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EDITOR’S WORD K

EVIN COSTNER IS not your average Hollywood star.

I don’t mean because he’s won a brace of Oscars, three Golden Globes, and an Emmy. (Although, there is that.) But rather because he puts his money where his mouth is. He’s invested a considerable amount of his own fortune into the film industry, working on projects he believes in, choosing carefully based on instinct and passion. In the case of the 2005 film Black or White, he bankrolled its $9m production budget himself. Although not exactly a box office smash, it still brought in $26m. You have to respect him for not taking the easy route. There were few studios in their right mind which would have turned down the opportunity of making, say, Bull Durham 2, The Bodyguard Returns, or Robin Hood: King of Thieves. But sequels are not Costner’s bag. Given his status, he could have signed up to double or triple the number of films he has, but discernment has stopped him. At least, most of the time. Let’s not dwell on The Postman, OK? What’s even more admirable about the actor is his endeavours beyond the film industry. For example, he spent more than $20m of his own cash developing a centrifuge machine that separates oil from water. (You know – as one does.) On several occasions, he has even testified to the US Congress about the ground-breaking technology, which was masterminded by his brother. Indeed, despite a rocky start to this business, BP placed an order for 32 machines to help clean up the Gulf of Mexico oil spill. Costner’s latest film, Hidden Figures, is based at NASA in the 1960s, and intelligently tackles the pertinent topic of race relations in America. When your career is as prolific as Kevin Costner’s, it seems churlish to talk about comebacks. But given the film’s critical rating of 92% on Rotten Tomatoes, it’s fair to say Costner is making waves – and not of the Waterworld variety. ■

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@SQUAREMILE_COM SQUAREMILEUK SQUAREMILE_COM THIS MONTH’S CONTRIBUTORS

JENNIFER MOSS Jennifer Moss is the founder of Plasticity Labs, a technology company dedicated to providing people with the tools to be happier and higher performing. In this issue, she offers advice on how to achieve greater happiness in the workplace. [Turn to p26]

RICHARD WOLFE After business school, and many years in the internet industry, Richard has dedicated himself to helping people master email – and has now authored his first book on the subject. This issue, he begins to explain the secrets of ‘speedmailing’. [Turn to p27]

Mark Hedley, Editor, @mghedley

Help for Heroes is square mile’s official charity partner. Please give generously. helpforheroes.org.uk

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“WORK’S NOT BAD, BUT IT DOES TEND TO MESS UP YOUR DAY” – Cath Tate Work Tends to Ruin Your Day is out now (Portico, £7.99)

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ELAINE LIPWORTH Born in Manchester, award-winning writer Elaine Lipworth has been based in LA for more than 20 years, writing for Marie Claire, In Style and ES Magazine. Not only has she interviewed Kevin Costner several times, she’s even caught a ride in his private jet. [Turn to p94]

SIMON BROOKE Simon Brooke is an award-winning journalist who writes about the luxury sector, business, and men’s fashion for newspapers including the Financial Times and the Sunday Times. This issue, he talks us through Britain’s flourishing shoemaking scene. [Turn to p66]

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FASHION FORWARD 082

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ISSUE 120

104

FEATURES

PORTFOLIO

ASSETS

070 . SPRING/SUMMER 2017

018 . THE EXCHANGE 023 . ART WORK 024 . THE ANALYST 026 . HAPPINESS 027 . SPEED MAIL 028 . POLITICS

104 . CRETE 108 . MR & MRS SMITH 111 . LONDON 112 . MOTORS 116 . PUB AWARDS 2017 122 . WINE

078 . THE WORLD’S BEST TAILOR?

EXPOSURE

HOLDINGS

062 . KEANU REEVES

The John Wick star gets his motor running.

066 . BRITISH SHOEMAKING

The UK’s cordwainers are in ascendence. We check out this season’s strongest looks. How Huntsman became Savile Row’s best.

082 . FASHION’S NEW GUARD

Charlie Casely-Hayford cuts a dash.

088 . TALKING ABOUT A REVOLUTION Up close and personal with Fidel Castro.

094 . HOLLYWOOD HEAVYWEIGHT

COVER

In our exclusive interview, Kevin Costner talks race relations and business decisions.

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032 . STYLE 035 . COLLECTIONS 037 . SHARP NOTES 039 . SUITS 041 . ACCESSORIES 045 . SHOES 046 . ROYAL EXCHANGE 048 . WATCHES 055 . MY WORLD

131 . GREENWICH 133 . THE STRAND 135 . DESIGN FOR LIFE

END PLAY 141 . GALLERY 143 . EVENTS 146 . WORLD’S BEST JOB

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PORTFOLIO

THE EXCHANGE ARTWORK THE ANALYST COLUMNS

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018 023 024 026

REAR OF THE YEAR . 018

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THE   E X C H A N G E

THINGS TO DO AFTER THE CITY WORDS Saul Wordsworth

#95 LION TAMER

▽ SO YOU want to be a lion tamer? Great idea, there’s nothing tamer than a lion. Other than a puppy. And a snail. And cabbage. Cabbage is tame. And Vladimir Putin. Even Putin’s tamer than a lion. Why do you want the job again? We all know the elephant in the room (if he’s allowed – elephants and lions don’t mix well) is the danger inherent in such a position. Even with extensive training, there’s always the chance that rather than you taming the lion, the lion may wish to tame you. This is unlikely to manifest in it requesting to borrow your top hat and whip but may instead present in a more assertive fashion, ie biting your head off. If your head does get bitten off, it is important not to panic. Not panicking is rule

WISE GUIDES WORDS Ben Winstanley

BEST CHAMPAGNE FOR UNDER £100

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number two of lion taming, rule number one being never to talk about lion taming club. Many believe lions should not be tamed but instead allowed to roam free, hence why people like you and your sister show special interest in tales of lions overpowering their masters. Recent figures suggest 112% of all lion tamers are either maimed, disfigured or eaten up to death. Thankfully the role offers extensive benefits (23 days annual leave plus a fancy jacket) to offset any danger associated with the position. Should you be granted an interview, make sure you wear a suit and tie – lions are fierce traditionalists. Maintain eye contact at all times and prepare a few jokes in advance (lions love jokes). Show no fear and use the bathroom thoroughly beforehand. Do bring an oven glove just in case of handshake. We heard on the grapevine you were shortlisted for interview. That’s brilliant, really well done. How did it go? Hello? Hello? Oh… ■

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LOUIS ROEDERER BRUT NATURE 2009 £69.95

▷ Louis Roederer is always a sure-fire bet when it comes to fancy fizz, and its latest expression is no different. Aged for a full five years in the bottle, this champagne comprises the three traditional champagne grapes of chardonnay, pinot noir and pinot meunier, with 25% of the wine vinified in oak casks for an added toasty complexity on the finish. With a flavour profile that’s bursting with ripe fruit, as well as a touch of zest and a saline freshness, this is an undoubtedly elegant addition to any celebration, or just pop it because you want to. For more info, see louis-roederer.com


PORTFOLIO

BONUS BUS TER

FORD GT APPROX £320,000 WORDS Mark Hedley

▷ In President Obama’s farewell speech, one of the highlights he picked up on from his eight-year tenure was the rebooting of the US auto industry. With

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POL ROGER 2006 BRUT VINTAGE £60

▷ When it comes to choosing your champagne, you’ve got to trust the experts – like Winston Churchill. The British Bulldog loved Pol Roger so much that the champagne house actually named a cuvée after him. A fine achievement. This 2006 brut vintage showcases all the hallmarks of a classic Pol Roger: a rich palate of ripe autumnal fruit, grilled nuts and honey sweetness, with a long and satisfying finish. This is champagne as its early pioneers intended. Don’t take our word for it, though: Winston knows best. For more info, see justerinis.com

cars like the Ford GT, you can see where the Americans are starting to go right again. The most recent reinvention of the 1966 GT40 legend is a thoroughly modern affair. Although the styling cues are still

The racing variant won the GTE Pro racing class at Le Mans – two notches below the top prototype class – and outlasted an impressive challenge from Ferrari’s all-new 488 car. Fifty years on from when Ford won the 1-2-3 at

taken from the original, that’s about where the similarities end. This one doesn’t even have a V8. Instead, it boasts a 3.5-litre EcoBoost V6 enhanced with a pair of turbos. The result is 600bhp+ and a 3.2-sec 0-60mph time.

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the 24-hour race, this has been quite some comeback. The estimated price for a slice of modern motoring mastery? About £320,000. And only 1,000 will be built. Yee-ha! ■ For more info: ford.com

PASCAL DOQUET HORIZON BLANC DE BLANCS BRUT NV, £24.20

▷ So, your father-in-law considers himself an oenophile, and turns his nose up at the very mention of Moët or Veuve Clicquot? You need a small-grower champagne that leaves no room for argument – Pascal Doquet is your best shout. Farmed from a mere eight hectares of vines, the veteran winemaker does a lot with a little. Take this non-vintage blanc de blancs: a 100% chardonnay that offers a fine balance of floral and citrus notes, with a crispness in the finish that makes this particular bubbly especially easy to drink. Beat that, old man. For more info, see justerinis.com

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PORTFOLIO

MARK SELBY, CO-FOUNDER, WAHACA

▽ I LEFT Edinburgh University and headed

THE EXCHANGE

straight for the City to work in corporate finance at Merrill Lynch. While I loved the excitement of live deals and valuing companies, I knew that my real passion lay in the actual running of these businesses, not the corporate side. I wanted to build a brand. I learnt a huge amount from the City in terms of how you value and need to look at businesses. Two years there really taught me – it was like a mini business school. I left Merrill Lynch to work with Stelios Haji-Ioannou at easyGroup in the new ventures team. I then met the founders of Nandos and decided to join them in a strategic/financial role. My eyes were opened to the excitement of the restaurant world and the role of brands within it. By 2006 I felt ready to set up my own business. In 2007, my business partner – Thomasina Miers – and I opened our first Wahaca in Covent Garden. We were determined to create a scalable Mexican restaurant which not only had sustainable principles but also showed that real Mexican food was different to what was on offer in the UK at the time. We now have more than 20 restaurants in the UK and continue to grow. ■

ESC APE ARTIS T

For more info, visit wahaca.co.uk

WIN

WIN A £500 VOUCHER TO USE AT THE COACH HOUSE ON REGENT STREET ▷ Coach, the original American house of leather, continues to celebrate the opening of its Coach House on London’s Regent Street. As such, it is giving you the chance to win a £500 shopping spree where you can indulge in its American heritage and superior leather craftsmanship.

Coach creative director Stuart Vever’s current collections continue with a celebration of New York City edge and its melting pot of cultures. Featuring an array of luxurious leather jackets, attractive shearlings, and novelty knits, shop here and you’re bound to feel the cool of the Big Apple.

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COMPETITION

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PORTFOLIO

A R T WO R K

HEADLINE### POUND LAND BY FIRSTNAME VICKY SMITHSURNAME

MAKING BIG MONEY Hyperreliast sculptor Diederick Kraaijeveld creates astonishing, photo-realistic pieces from salvaged wood. In the case of this piece, ‘British Pound’, that wood was found in skips outside gutted 19th-century mansions in Amsterdam and The Hague. Money for nothing, indeed.

TIME TO GET REAL

ARTWORK by Diederick Kraaijeveld

Plus One Gallery has relocated from Pimlico to Battersea, but the team’s dedication to discovering and promoting hyperrealist artists remains unchanged. The gallery’s winter exhibition – which is on until 24 February – will showcase 25 artists whose work demonstrates the increasing importance of hyperrealism within the art world.

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PORTFOLIO

A N A LYS T

SPEAKERS’ CORNER BY JACK DONNE

LOUD AND PROUD Bang & Olufsen’s Beolab 90 was first announced at the back end of 2015 to mark the brand’s 90th anniversary, but many audio journalists are only now getting the chance to test them for the first time. B&O set out to make “the perfect sound from the ultimate loudspeaker”. And on first listening, it’s clear that goal has been achieved.

HEAVY WEIGHT The striking speakers weigh in at 65kg a pop, and will set you back the best part of £27k per unit. Each one has seven tweeters, seven midrange drivers, three side/ woofers, and one front woofer. That’s 18 drivers with a total power output of 8,200 watts. Sounds pretty good to us.

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O PI N I O N

IN A HAPPY PLACE It’s nice to be nice, and lucrative, too. JENNIFER MOSS explains why when it comes to business, happiness really can be the key to success

I

N 2012, GOOGLE initiated a research

assignment named Project Aristotle. The study assessed 180 of Google’s most successful teams to determine why they were so high performing. From this report Google learned that the most successful and innovative teams had one fundamental trait in common – they experienced the highest levels of psychological safety. Essentially, after years of gathering data, Google would find that simply being nice would lead their company to greatness. For Google, this was a provocative realisation, one that encouraged increased investment in programming geared to building kindness, happiness, emotional control, well-being and mindfulness. Economists have long been studying the impacts of happiness on the bottom line. Although commensurate financial compensation is still valuable to retaining an employee, it isn’t the only reason an employee will stay. Creating a strong company culture and keeping employees intrinsically motivated is important to high performers, who on average, make 35%

important to comment here, that millennials aren’t trying to get out of work – flexibility has actually been proven to increase an employees’ productivity. It’s why we’re seeing the rise of hot desks, and flex times, and working remotely. In fact, a recent survey found that 51% of working adults plan to look for a new job that offers more flexibility within the next three years. As millennials get older and begin starting families, this need (and expectation) for flexibility will only rise (Mom Corps, 2014). Shawn Anchor, bestselling author and advisor to NASA and the White House, has been researching business outcomes as a result of happier employees for over a decade. In his book The Happiness Advantage, he proves that happiness raises

❱❱ HAPPIER PEOPLE TEND TO BE MORE GRATEFUL, AND IN THE WORKPLACE, GRATITUDE IS CORRELATED TO BETTER BUSINESS OUTCOMES more than low performers, and 27% more than core performers (Straz, 2014). Even more notably, when you look at the workforce composite of high-growth industries, 70% of those employees are millennials. And, millennials have a different concept of work and life compared to previous generations. Their attitude happens to be more holistic in its approach: they see work as flexible and fluid, making the nine-to-five workday slowly move towards obsolescence. It’s

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nearly every business and educational outcome: increasing sales by 37%, productivity by 31%, and accuracy by 19%. Happier people also tend to be more grateful – and, in the workplace, gratitude is correlated to better business outcomes. A study conducted by Plasticity Labs researcher Dr Vanessa Buote found that employees with higher gratitude expressed higher current job satisfaction and predicted future job satisfaction. Companies with the highest levels of

reported happiness confirmed better business outcomes across the board. They boasted greater customer loyalty, higher NPS and e-NPS scores, productivity and profitability. Gallup studies over decades showed that employees in the top quartile on employee engagement averaged $80,000 to $120,000 higher sales revenue per month (Gallup, 2013). As you can see from the above stats, figures, case studies and examples, happiness offers significant ROI for any leader. However, rather than focusing on lofty goals, instead leaders should invest in a well-being strategy. Workplace happiness is merely a constellating of healthy psychological traits that conclude in happier, higherperforming individuals and collectives. Happiness, like engagement and productivity, is an outcome. Taking time to increase hope, efficacy, resilience, optimism, gratitude, empathy and mindfulness in your people will be a winning strategy every time. Futurists predict that compassionate capitalism will be the next economic revolution to disrupt our workforce. We’re actually seeing the first signs of a tipping point now with more large enterprise companies claiming they want to “do well by doing good”. And, in all intents and purposes, isn’t a triple bottom line good for everyone? ■ Unlocking Happiness at Work by Jennifer Moss is out now (Kogan Page, £14.99).


PORTFOLIO

O PI N I O N

COMBAT YOUR MAIL DEMONS Is your inbox out of control? Streamline your emails with these simple tips from RICHARD WOLFE , and you’ll clear your mind as well

TURN OFF POP-UP EMAIL NOTIFICATIONS Most email programs will tell you when a new email arrives, preferably in as many ways as possible to make sure it doesn’t escape your attention. Although it might seem smart to stay on top of the news as it comes in, it’s actually pretty counterproductive – each notification is distracting you from the task at hand. In the end, neither the email nor the thing you were working on is getting your full attention. So turn off your email notifications – think of it as sanity security.

that will allow you to focus on your most important tasks, we need to introduce a few folders to help you quickly and effectively sort out all of the emails that come in. These folders are time based, and not subject based; subject-based categorisation quickly gets too complex to manage efficiently, especially as content categories can change over time. The most effective way to sort emails is based on how soon they require attention. I would recommend creating four ‘action folders’:

PROCESS YOUR INBOX TWICE A DAY Ideally, just check your inbox a couple of times per day (for example, first thing in the morning and after lunch) – whenever you do it, give it your undivided attention. Process the emails in one go, and then get on with your most important tasks. Try not to check too frequently, or you’ll just

1 DO THIS WEEK File any email that is urgent or important enough to be done in the short term.

2 HOLDING FOR LATER This is a parking spot for emails that require your attention but are less

❱❱ IDEALLY, YOU SHOULD JUST CHECK YOUR INBOX A COUPLE OF TIMES PER DAY, AND WHENEVER YOU DO IT, GIVE IT YOUR UNDIVIDED ATTENTION end up losing time again by getting sucked back into email enthrallment.

urgent. Once a week this folder should be reviewed to determine which emails will need to become to-do items.

SORT EMAILS INTO FOUR FOLDERS ILLUSTRATION by Mark Boardman

You obviously can’t take care of every single email in your inbox in just one sitting – not if your inbox looks like mine, anyway. So, we need a way to prioritise our mail and make sure we don’t miss any emails (or see them too late), and don’t lose track of the to-dos that they contain. To implement a ‘clean-mailbox policy’

3 WAITING FOR OTHERS This folder contains emails that you need to keep an eye on, but the ball is in someone else’s court. Again, you should review this folder once a week.

should be filed. You can save the entire email here, so that you have all the details.

FILE ALL EMAILS THAT NO LONGER NEED YOUR ATTENTION IN A SINGLE FOLDER Once you’ve finished with an email, you’ll often want to keep it to look up or refer to later. You might be tempted to create a complicated hierarchy of folders by projects, customers, or events to sort and save these old emails – but trust me, that’s actually a waste of time. Building and updating all of these folders will take more time than you actually spend on the email, and the more complicated the structure, the more problems it can cause when you are trying to retrieve the emails. Far better to use a single filing folder. This ensures your folder structure will never be out of date. Some email clients like Gmail already have this functionality built in, allowing you to simply use an archiving button to file emails. If your email client doesn’t offer this option, it’s easy to make your own: just by adding one more folder (‘Filed Items’) to your action folders. You may get a little nervous about putting all of your email messages into a single folder. The key to this singlefiling method is your email client’s search function. Your email’s search bar is one of the most powerful speedmailing tools at your fingertips. Good luck! ■

4 CALENDAR

Speedmailing: Turn Your Work Enemy into Your

This is where any date-specific emails

Best Work Tool by Richard Wolfe  is out now (£9.99).

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PORTFOLIO

O PI N I O N

A CONSIDERED APPROACH Chancellor Philip Hammond is quietly implementing a traditional, simple and thought-through approach to policy, and that’s good news, says IAIN ANDERSON

CAST YOUR MINDS back to the early summer of 2007: almost a decade ago, but it feels like half a century in political and economic terms. The incoming Labour prime minister Gordon Brown – remember him? – had just taken over at No 10 from Blair. The seeds of the financial crisis had been sown and were starting to harvest with sub-prime already imploding on trading screens across the Atlantic. In those heady days, the Labour party commissioned Margaret Thatcher’s former favourite ad agency Saatchi & Saatchi to create a campaign for a ‘snap election’ for the autumn of that year. The idea: ‘Not Flash – Just Gordon’ was its banner headline. The idea was that the dour ‘son of the manse’ was the perfect antithesis to ‘bling bling’ Blair. Of course, that early election never came and the rest made for some of the most intriguing economic and political history of a generation. But the sentiment of the campaign could also have been written for a future

❱❱ LIKE ANY POLITICIAN, PHILIP HAMMOND IS A CANNY OPERATOR, BUT NOT IN THE BORIS, CAMERON OR OSBORNE OXFORD-UNION MOULD

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Follow Iain Anderson on Twitter: @iain_w_anderson

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ILLUSTRATION by Mark Boardman

chancellor – our latest one – Philip Hammond. While much has been made of his early life – the ‘goth’ that stalked the school corridors in a trenchcoat – there is little out there to decipher a very private person. I think he likes it that way – rather like the prime minister herself – with his cards played close to his chest. For so much of 2016, the headline writers were caught up in the idea that Hammond was out on a limb on the biggest issue of the day – dare I speak its name? – and marginalised as an EU Remainer. But as we ended 2016, there

is no doubt that Hammond’s idea that we don’t face a cliff-edge Brexit has taken hold of much of government. Transition is indeed very much the name of the game. This word was even uttered and promoted by our Brexit secretary David Davis as he and Hammond have stepped ever closer and closer in line. In fact, this political relationship is going to be a fascinating one in the coming months. If there is one thing that suggests we’ll get a pragmatic approach to Brexit it’s if these two can maintain that business-like relationship. I first met Hammond when he was in opposition. Shadowing the chief secretary to the treasury he proved a formidable member of the front bench. Utterly forensic was his approach then – questioning everything – and it appears to remain so to this day. Like any politician he is a canny operator. But not in the Boris, Cameron or Osborne Oxford-Union mould. Yes, he has confidence, but one that comes from the fact that even though he has been in politics for a very long time, he is not a professional politician with no wider career or personal hinterlands. Of course, before politics he was in business. In fact, he was even in business when he was studying, too. But he certainly had to make his own way in the world – and it shows. Risk taking earlier in life – with real business risks rather than playing with someone else’s money – creates a much more cautious approach later in life. And we are seeing this in the political outcomes. Hammond clearly likes policy simplicity. After all the endless fiddling, tweakery and control freakery from Brown and Osborne, the good news is that Hammond is making policy from a traditional, simplerto-understand, easier-to-implement starting point. This again fits well into the new style of government. Thought-through policy, eh? Who’d have, er, thought it. ■


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EXPOSURE

STYLE SHARP NOTES ACCESSORIES WATCHES MY WORLD

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PHOTOGRAPH: Hackett Mayfair double-face zip out blazer, £750; polo in cream, £95; puppytooth shorts, £120 (all from hackett.com)


EXPOSURE

STYLE VISVIM

IT’S ALL IN THE DETAIL

Japanese brand Visvim is the vision of Hiroki Nakamura, whose interest in mid-century Americana has resulted in a label that’s an instant classic says ADAM WELCH , editor of Mr Porter’s style guide, The Daily

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HERE’S A SIMPLE reason why Japanese

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FUTURE CLASSICS: Each Visvim garment is a fashion-forward vision of classic styles fused with modern touches, thanks to founder Hiroki Nakamura’s interest in artisanal production techniques and folk handicraft traditions.

The continuing focus of visvim is the idea of ‘future vintage’ – clothing that looks and feels as good now as it will in a decade

short, 15 years on, Visvim shows no signs of relinquishing its hallowed insider status. Visvim mounted its first ever runway show at Pitti Uomo last year, and delivered an overwhelmingly brilliant collection to match. From the printed shirts to the vintage-styled outerwear, this was definitely one of the Mr Porter team’s highlights. ■ You can find Visvim on mrporter.com

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PHOTOGRAPH by Mark Peckmezian

brand Visvim has long been one of the most coveted marques among a certain cadre of detail-obsessed style connoisseurs: its founder Hiroki Nakamura’s singular mission is to create products of the ultimate integrity, by whatever means he can. This might mean re-engineering the denim jean from the yarn up (which is the reason Visvim’s signature style is called ‘social sculpture’), or it might mean vegetable tanning leathers (which takes weeks as opposed to days), or it might mean developing a range of fabrics that are entirely exclusive (which he also does). In fact, Nakamura’s research into artisanal production techniques, many of which he imports from folk handicraft traditions and early 20th-century America, goes so far and wide as to make a full rundown almost impossible. Which is to say that, to really appreciate what goes into each Visvim garment, you have to actually try one on – these are pieces that are designed to be as strangely familiar and comfortable as the most cherished vintage items in your wardrobe, but executed with a keen eye for design that makes them feel refreshingly new. Born in Tokyo and educated in Alaska, Nakamura launched Visvim in 2001, focussing initially on footwear designs, such as his renowned FBT sneaker (a hybrid between a traditional, one-piece leather moccasin and a contemporary running shoe), which has since become something of a cult piece among sneaker heads. Though each season brings new elements to the Visvim world, the continuing focus is not just the endless inspiration that is mid-century Americana, but the idea of ‘future vintage’ – clothing that looks and feels as good now as it will in a decade. When Mr Porter spoke to Nakamura in 2014, he was keen to elaborate on this idea. “There’s a real pleasure in owning something with intrinsic value and in developing a fondness for something you’ve owned a long time,” he said. The proof of this statement is, of course, in the product, still released in limited quantities to select retailers, and still among the most considered casual and contemporary items to be found anywhere in the world. In


IN IN 1934, 1934, BRITANNIA BRITANNIA DIDN’ DIDN’ T T JUST JUST RULE RULE THE THE WAVES WAVES

On October 22nd 1934, two exhausted airmen landed on a racecourse in Melbourne, surrounded by On October 22nd 1934, two exhausted airmen landed on a racecourse in Melbourne, surrounded by cheering crowds. Flying a specially-built De Havilland Comet DH-88, Charles Scott and Tom Campbell cheering crowds. Flying a specially-built De Havilland Comet DH-88, Charles Scott and Tom Campbell Black set a new record, flying the 11,000 miles from England in just 71 hours. The Bremont DH-88 Black set a new record, flying the 11,000 miles from England in just 71 hours. The Bremont DH-88 commemorates their aircraft and their achievement. Containing actual material from the record-breaking commemorates their aircraft and their achievement. Containing actual material from the record-breaking plane, the Bremont DH-88 is available now in a strictly limited edition. But it won’t be available for long. plane, the Bremont DH-88 is available now in a strictly limited edition. But it won’t be available for long.

Mayfair Boutique · 29 South Audley St, London, W1K 2PE · Tel: +44 (0)207 493 5150 Mayfair Boutique · 29 South Audley St, London, W1K 2PE · Tel: +44 (0)207 493 5150 City Of London Boutique · 12 The Courtyard, Royal Exchange, London EC3V 3LQ · Tel: +44 (0) 207 220 7134 City Of London Boutique · 12 The Courtyard, Royal Exchange, London EC3V 3LQ · Tel: +44 (0) 207 220 7134


EXPOSURE

COLLECTIONS HACKETT

COMPARE AND CONTRAST

For Spring/Summer 17, Hackett has looked to the coast for inspiration, including the English Riviera. This isn’t about beachwear, though – it’s a combination of elegant tailoring and pastel tones, with a quintessentially British edge

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A SHORE THING One of Hackett’s SS17 collections has been inspired by the English Riviera. For those of you who don’t actually know what that is, imagine its French namesake but with less plastic surgery and more pubs. The key to the look is to layer and mix different textures to make a real impact; think linen shirts, knitted ties and textured suits.

TOP OF THE POPS This season is all about contrasts in colour: pops of brightness complementing muted shades. Essentially, you can get away with Hackett’s pastel chinos if they’re paired with a more toned-down grey jacket. Unless you’re planning on wearing them to a client meeting – then you really can’t. Sorry.

GET THE LOOK: Cotton linen texture blazer in grey, £400; linen shirt in optic white, £95; Kensington slim chino in light yellow, £100; knitted melange tie in grey, £65; all from hackett.com

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astron. astron. the world’s first astron. the first gps world’s solar watch. the first gps world’s solar watch. gps solar watch. As As Novak Novak Djokovic Djokovic travels travels the the world, world, his his Astron Astron GPS GPS Solar Solar keeps him on time, adjusting automatically to his time zone As Novak Djokovic travels the world, his Astron GPS keeps himDjokovic on time, adjusting to hisGPS timeSolar zone As Novak travels theautomatically world, his Astron Solar at the touch of a button and using just the power of light. keeps him on time, adjusting automatically to his time zone at touch a button andthe using justhis theAstron power of light. As Novak travels world, Solar keeps himDjokovic onoftime, adjusting automatically to hisGPS time zone Asthe Novak Djokovic travels the world, his Astron GPS Solar With dual-time display, Astron is simply the world’s finest at the touch of a button and using just the power of light. With Astron is simply the finest keeps him adjusting automatically to his time zone at thedual-time touch adisplay, button and using just the power light. keeps him on onoftime, time, adjusting automatically toworld’s his of time zone GPS Solar watch. With dual-time display, Astron is simply the world’s finest GPS Solar watch. at the touch of a button and using just the power of light. With dual-time display, Astron is simply the world’s finest at the touch of a button and using just the power of light. GPS Solar watch. With dual-time display, GPS watch. WithSolar dual-time display, Astron Astron is is simply simply the the world’s world’s fifinest nest GPS Solar watch. GPS Solar watch.

For stockists call: 01628 770988 | www.seiko-astron.com For stockists call: 01628 770988 | www.seiko-astron.com For stockists call: 01628 770988 | www.seiko-astron.com For stockists call: 01628 770988 | www.seiko-astron.com


EXPOSURE

STYLE RM WILLIAMS

SHARP NOTES

For RM Williams’ new design director, JEREMY HERSHAN , style is about form and function ON MY WRIST I wear an Omega Suveran: a watch made exclusively for the Swedish government in the 1940s. It’s a beautiful design with a military movement and an unusual background.

IN MY HAND An art deco silver tankard that was a gift from a great mentor, my last creative director. It’s engraved with my initials and the years and months of service rendered. Filled with some ice-cold lager, of course.

IN MY SIGHTS I recently saw a yellow 1978 Comanche Jeep Cherokee for sale and died a little. You would need an oil field to fuel it so it’s not ideal in terms of carbon footprint, but it’s an absolutely wonderful looking beast nonetheless.

IN MY WARDROBE Vintage Levi’s and boots. Currently on heavy rotation are a pair of 1970s 505s that I picked up while I was in Tokyo and a pair of welltrodden RM Williams Turnout boots in Vesta, which is a hardy chrome-dyed pull-up leather that has a natural matt finish. They are pretty much the ideal work boots really.

THESE BOOTS ARE MADE FOR WALKING: As Design Director of RM Williams, Jeremy Hershan obviously has a passion for footwear, and believes that when it comes to shoes and boots, “you can’t have too many options.”

from function and that are built to last, and these absolutely live up to both mantles. Made in England from robust fabrics, beautifully considered and detailed.

ON MY RADAR L E J Walker, a new London-based label that’s dedicated to well-crafted, military-inspired work shirts. I’m all about items that are born

PHOTOGRAPH by H Stewart

When it comes to clothing, I’m all about items that are born from function and that are built to really last squaremile.com

ON MY TRAVELS Footwear and more footwear – you can’t have too many options. It varies slightly depending on climate, environment and purpose of travel, but usually I’ll take multiple shades of suede RM Williams plus a beaten-up all-weather pair and some snaffles for good measure.

IN MY PAST I don’t throw out much, which has caused a bit of a space concern at home, but I’ve definitely had items over the years that I’ve cherished or worn to death and that I’m perpetually looking to replace or upgrade. I’m quite consistent that way. Denim shirts are one such example.

ON MY AGENDA To spend some time getting lost in Berry Brothers & Rudd’s cellar, which I’ve heard spans a couple of miles underneath St James’s.

IN MY DREAMS

ON MY BUCKET LIST

If money were no object (and there was plenty to go around for all the important things), a home in the Caribbean wouldn’t go astray. I’d be like Lord Glenconner and family – friends could come and go freely.

A road trip up the coast of Australia in a Kombi van with my wife, stopping at all the important cultural sights like the Big Prawn, the Big Pineapple and the Big Banana… ■ For more information, see rmwilliams.com

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floris, 89 jermyn street & 147 ebury street, london florislondon.com


EXPOSURE

SUITS MAGEE

CHECK IT OUT Magee focuses its SS17 collection on a relaxed sartorial look – including this subtle check suit

WORKING WARDROBE

PHOTOGRAPH by Alex Hutchinson

Magee’s Summer Skyline collection seamlessly blends business and casual across a range of contemporary silhouettes. Take this sophisticated three-piece suit: composed of a sharp cobalt blue wool, it features a timeless check design to keep you looking sharp whether you’re heading to a midweek meeting or pairing the jacket with jeans for Sunday lunch at the pub. From £393.90; magee1866.com see  more  on

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A time for pioneers.

Not only does the Meister Driver Chronoscope display the time, it also evokes an entire era: the early years of modern motoring, a time of great technological pioneers. Its appearance is inspired by the design of historically-significant classic cars and their dashboard instruments. Like no other watch, the Meister Driver combines the distinctive charm of these automobiles with our passion for mechanical timepieces – and thus becomes our most nostalgic Meister ever.

www.junghans.co.uk ¡ info@thebluecompanylondon.co.uk


EXPOSURE

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STYLE BAGS

KEEP IT SIMPLE Paired-down design and muted tones mean there’s no room for fussing with the new Elegance accessories collection from BOSS Menswear

INSTANT CLASSICS Modern, minimalist and extremely lightweight, the new accessories range from BOSS has been named Elegance with good reason. Its deconstructed aesthetic, bold shapes, and muted colour palette of cool blue, tan and grey ensure that it’s as versatile as it is sophisticated. From slim document cases through to this handy holdall, ‘less is more’ has never looked so good.

NATURAL STYLE: Made in Italy from supple, drum-milled leather, the Elegance collection puts the quality of craftsmanship at centre stage, with clean design allowing the leather’s natural grain to shine.

hugoboss.com

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ROYAL COLLECTION

NEBULA Hand-crafted in Switzerland Caliber A&S5101: manufacture movement / skeletonized and symmetrical architecture / hand-wound / power reserve over 90 h / historical English movement design with 10 bridges and solid gold chatons / all technical elements visible dial side / Haute Horlogerie finishing: chamfered bridges with polished edges, sunburst barrels, satin-finished wheels and ratchets with chamfered and polished edges, screws with bevelled and mirrorpolished heads. Functions: hours, minutes and small seconds. Case: very elaborated and tapering from top to bottom to perfectly fit on the wrist / stainless steel / diameter 41.50 mm. www.arnoldandson.com


EXPOSURE

ACCESSORIES COACH

LEADERS OF THE PACK

The backpack is having its moment in the fashion spotlight, with several high-profile designers releasing their own take on the trend this season. Our pick of the lot is this Wild West-inspired piece from Coach

BACK TO BACK It’s official: backpacks are, well, back. And if the last time you owned one was at school, now’s the time to embrace them again. The real beauty of the two-strap bags is that they’re actually quite (whisper it) practical, making this a trend we’re on board with, especially when they look like this one from Coach.

WILD WEST This season, Coach has looked to all-American iconography for inspiration. This Flag backpack is a great example, fusing New York punk with a Wild-West pioneer spirit. The pebble leather – inspired by the soft leather used in Coach’s early days – is handmilled, enabling it to be supple yet exceptionally durable. £695, uk.coach.com

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Conduit Street j o h nv a r v a t o s . c o m

Vintage Trouble, 2017 K ings Theatre, Brooklyn, N Y


EXPOSURE

STYLE SHOES

SUEDE IN LONDON After a successful debut year, luxury shoe brand Sons of London is back with a new collection in suede

HELL FOR LEATHER Founded on the simple premise that luxury shoes don’t need to cost the earth, Sons of London bypasses the traditional retail model to create shoes that cost less than half their usual price.

SKIN IN THE GAME

PHOTOGRAPH by publinc PHOTOGRAPH larit em potinium by David vid ces Harrison blah

The new collection of chocolate brown shoes is made from an incredibly soft Italian goatskin suede, which is noticeably finer and more luxurious to the touch than cow suede. Specially treated during the tanning process to give it water-resistant properties, they’re hardwearing too. Prices start at £180; sonsoflondon.com

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EXPOSURE

RETAIL THE ROYAL EXCHANGE

RETAIL DETAIL

SHOPPING BAG THE ROYAL EXCHANGE, LONDON, EC3V 3DG THEROYALEXCHANGE.CO.UK

The latest luxury items available at the Royal Exchange: treat yourself to any – or all – of these, and 2017 will be a good year

ALPHA AND OMEGA: The Omega Globemaster was one of the sensations of Baselworld 2015. The latest addition to the brand’s Constellation collection, the updated Globemaster houses the brand’s most advanced mechanical movement.

ASPINAL OF LONDON For SS17, Aspinal of London has produced a range of typically stylish designs. We’re particularly partial to this leather credit card case from the brand’s Bordeaux Croc and Burgundy range. You’ll never want to pay with cash again.

omegawatches.com

35 Royal Exchange, EC3V 3LT

JO MALONE LONDON This cologne from Jo Malone fuses the sap of the Namibian myrrh tree with the vanilla of the tonka bean. The result? A memorable scent, proving myrrh is far more than the gift of choice for those too cheap to pay for gold and frankincense. 24 Royal Exchange, EC3V 3LP

WATCH THE THRONE

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SAGE BROWN FINE LEATHER A classic Kensington briefcase constructed in fine-grain cowhide, meticulously hand-stitched around the edges. With its brass handle plate and suede-lined interior, this is one piece of baggage you’ll never want to let go of. 31 Royal Exchange, EC3V 3LP

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PHOTOGRAPH by (Omega) Alex Kangangi

The updated Globemaster is a thing of beauty. The ‘pie pan’ dial is inspired by the first 1952 Constellation model and comes in sun-brushed blue or two shades of grey. The stainless steel case features a fluted bezel with a rhodiumplated Constellation star. Most impressive is the movement, which uses anti-magnetic technology and has attained Master Chronometer status. Omega, 1 Royal Exchange, EC3V 3LL


EXPOSURE

WATCHES PIAGET

SLIMMING WORLD When it comes to slimline wristwatches, Piaget’s Altiplano collection leads the way. To mark its 60th anniversary, two new models have been released, and they’re worth your attention, says ADRIAN HAILWOOD

A

SPIRATION IS A funny thing; we always

crave what we don’t have. Today, with our sedentary lifestyles, we wear watches that proclaim us to be deep-sea divers, pilots or racing car drivers. Back in the 1960s and 1970s many more workers were engaged in manual labour and so aspired to lives of luxury, elegance and refinement as embodied by the ultra-slim gold dress watch. While other companies have taken on this most minimal of watchmaking challenges, the master of the art since 1957 is Piaget. In a world more used to celebrating how much you can cram into a watch, it has earned its plaudits based on how much it manages to take out. In 1957, the brand launched the 9P hand-wound movement used in the Altiplano collection. At 2mm thick it wasn’t a record breaker but its sturdy construction and reliability in a sector where this was rare lead to it achieving longevity and renown. More recently in 2014 Piaget did set the record for the slimmest mechanical watch with their Altiplano 900p, although a height for the movement alone is difficult to give as it is integrated into the case itself. The inner case back also doubles as the bottom plate for the movement, saving precious tenths of a millimetre. The construction technique follows a similar line to that of the Concord Delirium, a quartz watch from 35 years earlier. The Delirium was the result of a skinny war between the Swiss and Japanese back in the 1970s when svelte watches were still in

048

LESS IS MORE: [this pic] Ryan Reynolds wears one of Piaget’s super-slim Altiplano 60th anniversary watches. The actor is International Brand Ambassador for the watchmaker; [below] fine detailing on the Altiplano 60th anniversary special edition’s movement.

demand. The first model measured a mere 1.98mm thick while the later Delirium IV shaved this down to 0.98mm, becoming the thinnest watch ever made yet at the same time completely unwearable as strapping it on the wrist would actually break it. This year is the 60th anniversary of Piaget’s Altiplano and to mark the occasion the brand has released two special-edition watches: a 43mm automatic and a 38mm hand-wound. The hand-wound uses the successor movement to the 9P, the 430p. Its 0.01mm thicker but incorporates the latest developments in movement technology and, after all, Piaget has the 900p as its record holder so doesn’t really have to try too hard. With case sizes more in keeping with current trends, maybe the ultra-thin dress watch will finally receive the recognition that it deserves. Case size has always been a bugbear for Piaget in the pre-owned market, with diameters in the range of 30mm-32mm, they lack a wrist presence that the modern market

demands. If you can cope with these diminutive dimensions then you can pick these up at auction for bargain prices that represent little more than the gold weight of the watch – and that’s not a lot of weight. Lovers of hulking sports watches will struggle to adapt but for the more flexibly minded, it’s worth giving one a try. The narrow bezels make the watch wear surprisingly large and remember a formal dress watch is all about being discreet, which these do perfectly. Imagine a sliver of gold or platinum peeking from beneath a marcella French cuff and you have the idea. It’s such a shame that a certain British super-spy dented this aspirational image so much by pairing his dinner jacket with a dive watch. Maybe if Fleming had followed his original thought of giving Bond a slim, singlestack Berretta 418 with skeleton grip and ignored the taunts of Major Boothroyd that it was “a lady’s gun”, Bond might have worn an equally slim watch – and horological history would have been very different. ■

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NEW ABARTH 124 SPIDER. REAR WHEEL DRIVE PERFORMANCE. ADDICTED TO PERFORMANCE. SINCE 1949.

SEASONS CHANGE. OUR PASSION FOR PERFORMANCE IS ALL YEAR ROUND. TAKE TO THE ROAD AND DRIVE. NO EXCUSES. ABARTHCARS.CO.UK Official fuel consumption figures for the Abarth 124 spider range mpg (l/100km): Combined 42.8 (6.6) – 44.1 (6.4), Urban 31.0 (9.1) – 33.2 (8.5), Extra urban 54.3 (5.2) – 55.4 (5.1), CO2 Emissions: 153 – 148 g/km. Fuel consumption and CO2 figures are obtained for comparative purposes in accordance with EC directives/ regulations and may not be representative of real-life driving conditions. Factors such as driving style, weather and road conditions may also have a significant effect on fuel consumption. Abarth UK is a trading style of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles UK Ltd. The Abarth 124 spider range starts from £29,565 OTR. Model shown is an Abarth 124 spider 1.4 Turbo Multiair Manual at £31,215 OTR with Costa Brava 1972 Red Pastel Paint (£400), Visibility Pack (£1250) and Racing anti-glare pack (No cost option).


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EXPOSURE

AUTOMATIC FOR THE PEOPLE: [Clockwise, from far left]: Elliott Brown Tyneham Steel Black, £795, elliotbrownwatches.com Junghans Max Bill Automatic 027/3502.00, £870, thewatchgallery.com Farer Beagle, £875, farer.com Tissot Le Locle Automatic, £375, tissot.com Movado 1881 Automatic, £675, movado.co.uk Seiko Presage SPB041J1, £649, seiko.co.uk Ch Ward C60 Trident Pro GMT 600, £455.30, christopherward.co.uk

PHOTOGRAPH by publinc PHOTOGRAPH larit em potinium by David vid ces Harrison blah

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EXPOSURE

WATCHES INSTAGRAM

#WATCHWEWANT Every Wednesday, we post our favourite wrist candy to the @squaremile_com Instagram account. Get in on the action: share your watches with #watchwewant

POWERED UP Peering under the hood of Christopher Ward’s latest release, you’ll find the manually wound Calibre SH21. The in-house movement, designed by watchmaking starlet Johannes Jahnke, runs for a prodigious 120 hours before it needs rewinding – conveniently, the length of a working week. £1,550; for more info, christopherward.co.uk

DIALLING IN Inspired by the Smith MKII clock found inside the cockpit of a Spitfire Supermarine, the C8 Power Reserve features a handsome black dial made from sandblasted DLC (diamond-like carbon), with two-tone hands and sunken subdials for added see  more  on squaremile.com depth: it’s the perfect balance of historical influence and modern watch design.

WIN A £1,350 BESPOKE SUIT FROM STEPHEN WILLIAMS LONDON

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To enter, go to squaremile.com/competitions

squaremile.com

PHOTOGRAPH (STEPHEN WILLIAMS) by Daniel Jaems

COMPETITION

We’ve teamed up with London-based British tailor Stephen Williams to offer you the chance to win a beautiful, bespoke two-piece suit. You’ll be invited to meet Stephen Williams, the Savile Row-trained tailor who has dressed British icons from David Beckham to astronaut Tim Peake, for a private appointment to create your very own bespoke suit. ■


EXCEPTIONALLY FAST BEAUTIFULLY DESIGNED ITALIAN ICON

Sound familiar? Typical top speed for a cruising motor yacht is 35-40mph. For a Pershing however, it’s 45-50mph. As shapely as a Maranello supercar, and with an interior worthy of a Milanese designer apartment, it’s no wonder Pershings are known as the Ferraris of the sea. Except for one thing, they’re a bit more powerful: 1,600hp to 10,400hp.

www.venturaeurope.com Ventura UK 17 Queen Street Mayfair London W1J 5PH Tel +44 (0)20 7495 2330 mail@venturaeurope.com CP


The Watch Sale Tuesday 28th February at 11am 19 Augusta St, Birmingham

The Watch Sale The TheWatch WatchSale Sale

Viewing Days:

Tuesday 28 February at 11am 28 21stTuesday February 12 noon - February 7pm | Londonat Tuesday 28th February at11am 11am Our London viewings are held at No.42 Berkeley Square, Mayfair th th

19 Augusta St, Birmingham 19 19Augusta AugustaSt, St,Birmingham Birmingham

25th February 11am - 4pm | Birmingham February Days: 10am - 4pm | Birmingham 27thViewing Viewing ViewingDays: Days: th February 8.30am - 11.00am | Birmingham 28 21 st st February 12 noon - 7pm | London

Glashutte Panoramadatu Estimate £3,500 - £4,5

st 21 February 12 noon - 7pm | London

21 February 12 noon - 7pm | London (Photo ID required) Our London viewings are held at No.42 Berkeley Square, Mayfair Our London viewings are held Our London viewings are heldat atNo.42 No.42Berkeley BerkeleySquare, Square,Mayfair Mayfair th 25th25 February 11am Birmingham th 25 February 11am - -4pm |||Birmingham February 11am -4pm 4pm Birmingham thth th February 10am 4pm | Birmingham 27 10am - 4pm | |Birmingham 27 27February February 10am - 4pm Birmingham th th 28th28 February 8.30am 11.00am Birmingham February 8.30am 11.00am 28 February 8.30am - 11.00am|||Birmingham Birmingham

Glashutte Panoramadatum Panoramadatum Glashutte Glashutte Panoramadatum Estimate £3,500 £3,500 -- £4,500 £4,500 Estimate Estimate £3,500 - £4,500

(Photo required) (Photo IDIDrequired) (Photo ID required)

AUDEMARS PIGUET 18ct white gold Edward Piguet Chronograph Estimate £4,000 - £6,000 AUDEMARS PIGUET AUDEMARS PIGUET AUDEMARS PIGUET 18ct white gold Edward PiguetChronograph Chronograph 18ct white gold Edward Piguet 18ct white gold Edward Piguet- £6,000 Chronograph Estimate £4,000 Estimate £4,000 - £6,000 Estimate £4,000 - £6,000

HEUER HEUER Monaco Ref 1133 Monaco Ref 1133 HEUER HEUER Estimate £8,000 - £12,000 Estimate £8,000 - £12,000 Monaco Ref 1133 Monaco Ref 1133 Estimate £8,000 - £12,000 Estimate £8,000 - £12,000

BREITLING Chrono Galactic Estimate £1,000 - £1,500 BREITLING BREITLING BREITLING Chrono Galactic Chrono Galactic Chrono Galactic Estimate £1,000 -- £1,500 Estimate £1,000 £1,500 Estimate £1,000 - £1,500

OMEGA

OMEGA Seamaster Professional Seamaster Professional 300M 300M OMEGA OMEGA Estimate -£900 Estimate £700£700 -£900300M Seamaster Professional Seamaster Professional 300M Estimate £700 -£900 Estimate £700 -£900

CARTIER 18ct yellow gold Tonneau Estimate £2,800 - £3,200 CARTIER CARTIER CARTIER 18ct gold Tonneau 18ctyellow yellow gold Tonneau 18ct yellow gold- £3,200 Tonneau Estimate £2,800 Estimate £2,800 - £3,200 Estimate £2,800 - £3,200

PATEK PHILIPPE

PATEK PHILIPPE Lady’s stainless steel Twenty~4 Lady’s stainless steel Twenty~4 PATEK PHILIPPE PATEK PHILIPPE Estimate £3,000 - £5,000 Estimate £3,000 - £5,000 Lady’s stainless steel Twenty~4 Lady’s stainless steel- Twenty~4 Estimate £3,000 £5,000 Estimate £3,000 - £5,000

View the catalogue onlineat atwww.fellows.co.uk www.fellows.co.uk View the catalogue andand bidbid online View the catalogue and bid online at www.fellows.co.uk Head & Saleroom | Augusta | 19 Augusta Street | Birmingham B18 6JA | 0121 212 2131 View the Office catalogue and |bid online House atHouse www.fellows.co.uk Head Office & Saleroom Augusta | 19 Augusta StreetBirmingham | Birmingham B18 6JA | 0121 212 2131 Head Office & Saleroom ||Augusta House | 19 Augusta Street B18 6JA | 0121 212 2131 London Office 3 Hill Street | Mayfair | London W1J||5LA | 020 7127 4198 Head Office & Saleroom | Augusta House | 19 Augusta Street Birmingham B18 6JA | 0121 212 2131 London Office | |3 3Hill Mayfair||London London W1J | 020 London Office HillStreet Street || Mayfair W1J 5LA5LA | 020 71277127 41984198

London Office

| 3 Hill Street | Mayfair | London W1J 5LA | 020 7127 4198


EXPOSURE

MY WORLD JEAN-MARC PONTROUE

THE MAN OF THE HOUR Roger Dubuis may be based in Switzerland, but that’s where the watchmaker’s classic credentials begin and end – this innovative brand isn’t afraid to challenge tradition. Meet its CEO, JEAN-MARC PONTROUE

F

OR THOSE IN the know, Roger Dubuis

represents an exciting departure from the traditional ranks of Swiss watchmaking. Established in 1995, this is still a relatively young brand in the context of watchmaking, and it has a keen eye for the innovative and eccentric – producing the likes of the Excalibur collection, a skeletonized flying tourbillon with a distinctive star-shaped bridge. At the cutting edge of the watch industry, you would forgive CEO Jean-Marc Pontroue if his efforts to drive the brand forward focused purely on the avant-garde aesthetics for which Roger Dubuis is known. But there’s a reason its collections bear the Poinçon de Genève (Geneva seal) with pride – despite appearances, this is a brand that takes its watchmaking very seriously indeed. We caught up with Pontroue to find out what 2017 has in store for Roger Dubuis.

THE ONE TO WATCH: As CEO of Roger Dubuis, Jean-Marc Pontroue is at the forefront of one of the industry’s most cutting-edge brands, and is ready to push the company forward even further through the use of innovative materials and bespoke design.

ON ROGER DUBUIS Our world is one of creativity and watchmaking excellence. We enjoy international success for avant-garde designs that set us apart from the competition. A Roger Dubuis will rarely be a collector’s first watch; they are timepieces for the true aficionado who is looking for something unique to add to their collection. Our customers appreciate quality and functionality, as well as beautiful design. We’re not trend followers, we create trends: a Roger Dubuis watch focuses on a unique blend of unconventional aesthetics and the highest technical sophistication. Our creativity in the use of never-before used materials and unusual designs is what truly sets us apart.

ON COMPETING AGAINST FAMOUS WATCHMAKERS I believe that the world is changing, not just in the watchmaking industry, but in our way of thinking as a whole. Of course, there are still luxury brands that are steeped in history, but they are also looking to young, fresh creative directors to modernise them and make them relevant for the new, international, young customer. This customer is looking for the original, the ground-breaking, something that will set them apart from their friends. This is what we can provide at Roger Dubuis. ➤

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EXPOSURE

➤ ON THE CHANGING HAUTE HORLOGERIE MARKET I see great changes coming over the next few years. The watch industry is moving forward, with brands striving for more innovation to differentiate themselves. We see ourselves spearheading this movement, as this idea of pushing forward and striving to discover the ‘next big thing’ has always been a key part of our brand DNA. We revealed our latest projects at SIHH in January, and are preparing for some exciting times ahead.

ON CURRENT WATCHMAKING TRENDS I have noticed the trend for innovation in materials this year. This is something we are forerunners in at Roger Dubuis, for example with the debut of the Cobalt Micromelt material in our new Excalibur Quatuor for 2017. But I have noticed other brands beginning to experiment with new materials this year also, which is fantastic.

ON THE IMPORTANCE OF IN-HOUSE MOVEMENTS There is a belief that the market is shifting from in-house movements to aesthetics – I don’t think this is the case, especially for us at Roger Dubuis. It is in fact the combination of these two components that sets us apart. For our skeletons, our Excalibur collection, which is undoubtedly our most iconic design, it is the in-house movement’s relationship with the design that creates this pioneering collection.

ON ROGER DUBUIS’ PERSONALISATION PROJECT The Rarities by Roger Dubuis service is a celebration of choice and the unique – offered to our top-level customers. This customer also buys private jets, Ferraris, tailored suits. All of these brands and services give them the opportunity to create something bespoke, and they expect a similar approach when they come to us. We can personalise any aspect; dials, cases, gemsetting, signed functional components, special prints or engravings and even the packaging. The timepiece becomes the ultimate embodiment of individual personality and discerning taste. I have my initials at three o’clock and the letters are part of the movement. Once the

We are very much influenced by what is happening in other industries, such as the sports car and yacht businesses 056

WEB DESIGN: The Excalibur Spider features a skeletonised movement, case and hand, and is a typical example of Roger Dubuis’ boundary pushing and avant-garde designs.

design is approved it is carefully constructed, taking three months to perfect.

ON HIS FAVOURITE WATCH I wear the Excalibur 45 Double Flying Tourbillon. This is the embodiment of the ethos of Roger Dubuis in one watch. It is original and it makes a statement.

ON PARTNERING WITH OTHER LUXURY BRANDS I always look at potential partnerships dependent on brands who have the same ethos as us. Brands who are pushing boundaries, for whom technology, discovery and originality are key. We are very much influenced by what is happening in other industries, such as the aircraft business, sports car business and yacht business. Our very first partnership, for example, came about last year with FFF racing. We are in discussions with other companies but we also know that if you want do something right then it requires a lot of time, resources and people to do things well.

ON THE FUTURE An interesting change that I see continuing over the next few years is in what the ‘average’ watch customer looks like. I see younger, international customers and women growing in numbers, and watch manufacturers will need to adjust to this. We have our Velvet range which is a 100% female line, and we put just as much thought into the mechanics as the aesthetics. We know that women who are interested in watches want more than just diamonds, although we can provide that, too.

ON THE DANGERS FACING THE WATCH INDUSTRY The pessimism towards the luxury watch industry is a huge challenge that we are facing now. However, it’s often times of adversity that lead to the biggest development. It will take a strong mindset for watch manufacturers to continue to be successful in the coming years, but I think it’s a challenge our industry is ready for, and we will be leading the charge. ■ For more information, see rogerdubuis.com

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REDEFINING WHAT IS VOGUE by translating uncommonly creative craftsmanship into signature collections. We desire to reveal a more polished you with refreshing gentlemen’s wardrobes. Aitsegame Lu specializes in unique African native style garments and fine modern Western wear. Tailor with us.

Designing / Tailoring / Styling Manifestation of Luxury Apparel aitsegamelu.com Jzr production


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I’ve been taking Wellman since my twenties to support my health and hectic lifestyle.

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FEATURES

KEANU REEVES STYLE SESSIONS FIDEL CASTRO KEVIN COSTNER

. . . .

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REVOLUTIONARY ROAD . 088

PHOTOGRAPH by Lee Lockwood (Castro’s Cuba, Taschen)


FEATURES

MAN ON A MISSION: Keanu Reeves in character as John Wick in his new film, John Wick: Chapter 2. The actor plays a retired assassin who’s forced back into action both as a contract killer and a snappy dresser…

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THE MEASURE OF A MAN DESPITE BEING ONE OF HOLLYWOOD’S BIGGEST STARS, KEANU REEVES HAS NEVER BEEN A FAN OF THE SPOTLIGHT. UNLESS, THAT IS, IT’S AIMED ON HIS MOTORBIKE, SAYS JAN JANSSEN

W PHOTOGRAPH by Lionsgate/Entertainment Pictures; Alamy

HEN IT COMES to riding a motorbike, Keanu Reeves is no celebrity dilettante. Like his alter ego Johnny Utah in Point Break, the enigmatic movie star is a selfconfessed speed demon who regularly tests his limits as a fearless motorcyclist. As a young boy growing up in Toronto, Canada, where he first aspired to be a hockey goaltender before acting intervened, Reeves was fascinated by bikes. His stepfather owned a Norton Interceptor and to this day his favourite motorcycle remains his 1973 Norton Commando. But it took a pretty German girl to actually get Reeves on his lifelong motorcycle journey: “When I was 22, I was working on a movie in Munich and a girl showed me how to ride her Kawasaki Enduro. Ever since then I’ve been addicted to everything about motorcycles,” he says. “Wherever I’ve been in the world – shooting a film or whatever – I’ve always looked for a used bike shop to get something

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very fast I could ride around for a few months and then sell back afterwards. I get very restless if I don’t get to feel the kind of speed and freedom riding a bike gives me.” Reeves is a fearless renegade rider who cherishes the time and “incredible freedom” he experiences aboard an impressive collection of bikes that includes a 1974 BMW 750 (“I bought that while shooting The Matrix”), 1984 Harley Shovelhead, and Moto Guzzi T3, but he still finds time for his day job. His new movie, John Wick: Chapter 2, sees Reeves return to the role of the reformed hitman bent on atoning for his past. Not only did the original John Wick blow critics away and prove to be one of the sleeper hits of 2014, but it also gave Reeves his first truly galvanizing role since The Matrix films. In John Wick: Chapter 2, Reeves’s retired assassin is forced back into action again in order to foil a plot involving a secret assassins’ guild. Like the original, the sequel sets out ➤

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WALKING THE WALK: As John Wick in the sequel of the eponymous film. Of the character, Reeves comments: “One of the things that drew me to Wick was his sense of honour and desire to lead a better life. He’s driven by a firm set of principles.”

➤ to replicate the same kind of kinetic and brilliantly choreographed fight sequences that show he hasn’t lost any of the martial arts techniques that he has honed over his career. Says Reeves: “I can still hack it – I don’t want anyone else to do the fight scenes, and I still do virtually all of the fighting. The only problem is that you’re very sore and stiff the next day because you’re older and less flexible. I can’t jump as high as I used to, but my overall technique and ability to do the choreographed sequences is at a much higher level now and I still get a kick out of doing those scenes. I’ve also had some great teachers to get me to where I needed to be. It’s a lot of fun.” Shot in Rome and New York, the sequel co-stars Ruby Rose (Orange is the New Black), Ian McShane, John Leguizamo, Bridget Moynahan, Laurence Fishburne (his former Matrix boss), Common, Lance Reddick, Peter Stormare, and Riccardo Scamarcio. Ironically, the high octane sequel sees Reeves take the wheel of a supercharged

I don’t do anything to attract attention to myself and find it’s easier to live that way 064

Chevrolet Chevelle and mow down a villainous motorbike rider in one particularly thrilling sequence shot in New York’s Times Square. Despite any subconscious misgivings about running over a fellow biker, albeit for the sake of fiction, Reeves likes the fact that the new Wick movie raises the action bar even higher than the first. “I love John Wick. We had an amazing time making this story. I can’t say that we’re not geeked about continuing the idea and the character. We have some really cool ideas. We talk about what would be cool to take it to the next level… If the first one was a black belt, this one is third-degree black belt.” Set for release at the end of February, John Wick: Chapter Two could well be the kind of monster hit that Reeves needs to recover his Hollywood mojo. Now 51, the ever-handsome and still rather boyish-looking actor has seen his legacy tarnished in a string of critical and box-office flops. But in the guise of John Wick, he is able to infuse his palpable single-minded, melancholy spirit into a character who after losing his wife experiences a profound sense of despair. That underlying sense of rage and danger turns Wick into a ticking time bomb – someone you wouldn’t want to provoke. “One of the things that drew me to Wick was his sense of honour and desire to lead a better life,” explains Reeves. “He’s driven by a firm set of principles and he’s not someone who you want to mess around with after he’s lost his wife and simply wants to be left alone. But once he’s set in motion, he’s going to be a man who is very hard to stop.”

The image of the solitary warrior has been a prevailing theme in Reeves’s screen roles of late. Films like 47 Ronin, Man of Tai Chi, and Henry’s Crime all saw him play laconic, lonely figures railing against an indifferent universe. These kinds of stories have served to fuel the ‘sad Keanu’ meme that took hold after Splash News ran a photo of Reeves sitting by himself on a park bench munching on a sandwich. For a man with a personal fortune in excess of $100m it seemed like a tragic portrait of a suffering artist. Reeves, who has never married and has no children, rejects the notion that he is lonely, much less sad: “I don’t feel lonely. I don’t socialise a lot but I have good friends and I have a very good life. I just don’t do anything to attract any attention to myself and I find it’s much easier to live that way.” The meme itself was simply a case of him taking a break while shooting a film in New York. Explains Reeves: “It was lunchtime, between filming on Henry’s Crime. I decided to have something to eat during the break and began thinking about something. You know, sometimes you just start thinking during lunch. And that’s exactly what I did, but people seem to have decided that I was very sad. It’s interesting: photos can generate a thousand words, but none of them would be true!” Motorbiking is what excites Reeves more than anything else in life. He believes that the combination of fear and exhilaration that comes from riding a motorcycle at high speed is a “unique sensation” that has few equivalents. The desire to find “the ultimate

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Riding a bike is pure freedom. I love the speed and how it completely clears your mind

PHOTOGRAPHS by (bridge and Matrix shots) Pictorial Press Ltd/Alamy; (Suzuka) Jun Sato; (riding motorbike) WENN UK/Alamy

ride” is what inspired him to co-found the Arch Motorcycle Company in 2011 together with custom-bike builder Gard Hollinger. The fruit of that collaboration is the Arch KRGT-1, a bike that most motorcycle experts and enthusiasts consider to be one of the most elite custom motorcycles on the planet. It combines space-age design with state-ofthe-art engineering, and is powered by a Twin Cam 124 cubic-inch (2,032 cc) 45-degree downdraft fuel-injected engine that generates 122 hp and 122lb-ft of torque. According to Reeves, this is a motorcycle that delivers on every single level: “It’s a bike that’s really confident feeling going straight, and it has a lot of torque so whenever you get on the throttle, you can really feel the pull and push of the motorcycle. It can turn and handle. We knew we wanted to offer something unique, not only aesthetically, but also when it comes to the pleasure of riding. “I told Gard: ‘OK, the reason we should do this is because the machine is amazing, and we’re going to die anyway,’” he adds, laughing. Reeves was involved in the development process virtually every step of the way and found a kindred spirit in veteran bike builder Hollinger. They set up shop in Hawthorne, California, near to Elon Musk’s Space-X facility, and set about fashioning their dream machine. Though Reeves tends to downplay his technical input versus aesthetic contribution, Hollinger, his partner in the venture, has suggested otherwise: “He’s being modest. He always has a lot of feedback. I think he has to temper his wishlist a bit, because he doesn’t want to overwhelm me. His thoughtfulness and passion for riding was a huge part of what caused me to commit to the project. I’ve ridden my whole life, and when we talked about the riding experience, I was struck and impressed by how in tune he was. Man, all the years I’ve been riding, I’ve been taking it for granted.” At a premium cost of $78,000, the KRGT-1 incorporates aluminium construction, carbon fibre BST wheels, a futuristic instrument panel from MotoGadget, and a six-speed Baker transmission. While gearheads will be blown away by the custom specs alone, ordinary

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mortals and casual (albeit deep-pocketed) motorbike enthusiasts will be mesmerised by the bike’s otherworldly design. Says Reeves: “When we were discussing what we wanted to do with the bike, it was not just about building something that looked unique from a design standpoint but something which offered a very distinct experience for the bike rider. First of all, you need to build a machine that performs at the highest level – then you can talk about the aesthetics. But in the end, it’s all about the ride!” When he looks at the KRGT, which he classifies as a “performance cruiser,” Reeves’s expression lights up: “It’s a new class of motorcycle. It goes beyond anything we’ve ever seen in terms of aesthetics and ergonomics and the way it handles on the road. It’s the product of a lot of hard work and thought. I think it’s beautiful.” For Reeves, “the ride” is also a metaphor for one’s journey in life. For years, he’s lived almost like a Ronin – a warrior without a master – seeking some form of solace amid the constant attention that comes with being one of the biggest stars in Hollywood.

Yet he was largely indifferent to fame and fortune. He lived in hotels such as the Chateau Marmont for his first 15 years in Los Angeles before buying himself a house. He has little use for his immense fortune and has given much to friends, charities, and cancer research (he funded a wing of a hospital where his sister was treated during her battle with leukemia). Though he insists that he’s “not lonely”, motorbiking would appear to be his surest means of combating a sense of restlessness and finding peace of mind. He confesses that he’s often “happiest” cruising along Sunset Boulevard late at night when there’s little traffic and he can admire the beauty and spectacle of the Pacific Coast Highway. “Riding a bike is pure freedom,” Reeves says. “I love the speed and how it completely clears your mind. When I’m out riding, I just feel like I’m very calm and focused at the same time. One of my favourite rides of all is taking the Pacific Coast Highway through the Santa Monica mountains and Malibu Canyon and then making my way back home along Sunset: there’s just nothing else like it.” ■ John Wick: Chapter 2 is out in cinemas on 17 February.

IN THE FAST LANE: [clockwise from here] Reeves at the Suzuka 8 Hours motorbike race at the Suzuka Circuit in Japan; in blockbuster hit The Matrix Reloaded; the actor riding one of his treasured Norton along Sunset Boulevard.

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The Brit Parade FROM BESPOKE BROGUES TO THE ULTIMATE OXFORDS, THERE’S SOMETHING AFOOT IN THE WORLD OF MEN’S SHOES, SAYS SIMON BROOKE . HE MEETS THE BRITISH FOOTWEAR DESIGNERS WHO ARE LEADING THE WAY, ONE CAREFULLY CRAFTED STEP AT A TIME

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FRONT RUNNERS: [opposite] John Lobb’s Create Your Own service allows you to design a pair of Levah sneakers; [clockwise from here] Cavendish uppers waiting to be stitched together at Crockett & Jones; formal shoes from New & Lingwood; Crockett & Jones’ Lowndes double monks in black and brown

H

ERE’S A LITTLE game that you could play next time you’re sipping a coffee or having your lunch in the City. Put down your phone for a moment and take a look at the footwear of the men around you. Their suits might be from Savile Row (or, at least, doing a damn good impression of one that is) but what about their shoes? Does their sartorial sophistication end at their ankles? The answer, all too often, is ‘yes’ – although it shouldn’t be, of course. In fact, these days there’s less of an excuse for this omission than there ever has been before. British luxury footwear is on the march, with traditional manufacturers enjoying a new lease of life and exciting young talent breaking into the market. Euromonitor International says the value of the men’s designer footwear market in the UK rose from £117.5m in 2010 to £144.3m last year, increasing by 8.40% between 2014 and 2015. Exports as well as domestic consumption are buoyant according to Mario Ortelli of Bernstein. “The ‘made in the UK’ label is very attractive at the moment and in the formal luxury sector men’s shoes are showing a major spike,” he says. Newer entrants are adopting the best of both worlds by using traditional skills and exploiting the brand image of British heritage while introducing more relaxed fits and contemporary styling, he explains. Three years ago Selfridges unveiled what it claims is the largest men’s shoe department in the world at over 15,000sq ft, featuring more than 250 brands plus bespoke brand boutiques and a made-to-order shoe section. Shoe sales are up 200% since the department opened, according to buying manager Luke Mountain. Gaziano & Girling, which recently celebrated its tenth anniversary, brings together the traditional technical expertise of Northampton shoemaking and the creativity of London’s bespoke shoemakers, according to co-founder Tony Gaziano. “It’s about style and knowledge,” he says. He and Dean Girling established the business by selling 25 pairs of bespoke shoes to Japanese customers that they’d recruited from their previous employers. The company has

More men are realising that their choice of shoes is a really great way to express their personality squaremile.com

recently expanded its factory in Northampton and opened a shop on Savile Row, as opposed to Jermyn Street, home of so many footwear retailers. “We chose Savile Row as we wanted to be alongside the tailors and we’ve always taken a different approach to shoemaking.” Gaziano & Girling has made shoes for Ralph Lauren – that’s the man himself – and a number of renowned Italian designers as well as Elon Musk. The brand’s British identity blended with the spice of Gaziano’s name has been key to its international success, he believes. “Everyone wants something bespoke these days and more men are realising that their choice of shoes is a really great way to express their personality. The trick is to create something that people will notice but that doesn’t scream at them.” Longstanding manufacturers have also been enjoying new creative stimulus. The shoe department at New & Lingwood has also recently expanded, with the classic British brand’s growing footwear offering being given greater exposure in the Jermyn Street store. This is partly, according to product and marketing director Simon Maloney, because of the rising profile of shoes in a thoroughfare with a worldwide reputation for luxury British men’s clothing and accessories. “It’s important to keep some of the classic features but not to offer the same as everyone

else – you constantly need to add some kind of extra refinement,” says Maloney, who has designed this latest collection himself. Around 90% of New & Lingwood’s formal shoes are made in the UK. “It’s great to see that the skills are still here and that craftspeople are still upholding the same high standards. I think customers have a greater knowledge now and more of an interest in how something is made. It’s the same phenomenon that we’ve seen over the last few years in tailoring.” Peter Reed, sales director at Crockett & Jones, which has been making shoes in Northampton since 1879, believes that the international markets kick-started the trend. “It’s been driven by the Japanese initially,” he says. “They’re very demanding when it comes to quality, originality and authenticity and so they appreciate the best British shoes. Then we saw the French and Italians pick up on it and they started wearing them in a different context – with jeans, for instance. More recently the British themselves have started to look again at the shoes we make here.” Product knowledge is another driver. “Bloggers have been informing people about how shoes and clothes are made and what they should be looking for,” says Reed, who has spent his working life in the industry. “People like my son are willing to pay extra for Japanese selvedge denim jeans, for instance, ➤

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➤ because they know all about how and where they’re made. It’s the same with shoes.” Marc Hare – Mr Hare to you – launched his eponymous Mayfair store in 2009 after running a store called Low Pressure, which he described as “London’s only proper surf shop,” from 1992 to 2005. The dreadlocked Londoner sums up his ethos as: “We make incredible shoes for men who care.” The inspiration for Mr Hare came, he says, when he noticed the footwear of an elderly man at a roadside tapas bar in the Sierra Nevada mountains in Spain and decided he could improve on them. A year later his first creations were retailing at Dover Street Market and a new career beckoned. Somewhat confusingly there are two branches of John Lobb following a split in the family firm. The larger company is now owned by Hermès and over the last five years it’s opened stores in Dubai and Beijing as well as further expansion in the US. In June 2014 it appointed designer Paula Gerbase, known for her understated, sharply cut men’s and womenswear label 1205, as its first artistic director. Gerbase is subtly updating the

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collection of classic Oxfords, Derbys, loafers, buckled shoes and boots while John Lobb’s new, more contemporary look is illustrated in her range of high-end sneakers. John Lobb has recently re-launched its By Request service and introduced a new Create Your Own Levah service. Levah is the brand’s casual plimsoll shoe, inspired by a pair of bespoke tennis shoes found in its archives from the 1920s. The brand looks forward, too. As part of its new creative direction Gerbase is overseeing the introduction of sleek contemporary interior designs across all of its 125 stores. John Lobb Ltd, which is still owned by the family, operates on a bespoke-only basis with a pair of shoes starting at around £3,800 at its shop in St James’s. However, says Jonathan Lobb, the fifth generation of the family to continue the tradition, these will last quite a while. “We have people bringing them back for

repair after 20 to 30 years,” he says. “We’re seeing a new generation of customer, often from the Far East who really appreciate the connection with London and the fact that we have two royal warrants.” The craftspeople who create the lasts, in other words the individual wooden models for the shoes as well as the closers who make the upper parts work off site, often at home. “It’s still very much a cottage industry,” says Lobb. “There’s a growing interest among young people in this sort of work. Making something with your hands is very satisfying and certainly beats looking at a screen all day.” With more British shoemaking talent entering the market and a renaissance among the long-established names there’s no excuse these days for any guy to settle for second-rate footwear. So, chaps, when it comes to shoes, now’s the time to put your best foot forward. ■

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PHOTOGRAPH by (Crockett & Jones) Frasershot Studios

John Lobb Ltd operates on a bespoke-only basis, with a pair of shoes starting at around £3,800

A STEP AHEAD: [above] Hand-stitching ensures the shoes from John Lobb are of the highest quality; [this pic] Crockett & Jones’ Newquays in dark-brown suede. The brand has been making shoes since 1879 and remains one of the finest shoemakers in the UK.


O BSESSIVE.

Elliot Brown Tyneham Aut omatic 305-005-L15: ÂŁ795 to ÂŁ845. For stocki sts see www.elliotbro wnwatches.com Miyota 9130 Automatic, 4 0 hour power reserve indicat or at 1h, 2mm sapphire crystal , case-hardened bezel, be adblasted stainless ca se, dual stage shock protect ion, triple sealed crown, ha ck and hand wind, depth tested at 30 0m in water, fitted deploya nt calf leather strap,


FEATURES

LIGHT & SHADE NAVIGATING THE SHAPES AND TONES OF A WHOLE NEW STYLE SEASON ISN’T EASY - ESPECIALLY IF YOU’RE MORE WALL STREET THAN HIGH STREET. SO WE’VE DONE THE HARD WORK FOR YOU

BRUNELLO CUCINELLI JACKET, £2,020; SHORTS, £490

Some designers understand British summer, others do not: what can be seen as acceptable on the shores of St Tropez is definitely not the same as what works for St Mary Axe. Italian designer Brunello Cucinelli has struck a balance with his collection of warm-weather-friendly garments, which blend top-quality fabrics with seasonal styles. Take this blazer, made from a cool blend of houndstooth linen, wool and silk for a look that won’t make you hot under the collar. Team it with the brand’s twisted cotton canvas Bermuda shorts and step into summer in style. brunellocucinelli.com

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PHOTOGRAPH by publinc larit em potinium vid ces blah

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FEATURES

CHESTER BARRIE EBURY SUIT, £1,100

Choosing a summer suit can present a dilemma – stay cool in lighter fabrics but risk looking scruffy, or sweat it out in a more traditional wool-heavy cloth? Luckily, you don’t have to compromise at all with Chester Barrie’s spring/summer suit, which is a very wearable 50% wool, 30% silk and 20% linen blend, and will provide a pleasing balance of drape, sheen and comfort. Whether it’s for the inevitable round of summer weddings, parties and outdoor occasions or just days in the office where you need to keep your cool, it will see you through the warmer months well. Cut on the brand’s Ebury suit model, it has a smart, clean shoulder and broad peaked lapels, while mother-of-pearl buttons add an elegant finish. OK, you can stop looking at yourself in the mirror now – you’ve got an event to get to.

Summer smarts

chesterbarrie.co.uk

PHOTOGRAPH by (Bennett Winch) Michal Baginski

MARK GIUSTI

BENNETT WINCH

JM WESTON

REVERSIBLE BELT

THE WEEKENDER BAG

CALFSKIN LEATHER AND SUEDE LOAFERS

With one classic, smooth side, and a slightly flashier embossed surface on the reverse, this belt is a top choice for those days when you want to change your look but not your entire outfit, or just because you’re rubbish at making your mind up. Whichever look you choose, it’s made entirely of 100% calf leather in a rather smart and aptly named ‘London’ grey.

You’ve booked the perfect mini-break, now you need the perfect kit to go with it. Transport your weekend wear in this holdall from luxury British accessories brand Bennett Winch. Each bag is handmade from waterproof canvas and leather, and full of handy compartments and pockets. There’s even a padded laptop sleeve if you really can’t leave the City behind.

They say you shouldn’t mess with perfection, however we think the new suede and leather take on JM Weston’s iconic 180 loafer is a stroke of genius. Adding a softer edge to the classically all-leather loafer, the addition of calfskin suede brings the shoe straight into casual-with-a-twist territory; they’re as wearable in the office as they are at home.

£138; markgiusti.com

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£575; bennettwinch.com

£485;jmweston.com

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On the town CROCKETT & JONES SEYMOUR III DOUBLE MONK SHOE

In the business since 1879, Crockett & Jones knows a thing or two about timeless sophistication. The brand’s Seymour III double monks are made from the finest calf leather with bark-tanned leather soles for both comfort and longevity. They’re hand polished and hand burnished – and the buckles are handmade in Paris. You’ve gotta hand it to them… £525; crockettandjones.com

DOLCE & GABBANA FINE TAILORING

PHOTOGRAPH by (Crockett & Jones) Frasershot Studios

What do you do when you’ve got the board meeting at 5pm, and a dinner date at 6pm? Aside from organising a pretty nippy car, you get a suit that will take you seamlessly from work to play. Enter: Dolce & Gabbana, experts at mixing classic tailoring with Italian flair for suits that always look on point, whatever the situation. The sharp lines of this classic black number are formal enough for the day, but come the evening, cast aside your tie and it’ll see you through until the early hours. dolcegabbana.com

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ETTINGER BILLFOLD WALLET

Simple and understated on the outside, vibrantly coloured within, Ettinger’s billfold wallet from the luxury leather brand’s Sterling collection is subtly stylish. The exterior is made from black, Italian calf leather, drum-rolled for a pronounced grain, with an interior made from the butter-soft Italian calf sides, and dyed in colours inspired by the regal hues of British notes. It’s the perfect excuse to flash the cash. £170; ettinger.co.uk

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PORSCHE DESIGN

PRIVATE WHITE VC

JOHN LOBB

TITANIUM P8678 SUNGLASSES

TWIN TRACK JACKET

LEVAH SNEAKER

When it comes to shades, there’s a fine line between a classic shape and just plain dull – there’s no such problem for these immaculate sunglasses from Porsche Design. Made from 100% titanium, they offer the perfect blend of retro chic and modern material. The lenses can also be changed for different lighting conditions thanks to a handy quick release.

This updated version of Private White VC’s iconic Twin Track motorcycle jacket is handmade in Manchester, a sure-fire indication that it’ll do its job against the elements. Sturdy waxed cotton with military-grade copper hardware accents go even further to suggest that it’ll protect you from any downpours. This is British summertime, after all.

John Lobb’s Levah sneakers are more than just a pair of plimsolls. With a gleaming white rubber sole, waxed suede upper and quality of craftsmanship that’s second-to-none, they look pretty fresh, but if you’re not convinced they have the colourway for you, worry not – the Create Your Own Levah service means you can stay a step ahead of the rest, quite literally.

£350; porsche-design.com

£595; privatewhitevc.com

£445; johnlobb.com

Hit the streets

ST DUPONT ICONIC DOCUMENT HOLDER, £755

The year: 1947. The place: Paris. The situation: Hollywood royalty Humphrey Bogart is on the hunt for a light, easy-tocarry travel bag to take with him on flights. And the solution? A trip to ST Dupont, the French luxury accessories retailer, where the actor ordered one such item, to be embossed with his initials. Inspired by this famous customer, the ST Dupont team created the ‘Iconic’ collection, a range reflecting Bogart’s elegant, chic style. This document holder is a perfect example of the aesthetic: made from classic beige oiled cotton canvas and cognac leather, with a touch of panache in the form of a tricolour strip down the centre. You don’t have to take it to Paris, but what we would recommend is carrying it with a touch of Bogart swagger. ■ stonegift.com

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“Focus and purity”

“Just sublime”

“Lotus at its very best”

“A British Porschebeater”

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The StyleHigh Club ONE OF SAVILE ROW’S MOST DISTINGUISHED AND EXPENSIVE TAILORS, HUNTSMAN, IS STAYING A STEP AHEAD WITH THE HELPING HAND OF A HEDGE FUND MANAGER, FINDS SAFI THIND

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T’S THE DAY of the Brexit referendum. Dark

clouds are hanging low over London. Stockmarkets are plunging. The pound is in freefall. My own brow is furrowed, however, because I’m going to Huntsman – probably the priciest and some would say the most esteemed tailor on Savile Row – and there’s a button that’s missing from my jacket. As I walk in through the doors of number 11, picking up the sound of a 1920s jazz ditty tootling through the walls, I detect a certain odour. It’s the smell of Bertie Wooster. Rex Harrison. Winston Churchill and David Niven. Character, refinement, class and above all, tradition. My own jacket wilts under the weight of this prestige. The missing button stares out like an offending jailbird. Popping out of his office to meet me is Philippe Brenninkmeijer, a 30-something Dutchman and the current chief executive of Huntsman. I’m taken to a space at the back which has tweed-lined walls and drink-lined cabinets and resembles a sort of gentleman’s

Hanging on the wall are David Bowie’s suit patterns. Further along are Gregory Peck’s jackets

PHOTOGRAPH by publinc larit em potinium vid ces blah

JOIN THE CLUB: The Huntsman store on Savile Row is an homage to the brand’s prestigious history, with photographs of notable past clients. There’s also an area where clients can play pool on a bespoke Huntsman table while deciding on their suit.

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den. Hanging on a wall are David Bowie’s suit patterns. Further along I see a rail of Gregory Peck’s jackets – he commissioned a total of 160 suits from them. To top it all off, the table I’m sitting at reverses to a pool table complete with Huntsman-check baize. Indeed, this area has been designed specifically for customers to rest easefully and decide on their suits in tranquil privacy. It’s charmingly old school and soothing enough to settle any nerves. Huntsman was founded in 1849 as a breeches maker. The store prides itself on its individual house style, that’s been built up over many years. The Huntsman suit jacket has a longer skirt, slightly pinched at the waist, and a more dominant shoulder with a single button to fasten, giving it an hourglass effect – an optical illusion that’s designed to shed a few pounds off whoever is wearing it. This has proven a draw for many of the great and good. The likes of Laurence Olivier, Ronald Reagan, Lucian Freud, and, er, Elizabeth Taylor, as well as the ➤

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➤ aforementioned Peck and Bowie, all number as clients of this prestigious tailor. Yet amid all the tradition, the 167-year old company with the most expensive suits on ‘the Row’ has taken some recent steps into the modern era. The man who is behind the revamping of the store is Belgian-born hedge fund manager Pierre Lagrange, one of the initials in the $33bn GLG hedge fund, who bought the place in 2013 along with his then partner, Roubi L’Roubi.

OPENING UP

A suit from Huntsman’s finest fabric – the Opus cloth from Australia – will set you back £20,000 080

A FAMILY AFFAIR I’m curious to see behind the scenes, so Brenninkmeijer takes me on a tour of the cutting room downstairs where I get to witness the experts doing what they do best.

It’s a professional workshop but also looks quite intimate – like a big family. It is also very busy. Generally, it takes more than 80 man hours to produce a bespoke suit. I touch some of the fabrics, one of which feels like butter in my hands. This is the Infinity 3 luxury cloth, probably the best wool in the world, from New Zealand Saxo Merino farming and Dormeuil’s woollen mill in Huddersfield. The company only has 17 suit lengths of the fabric which is described on the website as the ‘Petrus’ of fabrics. But it’s not even Huntsman’s finest – that was the Opus cloth from Australia. A suit cut from that would set you back £20,000. Brenninkmeijer takes me back to the shop upstairs and offers me a ready-to-wear jacket to try on. I feel like Rudolph Valentino – who was also a Huntsman client – as I stand in the changing room looking at myself in it. I ask Philippe how much it costs and he tells me it’s £2,000. He enquires if I might like to buy it. I choke as I hand it back to him. It’s not all serious, however. He shows me some of the “fun” stuff they have done, including a two-piece dinner suit for a dachshund. “Bespoke is a serious trade but we also have fun,” says Brenninkmeijer. And my own jacket’s now been repaired. The buttons, I learn, are two-eyed, made from horn, a Huntsman speciality. My old ones were plastic. I like the new ones much better. As a parting note I ask Brenninkmeijer if Brexit might shift things for the store. “We are 167,” he answers. “We’ve lived through two world wars and one cold war.” Roll on the next 167 years. And hopefully I’ll be back again one day – but next time, I’ll make sure that I’m suitably attired. ■

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PHOTOGRAPHS (Brenninkmeijer) Sam Pearce; (Gandy) Eamonn M McCormack

Though he is not involved in the day-to-day operations, Lagrange has been steering Huntsman’s high-level business. In 2015, he appointed head cutter Campbell Carey as creative director and the pair helped to reintroduce a Huntsman ready-to-wear collection. The company also introduced online buying under his stewardship as well as expanding its position overseas, carrying out its first trunk shows in Asia a year ago and opening a US store in March. “It’s not true that change hasn’t occurred,” says Brenninkmeijer. “Huntsman opened a store in New York recently – the first Savile

Row tailor to do so. We have a pied-à-terre there. For our US customers, it is pretty much a home away from home.” But Lagrange has not always been viewed fondly by the Savile Row set. Eyebrows were raised on his arrival, an outsider and finance man getting into the most traditional of British traditions. L’Roubi’s experimental tinkering was disliked, too – Huntsman and chinchilla do not go, they said. Indeed the general manager and head cutter left soon after. But three years down the line things have settled down. L’Roubi has left. The staff appear happy and sartorial perfection remains uncompromised. Speaking of sartorial perfection, I suddenly notice Brenninkmeijer looking at me strangely. His gaze is fixed on my jacket. It’s the missing button which I’ve been trying to hide. Not batting an eyelid he asks if I’d like it replaced. I nod and hand over my jacket and it’s passed to one of the guys behind the cutting table who is asked to replace all of the buttons. “It’s all part of the service,” says Brenninkmeijer kindly. For the future, there are discussions of opening the place to wholesale. Products will be sold through other luxury retailers, but quality control will be maintained. “We want to be very careful to ensure that we can deliver the same quality that is embodied in house,” says Brenninkmeijer. “We’re not boxed in with our thoughts. It is a logical step for Huntsman to take.”


DRESSED FOR SUCCESS: [from top left] Executive director of Huntsman Philippe Brenninkmeijer; David Gandy attends a Huntsman event looking predictably sharp; Huntsman’s looks are predictably timeless

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It almost feels like the industry is about to implode HE’S ONE OF BRITAIN’S MOST CELEBRATED YOUNG FASHION DESIGNERS, DRESSING THE LIKES OF TINIE TEMPAH, BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH AND CHRIS BROWN. CHARLIE CASELY-HAYFORD TELLS MAX WILLIAMS ABOUT THE FUTURE OF FASHION PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID HARRISON 082

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FAMILY MATTERS: It’s no surprise Charlie CaselyHayford’s eponymous fashion brand’s a hit – his father Joe is a designer too, and runs the label alongside him. Style is in his genes and his jeans.

PHOTOGRAPH by publinc larit em potinium vid ces blah

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MODEL BEHAVIOUR: As well as running the label, Casely-Hayford has also worked as a model, making him a none-too-shabby choice to show off the brand’s street-style-meets-finetailoring designs.

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OR ONE OF Britain’s leading young fashion

designers, Charlie Casely-Hayford can come across as remarkably…“Antifashion?” He laughs. “I think that is basically because I grew up in fashion. Because we are a family business, there’s a real integrity. We’ve always, as a family, chosen to exist outside of the fashion circle. We kind of just like doing our own things.” They certainly do. His aunt Margaret, a successful lawyer, now chairs the charity ActionAid UK. Uncle Gus is a celebrated historian. Great-grandfather Joseph – novelist, lawyer and politician – can reasonably be described as one of the major figures of 20th century Africa. And father Joe remains one of the world’s leading fashion designers, a former creative director of Gieves & Hawkes who was awarded an OBE in 2007. A year later Powerlist named the Casely-Hayfords the most influential black family in the UK. No pressure then, Charlie. “There was never any pressure from anyone in my family at all. They instilled in you from a very young age to do your best at what you chose to do, and there was no pressure to necessarily do anything in particular with regards to a profession. Just to always make sure you do your best at whatever you do.” He decided to do fashion, following Joe into the industry. The pair launched luxury menswear brand Casely-Hayford in 2009. “[Fashion] was all I knew,” says Charlie of this decision. “My dad’s siblings and my immediate family have done very well in their respective fields, so I guess when you grow up in that environment you just think that’s the norm. Set your mind to something, do it.” Impeccably polite, strikingly handsome (he has moonlighted as a model) and possessor of a gilded surname: if you took Charlie home to meet the family, mum and dad would be dancing on the kitchen table. He arrives at the square mile studio armed with a notepad and a copy of The Bonfire of the Vanities; after hearing on the radio that everyone should have read all the books in their house, he decided to make a start. As you might have guessed, Charlie is worlds away from the brash flamboyance of a Karl Lagerfeld or John Galliano. His speech is soft and riddled with pauses – if you mentally insert an ellipsis after every clause you wouldn’t be far off. He dresses with simple elegance: suit jacket, T-shirt, boots. This “uniform”, as he refers to it, is an unexpected by-product of his profession. “I work in an industry that’s based on movement. It doesn’t exist. Fashion by definition has to change every season,

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otherwise it wouldn’t be fashion anymore: it would be style. I like the permanence of knowing that when I wake up in the morning I’ve got X number of suits in my wardrobe, I’ve got a stack of black tees, a stack of grey socks, a stack of army boots. It’s a nice feeling.” And so you’ll never spot Charlie CaselyHayford striding down the street wearing a pink fur coat and thigh-high yellow boots. He credits his friends with keeping him grounded away from the catwalk and studio. “I spend a lot more time with normal guys who don’t know about fashion and think what I do is ridiculous. It normalises you, because I think it’s quite easy to get taken away by the…” he gropes for the right word, “seductive nature of the fashion world.” Yet despite having a life beyond fashion, Charlie has no plans to work outside it. “I think I’ll stick to what I know best, and try and do it well. I’d rather do one thing well than do a lot of things badly.” Not even try his hand in the music industry, of which he is a passionate fan? “I wish,” he says, genuinely sincere. “I really regret not taking that ambition on as a child. I think maybe I’d have gone in that direction. Playing the drums, probably.” Nonetheless, things haven’t turned out too badly: like his father, Charlie is well on the way to conquering the fashion world. The Casely-Hayford brand fuses street style with fine tailoring, “establishment and antiestablishment garments,” as he describes it. “There’s an interesting brand message that speaks about duality, which I think that a lot of people who wear our clothes relate to. “We felt that is the definition of London culture. It’s not one or the other: it’s both simultaneously… We’re so accepting of other cultures in London, it makes for a very interesting place. To us, a true Londoner is a renaissance man, because he has a real and true understanding of everything that’s going on around him; he has an international outlook even though he might only be in one city. [In London] you can almost touch the entire world in just one place.”

It’s been important for us to never be the flavour of the month. You put a sell-by date on yourself

This pluralist approach has won numerous fans: Chris Brown, Drake and Lewis Hamilton are just a few of the high-profile names to sport Casely-Hayford designs. “What’s nice is that we’ve never actively approached anyone. It’s always been because people feel like there’s an affinity with the brand. Whether that’s Benedict Cumberbatch or Robert Downey Jr or Sam Smith or The xx – there’s a real breadth in terms of the people who we work with. They’re all people we respect in terms of being at the top of their game at whatever it is that they’re doing.” Rather like the brand itself. What’s the secret to its continuing success? “It’s been important for us to never be the flavour of the month. You kind of automatically put a sell-by date on yourself, and you can only really go one way from there. We try to build some consistency through inconsistency. “[Fashion] is such a tough industry because it’s based on transiency, so you constantly have to be relevant, you can’t just rest on your laurels. Every season is almost like starting a new job. To do that for 30 years [in reference to his father, Joe] is quite an accolade.” One might assume this transience would aid the fashion industry in these highly transient times, where the revolutionary can become obsolete in a matter of days. Yet even fashion isn’t immune to the speed and capriciousness of the 21st century. “We’re at such a turbulent moment in fashion,” notes Charlie. “It almost feels like the industry is about to implode; nobody really knows what’s going to happen. It’s hard to predict next year, let alone five years. “Everything has sped up. Social media has democratised fashion, because there is no real sense of hierarchy or exclusivity – or at least those barriers have been broken down.” He believes this democratisation, and the dwindling power of the luxury label, will be one of the foremost changes for the industry. “Fashion is built on this idea of desiring things you don’t necessarily need. Coco Chanel said: ‘I think luxury is a necessity that begins when necessity ends.’ When you suddenly remove all those [luxury] perimeters, how do you maintain this dream-like quality? I think a lot of brands are struggling with that.” Including Casely-Hayford? “With us, we’re very much steeped in culture movements and reacting to our environment. Because of that, I think it gives us a slightly different angle.” Time for some philosophy. Does the man make the style or does the style make the man? He chuckles. “That’s quite a hard one! I think the style is defined by the man, ➤

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➤ because two guys can wear the same thing and it can look completely different. There’s obviously a reason for that. It’s an embodiment of who you are and how you carry yourself, so I guess style comes from within in that sense” We say ‘man’, but this is a little misleading: Casely-Hayford showcased its first ever womenswear collection on the AW16 catwalk. “You can have a bit more fun with womenswear,” Charlie concedes. “Particularly in terms of the made-to-measure, because women are more open to colour, fabric, pattern, shapes, trying new things. Whereas 90% of our menswear suits in the made-tomeasure are still a navy, two-button, notch lapel. But guys look good in that!” The foray into womenswear isn’t the only innovation at Casely-Hayford. The brand recently opened up its ‘express service’ to the wider public: designing a bespoke suit in a matter of days. Useful if you’re flying into town at short notice, especially for a big event. “When a client wants something for the red carpet, they pretty much always come to us three days before. So we put a team in place so we could turn it around that quickly – whether it’s for the Grammys, the Brits, whatever. Then we thought it would make sense to open it up to other clients at a premium, because a lot of people are pressed for time nowadays.” It isn’t easy, though. In order to make the suit, Charlie admits: “We put everything else on hold, and everyone focuses on that. That’s why it comes at a premium!” So what does the future hold for the brand? Consolidation and expansion, essentially. “We currently run our personal tailoring from Harvey Nichols,” says Charlie. “I guess that next step is opening retail space. Not necessarily in a rush, but we are talking about it. The demand is definitely there. Our madeto-measure side is really growing. “It’s been really interesting for us making a suit for the CEO of a bank, and then making a suit for someone for the red carpet. They are totally different worlds.” Don’t expect any fundamental changes to the brand’s core identity. Father and son don’t always agree but they share a common ethos. “My dad has approached [fashion] in light of ‘how do I make a garment that’s going to make someone feel better about themselves? How do I make a garment that’s going to make someone look better?’ To do that, you’ve got to detach yourself from the basic notions of what fashion is, and think about the everyday guy. “The worse kind of fashion is when it’s totally alienating, and makes people feel bad about themselves. What’s the good in that?” ■ For more information, see casely-hayford.com

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STANDING TALL: For our exclusive shoot Charlie wore a range of his own creations. Casely-Hayford designs are a staple of the red carpet, worn by everyone from Lewis Hamilton to Sam Smith.

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Illustration: Mark Ruffle

Dancers: Alina Cojocaru and James Forbat. Photo © Jason Bell. Art Direction and Design: Charlotte Wilkinson Studio


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Living with Fidel

FEW AMERICANS KNEW FIDEL CASTRO AS WELL AS

LEE LOCKWOOD . IN THIS REVEALING PORTRAIT, THE US JOURNALIST

GIVES A UNIQUE INSIGHT INTO THE MAN BEHIND THE REVOLUTION

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ROCK THE CASTRO: The dictator relaxes at his secluded island retreat on the Isle of Pines – “a small cauliflower-shaped island, due south of Havana” – in 1965. Castro visited the single-storey complex to hunt and fish, and for mild respite from the frantic nature of political life in Cuba.

HE DEATH OF Fidel Castro in November last

year reveberated across the globe. Mere months after President Barack Obama’s historic decision to loosen Cuban trade embargoes, El Jefe’s passing was met with jubilation and sorrow in equal measure. His atrocities were many, his ideology refuted by the Western world, but his spellbinding oratory inspired hope, fear, and revolution with global repercussions. In spite of his status as public enemy number one of the United States, he fascinated those who hated him most. In particular, his charisma and frequently explosive public speeches drew American journalists to his lectern, but few can claim to have known the man out of the spotlight. When the cameras stopped rolling, who was Fidel Castro, and could he possibly live up to his reputation? Lee Lockwood, a young US photojournalist, set out to answer that very question on 31 December 1958. Arriving in Cuba on what transpired to be the final day of Fulgencio Batista’s regime, Lockwood wasn’t to know that a week later he would come face to face with the revolutionary who now had the country in his grasp. It must have seemed stranger still when Castro struck up an unlikely friendship with the journalist that would see Lockwood return to the island on a number of occasions throughout the next decade. At the peak of Castro’s powers in 1965, three years after the Cuban missile crisis, Lockwood was given the extraordinary opportunity to interview the leader in-depth – a conversation everyday Americans, let alone the US State Department, would be keen to hear. Castro made him work for it, mind: the journalist had to wait three months, following El Jefe around the country, hearing no contact for weeks and countless pleading with the leader’s aids until the moment finally arrived… Lockwood’s persistence had paid off. The extract that follows details the events of the first day of interviewing. Six days later, Lockwood finished one of the most detailed portraits of Fidel Castro – as both a man and as a leader – ever captured. ➤

PHOTOGRAPH by Lee Lockwood (Castro’s Cuba, Taschen)

A conversation with Castro is an extraordinary experience – and also a most unnerving one squaremile.com

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W

HERE WERE YOU?” Castro said, stamping

mud from his boots and shucking his field jacket at the same time. “I wanted you to go with me and photograph me shooting! I shot five birds! Well, maybe we can go again before you leave. Anyway, tomorrow we work, eh? The whole day, starting very early, eight o’clock perhaps? Until we finish! I hope we finish tomorrow, because I want to relax!” The next morning, under the watchful eye of a guard, I set up my tape recorder and microphone on the card table outside Castro’s door. He appeared at 9am and went to have breakfast. It was nearly 10am when we finally sat down, lit cigars, and I started the recorder. “Ah, what a fine machine!” Fidel exclaimed, leaning forward to get a closer look. “So small! Show me how it works.” I gave him a demonstration, which deepened his curiosity. For 15 minutes he asked question after question, curious to learn every little detail – how many speeds it had; how long it played on its battery; how the controls worked; where it was made; how much it cost – and he pushed the buttons himself experimentally with great delight. Finally, he approved: “This seems a most efficient way of working. I think we shall do good work with this wonderful machine.” I started the tape again. “Wait…” he said, holding his hand over the microphone until I stopped the recorder. “First, I want to know if you have a plan. What is your plan as to how we shall work?”

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As I gave a brief outline of the subjects that I hoped to cover he listened with absolute attention, his dark eyes fastened on mine. I had the feeling that he was already composing answers to questions that I might ask. “But,” I said at the end, “This is only a general list of things we might talk about. I hope you won’t expect them all in exactly the same order. I would like to keep this conversation informal and ask you questions about anything that comes up while we’re talking, even if it takes us afield temporarily.” Fidel rubbed his bearded right cheek thoughtfully with his knuckle. “Very well,” he said finally. “A good plan. A conversation – that is much better than an interview, I agree. Only we must hurry, so that we can finish today. You have mentioned many things…” He sighed. “OK.” He pulled his chair up behind him and leaned forward intently. “What is your first question?” And so at last, almost to my disbelief, I started the tape and the interview began. It was a far-from-auspicious beginning, however. For one thing, I had little experience at conducting interviews before, and the job of having to think of the questions, listen to Castro’s answers, and simultaneously man the controls of the tape recorder (it was a new machine to me, too) was taxing at first. Moreover, Castro’s earlier reluctance to give the interview and his expressed longing to be done as hastily as possible were an added pressure that made it difficult to establish the

I was like a moth that had set out looking for a little light and had flown straight into a laser beam intimate, easy atmosphere that I wanted. Added to this was the complication that it was necessary, for the sake of absolute clarity, that my questions were translated into Spanish and Castro’s answers into English a sentence at a time. This cumbersome machinery at first irked Castro, who has the declamatory habit of many years of public speaking and tends to unfold his thoughts in long, repetitious, convoluted sentences of baroque syntax whose meaning is carried forward almost as much by the cadence of the phrases as by the connotations of the words. However, after a somewhat stilted beginning, the translations gradually integrated themselves, Castro’s impatience diminished, and the conversation began to develop its own rhythm. Then came a moment of crisis. In the middle of one of Fidel’s involved answers I noticed that the tape recorder was not recording. What was more, I had no way of knowing how long the tape had been running blank. “What is wrong?” Fidel asked, interrupting himself as he noticed my consternation. “The contact in the microphone cord seems to be loose,” I said as casually as I could. “Maybe it’s the humidity.” He watched with surprising patience as I searched for the trouble. As I had hoped, it was only a loose connection. “But how did you know that it wasn’t recording properly?” I showed him a meter on the side of the machine and explained how, when the machine is recording, the little needle jumps and falls with each impulse of sound. He nodded, fascinated. We started again. I asked him whether he could give his last answer over again from the beginning. Although at least 15 minutes had passed, he still had the train of thought fully in his mind and was able to repeat his answer word for word and sentence for sentence. It was an impressive feat. While he talked, I turned occasionally and checked the meter to make sure that the connection hadn’t come loose again. Each time I did this, Castro shook his head. Finally, he covered the microphone with his hand and said, “Don’t worry – I’m watching it..” The passing of this moment of tension

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PITCHER THIS: Lockwood and Castro on the baseball field in 1964:“Though Fidel takes baseball seriously, it is not one of the sports at which he is most talented.” The journalist never saw the dictator win a game.

PHOTOGRAPH by Lee Lockwood (Castro’s Cuba, Taschen)

somehow served to relax all of us and from then on the conversation flowed easily forward. We passed smoothly from the subject of farm production to the counterrevolution, political prisoners, the Bay of Pigs, and back to agriculture again. Castro’s answers grew increasingly involved as he became more and more engrossed. I noticed that he seemed to savour the pointedness of some of the questions. Suddenly, he looked at his watch. “Two-fifteen!” he exclaimed. “We must have lunch!” He rose and stretched. The other guests were grouped around the dining room door, watching us and waiting patiently for the jefe to come to the table. After lunch, we sat down to work again and talked until dark. With time out for a short dinner, we went back at it again until well after midnight. Now that he was interested, Castro’s enthusiasm for the conversation became indefatigable. Whenever we would take a break – and that happened rarely – his mind would go on working, and he would return to the table charged with excitement, impatient

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for me to get the machine going so that he could record a whole new set of ideas on whatever it was we had last been discussing. At 1am, Castro finally called a halt, and we went to bed, promising an early start the next morning. Limp with exhaustion, I lay on my back and heard the sound of Fidel’s voice echoing in my mind as insistently as if he were still sitting next to me. It was going to be a hard week, and I was already tired out after only one day. As I drifted quickly off to sleep, my last conscious thought was the rueful reflection that I was like a moth that had set out looking for a little light and had flown straight into a laser beam. A conversation with Castro is an extraordinary experience and, until you get used to it, a most unnerving one. In the first place, unless you are very firm, it is not properly a conversation at all, but something more like an extended lecture, with occasional questions from the audience. This is not to say that Castro is rude, for he is not; in fact, socially he can be as courtly as a

Castilian nobleman. Nor does it imply that he is not interested in what you have to say. It is simply that he is one of the most enthusiastic talkers of all time. A ten-word question can programme him for an answer lasting 15 or 20 minutes. His mind is as precise and organised as a watch and ticks out its ideas just as inexorably. He is seldom irrelevant or banal, and he never loses sight of the original point he started to make, no matter how many embellishments, circumlocutions, or interruptions may occur along the way. His memory is prodigious. If you change the subject before he has finished with it, he will reply to your new question first, in as much detail as it needs, then return to his previous thought and complete it. In developing an argument, he is as careful, as patient, and as logical as a spider spinning a web; its conclusion leaves you gasping and entangled, yet marvelling in spite of yourself at the inevitability of its symmetry, and at pains to remember where it all began. For Castro, trained as a lawyer, and an ➤

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GUERILLA BEACHWARE: Standing in his army fatigues on Varadero Beach, near Havana, Castro cuts a strange figure alongside the skin divers enjoying the water.

orator and a politician since his university days, the primary use of speech is demagogic: that is, its purpose is not so much to exchange ideas with someone as to convince another of his own. This is true whether he is addressing half a million people in public or conversing privately with one man. It is not enough that you understand; you must, if at all possible, be convinced. To this end, he bends his considerable energy and intellect with enormous concentration. As the carefully formed sentences flow out in cadence, every word has the ring of absolute conviction, the product of a mind never in doubt. But what is even more compelling than Castro’s mind is his manner, the way he uses his voice and his body, especially his eyes, to reduce a listener to surrender. If he is effective in a public speech, where the listener is at a relatively safe “aesthetic distance,” in a private conversation, focussing the full force of his

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as long as a quarter of an hour, touching me rhythmically as he spoke, then looking away, then swinging back and fixing me in his manic gaze, as if we were the only two people in the world, and he had an urgent message to give me that words alone could not carry… ■

DISCOVER MORE CASTRO’S CUBA

Originally published in 1967, Lockwood’s observations and interviews with Fidel Castro are now republished by Taschen alongside hundreds of photographs covering both the weeks Lockwood spent travelling with Castro and the years he documented Cuba throughout the 1960s. From military encampments in the Sierra Maestra mountains to Havana street life and political rallies, many of these colour images have never before been published. Castro’s Cuba by Lee Lockwood is available to buy for £44.99 from taschen.com

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PHOTOGRAPH by Lee Lockwood (Castro’s Cuba, Taschen)

Castro’s every word has the ring of absolute conviction, the product of a mind never in doubt

personality upon you at close quarters for hours at a time, he is formidable. Replying to a question, Fidel would usually begin in a deceptively detached, conversational tone of voice, his eyes fixed on the table, while his hands fidgeted compulsively with a lighter, a ballpoint pen, or anything else at hand (I had to tape down the microphone stand so that he wouldn’t move it inadvertently). As he gradually warmed to his subject, Castro would start to squirm and swivel in his chair. The rhythm of his discourse would slowly quicken, and at the same time he would begin drawing closer to me, little by little, pulling his chair with him each time, until at last, having started out at right angles to my chair, he now would be seated almost alongside me. His booted foot, swinging spasmodically beneath the table, would touch my foot, then withdraw. Then his knee would wedge against mine as he leaned still closer, his voice becoming steadily more insistent. As he bent forward, his hands, surprisingly delicate and fine-boned, moved gracefully out and back in emphatic cadence with his words; then they would begin reaching toward me, tapping my knee, touching my chest, plucking softly at my shoulder, still in the same hypnotising rhythm. As he continued speaking, I would become aware of his rich, dark, brown eyes, glittering in the frame of his tangled beard, peering fervently into my own eyes from only inches away. He would remain thus sometimes for


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FEATURES

American Dreamer KEVIN COSTNER’S HERO STATUS ISN’T JUST RESERVED FOR HIS MOVIE ROLES – THE ICONIC ACTOR IS AS MUCH A LEADING MAN IN HIS PERSONAL LIFE, SAYS ELAINE LIPWORTH PHOTOGRAPH BY RICCARDO GHILARDI

F

OR MORE THAN three decades Kevin

Costner has personified the all-American everyman. We root for him to save the day – and it’s an archetype he’s happy to embody. “I think when people are watching a movie, they often just want to feel like the right thing is going to be said and done. They want to know that somebody is willing to die for an idea, and I’ve been fortunate to play that kind of hero,” says the screen legend and Oscarwinning director. It’s an astute observation given the indelible characters he’s portrayed in blockbusters ranging from classic baseball flicks, Bull Durham (1988) and Field Of Dreams (1989), to epic western, Dances With Wolves (1990) and romantic thriller The Bodyguard (1992). In the tradition of Spencer Tracy (one of his own role models), and his contemporary, Tom Hanks, Costner possesses a basic decency – together with blue-collar cred – that translates authentically onto the screen. “You know, movies are a chance for us to sit in the dark and wonder who we are and who we wish we could be,” reflects Costner, discussing his formidable film career over coffee in Beverly Hills. “People go, ‘I wish I was him,’ or ‘I wish somebody would fight for me the way he fought for them.’ We all want somebody

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to stand up for us,” says the actor, who at 62, remains a charismatic presence. There are lines around his vivid green eyes, but that doesn’t detract from his intrinsic good looks. He’s in great shape. Rather than rigorous sessions logged at the gym, it’s the result of intensive physical labour at his 160-acre Aspen, Colorado ranch and keeping up with his three young children – Cayden (nine), Hayes (seven), and Grace (six) – from his second marriage to Christine Baumgartner. There have been deviations from Costner’s stock in good-guy roles: he played against type as a terrifying psychopath in last year’s sci-fi thriller, Criminal. But it’s the heroes that have defined him, which is obviously why Theodore Melfi (writer/director of St Vincent) cast him as the head of NASA’s Space Task Group, standing up to racial prejudice, in the soaring drama Hidden Figures. Set in the early 1960s at the height of the Cold War, when segregation divided the United States, it’s based on the book of the same name by Margot Lee Shetterly. The film relates the true, little-known story of three brilliant black female mathematicians. Known at the time as ‘coloured computers,’ they were instrumental in helping America to win the Space Race. ➤

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SCREEN LEGEND: Kevin Costner has been one of Hollywood’s biggest names for more than 30 years, and has absolutely no intention of slowing down, with a brand-new film – Hidden Figures – about to hit cinemas, as well as an epic new directorial project on the horizon later this year.

PHOTOGRAPH by Riccardo Ghilardi/Contour by Getty Images

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➤ “These young black women were so smart that their talent was recognised – and they had success in between the raindrops of racism,” says Costner, who nails the role of their boss, the gum-chewing, straight-talking (fictional) Al Harrison, with his crew cut, grey Brooks Brothers suits and narrow ties. A pragmatist, Harrison observes the potential of one of the ‘computers’, Katherine Johnson (played in the film by Taraji P Henson). A mathematical prodigy, Johnson, now 98, calculated the trajectory for astronaut John Glenn’s historic 1962 orbit of the Earth. (Glenn died in December last year). “Maths is almost like sports: you can either

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do it or you can’t,” says Costner, explaining how Johnson and the other women, Dorothy Vaughan (Octavia Spencer) and Mary Jackson, NASA’s first black, female engineer (Janelle Monáe) were hired and made an impact, despite the racial discrimination and sexism they faced. “Maths has nothing to do with the power of your personality or good looks or anything else that people are often measured by,” says Costner, “so when they were looking for the very best at NASA, they had the tendency to go colour blind.” There is a dramatic, pivotal moment in the film that sums up Costner’s character – and the man himself – when Al Harrison takes a

hammer to the ‘whites only’ bathroom sign and smashes it down, pronouncing: “At NASA we all pee the same colour.” Costner says his character isn’t a civil rights pioneer; he is simply intent on getting the job done. “He doesn’t want America to lose the Space Race, but he also has empathy and fairness, so when injustice is put in front of his face, he says ‘of course, that should be fixed.’” “I’ve been humiliated before in my life by a teacher,” he goes on. “I was in the fourth grade (aged nine), I remember I was scared, so can you imagine being humiliated everyday of your life? Racism is alive and well in America,” Costner comments, noting that Hidden Figures

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LEADING THE WAY: [this image and right] In latest film Hidden Figures, in which he plays Al Harrison, the head of NASA’s Space Task Group. His character is intent on ‘getting the job done’, and not letting anything – including racial prejudice – stop him and his team.

PHOTOGRAPH by Hopper Stone, SMPSP ©Fox 2000, 2016

is still relevant in the new era of Trump’s America. “It’s unfortunate, but it’s there, and all I can try to do is make my choices and educate my children.” (As well as his young family, Costner has three older children, Annie (32), Lily (30), and Joe (29), from his first marriage to Cindy Silva – they divorced in 1994. He also has a son Liam (20), from a relationship he had with Bridget Rooney. Costner admits that growing up in Compton, close to LA, racism was entrenched and his own family and friends were oblivious to the language they used habitually. “I said the N-word a thousand times as a child. That’s how you talked. But there comes a moment

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when you choose how you are going to be yourself. All of a sudden, telepathically you knew that word wasn’t funny; it fell flat like a coke that had no more bubbles in it, and it was gone, eliminated.” He points out, though, that even in the early 1990s, “Some people weren’t happy that I picked Whitney Houston to be my love interest in The Bodyguard – and that I kissed her; who wouldn’t want to kiss her? I don’t think those people were happy that I would do Hidden Figures.” While Costner is motivated by a deep, altruistic impulse, he has consistently refused to play it safe. There’s been no shortage of accolades in his career, Dances With Wolves won seven Oscars, two for Costner. Oliver Stone’s JFK led to strong reviews, so did the golfing comedy Tin Cup (1996), Clint Eastwood’s drama, A Perfect World (1993), and the 2012 mini-series Hatfields & McCoys, which resulted in an Emmy. There have been disappointments, too: the 1995 postapocalyptic Waterworld was panned by the critics and tanked at the box office, although the film eventually broke even internationally. Yet Costner has always enjoyed taking risks and is prepared to put his own money on the line for passion projects. “I have done it a lot in my life. My wife and I paid for Black and White with our money [a recent film dealing with race relations]. Relativity Media [the company behind the film] went bankrupt, but I am proud of the movie. I’m drawn to stories of all different sizes – Field of Dreams and Bull Durham cost less than $10m – it’s simply how I conduct my life. I love the ‘what if it works,’ better than the ‘well I guess it didn’t…’ I love the ‘everything’s possible’ mentality.” He has the same approach to business. “I’ve lost my own money on projects, but I’ve never lost other people’s money. I’ve invested enormous amounts of money in technologies that I thought would help the world,” says Costner whose company, Ocean Therapy Solutions (OTS), developed a system designed to clean up oil spills. The actor tells me he lost more than $40m with his eco endeavours. Characteristically, he has no regrets. “I did it at the time because I thought it was the right thing to do. I made that money back 20 years later, believe it or not, and I didn’t know that I ever would,” he says. “But I am not the greatest businessman because most businessmen say: ‘use other people’s money.’ I’m more of a dreamer. I’ve always felt that failure is a completely underrated experience. I take chances, it’s part of my DNA.” It’s one of the actor’s most appealing qualities. And I’ve discovered over the course of many interviews with Costner, that he is

I am not the greatest businessman – most businessmen say: ‘use other people’s money’ also instinctively warm and generous. Several years ago, at a remote film set in Louisiana, where he was shooting The Guardian (another of those Costner staples in which he played a rescue swimmer) we talked over lunch in his trailer – steak and potatoes – and the actor invited me to a private concert at a nearby US air force base, where he was performing with his rock band, Kevin Costner & Modern West. (They still tour regularly.) The next day, I mentioned to Costner that I would have to take three flights back to LA, where I live, and he immediately arranged for me to travel home in his own Gulfstream III, flown by his personal pilot. Another interview took place at the actor’s sprawling ranch in Colorado, which he describes as ‘God’s country’. He drove me around the estate, which has breathtaking views over the mountains, and gave me a tour of the house; before we joined his wife and children for lunch. The family also owns an ➤

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➤ ocean-front house near Santa Barbara. It’s evident that Costner doesn’t take any of it for granted and is still firmly in touch with his working-class roots. He was raised with his older brother Dan; (a middle brother died at birth); his father Bill, a ditch digger, then an electrician; and his mother Sharon. “My family had very modest amounts of money – we had a small house, but my backyard was my kingdom,” he says. “And I loved being out in the wild.” Costner attended college in California, studying business, where he met his first wife. With the goal of becoming an actor, he paid the rent working a variety of jobs: as a carpenter, a fisherman and a truck driver. Given Costner’s all-American persona, it’s interesting that the man who inspired him to pursue his dreams seriously was fiery Welsh rebel rouser Richard Burton, who he met on a plane in 1978, returning to California from his honeymoon in Mexico. “I saw that he (Burton) boarded the plane before anyone else. He’d bought four seats around him so nobody would talk to him. I didn’t fucking know that,” laughs Costner. “I just saw him and took the opportunity to try talk to him.” With the cavalier bravado of youth, Costner walked up to Burton. “I was like a mouse playing with a mongoose. I said, ‘Hey, can I talk to you?’ And he said ‘OK, after I finish this book.’ I saw him put the book down and then he went to sleep.” When Burton woke up, Costner sat down beside him. “I’d grown up hearing about his reputation as a brawler and having a kind of unhappy life, and I told him: ‘Gee, I don’t really want it [success] that bad to go through all that.’” What exactly did the two men discuss? “He didn’t say ‘Well, you’re going to have to work really hard.’ He didn’t bother with all that bullshit because either you know that or you don’t… I’m not telling you what he said, because I haven’t told anybody, but he was kind.” The actor laughs. “When we got off the plane he didn’t have to go through customs and I thought: ‘Wow, that’s cool!’ Then me and my wife were sitting out on the curb at the airport in LA with our luggage, waiting for the bus, and I swear to God, all of a sudden this

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limousine came this close,” Costner reaches out across the sofa and touches my arm, “and it stopped, and the window came down, and it was Burton – he said ‘Good luck!’” The serendipitous encounter changed his life. “I had taken a job in construction, but I was going to acting school at night, after that, I said to my wife: ‘We’re moving to Hollywood.’” Of course, he never looked back. After the disappointment of his first film role, as a corpse in Lawrence Kasdan’s classic, The Big Chill, which ended up on the cutting room floor, he landed the role of federal agent Eliot Ness in the gangster flick, The Untouchables, three decades ago. That same year, the psychological thriller No Way Out vaulted Costner to stardom, establishing him as a leading man – and a sex symbol. His enthusiasm for filmmaking has never diminished. “It’s about being fearless. I’ve never been afraid of whether or not I’m number one at the box office.” He returns to his favourite theme, essentially his philosophy on life: work hard and take risks. “I’ve tried to live my life so my kids can take whatever example they want from it. They understand that when things don’t work for me, I just change my thinking and I figure it out.” Given his own humble upbringing, he says he’s done his best to teach his children strong values, without spoiling them. “Their set of problems are different from mine,” he smiles. “They’re having to learn how to share the good luck that we’ve had,” says Costner, a devoted family man. “Fatherhood is a lifetime commitment,” he says. “It is the one thing I’m really proud of. I’ve heard a lot of people say ‘Oh the first time

around I was so busy with my career, I didn’t get to be with them,’ but that’s not my story.” Costner’s Hollywood story continues with a mammoth project planned for 2017, which sees him going behind the camera, returning to the genre that is closest to his heart. “I’m making a ten-hour western – maybe it will be three movies, I don’t care – I’m going to shoot it all. It’s going to be pretty beautiful and pretty violent, about people making their way across the country in a resourceful way, in a violent way, and the people who got trampled in the middle,” he says, carried away by his epic vision. The last film Costner directed was a western too, Open Range in 2003. “I’m always drawn to them; they look at how America was this giant experiment, full of hope and opportunity for some people and a death note for others.” “There’s no formula for why I do what I do when I do it,” he says about his choice of roles. “It’s like when you’re in school and you hear the bell go off, I just run outside and see what I want to do.” But Costner says he is most content on the Aspen ranch. “I was just there for three weeks and I worked every day for seven hours. I got on my tractor; I built roads; I built a tree house; designed a barn,” he says. “I get the hammers and the saw out – I get the kids out there and we work. I’m not a terribly good craftsman, but I can work all day. I’m kind of a mule and I am happy when I’m on my tractor.” He pauses and smiles: “You know, I never had a perfect life, but I have had a perfect life in a way. My children are healthy, I’ve got a couple more cowboy movies I want to make, and I’m feeling alright.” ■ Hidden Figures is in cinemas on 17 February 2017.

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PHOTOGRAPH by Paramount/courtesy of Everett Collection/Alamy

Fatherhood is a lifetime commitment, and it is the one thing in my life I’m really proud of

FULLY FOCUSED: Costner at the start of his career in one of his first big movies, The Untouchables, in which he played a federal agent alongside Robert De Niro and Sean Connery.


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PHOTOGRAPH: Elounda Peninsula (eloundapeninsula.com)


TRAVEL CRETE

CRETE YOUR HEART OUT Sixteen years since his first trip to the island, MARK HEDLEY returns to Crete older, wiser, and far less inclined to do shots. Probably…

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HE LAST TIME I went to Crete, I was 18. The destination of choice? Malia. The reason? Buckets of Blue Lagoon cocktails, UK garage music, and the kind of dubious sexual morals that make Geordie Shore look prudish. Our idea of sophistication was eating watermelon that hadn’t been soaked in vodka overnight, and dining at the Chinese restaurant – rather than the British pub – because the food there was more ‘exotic’. We stayed in the authentic Ancient Greek establishment, the Kastro Beach Apartments, home to Charlie’s Bar – possibly the worst bar on the island. Which is saying something. Perhaps it was for this reason that I hadn’t returned to the island in 16 years – I mean, how could I possibly top that? Obviously, despite my desire to return to some of our favourite haunts – such as Babylon Bar, where they would routinely light the bar on fire with Zippo fuel to notify when it was time to grab a free watered-down shot – we bypassed Malia’s dubious allure and headed further afield. Elounda is a charming seaside town with bars and beaches aplenty, about an hour from the airport. A mile or so down the coast, it’s also home to a trio of luxury hotels. Porto Elounda, Elounda Mare and Elounda Peninsula are all owned and run by the Kokotos family – the patriarch of which, Spyros, is a world-renowned hotel architect. Where Porto is family-focused and Relais & Chateau Mare is aimed at couples, Peninsula is pitched as a suite-only hotel – and as such is all things to all (wealthy) people. Guests here have access to everything all three hotels have to offer, from the kids’ club complete with Arsenal Football Academy and waterpark to the eight restaurants dotted throughout the resort. On arrival, a golf buggy will whisk you straight from reception to your room – in our case, a two-bedroom Grand villa, with a pool and garden. It’s a perfect amount of space when you have a three-year-old in tow. Indeed, the buggy ride alone is a hoot when you’re three (or 33) – taking you through winding paths that pass by the nine-hole golf course, surrounded by lipstick-magenta bougainvillea draped over white walls, and villa roofs planted with grasses and wild flowers. ➤

This time, we bypassed Malia’s dubious allure and headed for charming Elounda squaremile.com

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➤ With two well-stocked mini bars, daybeds, and your own pool, it would be easy to lounge about your new crib all day. But then it would be a shame not to head down to one of the two beaches that recede into Mirabello Bay – a larger one for families, and a smaller cove that’s exclusive to guests of the Peninsula. Both have crystal-clear waters, only ruffled by schools of translucent fish, that lap the shores of perfect castle-making sand. There’s a fresh-water pool – and more importantly its poolside bar, which will serve you drinks wherever you sit. For lunch, Aglio & Olio was our pick: the tables are positioned around a gnarled olive tree, which grows skyward, literally through the roof, providing a dappled shade. Eclectic lanterns dangle from the wooden rafters and swing, alongside grape vines, in the sea breeze. It’s a lovely spot from which to enjoy fresh salads and far less healthy things, all washed down with a glass (OK, bottle – who am I trying to kid?) of ice-cold rosé. For sundowners, grab a drink on the terrace at Porto, with impressive views across the whole resort. Beyond, the golden sunset toasts a terracotta mountain range, which climbs up from the sea from near-vertical cliffs. The only thing that beats the vistas are the cocktails, served up by a silver-fox charmer, Giorgos. With 30 years in the business – and recently voted the best bartender on the island (not sure by whom, but it’s deserved), Giorgos could work on Park Lane, let alone the Peninsula. If you’re staying half-board then the neighbouring Nafiska is the place for dinner. A Mediterranean buffet gig, it isn’t overwhelming in its size or offering (as so many grand resorts can be these days) but rather consistent in its quality across the board. Instead of attempting every type of cuisine known to man and executing them all badly, it does what it does well, and with a heavy bias towards local dishes, all delicious and many almost healthy enough to justify you going to town on the deserts – including the help-yourself ice-cream counter. Beyond Nafiska, you can use half-board vouchers to knock off €20 per head at any of the other restaurants. In one week, you probably won’t manage to get to all of them, but it’s

Crystal-clear waters ruffled only by schools of translucent fish lap pristine sandy shores 106

CRETE DREAMS: An aerial view of Elounda Peninsula where each room has a private pool. There are two bays – the smaller one is exclusive to the all-suite hotel.

certainly worth indulging in Monday’s ‘Crete night’. This could, if handled poorly, descend into the naff. Fortunately, in the shadow of the hotel’s quaint chapel, it feels rather more genuine – the food in particular is as authentic as it comes. The pea-cocking local dance is great to watch, but definitely not to attempt yourself. Unless you’re three years old, in which case you might just about be able to pull it off. At the end of the serving, head straight for the baklava table, offering a mountain of honeydrenched crispness that will have your gums aching in sugar-coated glee. Our stand-out meal was at Koh – a panAsian affair with some of the best views on site: there are even glass floors so you can see the white water beneath you. Book a table by the ragged water’s edge where the sea crashes onto the rocks, only very occasionally giving you a light spray of refreshment. At all of the restaurants, there is a decent cellar of both Cretan and Greek wine available. Put all preconceptions aside: the Papaioannou pinot noir, for example, would put any equivalently priced burgundy to shame. Crete is home to some 50 vineyards yet only 500,000 people: not a bad ratio, proving how serious they take their grape growing. It also happens that the man who built this hotel has a vineyard in central Greece, too – and his Kleftra Kissa rosé was a favourite of ours. To work off all the calories, there are three gyms on site, as well as tennis courts, and a PADI-certified scuba diving centre. Although

there isn’t any sailing or windsurfing here, there are plenty of petrol-powered water sports to enjoy – including the jetski-propelled propulsion device that allows you to fly in the air, Iron Manstyle, but with less grace and fewer witty retorts. For a proper sea journey, you can either hire out or join a group trip aboard the resort’s Rizzardi Posillipo Technema 58 power boat. As well as taking you to hidden bays away from the crowds, it’s also the most efficient way to see the local ruins – Spinalonga. This sea fort has become famous as the setting for Victoria Hislop’s The Island. Her award-winning book has been turned into Greece’s most expensive TV production in history. Hence, the crowds can be sizeable – and the heat unbearable. Far better, we thought, to see it from the sea. Well, it did use to be a leper colony, after all. Back at base, there is one spot you have to visit during your stay. The 2,200sq m Six Senses Spa is an ethereal retreat positioned, not by accident, right at the very top of the resort. It has a river running through its sandstone centre, which feeds into a large pool kitted out with water sprays and air nozzles to help you relax before someone else takes over. A 90-minute deep-tissue massage with Elena is enough to dissolve any stresses from City life – and set you up for just the holiday you need. Lying in the spa’s infinity pool, looking out across the cobalt Aegean, I’m glad I finally returned to Crete and had the chance to explore some blue lagoons of a very different nature. ■ For more info: eloundapeninsula.com

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The top of the tree The winners of the Mr & Mrs Smith Hotel Awards have been announced. A dozen of the world’s finest boutique boltholes were chosen by the judging panel – each one a celebration of detail BEST FAMILY HOTEL: TREEHOTEL, SWEDEN A truly family-friendly hotel rolls out the red carpet for even the youngest of guests – without compromising on style, space, or quality time for grown-ups. At Treehotel in Swedish Lapland, you can stay in a UFO, a treehouse, or a giant bird’s nest, and it’s delightful no matter how old you are. Here, you can spot some Nordic wildlife, take a dip in an open-air hot tub or have a sauna in the woods; the kids can learn to build snowmen, have tot tea-time, and huddle-around-thecampfire meals. We’ll leave it to you to tell them there’s an ice-cream sundae machine. BEST-DRESSED HOTEL: PALAZZO MARGHERITA, BASILICATA, ITALY We’re not looking for a repository of high-cost fittings or design-directory name-dropping, but a well-curated assembly of refreshing, inspired ideas. In other words, our best-

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dressed hotel is one hell of a looker. And Francis Ford Coppola is a dapper don, so it’s no surprise that his Baroque bolthole has va-va-voom by the palazzo-load. Suite Four was designed by Francis’ daughter, acclaimed director Sofia: picture pastel-shaded frescoes, chevron floor tiles, lacy wall friezes and a small garden-spying terrace. Salvaged furnishings and walls dressed in retro Le Manach fabric decorate the Family Bar. WORLD’S SEXIEST BEDROOM: KEEMALA, PHUKET, THAILAND Romance comes in many guises – and there are no hard and fast rules for creating the perfect boudoir. But some things we can all agree on: it has to delight, excite, and surprise – much like the bird’s-nest bedrooms at Keemala, then. Loosely based on ancient tribe dwellings, each of these lofty pool villas is a cocoon of woven wood, with a glass wall overlooking lush

rainforest, rugged mountains and the glittering Andaman Sea. Forget romancing the stone; romance the four-poster bed, the al-fresco bath tub, or the private lap pool. BEST DATE-NIGHT BAR: LONDON EDITION, LONDON, UK Next time you need to dress to impress and casually suggest you ‘know a little place’, here’s where to make a beeline for. The Punch Room is tucked away in the London Edition Hotel, and evokes a Victorian gentlemen’s salon. Tufted banquettes and fumed-oak panelling bring to mind Dickens’ cheerier scenes, and a fireplace warms in winter. Award-decorated mixologist Davide Segat preps historic cocktails, such as the Mayflower Punch (from 19th-century tome, Oxford Night Caps) before they’re ladled into dainty glassware. Still thirsty? The Scandal Water afternoon tea has a trinity of top tipples…

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PROMOTION

BEST GOURMET GETAWAY: THE OLD CLARE, SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA The best gourmet getaway is about more than culinary stars: it’s an experience to savour. At the Old Clare in Sydney you’ll get just that, courtesy of not one but three world-class chefs. Kensington Street Social is the hotel’s newest offering, where Brit chef Jason Atherton dishes up breakfast, lunch and dinner in slick industrial-style surrounds. For Scandinavian flavours, head to Silvereye, former Noma sous-chef Jason Miller’s paean to all things pickled, fermented, salted, cured and smoked. At Automata, Australian chef Clayton Wells cooks up five-course tasting menus in a 1930s warehouse. Bring your eating trousers. MOST SPOILING SPA: AMANEMU, MIE, JAPAN Amanemu’s tranquility zone is based around the onsen: a centuries-old Japanese bathing tradition. Among peaceful gardens, these stone baths are fed by mineral-rich saltinfused water from nearby thermal springs to soothe muscle tension and joint pain. Hot stone therapies, salt-infused plunge pool or heated outdoor pool: what will you choose? HOTTEST HOTEL SOUNDTRACK: FAZENDA NOVA COUNTRY HOUSE, ALGARVE, PORTUGAL Who do you turn to when you want the perfect playlist for your restful rural retreat? For Fazenda Nova Country House co-owner, Hallie, the answer was: Dad – as ex-editor of the NME and founder of Smash Hits, he knows a thing or two about music. As well as a lovingly kept library of said volumes, there is a heaving, genre-spanning vinyl collection for guests to play and an open ‘hey, this would be cool’ policy for daytime listening.

where going the extra mile is the rule, not the exception. Awasi’s stellar service starts from the moment you get off the plane, when a representative from the lodge will meet you at the airport and drive you to your luxury cabin. From there, you’ll have a private guide to show you the hidden charms of Chile’s breathtaking Torres del Paine national park, giving you an insider’s view of the forest, Lake Sarmiento, and the pampas of this wild terrain. You’ll be a master of the mountain in no time. COOLEST CREATIVE HUB: FOGO ISLAND INN, NEWFOUNDLAND, CANADA Edgy events spaces, clubby co-working areas, expertly hung art galleries – hotels can be more than just a place to rest your head; they can fire your imagination, too. And, yes, Fogo Island Inn is hardly a buzzy, pop-in-and-out office alternative, but if you want to switch off and seek stimulation from the simple things, this is your place. Architecturally it’s an essay in masterful minimalism; its glass-walled insides dotted with furniture fashioned by local artists, some of whom run painting, still-life drawing or found-object collage workshops. If you take your art a little more seriously, take advantage of the isolated, off-grid studios and capture nature at its most dramatic.

LOCAL HOTEL HERO: 11 HOWARD, NEW YORK, US New York’s 11 Howard was once a post office, but is now a striking SoHo hotel paying dues to its neighbourhood and beyond. The vast blue and white south-wall mural was created by local students (under the tutelage of Jeff Koons no less), in-room food and drink-ordering is connected to Olivia Wilde’s Conscious Commerce initiative, each treatstuffed Feed 11 bag on sale helps feed 11 lowincome American families and a percentage of your booking goes straight to the Global Poverty Project – this hotel gives back wherever it can; truly a local hero. BEST SMITH HOTEL: HALCYON HOUSE, CABARITA BEACH, AUSTRALIA So here it is: the big one. The hotel that stands head and shoulders above the rest – your most beloved bolthole, the stuff of your travel fantasies. The best of the best… And with its good looks (imagine a heady mix of Firmdale flair, Euro beach-chic and Californian cool), destination dining and down-to-earth charm, Australian surf-motel makeover, Halcyon House, is a very well-deserved winner indeed. ■ For bookings at all these award-winning hotels – and many more – go to mrandmrssmith.com

PRIDE OF PLACE: [Opposite] Treehotel in Swedish Lapland; [clockwise from this image] Awasi in Patagonia; 11 Howard in NYC; Keemala in Phuket; inside the overall winner, Halcyon House

PHOTOGRAPH (Phuket) by Brent T. Madison

POOL WITH A VIEW: GRAND HOTEL TREMEZZO, LAKE COMO, ITALY Nothing will have you hankering for a holiday faster than the anticipation of cool water caressing warm skin; of sun, sky and birdsong reflected across mirror-flat surfaces. But, let’s face it, it’s such a drag having to pick between lake, beach and swimming pool when holidaying in paradise. Brows need never furrow for this reason (or indeed any reason) at Grand Hotel Tremezzo, whose water-onwater pool is exactly that: a swimming pool set on a lake. There’s a beach – and a champagne bar – just a splash away. ABOVE & BEYOND: AWASI, PATAGONIA, CHILE Some stays are made even more special by seamless service and generosity of spirit –

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HOTELS THE ATHENAEUM

MEET THE RESIDENCE EXPERTS

The handsome redesign at Mayfair’s Athenaeum hotel is sure to turn heads, but it’s more than just a pretty face. BEN WINSTANLEY experiences one of the most relaxing stays in London at this rejuvenated icon

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N OUR MODERN world, there is no time for

the frippery of a hotel reception desk. We are, after all, busy and important people (I keep telling myself) and whether we’re on the clock or clocking off, queuing for a prebooked room shouldn’t factor into our plans. Gladly, this is one of the many thoughts I share with the excellent team behind newly revived icon, The Athenaeum. Its bellhops and top-hatted door staff make for a seemingly traditional five-star welcome, but one step into

PHOTOGRAPHS by Chris Tubbs

The three-bedroom penthouse is subtly luxurious, a space that’s a home-from-home squaremile.com

the beautiful lounge-cum-reception is evidence enough of the modern heart beating beneath its sleek exterior. Steps away from Green Park, the space is an oasis of calm in which the often impatient wait for the room key actually becomes an opportunity to relax. When a member of the tablet-wielding check-in team glides over to your sofa, the question of your reservation is swiftly followed by one asking if you’d like a drink. The answer is, of course, yes – and, besides, you’ve earned it. Thirst quenched, room key in hand, the biggest decision of the night is upon you: dinner. Less liberally minded individuals will make a beeline for the superb restaurant by the Michelin-starred Galvin brothers. With a happy blend of French and British favourites (get the crab lasagna to start), your decision would be a good one – but the chefs’ ambitious decision to take over the room service operation of the hotel is difficult to resist. Eating in your

dressing gown is optional, but encouraged. Speaking of rooms, the hotel has 164 of them – each as understated and elegant as the next – including 44 overlooking Green Park. If you’re expecting flash, you won’t find it here: bedrooms are classy yet practical – a calming and welcome escape from The Smoke. Even the three-bedroom penthouse is subtly luxurious in its charms. Sure, you’ll find a Jacuzzi bath and a fantastic private balcony, but this is definitely a space that is much closer to a home from home than a palatial experience. In a way, that only adds to its considerable appeal – and explains the number of full-time residents among the usual prattling of tourists and business folk. In fact, that is a new life goal for me. Should you find a slightly deranged young gentleman roaming the halls, just know that I succeeded. Or slipped passed security again. ■ For more information, athenaeumhotel.com

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MOTORS BENTLEY

BENT ON ADVENTURE

Thought diesel was just for truckers and suckers? MARK HEDLEY finds the new Bentley Bentayga provides plenty of fuel for thought

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BENTAYGA DIESEL

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£136k APPROX

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HERE WAS A time when ‘luxury diesel’ was as much of an oxymoron as ‘Microsoft Works’ or ‘military intelligence’. Manufacturers with the calibre of Bentley would never consider the inevitable power lapses as tolerable – or fuel efficiency as particularly high up its customers’ priority list. But times, and technology, are changing. And so is Bentley’s customer base. Or at least, that’s certainly been the plan with last year’s launch of its first ever SUV, the Bentayga. The SUV segment is the only one of the motoring market which is enjoying significant worldwide growth, so why wouldn’t Bentley want a piece of the action – especially when it means nabbing clients from some of its competitors? In the first year of the Bentayga’s production, the model far exceeded sales targets. Bentley hoped to shift 3,600 units, but with a month to go before Christmas last year, it had already made 5,500 sales. More than 50% of these buyers have scaled up to Bentley from other brands. These ‘conquests’, as they’re known in the business, are mostly coming from Range Rover. And it’s this conquering spirit where Bentley’s first ever diesel drivetrain comes in to play. You see, with a whacking great W12 and a £165,000 starting price, the Bentayga’s first iteration had only so much appeal. But add a diesel into the equation and slash the best part of £30,000 off the asking price, and the chances of taking on some new blood would pretty much seem a certainty. So, what of this four-litre 32-valve luxury diesel, then? Well, its engineers faced two considerable challenges before they could confidently say that they’d created one that was worthy of the Flying B badge. First, refinement. There’s no point in designing a vehicle that’s meant to quash Porsche Cayennes and dispatch with Range Rover Autobiographies if it sounds like a tractor with bronchitis. Consequently, painstaking exhaust-note tuning was the order of the day: unlike some marques, there’s no artificial cabin transmission here, thank you very much – just pure, old-school acoustics. Of course, sound proofing is also part of the equation: to ensure you only hear the noises Bentley want you to hear, padding has been crafted into both the engine bay and wheel arches to isolate any unwanted sound transfer. Even to a well-trained ear, you’d have some difficulty claiming that it was a diesel with any degree of certainty without actually physically checking the colour of the fuel cap. The other, arguably even more important factor is performance. And this is where the really clever stuff comes in. Infamously, ➤ 113


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The roads here snake through the scenery testing out what the Bentayga is capable of

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With this launch, there’s the option of a new veneer called Liquid Amber. It comes from the American red gum tree mostly found in Mississippi, and has the warm, smokey brown character of a fine single malt. Overall, the Bentayga is a perfect motorway muncher – the grandest of grand tourers. There is little that’s particularly luxurious about refuelling a car (especially if you accidentally forget it’s a diesel), but with a range in excess of 1,000km, this unfortunate necessity will at least be a rarity with the Bentayga. Averaging 35.8 mpg, it is the most fuel-efficient Bentley in history. You can get all the way from the City to Verbier (approximately 632 miles) on just one tank – and certainly won’t need to worry about the snow hindering your progress. (Should that be ‘snow progress’?) Sadly, you couldn’t quite make it all the way to the Puente Romano resort in Marbella with just one tank, but you might in two. Either way, it would be fun trying. ■ For more info, see bentleymotors.com

SAME, BUT DIFFERENT: [clockwise from here] The Bentayga diesel has all the hallmarks you’d associate with a Bentley, including swish interiors and finishes; as you’d expect from an SUV, it can handle itself on and off road; just in case you happen to forget…

PHOTOGRAPHS by Stuart Price

➤ diesels suffer from turbo lag – sure, they may have bags of torque, but it’s not always accessible when you actually need it. So Bentley came up with not one, but three solutions to this, all of which work in harmony or, more accurately, in succession. It’s called triple-charging technology. I’ll try – for your benefit and mine – to keep this as simple as possible. Put your foot down, and for its initial surge, the drivetrain makes use of a 7kW electric engine intake compressor – effectively a supercharger, but one that doesn’t cause a drain on the engine. This little critter can spin up to 70,000rpm in a quarter of a second, pretty much eliminating any lag. As you build up the revs, an active turbo kicks in – still at relatively low range. This gives a second, larger passive turbo time to spool up before it joins forces with its baby brother – and the engine is fully bi-turbocharged. Got it? Despite its undeniable complexity, the transition between these modes is absolutely seamless: each turbo is fed by all eight cylinders and the shift from one to the next is employed by an ingenious sliding cam. It’s extremely impressive that so many technologies are crammed into one engine. Why make do with just one when you can have three, right? The result is mesmerising: a constant, unerring swathe of torque all wrapped up in Bentley’s signature waft. Despite only registering 435PS, it has as much torque as the famed W12 petrol alternative. The petrol-guzzling older brother can hit 60mph in just four seconds. But the diesel is no slouch, making that mark in just 4.6secs and going on to a 168mph top speed. Many car companies have claimed their diesel powertrains to be as worthy as their petrol equivalents, but until I took to the foothills of Spain’s Sierra Blanca in the new Bentayga, I didn’t believe any would achieve it. Now, you may question the need to travel to Andalusia to test the theory out. But given the car’s remit of maximising sales in a broader range of territories – especially the dieselthirsty Western European countries – our location isn’t totally out of left-field. That, and the sun-soaked hills don’t half make a pretty backdrop for our photographer.

It also helps that the roads here snake through the scenery in an addictive sequence of curves ideal for testing out exactly what the Bentayga is actually capable of – which, I’m happy to report, is rather a lot. There is negligible body roll thanks to the same 48V active anti-roll control system in the petrol version. But as this engine is lighter, the car is arguably even better balanced. Either way, it’s far more dynamic than it really has any right to be given the weight of it – a triumph of engineering over physics. I did drive it off-road – and it coped admirably. But just in the way you’re not going to take your Rolex Submariner down to the Mariana Trench (presumably), you probably won’t be using your new Bentayga to help plough the fields any time soon, so I’m not going to dwell too much on all that. For most buyers, it will be the interior that figures much higher on their checklist. Needless to say, the finish is as impeccable as a Savile Row suit – with the stitching to match.

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IN ASSOCIATION WITH

DRINK PUB AWARDS

SQUARE MILE PUB AWARDS 2017

Oh sure, there are a few gongs being handed out at a few ceremonies in Hollywood. But we all know which awards really count. Here’s the shortlist for the inaugural Square Mile Pub Awards. Vote online now!

A. THE OLD BANK OF ENGLAND

B. HACK & HOP

C. THE PUNCH TAVERN

194 Fleet St, EC4A 2LT

35 Whitefriars St, EC4Y 8BH

99 Fleet St, EC4Y 1DE

Boozing on the site of The Old Bank of England dates back nearly 500 years, when two taverns, The Cock and The Haunch of Venison, kept ye olde Londoners happy long into the night. The taverns were demolished in 1888 to make way for a branch of, you guessed it, The Bank of England, which traded until 1975. Now in the trusty hands of Fuller’s, the site is back to what it does best. If this wasn’t enough history for you, the pub supposedly stands between Sweeney Todd’s Barber Shop and Mrs Lovett’s Pies. The pub also serves pies, but thankfully not of the human variety.

Situated just a hop away from the hacks of Fleet Street (genuinely how the pub got its name), Hack & Hop offers a beer list that would make Barney Gumble book a direct flight from Springfield to London City. But rather than Duff, the beers on offer are largely of the craft variety: whether it’s keg or cask, a rotating selection of the UK’s finest brewers is always on offer. Accompanying your pint is the kind of sturdy pub fare conducive to a lengthy drinking session. The delicious ‘sharing’ platters are something of a misnomer, though: keep ’em to yourself.

This pub is named not for its proliferation of fruity cocktails, or the frequency of bar-room brawls, but rather the beloved puppet and tormentor of his wife, Judy. Keep an eye out for the series of Punch & Judy-themed paintings on the walls (they’ll probably be behind you). Like its fellow tavern The Viaduct, The Punch was also once a Victorian ‘Gin Palace’ – and duly sells more than 40 gins. You won’t get through every label in one evening (we hope), but that gives you a good excuse to return to this beautiful, quirky pub and even take a meal in the private dining room.

For more info, see oldbankofengland.co.uk

For more info, see thehackandhop.com

For more info, see punchtavern.com

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D. THE BLACK FRIAR

G. THE FOX & ANCHOR

I. THE JUGGED HARE

174 Queen Victoria St, EC4V 4EG

115 Charterhouse St, EC1M 6AA

49 Chiswell St, EC1Y 4SA

The first thing you’re likely to notice about The Black Friar is the black friar himself: the large, laughing statue of the man of God situated above the front door. Apt for a pub that wears its heritage proudly. Step inside and you’ll discover multiple other engravings on the walls, in what must be the most remarkable building to house a pub in London. Squeezed between two converging roads, like a boozy rendition of New York’s iconic Flatiron building, it was constructed around 1875, and is named for a nearby Dominican Friary that existed in the middle ages. Tuck into the food and make merry with the varied draughts of real ale.

Unlikely pairings can often work surprisingly well: think peanut butter and jam, or Claudio Ranieri and Leicester City. So it proves with foxes and anchors, which combine to produce this magical little pub that also doubles up as a boutique hotel. Yes, if you want a City break, or simply can’t be bothered to travel home, you can book yourself into one of the double rooms upstairs. That way you can also enjoy the City Boy Breakfast in the morning: an £18 monster that finishes with a pint of Guinness. There’s also a wine bar, if you fancy something a little more refined…

This undoubtedly classy bar deftly skirts the fine line between contemporary boozer and the misty-eyed pub we all see in our fantasies – are we the only ones who dream about the mighty pub? It really is difficult to know where to start: sporting a formidable bar snack menu (venison scotch egg, chips and gravy, and pork crackling with apple sauce, to name but a few), four pumps for proper ale and a sleek dining room should you fancy its sensational gameheavy cuisine, this is as perfect as any pub in the whole of London. We couldn’t be more jealous of the neighbouring Barbican residents.

For more info, see foxandanchor.com

For more info, see thejuggedhare.com

H. THE OLD RED COW

J. YE OLDE WATLING

71 Long Ln, EC1A 9EJ

29 Watling St, EC4M 9BR

Built in 1854, the Old Red Cow has gone through several incarnations in recent years. Until 2006 it was named Ye Olde Red Cow but then changed its moniker to Long Lane, before switching back to the Old Red Cow (without the olde English affectations). Happily, stability seems to have been restored, and you can enjoy the extensive range of craft beer on tap. Hungry? Sample one of the scotch eggs, made with duck egg and black pudding. Don’t be alarmed if you hear unexplained noises from above: the ghost of former landlord Dick O’Shea is said to haunt the first-floor balcony.

Legend has it that this famous old pub was built by Sir Christopher Wren in 1668 from the timber of old ships. Furthermore, many believe Wren subsequently designed St Paul’s Cathedral sat in its upstairs rooms. Despite, this historic edge, the pub itself is practically modern compared to the road it stands on: Watling Street dates back to the Romans, and was reportedly the site of Boudica’s decisive defeat in AD 60. Happily, the pub has fared better than the unfortunate Empress, offering an impressive selection of ales and classic British cuisine. Here’s to another 350 years! For more info, see nicholsonspubs.co.uk ➤

For more info, see nicholsonspubs.co.uk

E. HARRILD & SONS 26 Farringdon St, EC4A 4AB Once the site of a printing-press manufacturer (owned by one Robert Harrild), the only thing you’ll find rolling out of this grand space these days is well-lubricated City folk. You would do well to arrive thirsty to this fine establishment: with a beer menu that lists an intimidating 100-plus bottles from the best breweries in the world, you’re going to want to try a few. Should you require something on the harder side, however, its 5CC cocktail club downstairs is as sophisticated as it is subterranean. For more info, see harrildandsons.com

F. THE VIADUCT TAVERN

For more info, see theoldredcow.com

126 Newgate St, EC1A 7AA

For more info, see viaducttavern.co.uk

KNOW YOUR LIMITS: We had to draw the line somewhere, so we went with the City’s local authority borders. And then we made a couple of exceptions, because we’re renegades that way.

PHOTOGRAPHS by Claire Menary

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The grand gin palaces of 18th-century London were some of the most decorous (and raucous) locations in the City – and genuine rivals to the City alehouse. Sadly, no originals survived the ravages of time, but one faithful Victorian imitation still remains: The Viaduct Tavern. Originally built in 1874, this brilliant pub is a legitimate contender for the most beautiful in London. All etched glass and Lincrusta ceiling, it is a must visit – if for the atmosphere alone. Unsurprisingly, it serves a fine G&T, with a well-pulled pint to boot. Located just around the corner from the Old Bailey, it’s the perfect conflation of law and, well, disorder.

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ON THE MARKET: [Clockwise from main] The Lamb Tavern has graced the halls of Leadenhall Market since 1780; the unmistakable Black Friar wears its heritage proudly on its sleeve; The Arbitrager may be small, but it is well worth the visit.

K. THE TRADING HOUSE

L. THE PELT TRADER

89-91 Gresham St, EC2V 7NQ

Arch 3, Dowgate Hill, EC4N 6AP

With its mounted animal heads, cavernous interior, tropical plants and stuffed songbirds perched on plinths, The Trading House is the type of eccentric outpost where you can imagine a Victorian adventurer taking a final supper before setting off for the Far East. Or perhaps we should say Down Under: this Grade II-listed building was formerly the Bank of New Zealand. An enjoyably inventive cocktail list and generous array of dishes (may we point you towards the hanging kebab?) only add to the fun. This is a quirky refuge for those City workers seeking something a little bit different.

Hidden beneath a railway arch at Cannon Street Station, this cool commuter spot is engineered for one thing and one thing only: good times. With 16 taps dedicated to one of the best selections of craft beer in the Square Mile, and a cracking range of pizzas ready to mop up the booze, you’re in very good hands indeed. The acoustics of the building’s arch mean there’s always a hubbub about this place, while in the summer months punters spill out onto the streets. Us? We’ll be at the bar drinking Redemption Big Chief IPA and eating a New York Hot pizza. Fortunately, the last train home couldn’t be closer.

For more info, see thetradinghouse.uk.com

For more info, see pelttrader.co.uk

M. THE HYDRANT

This cool commuter spot is engineered for one thing and one thing only: good times squaremile.com

Equitable House, 1 Monument St, EC3R 8BG Unlike many of the pubs on this list, The Hydrant is a proudly contemporary establishment. Don’t worry: that doesn’t mean it has modernist toilets and serves drinks in a vase. However, you can expect bright red bar lights, a concrete floor and metal stools – the aesthetic is very Brooklyn. This

would be a great place to come to impress the clients, especially owing to the large number of sharing plates on offer and plenty of beer, craft or otherwise. Also, take a moment to appreciate the name: The Hydrant is situated just metres from Pudding Lane, where the Great Fire of London was first ignited. For more info, see thehydrant.co.uk

N. THE ARBITRAGER 27A Throgmorton St, EC2N 2AN We love all drinking establishments here at square mile, no matter how big or small – and this pocket-sized space is certainly the latter. What it lacks in size, though, it makes up for in its drinks selection: behind the bar you’ll find 12 taps kitted out with London-only beers and bottles of gin. From Beavertown to Howling Hops, Sipsmiths to East London Liquor Company, these guys have the local angle covered. Best of all, is the take-away beer in one of The Arbitrager’s growlers. (Stop sniggering at the back.) Should you need to make a dash for the train, at least you can rest assured you’ll be suitably refreshed. What can we say? They know what the people want. For more info, see thearbitrager.co.uk ➤

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CRAFT WORK: [From top to bottom] Standing in the shadow of the Gherkin, St Mary Axe houses 18 keg lines and more than 200 bottles and cans; drinking on the site of the Old Bank of England dates back 500 years; The Punch Tavern is a hit in the City.

O. JAMAICA WINE HOUSE

St Michael’s Alley, EC3V 9DS Winding your way along the narrow lanes that lead to Jamaica Wine House is to experience the medieval heart of the City. Indeed, dating back to 1652 and restored in 1885, entering through the doors of this red sandstoneconstructed building is to take step back in time to how pubs used to be – some might say, should be. Back in the present, the magnificent wood-panelled room is one of the most popular in the City, while downstairs hosts Todd’s Wine Bar for hungrier, vino-focused patrons. For more info, see jamaicawinehouse.co.uk/

P. LAMB TAVERN 10-12 Leadenhall Market, EC3V 1LR A City institution, Leadenhall Market is one of the oldest markets in London (it dates back to the 14th century), and the Lamb Tavern is its most famous pub. Established in 1780 when it was owned by one James Pardy, the current building dates back to 1881, with an etched glass window still bearing the name: “W Pardy wine & spirit merchant”. Clearly the Pardy clan stuck around for a while. Despite its three floors, the pub becomes very busy after work, so be prepared to burn off some of those beer calories by fighting your way to the bar. For more info, see lambtavernleadenhall.com

Q. DRAFT HOUSE – SEETHING 14-15 Tower Hill, EC3N 4AX The beauty of this small pub group is that beer matters to them as much as it does to us. With that in mind, it’s no surprise that not only will you find one of the best selections in the City at this outpost on Seething Lane (address certainly not appropriate), but it’s also some of the best value around. There’s also the magnetlike pull of the menu – replete with your favourite junk food items, including burgers and nachos – fuelling you up for what can only be a great evening. We’ll drink to that. For more info, see drafthouse.co.uk

R. THE CRAFT BEER CO – ST MARY AXE 29-31 Mitre St, EC3A 5BU Guess this pub’s speciality? That’s right, the pies are delicious – as you would hope, considering the pub stands in the shadow of the Gherkin. To accompany your meal, and any geographically appropriate pickles, there is also quite the abundance of craft beer. St Mary Axe houses 18 keg lines, nine cask pumps and more than 200 bottles and cans. Don’t fret if beer isn’t your tipple of choice, the spirits range is also strong. This is the seventh pub from The Craft Beer Co, and as you’d expect, the group know the score when it comes to giving the people what they want. For more info, see thecraftbeerco.com

S. THE WILLIAMS ALE & CIDER HOUSE 22-24 Artillery Ln, E1 7LS This is one of those pubs that has something for everyone – including ale and cider, obviously, but also darts, live sport, a beautiful brick interior, a decent wine list and a food menu that is meaty in both senses of the word: Fat

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Fil’s Platter feeds up to ten and includes BBQ ribs, lamb koftas and mini sausages. (You can also order a vegetarian alternative.) If you’re struggling to choose which of the many labels take your fancy, the pub offers three thirdpints for the price of a normal one, so you can experiment without fearing work the next day. For more info, see williamsspitalfields.com

T. GALVIN HOP 35 Spital Square, E1 6DY The Michelin-starred Galvin brothers continue to take the capital by storm, with their individual approach to some of our favourite London restaurants. Now, they’ve turned their expertise on the world of pubs and created one hell of a treat for any Spitalfields locals. This bistro-cum-boozer flirts with a more restaurant-y theme, while still being more than capable of serving up a decent pint. Speaking of which, copper tanks of unpasteurised Pilsner Urquell call to you from behind the bar, while classic pub favourites like a Barnsley pork chop and hot dog with all the trimmings keep hunger well and truly at bay. See galvinrestaurants.com ■

VOTE ONLINE NOW! The winners of the inaugural square mile Pub Awards will be decided by you, our readers. To vote, go to squaremile.com to make sure your favourite is in with a chance. The Top three will be announced in our April issue, along with an award for the best spirits selection, chosen by Southern Comfort.

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The Great British Club... Stoke Park is a luxury 5 AA Red Star Hotel, Spa and Country Club set within 300 acres of beautiful parkland. Members join to take advantage of the unique combination of the traditions of an exclusive Members’ club and the best of today’s sporting, leisure, entertaining and hotel facilities, which include:

• 49 bedrooms and suites • Award winning Spa • 27 hole Championship Golf Course • 3 Restaurants and Bars, including Humphry’s (3 AA Rosette, fine dining) • 13 Tennis Courts (indoor, grass and artificial clay) • State of the art Gym with Fitness, HotYoga and Spinning Studios hosting up to 50 classes per week • Indoor Pool • Crèche • Games Room • Playground

www.stokepark.com For more information or to book, please contact our Reservations Team on 01753 717172 or email reservations@stokepark.com For Membership Enquiries please contact our Membership Team on 01753 717179 or email membership@stokepark.com


Design – sort image

ASSETS

WINE RHONE

ONE MORE FOR THE RHONE

The Rhone valley stands out for offering serious wines made by small, qualityconscious growers at surprisingly reasonable prices. Here’s our pick of the bunch

1. RENÉ ROSTAING AMPODIUM, CÔTE RÔTIE, 2010, £45.50/BT

2. CHÊNE BLEU HELOISE, VIN DE PAYS DE VAUCLUSE, 2010, £57.50/BT A southern Rhone with a northern twist, Heloise is anything but simple. It’s suave and rich, yet full of freshness, too. It’s full bodied yet finely balanced. All of Chêne Bleu’s boutique wines are enough to make any cynic of organic and biodynamic wines rethink their position. justerinis.com

1

This is a textbook Côte-Rôtie – literally meaning Roasted Slope. While not cheap in the grand scheme of things, it is great value for a wine from this region. Spiced fruit, lush flavours, and welltoned, it’s a blend of several vineyards from all over the appellation including La Viaillère. justerinis.com

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3. DOMAINE LA BARROCHE SIGNATURE 2013, CHÂTEAUNEUF DU PAPE, £32.49/BT Julien Barrot’s Pure will set you back north of £100 a bottle. But thanks to a poor 2013 grenache vintage, all his top vines have gone into this Signature blend instead. It’s a masterclass in ripe plums, damson fruits and summer berries. justerinis.com

4. ANDRÉ PERRET, ST JOSEPH, 2012, £16.50/BT André Perret’s forefathers owned and worked vineyards in ChassagneMontrachet. He’s taken some of this Burgundian prowess and bottled it inside a Rhone that’s pure, finely balanced and spicy, without being at all forced. justerinis.com

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PHOTOGRAPH by publinc larit em potinium vid ces blah

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EV E RY H OM E H A S I T S OWN SKY GARDEN 25m OUTDOOR LAP SWIMMING POOL SET IN LUSH GARDENS RESIDENTS’ LOUNGE, BAR & PRIVATE DINING ON 53 RD -FLOOR

COMPUTER GENERATED IMAGES. PRICES CORRECT AS AT TIME OF PRINT.

WA R D I A N L O N D O N O F F E R S A N O A S I S O F N AT U R E , C O M P R I S I N G T W O I C O N I C A PA RT M E N T T OW E R S W I T H A N A R R AY O F FA C I L I T I E S A N D S E RV I C E L I K E N O N E O T H E R ; A H AV E N O F PEACE AND BEAUTY IN THE HEART OF LONDON. P R I C E S F R O M £ 5 7 7, 5 0 0 MOMENTS FROM CANARY WHARF REGISTER YOUR INTEREST

020 3432 9173

WA R D I A N .C O M


“NONE GENUINE BUT MINE”™

SOUTHERNCOMFORTUK #SOUTHERNWELCOME

AVAILABLE FROM BARS AND RETAILERS NATIONWIDE. DRINK RESPONSIBLY

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tHE HEiGHt OF EaSt END LiViNG Luxury two and three bedroom apartments in a new landmark residential tower on the Grand Regent Canal close to Victoria park and mile End park.

Stamp Duty paiD* • • • • • • •

High-end contemporary interior specification Sweeping views from many apartments Private balcony or terrace to each apartment Boutique-hotel style communal areas Secure car parking space for all properties^

Concierge service Under 500 metres from Mile End tube Central and Hammersmith & City Lines • Close to Mile End Park, Victoria Park Village and Roman Road market • Convenient for the City and Canary Wharf Two bedroom apartments from: £615,000 Three bedroom apartments from: £750,000 ^Additional cost for parking space *Selected plots only, Subject to contract. The incentive is paid at the HMRC standard rate and does not include the higher rate payable for additional properties.

register your interest online


www.titaniumpoint.co.uk | 0208 099 6021


CITY

The Stage will be a dynamic new landmark on the City’s skyline, offering the ultimate in luxurious London living with world class interior design by Nicola Fontanella of Argent Design. The high life starts at £680,000, with a package of exclusive incentives and a 3 year complimentary membership to Equinox global health brand at The Stage.

THE HIGH LIFE.

PREVIEW THE STAGE

LONDON’S FINEST APARTMENTS & PENTHOUSES BRINGING SHOREDITCH TO THE CITY

IN JOINT VENTURE WITH

THE STAGE SALES & MARKETING SUITE FAIRCHILD PLACE, SHOREDITCH, LONDON EC2A 3EN

020 3409 2267 thestage@galliardhomes.com

THESTAGESHOREDITCH.COM

RESIDENTIAL AGENT


HOLDINGS

GREENWICH . 131 THE STRAND . 133 DESIGN FOR LIFE . 135

KITCHEN SYNC . 131

PHOTOGRAPH: Interior design at Greenwich Peninsula


A A Capital Capital Investment Investment Invest in the best choice of homes across the Capital from Invest in the best choice of homes across the Capital from contemporary pied-à-terre’s to luxury duplex apartments. contemporary pied-à-terre’s to luxury duplex apartments.

Take a look at our portfolio of brand new homes in and around the Capital and contact us to discuss further. Take a look at our portfolio of brand new homes in and around the Capital and contact us to discuss further.

Canary Wharf, E14 Canary Wharf, E14

Dockside: Luxury 2 and Dockside: 2 and 5 3 bedroomLuxury apartments, 3 bedroom apartments, 5 minutes from Canary Wharf. minutes from Canary Wharf. Prices from £689,995 Prices from £689,995 Tel: 0845 548 8137 Tel: 0845 548 8137

Deptford, SE8 Deptford, SE8

Kent Wharf: Stylish 1, 2 & Kent Wharf:apartments, Stylish 1, 2 &3 3 bedroom 3 bedroom apartments, 3 minutes from Greenwich. minutes from Greenwich. Prices from £369,995 Prices from £369,995 Tel: 0845 257 6064 Tel: 0845 257 6064

Bromley, BR1 Bromley, BR1

Hampton Grange: Award Hampton Award winning 2 Grange: & 3 bedroom winning 2 &30 3 bedroom residences, mins to City. residences, 30 mins to City. Prices from £600,000 Prices from £600,000 Tel: 0845 548 8136 Tel: 0845 548 8136

Camberwell, SE5 Camberwell, SE5

Elmington Green: Houses Elmington Green: Houses and apartments in this artistic and apartments in this artistic new Zone 2 community. new Zone 2 community. Register for further details Register further Tel: 0845for 257 6067 details Tel: 0845 257 6067

1765 London homes. One address www.bellway.co.uk 1765 London homes. One address www.bellway.co.uk Travel times are approximate only quoted by train or car. Computer generated images are indicative only. Travel times are approximate only quoted by train or car. Computer generated images are indicative only.

Nine Elms, SW8 Nine Elms, SW8

The Residence: Exclusive The Residence: Exclusive apartments launching this apartments launching this Spring in Zone 1 location. Spring in Zone 1 location. Register for further details Register further Tel: 0845for 548 8075details Tel: 0845 548 8075


HOLDINGS

PROPERTY LONDON

IT’S A WHOLE NEW WORLD A development to rival all others, Greenwich Peninsula isn’t just about creating new places to live, it’s a project that will result in an entirely new area in its own right – and now’s the time to get a piece for yourself

Y

OU MAY NOT have been to Greenwich Peninsula yet, but this 150-acre plot of land next to the Thames in SE10 is set to become one of London’s most coveted neighbourhoods. It is in fact the largest single regeneration project in all of Europe. Less of a housing development and more the creation of an entirely new district – one that’s twice the size of Soho – the Peninsula, when completed, will accommodate around 34,000 residents in seven new neighbourhoods. There’s already new bars, restaurants, a 5km running track and one of London’s biggest entertainment venues, The O2, on the doorstep, with a film hub and two schools on the horizon, too. Want a piece for yourself? Of course you do. And the good news is, now’s the time to get a slice of the action, as the first riverfront apartments in the Upper Riverside area are released to the market. Designed by renowned architects Skidmore Owings & Merrill, with interiors by State of Craft, the stylish No 1 and No 2 Upper Riverside are the first of a series of five light-filled glass and stone towers with roof gardens cascading to the edge of the Thames. Amenities include two gyms, a private dining room and one of London’s highest residential swimming pools. Accommodation ranges from one-bedroom spaces all the way up to a series of spectacular penthouses with river-facing roof gardens. Whatever size of apartment, they all come with a garden, river or City view. And speaking of the City, reaching it couldn’t be easier, with North Greenwich station just minutes away. ■

AT THE WATER’S EDGE: [clockwise from here] The Upper Riverside area of the Greenwich Peninsula development. Apartments in two of the towers are now ready to buy; accommodation is bright and spacious; interiors have been carefully selected.

Prices start at £450,000 for one-bedroom apartments. Anticipated occupancy date is autumn/winter 2018. For more information, see

greenwichpeninsula.co.uk

••

Greenwich Peninsula is the largest single regeneration project in all of Europe – it is twice the size of Soho squaremile.com

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London Living WITH JUST A 5% DEPOSIT*

1, 2 & 3 bedroom apartments ideally located in vibrant Peckham. 5 minutes from Queens Road station in Zone 2, just a 10 minute journey to London Bridge**. Ready to move into Spring 2017

1 beds from £455,000 2 beds from £599,995 2 BEDS SOLD OUT

Visit our Sales & Marketing Suite, open daily Mon 12-7pm, Tues - Fri 11am - 7pm, Sat & Sun 11am-4pm 2 Wood’s Road, Peckham, London, SE15 2BB

www.crestnicholson.com/woodsroad

0203 437 1276

Terms and conditions apply. Please speak to a Sales Advisor for further details on Help to Buy London. **Train times taken from National Rail. Show Home photography. Pricing correct on 21.01.17.

*


HOLDINGS

PROPERTY LONDON

ON THE PLUS SIDE Whether it’s your next step up the London property ladder, or a pied-à-terre par excellence, St Edward’s new development on The Strand marries fivestar living with one of the most enviable addresses in the capital

A

S BONUS SEASON in the City gets into full

swing, many discerning investors will be looking to property – either as an investment or for a life upgrade. Epitomising luxury and refined British elegance are an elite collection of apartments and penthouses at St Edward’s 190 Strand, a landmark scheme and the first of its kind on this iconic street for more than 100 years. A home at 190 Strand offers a rare and unique opportunity to live in one of the Capital’s most renowned locations. Many of the opulent homes here boast panoramic views of almost every London landmark from The Houses of Parliament and the London Eye in the West, to St Paul’s Cathedral and The Gherkin in the East. The development is so impressive that your guests may even mistake your new home for a five-star hotel, as 190 Strand’s interiors echo the grandeur of the nearby Savoy Hotel. Residents benefit from an incredible range of on-site services usually reserved for the leading hotels of the world. You’ll be greeted by a liveried doorman resplendent in a top hat and armed with handmade umbrellas for the unpredictable British weather. There’s also an exclusive valet parking service with car lifts into the basement – a rare luxury for London. Rather than rising early to hit the gym by the office, residents have exclusive use of the fully equipped gym, state-of-the-art spa, 15m swimming pool, sauna and steam room. An on-site business suite means residents can host important

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FIVE-STAR POWER: [Clockwise from here] The Penthouse dining room; the 15m indoor swimming pool is exclusively available for the use of residents; the development handily straddles London’s East and West.

meetings on their doorstep. In addition, residents are spoilt for choice when looking to entertain guests from watching a film in the private on-site cinema to playing a few rounds of virtual golf. Many of the homes at 190 Strand provide vast entertainment spaces in the form of dual-aspect reception rooms, offering amazing views across the London skyline and many with spacious private outdoor terraces. Throughout the development, the apartments display suitably high-end interiors including stone and marble kitchens

and bathrooms, floor-to-ceiling windows, statement fireplaces, high-coffered ceilings, and sleek lines that offer a contemporary but timeless design. For weekend entertainment, 190 Strand is moments from the famous attractions of London’s West End, with its Michelin-starred restaurants, theatres, galleries and flagship designer retailers. ■ Luxury one-bedroom apartments from £1,720,000. Exclusive three-bedroom penthouses from £7,840,000. Contact St Edward on 020 3051 1022 or visit

190strand.co.uk

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WATERFRONT III CENTRAL LONDON CHIC ON THE RIVERSIDE ROYAL ARSENAL WOOLWICH

LIVERPOOL STREET 14 MINUTES*

CANARY WHARF 8 MINUTES*

BOND STREET 22 MINUTES*

HEATHROW 50 MINUTES*

Royal Arsenal Riverside is an outstanding riverside location, with an ever expanding range of residents’ amenities. It is ideally situated for the forthcoming on-site Crossrail station and London City Airport, which is just 7 minutes away.

Call 020 3582 7789 to arrange a viewing

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www.royalarsenalriverside.co.uk

Computer generated image is indicative only. Photography depicts Dial Arch Square at Royal Arsenal Riverside. Prices and information correct at time of going to press. *Approximate travel times for Crossrail taken from Royal Arsenal Woolwich. Source: www.crossrail.co.uk

Proud to be a member of the Berkeley Group of companies

Manhattan, 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments Prices from £420,000


HOLDINGS

DESIGN MARTIN KEMP

DESIGN FOR LIFE Martin Kemp is the man behind some of London’s most prestigious interior design projects. Here, he reveals what influences his style IN THE BEGINNING I come from a creative family: my mother was a portrait painter and my father was a planner and architect, so I think I’ve naturally always had that creative bone in my body. I studied art and design in college and went on to work in exhibition design. It was my time in LA which really exposed me to high-end residential, fuelling my passion for residential design and leading me to start my interior design career working for interior designer Barbara Barry in Beverly Hills. I was headhunted in 2003 to be creative director of Candy & Candy, leading me back to the UK, where we were responsible for projects such as One Hyde Park. Throughout my time there, I grew the business from a team of six to 120 people, gaining the experience required to set up Martin Kemp Design in 2012.

OUT NOW We have become an increasingly international interiors team which is echoed in the vast range of projects we have taken on across the globe. At the moment we are working on a sublime penthouse in the Bahamas, in addition to a number of extraordinary private houses in China, India and London.

ON THE DRAWING BOARD Having created design schemes for private jets and superyachts in the past, I am particularly looking forward to commencing work on the refit of an 88m superyacht in May. We also have another two residential projects due to complete this year – 77 Mayfair and the penthouse at Ten Trinity Square. PHOTOGRAPH by Remi Salva

IN YOUR SPACE One piece which holds a lot of value for me is a sculpture I have by Rochard, a designer I admire. The sculpture is designed as two birds sitting on top of a cresting wave. This

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MAN ABOUT TOWN: Martin Kemp started his interior design career in LA, but is now based in London, and undertakes projects all over the city.

piece holds a strong significance for me as it is something I have admired for as long as I can remember. I first saw it when I was a child, and when I grew up, it was naturally one of the first pieces of art I bought for my home. I also collect original Bally posters – I love their alternative style and their 1960s/70s modern artwork. One that stands out the most is a wonderfully colourful shoe poster from the 1970s that takes pride of place on my wall.

IN THE MIX Tom Ford is a designer I have always admired and I would love to think that one day we could be perceived as the ‘Tom Ford’ of the interior design world. I’d also love to create a signature range of Martin Kemp Design furniture, lighting and accessories.

IN THE MATERIAL Textured leather is a very versatile material that we use regularly in our design schemes, and I also love working with ziricote wood. Metal always has, and always will, continue to play a prominent role in all of my interior design work. We tend to avoid trends, preferring to work with what fits best with the specific setting and the preferences of each project and the individual clients.

ON THE INSIDE London is a very vibrant city and there is always something new and interesting popping up to visit. However, two particular designs have caught my eye recently. The first is Sexy Fish – the intricate design and attention to detail which has gone into the interiors of the restaurant is amazing. Secondly, Victoria Beckham’s store on Dover Street is another favourite. The minimalist, industrial-style design with its polished concrete floors and basic palette have produced a look which channels that of a modern art museum.

ON THE RADAR Despite the amount of travel involved in my day-to-day life, I have my eye on a few places in the world that I’d love to visit for the ultimate relaxation break. We are currently working on interior schemes in China, so I am spending a fair amount of time in the air. This flight takes us over Mongolia and Siberia and I love looking down at this incredible landscape that’s so unfamiliar to me. It also goes without saying that I am always looking forward to going back to Los Angeles. I class LA as my second home and head back there at every opportunity I can get. ■ For more information, see martinkempdesign.com

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REAP THE REWARDS OF A CITY LIFE Show Apartment Open Daily – Call To Arrange A Viewing 190 Strand is a new luxury development situated in London’s historic heart. Located minutes from the City, River Thames, Covent Garden and the West End, residents have the best of London on their doorstep. The 24 hour concierge, luxury spa, fitness studio and private cinema room makes for an exceptional living experience. Luxury 1,3 & 4 bedroom apartments and penthouses from £1,720,000. Call 020 3504 3431 to arrange a viewing. 190 Strand Sales & Marketing Suite, London, WC2R 1DT – Open daily 10am to 6pm (Thursdays until 8pm) Price correct at the time of going to press and subject to availability. Computer generated images are indicative only.

www.190strand.co.uk Proud to be a member of the Berkeley Group of companies


Price and details correct of time of print. Computer enhanced image depicts One Blackfriars and is indicative only. Price and details correct of time of print. Computer enhanced image depicts One Blackfriars and is indicative only.


The Art of Living. If you were standing in a One Blackfriars apartment you’d see why being on the Southbank is being in the heart of London. You’d see the Tate Modern, the National Theatre and the Royal Festival Hall, all from your window. You’d see St Paul’s across the river and the City just beyond. And with a 24-hour Harrods concierge, a private gym, spa, pool and screening room, you’d also see every amenity you need merely steps from your apartment. Luxury apartments from £1,150,000. London’s most anticipated show apartment now open. Arrange a private viewing: contact.oneblackfriars.co.uk 0203 883 4373 @oneblackfriars


Standing on the hallowed turf at HQ with Will Greenwood. Not your average corporate gig! 19.17 HRS. ASSEMBLED ON THE PITCH.TWICKENHAM DINNER.

Our legends put the fun into fundraisers, and the cheer into private dinners. From Michael Vaughan to Will Greenwood. FOUNDED, CREATED & HOSTED BY SPORTING LEGENDS

Call our team: 020 3696 5745 BOOK NOW Visit: www.OurLegend.com FOR 2017


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ON THE TOWN

Coach House Opening Party COACH HOUSE 200-206 Regent Street, W1B 5BN

In December, our readers joined US fashion brand Coach to celebrate the opening of its new flagship London store on Regent Street. Inspired by the brand’s New York City roots, guests enjoyed American-themed cocktails and canapés, while browsing the latest in menswear and leather accessories. Readers also received a monogrammed gift with any purchase they made on the night. ■ To learn more about the brand, see: coach.com For more info on upcoming reader events, go to squaremile.com/events

PHOTOGRAPHS by Rudi Netto

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ESSENTIALS

+ TO ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION PLEASE CALL 020 7819 9999

IMOSSI LONDON

BISLEY SHOOTING GROUND Have a blast at the UK’s largest sporting clay shooting ground.

Inspired by the clear shift in todays spending patterns, imossi london have designed a sleek & slim minimalist wallet machined from high grade aluminium which protects your cards from RFID fraud and also prevents card clash. Its variety of interchangeable coloured straps will securely hold up to 10 cards including a few notes. And for that extra personal touch, why not have it engraved with your initials? From £34 W: www.imossi.london @imossi.london

LE COLONEL MOUTARDE

The iconic “Made in France” bowtie brand Le Colonel Moutarde is opening its first shop in Shoreditch, London! They offer a collection of more than 200 different bowties, pocket squares and cufflinks; dot, stripe, gingham, Japanese and Liberty prints to suit your outfits.

Private & Corporate Events from 10-300 Persons Tuition Ÿ Ladies Days Ÿ Young Shots Days Ÿ Pay & Play No Experience Necessary Ÿ Open 7 Days a Week

W: www.lecolonelmoutarde.com A: 10, Cheshire St, E2 6EH

Bisley Shooting Ground, Bisley, Surrey GU24 0NY (w) bisleyshooting.co.uk (t) 01483797017

J O I N T H E L O R D M AYO R AT T H E C I T Y O F L O N D O N ’ S B I G G E ST F U N D R A I S E R FO R T H E A R MY ’ S NAT I O NA L C H A R I T Y 6 a p r i l 2 0 1 7, g u i l d h a l l , l o n d o n e c 2 w w w. s o l d i e r s c h a r i t y. o r g / l o r d m a y o r s t e l . 0 2 0 7 8 1 1 3 9 6 0


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EVENTS

WIN

Win a luxury Fort break in the Solent worth £599

COMPETITION

On The Town: Spring 2017 UFC FIGHT NIGHT LONDON

OLYMPIA AUTOMOBILE FAIR AND AUCTION

The O2; 18 March

Olympia London; 17-19 February

Fight fans, get excited: UFC is returning to London. Currently titled UFC Fight Night London, the event should provide another thrilling evening of mixed martial arts. Last year tickets sold out in 27 minutes to watch Michael Bisping beat the legendary Anderson Silva. Of course, Bisping went on to win and then defend the UFC middleweight title.

Car lovers can enjoy a weekend of heaven. The fair will provide visitors with a wealth of information and guidance on the world of historic automobiles. There’s a fine watch room, a classic car rally, talk theatre, and a restoration showcase. Meanwhile, the auction will see more than 100 historic automobiles go under the hammer with the show’s partner, Coys.

For more info: ufc.com/London

For more info: olympiahistoric.com

SIMAFRA: EDEN EXHIBITION

THE LORD MAYOR’S BIG CURRY LUNCH

Maddox Gallery; 27 January-11 February

Guildhall; 6 April

Your cultural hit for the month. Awardwinning young Italian artist Riccardo Prosperi, also known as Simafra, has won many admirers with his abstract landscapes. Visit Maddox Gallery and see firsthand what all the fuss is about.

Unlimited curry and a good cause? The tenth annual Lord Mayor’s Big Curry lunch offers a range of delicious dishes from Gurkha chefs, with all proceeds going to The Soldiers’ Charity for veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan.

For more info: maddoxgallery.co.uk

For more info: soldierscharity.org ■

squaremile.com

E

NJOY AN OVERNIGHT stay at the luxurious

Spitbank Fort in the Solent. A return boat transfer from Gunwharf Quays to Spitbank Fort will take you to a truly memorable break off the South Coast. Highlights of the trip include an historic tour of the finest British military architecture and restored original artefacts, as well as adrenaline-fuelled rib rides and fishing off the Fort (supplements apply). Along with a range of activities, the amenities are also spectacular. You will enjoy the use of a wine cellar, a games room, a champagne bar, and a rooftop hot pool and sauna. Try to fit them all in. Feeling hungry? Meals include a buffet lunch served in the Crow’s Nest and a gourmet four-course dinner served in the Officers’ Mess. Delicious in every sense.

For more info and to enter, go to squaremile.com

TO ENTER

Go to squaremile.com/ competitions and answer a simple question. T&Cs can be found online.

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Be Ready LAUNCHING FEBRUARY 18TH


Be First FIRST RELEASE OF ONE OF LONDON’S LARGEST REGENERATION PROJECTS CONTEMPORARY 1, 2 & 3 BEDROOM APARTMENTS YOUR FIRST OPPORTUNITY TO VIEW DETAILS OF BLACKWALL REACH, A LANDMARK DEVELOPMENT OF OVER 1500 APARTMENTS, PHASE 1 APARTMENTS AVAILABLE TO PURCHASE OFF PLAN.

REGISTER NOW FOR YOUR LAUNCH INVITATION WEB: WWW.BLACKWALLREACH.CO.UK TEL: 0203 151 7058

Selling Agent

In partnership with:

CGI is indicative only


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BEST JOB IN THE WORLD

Josh Cartu It’s a hard job but somebody’s got to be… a gentleman driver for Ferrari, as well as its Club President. JOSH CARTU talks racing, practice and space exploration

G

ETTING INTO RACING CARS costs an enormous amount of money. You’re a paying driver. The way to get sponsored is through increasing your social media presence. Most of us pay and pay and pay, and hopefully we win some races.

THE ADRENALIN IS BRILLIANT when you’re diving into the first corner. It’s pretty crazy, your blood’s up, and it’s extremely exciting. The speed, the close proximity to other cars, and the competitive nature of it.

MY GREATEST ACHIEVEMENT is getting within two seconds of my pro-driver and racing coach, Michele Rugolo, in Budapest. Anywhere else it’d be three-to-four seconds between us, but it was my home circuit.

THE BIGGEST PROBLEM WITH RACING is that it’s not like a bicycle: you can lose it so quickly. You have to do it consistently, you’ve got to be in a race car once or twice a month or you will lose it. It’s not a skill you keep. You’ve got muscle memory, and you will get it back, but if you’re not in a race car for two months you’ll be way slower.

I THINK ANYONE CAN BE QUICK. If you have the most basic skills of spacial awareness and the ability to feel the car moving around under you. There’s a lot of guys like that, probably millions of people in the world. All that matters at the end of the day is how many laps you’ve got in the car.

THERE’S THIS COMPANY CALLED XCOR that’s doing testing on suborbital flights and I’d like to be one of the first guys who goes to space in that programme. It’s more exciting than Richard Branson’s programme: XCOR is just you and the pilot. ■ To read the full article, go to squaremile.com

SEE MORE ONLINE For more ‘Best Jobs in the World’ go to squaremile.com. Reckon you know a contender? Email max.williams@squaremile.com

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HUGO BOSS UK LTD. Phone +44 (0)20 7554 5700 hugoboss.com


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