptural wall in polished plaster. A rich colour palette of navy blue, grey, soft metallics, accents of burnt orange and emerald green, alongside a dark stained oak herringbone floor, maintains a classic aesthetic throughout. Each piece of furniture in the apartment has been handpicked to complement the area’s revered design heritage, with stand-outs including customised Chevron dining chairs by Aiveen Daly, a Davidson dining table, and marble and crystal pendent lights by Lee Broom. Other pieces, including headboards with detailed stitching and studs, leatherlined display cabinets, and pinstripe walls emulating the stripe of the classic gentleman’s suit, are all clever nods to Jermyn Street’s association with fine crafted tailoring. Things take a turn for the contemporary in the Boffi kitchen, with its state-of-the-art

Gaggenau appliances, while further hightech touches include integrated technology and lighting systems alongside a designated gallery wall space for artwork to be exhibited. First-rate design isn’t just limited to inside, however, and the penthouse’s roof terrace incorporates an outdoor kitchen with antique granite worktops and backlit white onyx detailing, an eight-seater dining table and seating area with outdoor television, fire pit and entertainment system. As a final flourish, Oliver Burns has collaborated with long-time resident of Jermyn Street Floris London to create a bespoke room scent especially for the property. Joe Burns, co-founder of Oliver Burns, comments: “It was essential for the penthouse to have its own unique identity. Every single element has been exclusively designed and created, with the design weaving the heritage of the area throughout. This is a truly exceptional home which showcases the very best of thoughtful luxury and craftsmanship, in one of London’s golden postcodes.” ■ Price will be in excess of £15m. For more info contact Knight Frank on 020 7499 1012, CBRE on 020 7240 2255, or visit beauhouselondon.com

squaremile.com


NEW RELEASE NEW RELEASE

— AT — — AT —

Combining stunning architecture with a modern industrial specification, Emery Wharf offers a unique Combining stunning a modern industrial specification, Emery Wharf offers collection ofarchitecture one, two andwith three bedroom homes, including the new Manhattan suite.a unique collection of one, two and three bedroom homes, including the new Manhattan suite. Surrounded by beautiful open spaces including two private roof gardens, Emery Wharf is just moments from Surrounded by beautiful open spaces including private roof gardens, Emery Wharf is Canary just moments Tower Bridge, the historic Tower of London,two St Katharine Docks marina, the City and Wharf.from Tower Bridge, the historic Tower of London, St Katharine Docks marina, the City and Canary Wharf.

PRICES FROM £539,950* PRICES FROM £539,950* VISIT OUR MARKETING SUITE 9 Cargo Square, London, E1W 2AA VISIT OUR MARKETING SUITE 9 Cargo Square, London, E1W 2AA

LONDONDOCK.CO.UK | 020 3355 8839 LONDONDOCK.CO.UK | 020 3355 8839 Computer generated image is indicative only. *Price correct at time of going to press. Computer generated image is indicative only. *Price correct at time of going to press.


ALL ENQUIRIES: +44 (0) 20 3369 0539

westend.sales@cbre.com primenewhomes@knightfrank.com A development by


102 JERMYN ST. SW1 Dukelease presents a rare opportunity to live on this historic London street. Introducing Beau House, a boutique development of seven elegant apartments and a bespoke penthouse designed in collaboration with Oliver Burns.

BEAUHOUSELONDON.COM


+ TO ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION PLEASE CALL ON 020 7819 9999

CHRISTOPHER HAMPTON A NEW PRODUCTION DIRECTED BY SIMON CALLOW BY

‘I CAN HARDLY PRAISE THIS SHOW HIGHLY ENOUGH’ ‘WICKEDLY FUNNY’ ‘I LOVE THIS PLAY’ THE SPECTATOR

TIME OUT

GUARDIAN

LIMITED SEASON

WWW.WILDANDSONS.COM WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/WILDANDSONS @WILDANDSONS

WILD & SONS is an American car specialist supplying restoration, service and performance parts. They also carry out repairs, servicing, full restorations and custom builds including hot rods. Wild & Sons is a dynamic business and is already gaining a great reputation for their work. They cover all American makes and models from 1900 up to present day and also create bespoke bicycles.

wildandsonsHP.indd 1

24/02/2017 11:06


END PLAY

squaremile.com  |

squaremile.com  |

EVENTS

WIN

Win a solo health and fitness retreat worth £2,950

COMPETITION

On The Town: Spring in the City WORLD GUNMAKERS EVENING

FESTIBOWL

Knightsbridge; 18 May

Finsbury Square; 28-30 June

The global gun community comes to London to socialise, showcase and sell the finest examples of gunmaking on the planet. Running for its fifth year, Guns on Pegs unites prestigious British brands with the biggest names in the industry. Be sure to arm yourself with complimentary cocktails and canapés upon entry.

Combining lawn bowls with contemporary music, Festibowl is modernising one of Britain’s oldest sports. Offering a sociable atmosphere, a fully stocked bar and some of London’s best street food, this is the place for casual corporate gatherings with a retro twist. Tweed and red cords are optional.

For more info: worldgunmakers.com

For more info: festibowl.co.uk

BRIAN SAUNDERS: SELECTED WORKS

BMW PGA CHAMPIONSHIP

Lever Gallery; 12 May-31 July

Wentworth Club; 25-28 May

Celebrating the work of Brian Saunders, the acclaimed British illustrator who rose to prominence in the 1960s, this is an exhibit for anyone with an interest in art. Having illustrated for leading British magazines, advertising campaigns, and film posters, the man clearly knew his stuff. Go along and see for yourself.

A must-see event for any golf fan, and a flagship event on the European Tour: this year, reigning Open champion Henrik Stenson, Olympic champion Justin Rose and British favourite Rory McIlroy are slated to compete against a stellar field. Pack up your sun cream (well, we can hope) and get yourself down to Surrey.

For more info: levergallery.com

For more info: wentworthclub.com

squaremile.com

Y

OU NEED A holiday. Admit it – we’re not here to judge. Before you reach for the phone to call up your favourite Caribbean hotel, though, why not enter our competition for the chance to win a health and fitness retreat to Ibiza? Created by White Calm Retreats, a small group of participants will stay in a 5-star villa from 1-4 October 2017. After a series of health assessments, classes and sessions will be tailored to you as an individual. As well as fitness and high-intensity interval training, the retreat covers animal flow, mindful practice, body mobiliser, and yoga, alongside multiple other workshops. The City lifestyle can be draining, and sometimes we all need a break. Whether you are feeling stressed, can’t sleep, or just want to get fit, White Calm is here to help. ■ To enter, go to squaremile.com

TO ENTER

Go to squaremile.com/ competitions and answer a simple question. T&Cs can be found online.

143


squaremile

ESSENTIALS

+ TO ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION PLEASE CALL 020 7819 9999

DAN HENRY

ELIZABETH PARKER

W: danhenrywatch.com

W: elizabethparker.co.uk

ANDREW & COLE

SLICK REVOLUTION

@andrewandcole_oceanwear W: andrew-cole.com

T: 0127 428 8600 E: info@slickrevolution.co.uk W: slickrevolution.co.uk

BUGS VINTAGE

BARROR OF LONDON

@bugsvintage W: bugsvintage.com

BarrorLondon @barrorlondon W: barrorlondon.com

MARLOE WATCH COMPANY

IMOSSI LONDON

What if you could have a watch with vintage design aesthetics but without the wallet-incinerating price tag? And - even better - designed by someone with vintage watch DNA in their blood? Watch collector extraordinaire Dan Henry has turned watchmaker with models that fuse cues from Breitling, Omega and other twentieth century classics with modern materials and accurate, high-quality movements.

Andrew & Cole Ocean wear is a brand presenting a new way of comfort and style for men with its innovative lining without the net. This allows you to do summer activities all day! Visit andrew-cole. com for eye-catching and comfortable swimwear.

These vintage canvas duffle bags are available in tan, green and navy. They are just one of a verity of items Bugs Vintage have available ranging from traditional handmade razors, timeless men’s clothing and handmade leather goods.

Marloe Watch Company is an independent designer and producer of watches based in Oxfordshire. Founders Oliver and Gordon created Marloe to reinvigorate the world of hand-wound timepieces. Taking its name from the town of Marlow, where Oliver grew up, the company’s values are strongly bound to tradition and design. @marloewatchco @marloewatchco marloewatchco W: marloewatchcompany.com

DU MAURIER

The Commodore by Du Maurier Watches. This stunning, Swiss-made diving watch is a limited edition of only 125 pieces. A classic combination of style and performance, a true dress-diver that looks as good with a suit as it does in the water. The Commodore with tan leather strap £465 See the full collection at: W: dumaurierwatches.com T: 0146 022 0720

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Heart of Stone cufflinks by Elizabeth Parker. True modern classics, these semi-precious stone cufflinks are an elegant blend of .925 silver and lapis lazuli stone. At £75 they are also available in black onyx and mother of pearl. Elizabeth Parker is an independent UK designer of luxury men’s accessories including cufflinks, tie slides, bracelets and dress studs.

Looking to re-energise your commute and beat the tube to work? With a 12 mile range and top speed of 20 mph, Slick Revolution’s Max-Eboard is the perfect tool. Our Carbon 6 upgrade is the UK’s only carbon composite electric skateboard out there. Use code ‘squaremile’ for 10% off.

Our Weekender polo is one of our three button placket polo shirts in 100% cotton pique with colour on the cuff, hem and placket. The pique allows for a more breathable fabric allowing for a more comfortable wear. Which makes it ideal for relaxing weekends, a round of golf or for smart-casual wear.

imossi london has designed a sleek and slim minimalist wallet machined from high grade aluminium which protects your cards from RFID fraud and also prevents card clash. Its variety of interchangeable coloured straps will securely hold up to ten cards, including a few notes. And for that extra personal touch, why not have it engraved with your initials? From £34 @imossi.london W: imossi.london

TUSENÖ

In a short period of time, Swedish Tusenö has become a brand to remember. Through a mix of exciting materials and an extraordinary attention to details, its pieces speak to both watch enthusiast and the style-conscious man. Featured here is one of its models from the ”First 42” series in rosé gold. Priced at approximately £315. @tusenowatches W: tuseno.com


+ TO ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION PLEASE CALL ON 020 7819 9999

The Terrace at Chamberlain’s Restaurant, Leadenhall Market A perfect place to meet for cocktails, lunch or dinner

|

Bar

Private Dining

0207 648 8690

|

Terrace

reservations@chamberlainsoflondon.co.uk

tion a d n u o F s Royal Parkhon Half Marat e one finish lin Four parks,

er 2017

Sunday 8 Octob Sign up now

nspcc.org.uk/royalparks 020 3772 9720 running@nspcc.org.uk £1 registration fee

Enter discount code ROYALPARKS1 for an exclusive £1 registration fee when you sign up online.

© 2017 NSPCC. Registered charity England and Wales 216401 and Scotland SC037717. J20161422.

chamberlainsoflondon.co.uk

Photography by Daniel Hambury.

Restaurant


END PLAY

BEST JOB IN THE WORLD see  more  on

squaremile.com

Matthew Zorpas It’s a hard job but someone’s got to be… a gentleman blogger. Matthew Zorpas reflects on his fashionable life and times

I

EMERGED INTO THE industry from the business part of things. After practicing digital marketing for a few years I launched The Gentleman Blogger, not only to communicate my lifestyle but also challenge the entrepreneur in me towards the more creative parts of the industry.

THE ADAPTATION CHALLENGE of fashion fascinates me: transition, flux, change. FASHION BLOGGERS STRUGGLE with the public misconception that our work is ‘easy’. It is glorified as we only share a result – say, a beautiful image – instead of the eight-hour flight to New York for a meeting and back. LONDON AND NEW York continue to inspire. The mixture, the clashes, and how easily everyone fits into their surroundings – whether contemporary and modern or old and classy. I am in constant awe of it.

THE INDUSTRY IS constantly changing. Many brands are finally catching up with the idea of digital. Many have struggled to understand and invest, and therefore disappear from the public eye. A GENTLEMAN EMBODIES integrity, honour and makes a great effort in all of his interactions with others. It is not the suit or brogues, but the search for enlightenment and spirituality that makes a gentleman. IF I DIDN’T blog I would work for a tech startup. I love the process of creating something not yet existing but necessary. ■ To read the full article, go to squaremile.com

SEE MORE ONLINE For more ‘Best Jobs in the World’ go to squaremile.com. Know a contender? Email max.williams@squaremile.com

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& wellman.co.uk *England’s all time highest international wicket-taker, 463 test wickets correct at 28 November 2016. Source: www.jamesanderson613.com †UK’s No1 men’s supplement brand. Nielsen GB ScanTrack Total Coverage Unit Sales 52 w/e 25 March 2017.

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Square Mile - 123 - The Best of British Issue  

Square Mile Magazine - Issue 123 - The Best of British Issue