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£4 | ISSUE 100 | ISSN 1752-9956

100 th

ISSUE

POWER 100 KIT HARINGTON PAUL OAKENFOLD

FRANCOIS GRAFF THE CITY’S MOST ELIGIBLE BACHELOR

Idris

ELBA BRITAIN’S COOLEST MAN ON MUSIC, MOVIES AND MONEY


THE LEGEND AMONG ICONS.

Portugieser Perpetual Calendar. Ref. 5034:

through a transparent sapphire glass back cover that provides an

Real icons have a special story to tell. And what was true of the

unimpeded view of the IWC-manufactured 520 0 0 calibre’s

great Portuguese seafarers also applies to IWC’s own Portugieser.

impressive precision. The watch’s complexit y is eloquently

After all, the history of its genesis bears the stamp of courageous

expressed by the perpetual calendar, whose functions can all be

innovation and watchmaking expertise at its best. Seventy-five

adjusted simply by turning the crown. And just as observing the

ye ars ago, t wo Por tugue se busine ssme n approached IWC

star-studded heavens can guide a ship safely to harbour, a glance

requesting a wristwatch with the precision of a marine chronometer.

at the perpetual calendar and the moon phase display navigate

In response, IWC’s watchmakers took the unprecedented step of

the wearer safely through the complexities of time. This, in a

housing a hunter pocket watch movement in a wristwatch case. In

nutshell, is how 75 years of watch making history became an icon

so doing, they founded a watch family whose timeless elegance,

of haute horlogerie. And how, thanks to its unique blend of

sophisticated technology and unmatched complexity have been a

perfection and timeless elegance, it has become a legend in its

source of wonderment ever since. The movement itself is visible

own time.

I WC . E N G I N E E R E D FO R M E N .


LO N D O N B O U T I Q U E | 138 N E W B O N D S T R E E T | W 1 S 2TJ | +4 4 (0) 203 618 39 00 I WC S C H A F F H AU S E N B O U T I Q U E S: LO N D O N | V I E N N A | R O M E | M O S COW | N E W YO R K | B E I J I N G | D U B A I | H O N G KO N G | G E N E VA | ZU R I C H I WC .CO M


as loyal partners since the very first publication, we would like to congratulate all the square mile team on this milestone 100th issue. we have had a lot of fun working together for the last ten years.


B O O D L E S . C O M /A U R O R A


M A S TE R

OF

SU RPRISE

MASERATI QUATTROPORTE DIESEL FROM £69,235 ON THE ROAD Maserati has a long tradition of surprising the automotive world with innovation and unconventional thinking. The introduction of our new state-of-the-art V6 diesel engine in the Quattroporte is just the latest example. This 3.0 V6 unit produces 275 HP and the performance that befits the company’s flagship, whilst clever engineering has managed to reproduce the distinctive and much loved Maserati exhaust note. For more information on the new Maserati Quattroporte Diesel, call 01943 871660 or visit maserati.co.uk

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Q U A T T R O P O R T E

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HUGO BOSS UK LTD. Phone +44 (0)20 7554 5700 www.hugoboss.com

BOSS Menswear is available in stores in the following locations: Canary Wharf E14 Eldon Street EC2 One New Change EC2 and many more


EDITOR’S WORD A

S I WAS growing up, I watched my father and older

brothers toil away at successful careers in the City. It looked like fun (kind of), but very hard work. Far too much hard work for me. So I decided to become a journalist instead. It seemed like a bright idea at the time. When we started square mile ten years ago, there were just five of us. My first desk was a cardboard box; my computer was my wife’s old laptop, which had (just about) ground its way through her law degree; and the programmes we used to make the magazine hailed from, let’s just say, unorthodox sources. During the production cycle of the early magazines, anything could potentially halt progress – from an internet connection that only seemed to work for approximately 17 minutes at unspecified moments throughout the day, to our drunken neighbour, the self-proclaimed queen of Queenstown Road, pouring Stella Artois on us from his balcony. You’ll understand, then, why I ask with such incredulity how the hell did we manage to make 100 of these things? In the past decade, I’ve eaten a sandwich with Raymond Blanc in the House of Lords (it was delicious); driven a Bentley across the desert in Oman (it was hot); been to the gym with the Saturdays (it was also hot); and taken a private jet to, well, nowhere in order to test the effects of altitude on the flavour of vintage champagne (it was just silly). All of this was purely, you understand, to bring you your favourite City magazine. It’s been my absolute pleasure – and I just hope that square mile will continue to give you as much enjoyment as it gives me. (OK, it definitely won’t, but you know what I mean.)

Download the iPad edition from squaremile.com/app

Mark Hedley, Editor, @mghedley Winner, Editor of the Year, PPA Independent Publisher Awards

Macmillan Cancer Support is square mile’s official charity partner. Please give generously. macmillan.org.uk/donate

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THIS MONTH’S CONTRIBUTORS

MARTIN VANDER WEYER Martin Vander Weyer is business editor of the Spectator, contributor to the Daily Telegraph and author of a number of books, including his most recent work Any Other Business: Life In and Out of the City. This issue, he writes on the Square Mile’s good ol’ days. [p35]

ASHISH JAISWAL Ashish Jaiswal is an associate fellow at the Oxford Centre for Higher Education Policy Studies and the founder of the School of Business Schools. In his column he writes that business schools need to reform, otherwise MBAs may become redundant. [p36]

GERAINT ANDERSON Geraint Anderson headed up one of the highest-ranked teams in the City, but after watching the Square Mile degenerate into a Wild West casino he wrote Cityboy, a bestselling account of the madness. He writes about the good, bad and ugly of the past decade. [p74]

ROBIN SWITHINBANK Robin Swithinbank began writing about watches by mistake after being shipped off to Basel and dunked into the horological deep end. He now edits watch magazine Calibre. This month, he takes a look at Patek Philippe’s hall of fame, from 1868 to today. [p50]

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Montblanc Heritage Spirit Moonphase and Hugh Jackman Crafted for New Heights The Montblanc Heritage Spirit Moonphase features the moonphase complication in the spirit of traditional ďŹ ne watchmaking. Housed in a 39 mm 18 K red gold case, the self-winding Calibre MB 29.14 indicates the moonphase in a crescent-shaped aperture, making this reďŹ ned timepiece a true lifetime companion. Visit and shop at Montblanc.com


squaremile SQUAREMILE.COM

EDITORIAL

DESIGN

EDITOR

ART DIRECTOR

Mark Hedley

Matthew Hasteley

DEPUTY EDITOR

DEPUTY ART DIRECTOR

Jon Hawkins

Lucy Phillips

STAFF WRITER

DESIGNER

Aby Dunsby

Abigail Robinson

EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS

JUNIOR DESIGNER

Mike Gibson, Gary Ogden

Bianca Stewart

~

DESIGN ASSISTANT

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Jess Poulos

Hannah Summers

~

ASIA EDITOR

PHOTOGRAPHY

Cathy Adams

Paul Farnham, David Harrison

GOLF EDITOR

ILLUSTRATIONS

Nick Bayly

Jamel Akib, Mark Boardman

SUB EDITOR

FRONT COVER

Clare Vooght

Uzo Oleh / Chilli Media

IN IN YOUR YOUR INBOX. INBOX

ON YOUR DESK

CONTRIBUTORS

Tim Aldred, Geraint Anderson, Nick Bayly, Alex Dalzell, Kevin Hackett, Barry Hedley, Ashish Jaiswal, Anthony Pearce, Nick Savage, June Slee, Robin Swithinbank, Martin Vander Weyer, Saul Wordsworth PRINTING

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LEAD DEVELOPER

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COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR

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FRONTEND DEVELOPER

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CEO & CHIEF CARROT

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CHAIRMAN

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ACCOUNT MANAGERS

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© Square Up Media Limited 2015. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. All information contained in this magazine is, as far as we are aware, correct at the time of going to press. Square Up Media cannot accept responsibility for errors or inaccuracies in such information. If you submit unsolicited material to us, you automatically grant Square Up Media a licence to publish your submission in whole or in part in all editions of the magazine. All material is sent at your own risk and although every care is taken, neither Square Up Media nor its employees, agents or subcontractors shall be held liable resulting for loss or damage. Square Up Media endeavours to respect the intellectual property of the owners of copyrighted material reproduced herein. If you identify yourself as the copyright holder of material we have wrongly attributed, please contact the office. square mile uses paper from sustainable sources

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028

050

118

144

102 . Paul Oakenfold

The legendary DJ on swapping London for LA – and 25 years of Perfecto records.

106 . Art Kane

We look back at the creativity and diversity of photographer Art Kane.

118 . Idris Elba

ON THE iPAD

Download the monthly square mile App for free from the iTunes store. The digital edition has fancy extras, including galleries, videos and animations.

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COVER FEATURE

The East-End boy done good. Very good. The actor, DJ and musician talks about trading, laziness and his love for Luther.

124 . Kit Harington

Game of Thrones is HBO’s most popular show ever – and a lot of that is down to this man. He clearly knows something.

130 . The Home Guard

Four fellas, one private members’ club and the best of men’s spring style.

PORTFOLIO

ASSETS

24 . THE EXCHANGE 28 . ART WORK 32 . THE ANALYST 35 . COLUMNS

144 . MOTORS 153 . TRAVEL 163 . SPIRITS 165 . REVIEWS 173 . GOLF

EXPOSURE 40 . FRAGRANCES 42 . STYLE 50 . WATCHES 57 . MY WORLD

100 SPECIAL 64 . POWER 100 74 . GOOD, BAD & UGLY 80 . ELIGIBLE BACHELOR 84 . 100 HIGHLIGHTS

HOLDINGS 185 . INTERIOR DESIGN 187 . ARCHITECTURE 190 . THE PAD 193 . THE MANOR

END PLAY

ISSUE 100

FEATURES

205 . EVENTS 209 . PHOTO PRIZE 210 . EXTRA MILE

see more on squaremile.com

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PHOTOGRAPHS by (lead) Art Kane; (Elba) Chilli Media

WHERE THE ART IS 106


Orville Wright taking first flight with brother Wilbur running alongside at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, 17 December 1903. Image credit: WSU/planepix.com

A feW SeleCt peOple HAve beeN gIveN pArt Of tHe WOrlD’S fIrSt AIrCrAft. preSIDeNtS, AStrONAUtS AND ANyONe WItH A bremONt WrIgHt flyer. the bremont Wright flyer is a tribute to the Wright brothers’ famous aircraft. It’s remarkable to look at. but what makes it even more remarkable is that it features actual material from that very first aircraft. the watch also features another first: our first proprietary movement, the bWC/01. the Wright flyer is available now in a limited edition. but it’s unlikely to be available for long.

Bremont Boutique, 12 the Courtyard, royal exchange, london, eC3v 3lQ tel: +44 (0) 207 220 7134


PORTFOLIO

THE EXCHANGE ART WORK ANALYST COLUMNS

. . . .

024 028 032 035

GO FIGURE. 028 PHOTOGRAPH: Free Fall 3 (2014) by Jeff Rob from Albemarle Gallery in association with Shine Artists London


THE EXCHANGE

SQUARE MILE MAGAZINE

We’re not normally ones to blow our own trumpet, but WHAT A TRUMPET, eh? We’ve reached 100 issues. Mad, isn’t it? So we feel justified in blowing our trumpet as hard as we can. You can blow it too if you like – that’s what it’s there for, after all…

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THINGS TO DO AFTER THE CITY

WORDS Saul Wordsworth

#75 LONDON TOUR GUIDE

▽ “COCK LANE near Holborn Viaduct got its name for being the only street in medieval times to be licensed for prostitution. These days prostitutes are mainly sourced online, though a thriving trade continues in Soho. OK, let’s cross here…” As a tour guide your mission is similar to the BBC’s: to inform, educate and entertain, only with added Jack the Ripper facts. What better than teaching tourists about Dr Johnson while breathing in diesel fumes and being moved on from Clarence House? Your group will be a receptive audience, so alternate surprising facts (“it is illegal to die in the Houses of Parliament”) with something lighthearted (“London is the fun capital of the world!”) or misleading (“much of the West End is made out of hair”). Blend the mundane (“an earlier name for Spitalfields was Lolsworth”) with the shocking (“Oscar Wilde made love to a man through this railing”). Get people involved by asking questions (“this is Green Park. Hands up if you’ve had sex outdoors?”). Invest in a sturdy pair of walking boots, a smart raincoat and – if you’re feeling lucky – a hat. Line up a few dad jokes (“Harrods sold cocaine until 1916, so if you’re here for the drugs I’m afraid you’ve missed them!”) but try not to laugh too hard (unless no one else does). Where possible introduce a personal perspective (“Jimi Hendrix died after choking on his own vomit. By coincidence I was sick directly beneath his blue plaque on 23 Brook Street”) but steer clear of unnecessary detail. Good luck and keep smiling. If all else fails, here’s a fallback: there’s only one Tube station that doesn’t have any of the letters from the word ‘mackerel’ in it (that’s your homework). ■ For more see saulwordsworth.com

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ANTONY JENKINS

After refusing his bonus every year since he started as chief executive of Barclays, Antony Jenkins has finally cracked and taken a £1.1m bonus. It’s like the time we finally cracked and bought that PS4 after walking past Currys every day for a week.

GETTING STUFF DONE

Well done you. According to the Office for National Statistics, London workers are the most productive in the country, churning out 42% more per hour than the national average. And that’s even with Chris in finance pretending to go for a crap six times a day.

NAUGHTY BANKERS

The Financial Conduct Authority has revealed that senior bankers involved in cases of misconduct will be presumed guilty, until proven innocent. They’ll need to demonstrate how they took steps to avoid it, like when they said ‘no’ at least twice before folding.

DRIVING TO THE AIRPORT

Best get the train before a flight – seven of the ten most expensive airport car parks in the world are in the UK, with London City taking the top spot at £315 a week. Your only other option is to paint your car the same colour as a lamppost so the warden doesn’t notice it.

PA U L R O B S O N

In an industry first, the ex-Rabobank trader has been banned from Britain’s financial services industry after he was found guilty of fraud. That’s the first time the FCA has taken public action against an individual. Still, at least he’s not banned from Wetherspoons.

squaremile.com

ILLUSTRATION OF ‘MILES’ by Jamel Akib

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THE CITY INDEX


PORTFOLIO

WISE G U I D E S WORDS by Aby Dunsby

THE LUXURY TECH YOU NEED IN YOUR LIFE RIGHT NOW APPLE WATCH EDITION If you haven’t heard about the Apple Watch, then welcome to 2015. How was that hibernation of yours? The one you want is the Watch Edition – it has a 38mm or 42mm, 18ct yellow or rose gold case, while the display is protected by polished sapphire crystal. It’s clever, too, of course: the wearer can sync the watch with their iPhone and then make calls, text and send emails through it. The watch can also act as a credit card when you wave it over contactless card machines. It might make you look a bit mental in the queue at Costa, but at least you’ll get your skinny latte in record time. Price from £8,000, apple.com LEICA M-P CORRESPONDENT He might be best loved for his massive shades and a desire to “GETTT AWAAAY”, but did you know Lenny Kravitz is also a shutter bug? No, us neither. He’s done a good job designing the limited-edition Leica M-P Correspondent. Inspired by his first ever camera – the Leicaflex – this new version’s enamel has been rubbed down to look aged, and its grip and shoulder strap are made from snakeskin – much like Kravitz’s favourite trousers. And now for some techy stuff: it’s got a 24MP Leica MAX fullframe CMOS sensor, top sensitivity of ISO6400, and a full HD 1080p movie recording function. £17,800, leica-camera.com DJI INSPIRE 1 QUADCOPTER T600 Once the toy of the super geek or crazed celebrity stalker, these days a flying, picsnapping drone should be on every City boy’s wish list. The DJI Inspire 1 Quadcopter T600 will take some impressive aerial shots of you and your mates from angles that a selfie stick could never reach. And you can control it via a mobile app. The camera (with a nine-element lens that can shoot 4K video or take 12 megapixel images) is mounted on a three-axis stabilised gimbal for some seriously pro-looking 360-degree footage. It’s up to you to make sure it doesn’t end up landing in a bush, though. £2,380, store.dji.com

City Wisdom

IN BUSINESS, COMPETITION IS NEVER AS HEALTHY AS TOTAL DOMINATION – Peter Lynch, legendary fund manager and stock picker

WHAT THEY DID AFTER THE CITY...

ESCAPE A RT I S T ED WALSH, ALICE MADE THIS

▽ UNTIL AUGUST 2014, I worked as a moneymarket broker at the inter-dealer Compagnie Financière Tradition. I worked on the non-banking desk, which basically meant I helped anyone who wasn’t a bank invest in the market, whether it be making deposits, borrowing cash or buying bonds. I loved the competitive nature of the trading floor but after the credit crunch the market has never been the same. That realisation – that things had changed forever – took a while for me to believe. It was while I was waiting for it to turn around that my wife had designed and developed her first range of cufflinks. The business was based out of our small one-bed flat and my evenings were spent helping packing up orders, and discussing the business and how she was going to take it forward. The orders and interest in the brand were growing and it was at that point that Alice wanted to bring someone on board to run the business side of things, so we decided to put all of our eggs in one basket and I came on board as the business director. It’s been a very steep learning curve and it is a role that my time in the City hadn’t necessarily prepared me for, but I have been amazed by the level of help, support and openness of everyone I have come across since I started this journey. My only regret is that I wish I’d made the decision sooner. ■ To see more, visit alicemadethis.com

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025


PORTFOLIO

COMPETITION

THE EXCHANGE

BONUS B U STER

WIN A BROCKET HALL EXPERIENCE HOW WILL YOU SPEND YOURS?

HARRY WINSTON MIDNIGHT FEATHERS AUTOMATIC, £POA

Never let it be said we don’t give you anything. Exclusive interviews with big name stars? Check. Style advice, without which you’d be left to wander the earth in a tracksuit? Also check. Obscure words you’ve never heard before? Sure, and here’s another one for you: plumasserie. In case you’re wondering (of course you’re wondering), it’s the rare and deceptively difficult art of feather marquetry – selecting, shaping and arranging remiges (flight feathers) by hand to create a motif with striking texture, colour and depth.

WORDS Jon Hawkins

Jeweller and watchmaker Harry Winston – a brand with a wealth of history but a progressive outlook – first used plumasserie on its women’s watches in 2012, and this year the technique features for the first time in the malefocused Midnight 42mm collection. With a rose gold case and brown alligator strap, the Midnight Feathers Automatic will give your outfit a dash of feathery verve. It won’t give you the power of flight, though. You’ll need one on each wrist for that, obviously. ■

harrywinston.com

BROCKET HALL, HERTFORDSHIRE

▽ FANCY YOURSELF as the next Rory McIlroy? Whether you’re a golf pro or a total newbie, Brocket Hall in Hertfordshire is the ideal place to get into the swing of the sport. Now you could experience it firsthand as we’ve teamed up with the British estate to offer one reader the chance to escape the City for the day with three friends for a relaxing (or competitive) 18 holes, followed by dinner at its award-winning restaurant. The prize is worth £1,000, so the mates you choose to join you will certainly owe you a fair few pints if you win. The round will take place on one of the estate’s two championship golf courses, both of which offer stunning backdrops of the British countryside. Having impressed your pals (or not) with your golf skills, you and your group will move on to Brocket Hall’s awardwinning Auberge du Lac for dinner. Head chef Marcus McGuinness creates his menus around the seasons, featuring ingredients that he often picks himself from the Estate’s grounds. Alongside seasonal dishes are heartier offerings including a 42 day aged fillet of Cumbrian beef. Lucky you’ll be playing that round of golf first, really. ■ Terms and conditions apply. brocket-hall.co.uk

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COMIC by Modern Toss

TO ENTER Go to squaremile.com/ competitions and answer a simple question. T&Cs can be found online.


➤ Albemarle Gallery ➤

SQUARE SPACE — By Clare Vooght —

Taking photos of female nudes in 3D is all in a day’s work for Jeff Robb. A leading authority on lenticular photography, a technique that gives images the illusion of depth and movement, the London-based artist also created the first holographic

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artwork to be displayed at the V&A just after graduating from the Royal College of Art in the 1990s. Robb’s solo show at Albemarle Gallery this spring will focus on his lenticular work, which features willowy models with limbs contorted

into small spaces. And the best bit? You don’t need to wear naff 3D glasses to see them properly. ■ 16 April-9 May at Albemarle Gallery in association with Shine Artists London.

albemarlegallery.com

ARTWORK


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PORTFOLIO

➤ Square ➤ Ronchini Mile Gallery - Artwork ➤ ➤

CIRCLE HEADLINE LINES

ARTWORK

— Painting — Byby #### Jens— Wolf —

Berlin-based artist Jens Wolf is bringing his mesmerising geometric paintings to London for a new exhibition at the Ronchini gallery. His vibrant paintings on plywood panels explore colour, shape and flatness,

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taking inspiration from abstract movements of the 20th century. Using repetitive, bold-coloured shapes, Wolf’s works convey a childlike sense of playfulness. It’s hypnotic stuff. Look into the painting,

the painting, not around the painting; you’re under… ■ Jens Wolf takes place from 13 March – 16 May 2015 at Ronchini Gallery, London.

ronchinigallery.com


PORTFOLIO

@

@

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➤ This month ➤ ➤ Drinks cabinet ➤

THING THE HERE RAISING BAR — By Edward Lee —

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CABINET RESHUFFLE

ANALYST

This drinks cabinet is the bomb. Literally. It’s been crafted from a 1970s missile fuselage by Fallen Furniture, which makes bespoke designs from reclaimed aircraft parts. The Cluster Bomb stands a mighty eight feet tall and weighs 600 pounds, so you’ll need a pretty big living room – and a vast drinks collection to fill it.

BANGING HANGOVER The cabinet opens to reveal three shelves that rotate around a gold spindle. In the base, a sliding platform crafted from lacquered walnut conceals an armoury of custom-made drinks utensils. Just don’t go spoiling the macho vibe by making yourself a sex on the beach. £50k; fallen

furniture.com

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L I F E

I S

A B O U T

M O M E N T S

C E L E B R AT I N G E L E G A N C E S I N C E 1 8 3 0

CLIFTON REd GOLd, 39 MM SELF-wINdING www.baume-et-mercier.com

47 Kings Road, Chelsea SW3 4NB www.ernestjones.co.uk


PORTFOLIO

➤ Retrospective ➤

ANY OTHER BUSINESS — By Martin Vander Weyer —

W

ILLUSTRATION by Jamel Akib

HEN I’M OCCASIONALLY asked to address school prize-givings, I always make the same speech. As you go through life – I tell the fidgeting sixth-formers – the things that seem imposingly permanent when you’re young will often turn out not to be, but many of your friendships will endure for your whole life. That has certainly been the case in my long connection to the City of London, as a young banker and latterly as a financial columnist for the Spectator. If my writings hint at a love-hate relationship with the Square Mile, it may have to do with the fact that not a trace survives of either of the offices where I worked between 1975 and 1992 or of the specific companies (arms of Schroders and Barclays) that employed me. I’d like to think that’s not because I’m especially cursed, but because financial markets are perpetually flakier than the architecture favoured by bankers would suggest. I started as what would now be called an intern at J. Henry Schroder Wagg on Cheapside. My job was to process ‘bills of exchange’, shortterm debt that was sold to the City’s ‘discount houses’ each morning. Even when I came back the following year as a graduate trainee, the working day was pretty relaxed – 9.30am to 5.30pm max, with long lunchtimes devoted to crosswords or mis-spent in dark Victorian bars. It probably wasn’t very different from a clerk’s life in 1875; the only modern thing about it, oddly enough, was the Schroder building. But even that has already been knocked down and replaced, as has everything facing it across the street except the Sir Christopher Wrendesigned church of St Mary-le-Bow. Now western Cheapside is dominated by One New Change, a shopping mall that resembles an alien spaceship poised to attack St Paul’s. I hope I live to see that replaced too, perhaps by a nice little park. At least the new Paternoster Square (approved by even that stern architecture critic, the Prince of Wales)

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is more pleasant than its brutal 1960s predecessor, where I sometimes lunched for £2 at Oodles health-food buffet. My last City desk was in Ebbgate House, the headquarters of BZW, which evolved into Bob Diamond’s ill-fated Barclays Capital. It was an overcrowded concrete block, semi-detached to a multi-storey car park where, for unknown reasons, plainclothes coppers lurked in vans. Generating more testosterone than profit in an era when doomed British investment banks like ours were scrabbling for market share, Ebbgate’s only redeeming feature was its impressive view of the river. The last time I enjoyed that vista, with January sunlight sparkling on the water, was during the meeting at which I was fired – and I

thought, almost aloud: ‘Maybe I can write for the Spectator instead,’ which is what I have done ever since. Some years later, passing along Upper Thames Street, I realised that the scene of my Dr Who-like regeneration had been reduced to rubble – and I let out a yelp of joy for which I had to apologise to the taxi driver. In between times I worked for Barclays in a warren of Gracechurch Street offices adjacent to the bank’s then HQ on Lombard Street, designed in the spacious countryhouse style of the 1930s. In the early 1990s it was replaced by an allegedly more efficient building, topped with a dome and decorated with what looked from a distance like gold dollar signs that would have been more at home in Dubai – or so scoffed the last of the pin-striped discount house men over their mid-morning gin. Now Barclays has migrated to Canary Wharf, as have most of the other Lombard Street bankers. Gone altogether are the discount-house men, the mid-morning gin, the pinstripes, the undemanding working days and the dark Victorian bars. Now there’s TK Maxx, and New Look and Marks & Spencer; and if you find yourself at that same crossroads at midnight on a Saturday (perhaps, as I did, after visiting the nearby Proud Cabaret burlesque bar, though that’s another story) you’ll meet a surprising new City tribe of hardcore clubbers. Should we regret the passing of the old City? I guess not. It had its day; what came afterwards is more global, more energised, more creative. And I’m right that friendship endures, even if buildings and modes of business do not. I still count dozens of friends from my Schroders and Barclays years. When we get together, of course, we wax nostalgic. But the moral of the story is that the City has always changed as markets have evolved. It always will – and it will always be a fun place to start a career. ■ Any Other Business: Life In and Out of the City by Martin Vander Weyer is out now (£18.99).

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PORTFOLIO

➤ MBAs ➤

SCHOOL IS IN SESSION — By Dr Ashish Jaiswal —

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business school curriculum is a complete anathema for students preparing for entrylevel financial jobs, as it is largely incapable of producing what the business world sorely needs: innovators, entrepreneurs, creators and leaders. Ironically, even the financial curriculum of an MBA is not deemed rigorous enough to train students for positions in investment banking and other financial sectors: an undergraduate degree in economics from LSE, or even the recently established masters in financial economics (MFE) at the University of Oxford, is seen as far more comprehensive in this field than the generic MBA. Nevertheless, in spite of an obvious need for substantial reforms, there have been pitifully few reported instances of such remodelling in business schools. Even with those who claim to have overhauled their curriculum, their ‘reforms’ are, at best, little more than cosmetic changes at the fringes of the programme. To make matters worse, business schools regularly take between four and seven years to implement curricular reforms, which in the rapidly evolving digital economy might as well be a few centuries. Thus, these reformed curriculums are almost always obsolete for contemporary market requirements. But reforms can only be made effective if business schools ground their mission in tangible, reasonable outcomes. The

❱❱ There are more than 13,000 business schools worldwide, sending a staggering two million MBA students into the economy annually

ambiguity of claims made by many business schools is accentuated in their deliberately foggy mission statements. Although Harvard Business School claims to prepare students for “a lifetime of leadership”, there is little actual evidence in its curriculum to indicate how students are trained to be visionaries of individual businesses. Business school administrators may choose to deny it, but they are inescapably tethered to league-table rankings. The compulsion of placing students on an enhanced salary obliges business schools to take a certain type of student – those who can easily walk through standardised tests, have worked within the consulting or financial sectors, and who have a track record in steadily rising up the career ladder in their field. This decision – executed in the admissions process but made much earlier as a fundamental principle of the selection process – results in a disappointing homogeneity between MBA graduates. Programmes end up being tailored to rewarding invariable, systematic methods and approaches that stifle creativity. Visionaries, risk-takers, dreamers and people with an aptitude for developing groundbreaking ideas and changing the course of business history are filtered out in favour of the officialdom of ‘ticking boxes’. It should be a given that, if nothing changes, business schools will close. Although, the business of business schools is of less concern than the likely redundancy of thousands of paper MBAs wrongfully trained by them. The time has come for business schools to consider the kind of workers they want to send into the world, casting aside concern for league-table positions and tackling the question of where future business leaders will come from. It should be business schools, but that will only be the case if they change, fast. ■ Ashish Jaiswal is author of How to Reform a Business School (OxCHEPS; £24.99).

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ILLUSTRATION by Jamel Akib

HE FT’S 2015 MBA rankings are out, and the data tramples on any talk of a depressed City job market. An MBA degree from any of the top 100 business schools in 2014 resulted in a 91% increase in student earnings compared with their salaries before joining the programme. The problem is these figures focus only on elite business schools, hiding the elephant in the room. Incredible as it may sound, there are more than 13,000 business schools worldwide, sending a staggering two million MBA students into the economy annually. Not all business schools are made equal, but the inequality in salaries and career advancement of students can be divided into the 1% and the 99%. For those studying at one of the business schools in the 99% outside of the elite, an MBA degree may never pay for itself. Graduates of the top 1% of business schools may earn more, but the question remains whether the skills they learn are useful, either for the economy or their careers. Despite claims to the contrary, it appears that an MBA has little benefit for students who hope to find work after graduation. A recent survey in India has revealed that more than 90% of MBA graduates are unemployable, lacking even the basic skills required for business management. The situation in the UK doesn’t appear to be much better. Recruiters have time and again said, even with the top 1% of MBA graduates, it is not the content of the degree they’re interested in, but the admission list. What students learn on the programme is considered practically meaningless. Arguably, one key reason for the global failure of business schools is their reluctance to commit to reforms. For instance, the case-study method – still the most popular in business teaching – falls short in preparing students for understanding today’s complex, everevolving, globalised markets. Most of the


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EXPOSURE

FRAGRANCES STYLE WATCHES MY WORLD

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EXPOSURE

STYLE PERSONAL

THE DOG’S BOLLOCKS: As well as being swooned over in ads, Cooper and his wife own a Notting Hill pet store called The Mutz Nutz, which works with local animal charities. One look at his Instagram account proves Cooper is serious about three things: dogs, travel and fitness.

SHARP NOTES ANDREW COOPER – the model

known for his steamy Diet Coke ad – on his style staples, yachts and swimming with great whites ON MY WRIST My everyday watch is a steel Rolex Daytona with a black face. I like watches and have a fair few. I have an old Panerai GMT that I really love, as it was the first watch I bought. My next purchase will be a custom Rolex from my friend George Bamford.

IN MY HAND A black and silver Dunhill pen. My kids are always running off with it to do their doodles so it’s their favourite pen, too. I always travel with my Canon G12 compact camera and I just couldn’t live without my iPhone 6.

ON MY RADAR I really love Robert Geller for casual tailored hoodies and jackets. I am obsessed with BLK DNM. Every time I’m in New York I visit a good friend who lives above the store on Lafayette and I usually can’t walk past without getting new jeans and a leather jacket. In the UK I love Dunhill for all things smart and luxurious. I am also a big fan of Mr Hare shoes – they make the best leather derby shoes.

IN MY SIGHTS I’m dreaming of this beautiful black Dunhill cashmere coat I wore in the winter ads (hint hint), Mr Hare shoes...oh and a Bamford Watch Department custom Rolex Daytona in powder black with a grey dial.

My bucket list: sail round the world, perform at the National Theatre and then cage dive with a great white shark 042

IN MY WARDROBE My favourite piece of clothing is this extra-fine black cashmere sweater from Gucci. I bought it in Sardinia about eight years ago and I just can’t find a better sweater; it just goes great with everything and is the perfect weight. I once left it in the Park Hyatt in Seoul and had them courier it back to me, as it’s irreplaceable.

I would love to repeat the experience and adventure with my wife and children.

ON MY AGENDA Afternoon tea with the Queen at Buckingham Palace! Oh and I haven’t had a meal at the Chiltern Firehouse yet.

ON MY BUCKET LIST ON MY TRAVELS I travel a lot so I have this down: Persol Steve McQueen sunnies; B&W headphones; Orlebar Brown Bulldog shorts – they do the best colours and prints; and a Bose SoundDock for beach tunes. My TRX goes everywhere with me in case I can’t find a good gym; I’ve attached it to doors, palm trees and balconies.

IN MY DREAMS An 80ft sailing boat. My father used to take us sailing and we had an Oyster 80, we would sail around the Caribbean every Christmas and once we sailed all the way up through Alaska.

Sail round the world; perform at the National Theatre; cage dive with a great white shark.

ON MY SCENT A fragrance isn’t simply a scent; it’s also a state of mind, a place or memory. It’s a personal thing and I like to stick to one. I love Dunhill ICON; it has great notes such as cardamom, black pepper and lavender, then it’s topped with oud wood, vetiver and leather to make it feel powerful, rich and sophisticated. It feels like a place you know and want to go back to and that place is British. ■ Dunhill ICON is available to buy at House of Fraser.

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Extend by streching edges

EXPOSURE

STYLE SUITS

A FITTING CHOICE

Sharp tailoring; effortless style – it’s the Hugo Boss way. The brand has more London retail space than ever before, so the only choice left is off-the-rack or made-to-measure

BOSS SAYS RELAX The new Boss SS15 collection is all about casual tailoring: a less structured and more relaxed style, including tapered, slightly cropped trousers. This pure new wool Boss Huge & Genius suit (£500) is one of the stand-outs, thanks to its slim fit and checked pattern. With one store in Canary Wharf and two in the City, it’s not exactly hard to nip out and pick up something from the new collection – leave your old jacket on the back of your chair and people will just assume you’re in a meeting. hugoboss.com

BOSS STORES: The Willett Bldg 35-38 Sloane Sq SW1W 8DL 020 7259 1240

BOND TRADER Hugo Boss’s New Bond Street store has doubled in size, so now there are twice as many reasons to visit. Not to mention that here (and also in its Sloane Street store) Boss offers a made-to-measure service, allowing you to create a Boss suit that’s tailored to your personal taste and style.

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OUTSOURCE YOUR SHOPPING ENCLOTHED BRINGS YOU THE CLOTHES YOU WANT, FROM THE BRANDS YOU LOVE, DIRECTLY TO YOUR DOOR.


EXPOSURE

STYLE JUMPERS

SPINNING A GOOD YARN Hard-wearing and lightweight don’t normally go hand-inhand, but Orlebar Brown has pulled it off with its piqué cotton wear

TAKE YOUR PIQUÉ The piqué weave was first developed for white tie – the fabric held starch well making it ideal for a formal finish. However, left untreated it’s a perfect combination of durability and lightness. With Orlebar Brown’s Webster Polo (£125), the outer layer is hard-wearing yet breathable, and inside it has a soft, luxurious finish. It’s just the kind of versatility you need from a jersey in spring’s seesaw temperatures – whether you’re on the Côte d’Azur or Cornhill. orlebarbrown.co.uk

ORLEBAR BROWN STORE LOCATIONS: 206 Westbourne Grove, W11 2RH; 020 3441 6289 84-86 Sloane Avenue, SW3 3DZ; 020 8001 4997 11 Floral Street, WC2E 9DH; 020 3638 0493 24 Sackville St, W1S 3DS; 020 7734 5892 Jubilee Place 45 Bank Street E14 5NY; 020 7513 1157

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©2014 ©2015TUMI, TUMI,INC. INC.

TUMI is proud to celebrate 40 years of design excellence and outstanding product innovation. This exclusive collection commemorates the meticulous craftsmanship, technical innovation and functional superiority that TUMI is renowned for and pays homage to 1975, its founding year. Designed in America for Global Citizens everywhere, this American-made, limited edition series is crafted from leather inspired by the variety TUMI imported from South America in the early years and TUMI’s signature ballistic nylon. We invite you to continue with us on our journey.

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EXPOSURE

HEAVY METAL We’re not the only ones celebrating our 10th anniversary this year. MB&F is also ten – and like us, its team is essentially just a bunch of big kids. That’s probably why the first of its anniversary pieces is an awesome little robot. Named Melchior, and created alongside L’Epée 1839, the 30cm-tall creation also happens to be an impeccably finished, 480-component mechanical table clock.

RISE OF THE MACHINE

PHOTOGRAPH by publinc larit em potinium vid ces blah

MB&F CEO Maximilian Büsser is the first to admit he’s a huge Star Wars fan. Not only does his high-end table clock feature jumping hours, sweeping minutes, double retrograde seconds and a 40-day power reserve but, presumably, if your desk is ever invaded by a brigade of miniature Stormtroopers, this little dude has got your back. £POA; mbandf.com

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CLOCKS MB&F

I, ROBOT Remember when your desk was happy with a stapler and some paper clips…

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EXPOSURE

MY WORLD FRANCOIS GRAFF

REAL HARD GRAFF Francois Graff, CEO of Graff Diamonds, tells MARK HEDLEY why hard work and family are the cornerstones of his company Graff caused quite a stir at this year’s Baselworld. Talk us through your new collections – starting with the showstopper. We unveiled the Fascination, a unique, transformable jewel that encapsulates the ethos of our business – from sourcing the very finest diamonds, uncovering their potential through our cutting and polishing divisions, to pushing the boundaries of design, meticulous craftsmanship and attention to detail. It is an outstanding piece, carefully crafted so it can be seamlessly transformed from watch, to ring, to bracelet. A highly sculptural celebration of our diamond mastery, it joins our roll call of important jewels. And what about the other watches? We’ve unveiled a number of exciting new timepieces, including dynamic men’s Technical, Dress and Sport watches, a new evolution of our iconic Butterfly Watch, secret watches, and intricately carved gemstone jewellery watches. We also unveiled our Diamond MasterGraff Structural Tourbillon Skeleton powered by the Graff Calibre 6 – a proprietary movement featuring an exclusive skeletonised tourbillon-driven, hand-wound movement. It PHOTOGRAPH by Philippe Lopez/ AFP/ Getty Images

We are all extremely proud of our business, our incredible one-of-a-kind pieces that cannot be found anywhere else squaremile.com

LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON: Francois Graff and his father Laurence have worked hard to build their company into one of the most highlyregarded jewellers in the world

boasts a world premiere – hand-set diamonds positioned along the length of each bridge. Following the launch of our very first ladies’ technical timepiece, the GraffStar Icon Automatic last year at Baselworld, we have recorded strong appreciation for this piece from our clients globally. Increasingly, we are seeing more women who are intrigued about the inner workings of mechanical watches – with the quality of materials used also a key consideration. This year we have unveiled our Floral Tourbillon, a timepiece combining the craft and skill of our gem-setting experience, with haute horology and the finest Swiss complications – it’s our first ladies’ watch powered by a tourbillon calibre. With wearable technology threatening to monopolise wrist space over the coming years, do you have any concerns? Wearable technology is a different entity to a horologically advanced timepiece.

I believe there will always be appreciation for complicated watches, developed by brands with a history and heritage, incorporating many hours of meticulous craftsmanship and featuring traditional watchmaking techniques. Graff’s reputation is second to none – do you feel the pressure to consistently deliver the spectacular, or is it just ingrained now? Graff has been owned and run by our family for two generations. My father Laurence Graff is our chairman; my uncle Raymond Graff directs production at our London workshop; and my cousin Elliott Graff is responsible for the design and merchandising of our jewellery. We are all extremely proud of our business, our incredible one-of-a-kind pieces that cannot be found anywhere else. It’s a reputation we work hard to uphold, and our vertical integration also plays a key role in this, enabling us to grow, safe in the knowledge that we can supply ourselves with exactly what we need. ➤

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EXPOSURE

FAMILY JEWELS: (clockwise from main picture) Laurence and Francois Graff at Baselworld last year; the making of Graff’s 152.96carat Fascination with a 38.13-carat D Flawless pearshaped diamond at its core; the finished articles

➤ Is there a single Graff piece – jewellery or watch – that you’ve taken particular pleasure in since you’ve been in charge? It’s difficult to choose one single piece – over the course of our history we’ve handled some of the most fabulous and treasured diamonds in the world, including the Lesotho Promise, the Delaire Sunrise, the Graff Constellation, the Graff Pink, the Graff Sweethearts, and the Letšeng Star – to name but a few. One piece that stands out is the 603-carat Lesotho Promise – the largest rough uncovered this century, which took more than a year for our expert team to cut, polish and assess. This stone was not only an incredible size, it was also immensely complicated, with cracks

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Where do you anticipate being the major geographical areas of expansion for Graff in the coming years? Over the past 12 months we have continued to grow our business, with locations across Asia, the Middle East and Europe. New openings throughout 2015 will take our portfolio to in excess of 50; including stores in Paris, Nagoya and Macau, plus newly expanded locations within the Fine Jewellery Room at Harrods and Casino de Monte-Carlo. Through

relationships with global franchise partners we will also open stores in Oman, Riyadh, Azerbaijan and Cyprus. We are also expanding other areas of the business to support our retail expansion, including production, design, manufacturing and administration – these areas aren’t visible, but they’re incredibly important. Improving our business every day is a top priority and always has been. What’s your father like to work with? When you were growing up, did he ever tell you ‘you don’t realise how good you’ve got it…’? My father has always encouraged me to follow my dreams, and from an early age I was intrigued by the diamond business. I remember him returning home with a suitcase full of jewels, and sitting down and sharing stories with us about what he’d sold that day. It captured my imagination to go forward and to be a part of the business. It’s all I ever wanted to do and I can’t imagine doing anything else. I’m extremely proud of my father and what he’s achieved over the course of his career – his passion, drive and determination continue to inspire me. ■

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PHOTOGRAPH (Graff) by Daniel Herendi

I remember Dad returning home with a suitcase full of jewels and sharing stories about what he’d sold that day

and irregularities, including a huge chunk of uncrystallised carbon at its core. This diamond presented a daunting task, but also a once-ina-lifetime opportunity that surpassed anything we had acquired before. After a long and hazardous journey, we transformed the 603-carat rough into 26 magnificent multi-shaped D Flawless diamonds, weighing a total of 223.35 carats. With each diamond perfectly cut and polished, we finished a monumental task that nature began. These beautiful diamonds were then set as one single necklace, the most impressive necklace in the world. There is nothing like it, and it is one of our most treasured pieces to date.


Auctioneers & Valuers Antiques | Jewellery | Watches

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POWER 100 GOOD, BAD & UGLY ELIGIBLE BACHELOR 100 HIGHLIGHTS

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Jersey. For business. For life.

For those who want to work in a thriving international business centre but who also seek a work-life balance, Jersey is increasingly proving to be an attractive option.

Over the past year, the island, which sits in the English Channel just a few miles off the coast of France, has seen a significant rise in the number of professionals considering relocating themselves, their family and their businesses there.

cosmopolitan island with a strong reputation for being a top-rated international business centre and offering an excellent quality of life. You really can achieve a work-life balance here.”

According to Locate Jersey, the organisation responsible for promoting and retaining inward investment for Jersey and that provides support to those relocating, this is not surprising.

The proof is in the pudding, with Locate Jersey reporting a rise in the number of people interested in making the move this year. Whilst 2013 marked an upward trend, 2014 was even more successful with over 20 ‘high value residency’ approvals granted.

“Jersey is a very welcoming jurisdiction with a simple relocation process,” explains Wayne Gallichan, Director of Inward Investment and International Trade at Locate Jersey. “It is a thriving

“There are good reasons for this,” says Wayne. “For those requiring a robust and efficient business environment, Jersey’s standing as a leading and well-regulated IFC is absolutely key, whilst being one of


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the world’s first jurisdictions to roll-out gigabit speed fibre connectivity to all residents and businesses, is also hugely appealing. Being able to offer some of the lowest corporate and personal tax rates in the world clearly adds to the overall proposition too.” As well as offering a fantastic business environment, Jersey also offers an exceptional lifestyle and a safe and secure location for families thanks to its high quality health and leisure facilities, world class education and health systems, first class range of restaurants, and an ability to be home, on the beach or in breath-taking countryside within minutes of

leaving the office. Despite being an island, Jersey is a remarkably wellconnected place too, with regular flight links to the UK and Europe. In addition, the range of properties available is as diverse as the island itself, from luxury waterfront apartments and historic Cod Houses to picturesque granite farmhouses. There’s no doubt that, by blending the benefits of being both a vibrant business centre and a picturesque place to live, Jersey is certainly ticking the boxes of a growing number of successful businesses, individuals and families.

Get in touch Wayne Gallichan

Director of Inward Investment and International Trade Development T + 44 (0)1534 440604 E w.gallichan@gov.je

Kevin Lemasney Director of High Value Residency

T + 44 (0)1534 440673 M + 44 (0)7797 783457 E k.lemasney@gov.je

locatejersey.com


IN ASSOCIATION WITH

PHOTOGRAPH by blah

EVERY YEAR, WE COMPILE OUR CITY HALL OF FAME – THE FINANCIAL INDUSTRY’S BIGGEST HITTERS. FROM PUNCHY PRETENDERS TO THE ESTABLISHED ELITE, CHECK OUT WHO’S UP, WHO’S DOWN AND WHO’S NOT MADE IT AT ALL PROFILES BY CATHY ADAMS

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KIT MALTHOUSE

Deputy Mayor of London for Business & Enterprise; Chairman, London & Partners Last year: 98

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CLARE WOODMAN

Chief Operating Officer, Morgan Stanley International Last year: 100

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Chairperson, Pension Protection Fund Last year: 99

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CEO, Crossrail New entry

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IAIN ANDERSON

Director and Chief Corporate Counsel, Cicero Consulting Last year: 96

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Co-founder and CIO, Egerton Capital Last year: 95

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Co-founder and CEO, Crowdcube New entry

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SIMON COLLINS

UK Chairman and Senior Partner, KPMG Last year: 93

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PAUL PESTER

CEO, TSB Last year: 90

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Chairman, Shire New entry

90

KATHERINE GARRETT-COX CBE

CEO and CIO, Alliance Trust Last year: 87

89

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Co-founder and CEO, Nutmeg New entry

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Chairman, Land Securities; Non-executive Director of Zurich Insurance Group, Paccar Inc, and The British Library Trust Last year: 77

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Lord Mayor of the City of London Last year: 55

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JOSEPH SCHULL

UK CEO, Warburg Pincus New entry

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FRANCES MURPHY

Head of Corporate Practice, Slaughter & May Last year: 83

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ANDREW TYRIE MP

Chairman, Treasury Select Committee Last year: 82

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MICHAEL AND YOEL ZAOUI

Founding Partners, Zaoui & Co New entry

PHOTOGRAPH by Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

•• HE TRANSFORMED THE EMPTY DOCKLANDS INTO ONE OF THE MOST SUCCESSFUL COMMERCIAL DISTRICTS IN THE WORLD squaremile.com

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GERALD RONSON

CEO, Heron International Last year: 66

81

JAMES LUPTON

Chairman, Greenhill Europe Last year: 79

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ALEX WILMOTSITWELL

79

KURT BJÖRKLUND & TOM LISTER

President for EMEA, Bank of America Merrill Lynch; Director, Merrill Lynch UK Holdings and MBNA Limited Last year: 78

Co-Managing Partners, Permira New entry

78

CRAIG DONALDSON

CEO, Metro Bank Last year: 38

77

JOHN CRIDLAND CBE

76

ZANNY MINTON BEDDOES

75

JAYNE-ANNE GADHIA

Director General, CBI Last year: 75

Editor-in-chief, The Economist New entry

73

SIR GEORGE IACOBESCU CBE CHAIRMAN & CEO, CANARY WHARF GROUP

LAST YEAR: 73

Canary Wharf boss Sir George had a better start to 2015 than most, as he is set to trouser more than £3m from the sale of the Docklands estate to the Qataris. His total potential windfall from the sale of his Songbird shares – the parent company of Canary Wharf Group – comes to just shy of £6m, when the shares he was awarded in 2013 are released. Sir George, who fled Nicolae Ceausescu’s regime in Romania in the 1970s, was one of the main architects of Canary Wharf, transforming the empty Docklands into one of the most successful commercial districts in the world. He remains in management under the new leadership, presiding over Canary Wharf’s eastern expansion into Wood Wharf.

CEO, Virgin Money Last year: 74

74

DAVID HARDING

Founder, Chairman and CEO, Winton Capital Management Last year: 89

73

SIR GEORGE IACOBESCU

Chairman and CEO, Canary Wharf Group Last year: 73

72

PAUL MARSHALL

Co-founder, Chairman & CIO, Marshall Wace Last year: 72

71

JOANNA SHIELDS

Chairman, TechCity, Non-executive Director, London Stock Exchange Last year: 71

70

STEPHANIE FLANDERS

Chief Market Strategist for the UK and Europe, JP Morgan New entry

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ROBERT CHOTE

Chairman of the Office for Budget Responsibility Last year: 69

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MICHAEL PLATT

Founder, Bluecrest Last year: 63

67

ROLLY VAN RAPPARD

Co-Founder, CVC Capital Partners New entry

ICON KEY NEW ENTRY SAME AS 2013 UP FROM 2013 DOWN FROM 2013

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SIR MICHAEL RAKE

President of the CBI, Chairman of BT Group, Deputy Chairman, Barclays PLC Last year: 53

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UK CEO, HANDELSBANKEN

65

NEW ENTRY

You may not have heard of Handelsbanken, but it’s about to thrust itself onto your radar. The bank posted record profits for 2014 as it continues to fold itself into the UK banking landscape. The Swedish retail bank, which currently operates 178 stores in Britain, is one of a new wave of high-street banks that puts customer service and decentralism on a pedestal – African-born Swedish UK chief Bouvin, who has been with Handelsbanken for almost three decades, spends no money on marketing, supports Queen’s Park Rangers and doesn’t award himself a bonus. Next on the agenda? More, more, more. Expect to be seeing a branch popping up outside your office soon.

66

KATHLEEN BACON

Managing Director, HarbourVest Last year: 65

65

ANDERS BOUVIN

UK CEO, Handelsbanken New entry

PHOTOGRAPH by Photo by REX (1140893d)

64

ROBERT ELLIOTT

Senior Partner, Linklaters Last year: 62

63

SIR ALAN PARKER

Chairman, Brunswick; UK Business Ambassador Last year: 61

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62

SIR NICHOLAS MACPHERSON

Permanent Secretary to the Treasury Last year: 60

61

ALEX CHISHOLM

CEO, CMA New entry

60

ANTHONY HABGOOD

Chairman, Court of the Bank of England Last year: 58

59

SIR JON CUNLIFFE

Deputy Governor of the Bank of England, Financial Stability Last year: 57

58

MARK KLEINMAN

City Editor, Sky News Last year: 56

57

MICHAEL HINTZE

Founder, CQS Last year: 52

NEW ENTRY SAME AS 2013 UP FROM 2013 DOWN FROM 2013

BILL SMITH

CEO, Lazard Asset Management UK Last year: 50

Credit Suisse Last year: 51

54

47

LIONEL BARBER

Editor, Financial Times Last year: 49

ANDERS BOUVIN

ICON KEY

53

ROLAND RUDD

Founder and Chairman, RLM Finsbury Last year: 48

52

LORD TIM CLEMENT-JONES

Office Managing Partner (London), DLA Piper International Last year: 47

51

IAN WACE

Co-founder & CEO, Marshall Wace Last year: 33

50

WENJIAN FANG

General Manager, Bank of China London Branch; CEO, Bank of China (UK) Limited. New entry

49

HELENA MORRISSEY

CEO, Newton Investment Management Last year: 46

48

TIDJANE THIAM Incoming CEO,

•• ANDERS BOUVIN SPENDS NO MONEY ON MARKETING, SUPPORTS QUEEN’S PARK RANGERS AND DOESN’T AWARD HIMSELF A BONUS

ANTHONY BROWNE

CEO, British Bankers’ Association Last year: 45

46

RUPERT HARRISON

Chief of Staff to Chancellor of the Exchequer Last year: 44

45

MARTIN GILBERT

CEO, Aberdeen Asset Management Last year: 43

44

ROBERT PESTON

Economics Editor, BBC Last year: 41

43

ARPAD BUSSON

Founder and Chairman, EIM Group; Director, Gottex Fund Management Holdings Ltd Last year: 40

42

NIGEL BOARDMAN

Partner, Slaughter & May; Trustee of the British Museum Last year: 39

41

LORD ROTHSCHILD

Founder and chairman, RIT Capital Partners Last year: 37

40

LIZ BINGHAM

Partner, Ernst & Young Last year: 35

39

BEN BROADBENT

Deputy Governor, Monetary Policy Last year: 34

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PIERRE LAGRANGE

Chairman, Man Asia; Managing Director, Man GLG Last year: 29

31

IAN POWELL

Chairman and Senior Partner, PwC Last year: 21

30

Cabinet Secretary; Head of the Home Civil Service Last year: 13

38

29 28

LAST YEAR: 59

Never one to hold his tongue, the WPP chief has weighed in on some big issues this year: Scottish independence, Nigel Farage’s stance on immigration, as well as voicing concerns on the risk of Britain leaving the EU. Sir Martin, who started advertising behemoth WPP almost three decades ago from a shopping basket firm called Wire and Plastic Products, spent 2014 adding to the company’s own shopping basket – snapping up stakes in firms including Chinese e-commerce firm Polestar and adtech provider AppNexus to name a few. And like a true City boy, this ad man works hard and plays hard. Rumour has it that he was cajoling drinkers at this year’s Davos to down shots with him in a fake igloo.

Group CEO, WPP; Non-executive Director, Formula One, and Alcoa Inc. Last year: 59

37

ANDREA ORCEL

CEO, UBS Last year: 32

ICON KEY NEW ENTRY SAME AS 2013 UP FROM 2013 DOWN FROM 2013

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36

ED MILIBAND

Leader, Labour Party New entry

35

ALEX SNOW

CEO, Lansdowne Partners Last year: 31

34

PETER MARTYR

Global CEO, Norton Rose Fulbright Last year: 30

33

ANDREW BAILEY

CEO, PRA & Deputy Governor, Bank of England Last year: 64

TRACEY McDERMOTT

Executive Board member and Director of Supervision and Authorisations, Financial Conduct Authority Last year: 27

27

JAMES BARDRICK

Country Officer for UK, Citigroup Last year: 26

26

DAVID MORLEY

Worldwide Senior Partner, Allen & Overy Last year: 24

25

COLIN GRASSIE

CEO of the UK, Deutsche Bank Last year: 23

24

EMMANUEL ROMAN

CEO, Man Group Last year: 91

23

BORIS JOHNSON

Woodford Investment Management Last year: 25

20

MATTHEW LAYTON

Managing Partner, Clifford Chance Last year: 19

19

MICHAEL SPENCER

Group CEO and Chairman, ICAP Last year: 16

18

ROSS McEWAN

CEO, RBS Last year: 17

17

DAVID SPROUL

UK CEO and Senior Partner, Deloitte Last year: 18

16

INGA BEALE

CEO, Lloyd’s of London Last year: 15

DAVID SPROUL UK CEO AND SENIOR PARTNER, DELOITTE LAST YEAR: 18 It’s every auditor’s dream to be offered a bigticket brief from a blue-chip company, even when it’s a high-profile unpicking of the £250m black hole in Tesco’s accounts, alongside legal advisers Freshfields. David Sproul, recently re-elected as senior partner and UK CEO of Deloitte until 2019, has had a busy year: amid the day-to-day bluechip audits is a period of upheaval for the big four accountancy firms, which face ongoing reputation issues and regulatory changes. But for Sproul, a former UK managing partner at Enron auditors Arthur Andersen, it should be a walk in the park.

17

Mayor of London Last year: 22

22

MARTIN WHEATLEY

CEO, Financial Conduct Authority Last year: 20

21

NEIL WOODFORD CEO & Founder,

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PHOTOGRAPHS by Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images; Ben Gurr - WPA Pool/ Getty Images

38

MARTIN SORRELL

CRISPIN ODEY

Founder, Odey Asset Management Last year: 28

SIR MARTIN SORRELL GROUP CEO, WPP

SIR JEREMY HEYWOOD

•• RUMOUR HAS IT SIR MARTIN SORRELL WAS CAJOLING DRINKERS AT THIS YEAR’S DAVOS TO DOWN SHOTS WITH HIM IN A FAKE IGLOO


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DR NEMAT SHAFIK DEPUTY GOVERNOR OF THE BANK OF ENGLAND LAST YEAR: 42 Egyptian-born economist Nemat Shafik – described as “candid, loyal and a superb leader” by former boss Christine Lagarde – held a number of highprofile international banking positions before settling into Threadneedle Street as deputy governor in charge of markets and banking. Shafik, known by her nickname Minouche, is one of a select few women ever to sit on the Monetary Policy Committee, and her arrival last August signalled a move to appoint more women in senior roles at the Bank of England. That doesn’t mean the most powerful woman in the City has to put up with the Square Mile’s naughty behaviour, though – in particular market manipulation, which she slammed as “outrageous”.

11

15

ED BALLS

SHADOW CHANCELLOR

15

DR NEMAT SHAFIK

Deputy Governor, Markets & Banking, Bank of England Last year: 42

14

RICHARD GNODDE

Co-CEO, Goldman Sachs International Last year: 14

CEO, London Stock Exchange Last year: 12

MARK BOLEAT

Chairman, Policy and Resources Committee, City of London Corporation Last year: 11

11

ED BALLS

Shadow Chancellor Last year: 36

10

ANA BOTÍN

Chairman, Santander; Non-executive Director, Coca-Cola Last year: 10

•• BALLS IS STILL BEST KNOWN FOR SENDING A TWEET OF HIS OWN NAME, INSTEAD OF TYPING IT INTO THE SEARCH 070

Depending on the outcome of the general election, Ed Balls could soon be parachuted into 11 Downing Street as the new chancellor. He’s one of the most experienced business figures in Parliament, with stints as a lead economic writer for the FT, as an adviser to then-prime minister Gordon Brown and as economic adviser to the Treasury under his belt. If Labour comes to power next month, expect the restoration of the 50p tax rate, a crackdown on tax avoidance and the dreaded mansion tax. But despite being a senior – and well-respected – politician, Balls is probably still best known for sending a Tweet of his own name in 2011, rather than typing it into the search box. ‘Ed Balls Day’ is now celebrated in the Twittersphere on 28 April every year.

9

STUART GULLIVER

Group CEO, HSBC Last year: 4

8

DAVID CAMERON

Prime Minister Last year: 8

7

ANTONY JENKINS

Group CEO, Barclays Last year: 7

6

DANIEL PINTO CEO of CIB and Head

of EMEA and Member of Operating Committee, JPMorgan Chase & Co. Last year: 6

5

CHARLOTTE HOGG

COO, Bank of England Last year: 5

4

MICHAEL SHERWOOD

Vice Chairman of Goldman Sachs; Co-CEO, Goldman Sachs International Last year: 3

3

GEORGE OSBORNE

Chancellor of the Exchequer Last year: 2

2

MARK CARNEY

Govenor of the Bank of England Last year: 1

1

ANTÓNIO HORTA-OSÓRIO

Group CEO, Lloyds Banking Group Last year: 9

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PHOTOGRAPHS by Simon Dawson; Matthew Lloyd/ Bloomberg via Getty Images

13

XAVIER ROLET

12

LAST YEAR: 36


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OUR NUMBER ONE SPOT GOES TO LLOYDS BANK CEO ANTÓNIO HORTA-OSÓRIO WHO HAS NOW BECOME ABOUT THE MOST EMPLOYABLE MAN IN THE CITY

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PHOTOGRAPH by Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images

T’S NOT EVERY day you find one of the Square Mile’s top bankers hovering in the upper rungs of a GQ best-dressed list (and voted the sixth best-dressed man in business, beating the Dunhill chief and the general manager of Claridge’s no less). But then António HortaOsório is no fusty old bank chief. Rather, the boss of Lloyds Banking Group and current City darling is the – tanned, Mediterranean, wrinkle-free – face of modern banking. You may think Horta-Osório is a bold choice for the top spot in the third incarnation of our Power 100, effectively labelling him the most powerful man in the City. You’d be right – but there’s much to laud about this Gresham Street-based chief executive. He is enjoying an ‘I told you so’ moment after announcing good results for 2014, and is taking home £11.5m in pay and share bonuses for his troubles. In the past four years, the keen tennis player and scuba diver has presided over a turnaround at the state-owned lender, and finally, at the end of February, kicked off a nominal 0.75p a share dividend as the bank swung back to profit – returning £130m back to taxpayers, and making finance hacks crow into the column inches. He’s top of the City’s capricious food chain right now, but his tenure hasn’t all been plain sailing – so we go back to school and suss out his strongest subjects. squaremile.com


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MATHS The numbers have finally started to add up for Horta-Osório. When he took over as Lloyds chief executive in 2011 from American Eric Daniels, Lloyds was floundering post-HBOS deal with billions of bad debt and questions over its ability to recover to health. Four years on, its financial landscape couldn’t be more different: Lloyds posted a pre-tax profit of £1.8bn for 2014, a fourfold increase on the previous year – leading to the reinstatement of a 0.75p per share dividend, worth £535m to the bank’s army of beleaguered shareholders. Core capital is also up: the bank’s core tier-one ratio, which measures its financial strength, is up to 12.8%, putting it above other UK banks. That said, Horta-Osório shouldn’t put away his graph paper and protractor just yet. Lloyds is still being hammered by one-off provisions for loan insurance mis-selling, and questions over its ruthless in-store sales culture remain. Solid effort. A-

•• THERE’S A FACEBOOK PAGE IN HIS HONOUR. WE’RE YET TO SEE HIM ON SNAPCHAT, BUT COMMEND HIS EFFORTS organisation, and pushing it back towards its origins as a UK and customer-focused bank – easy rhetoric, maybe, when the British public still holds almost 24% of share capital. He’s keen to endorse Lloyds’ ‘Help Britain Prosper’ plan – which includes commitments to helping UK customers get on the housing ladder, SME investment as well as promoting retirement saving. It’s an arresting pledge that has as much political appeal as it does economic. Top of the class. A+

GEOGRAPHY

CURRICULUM VITAE EDUCATION + Management & Business Administration, Catholic University of Portugal, Lisbon + MBA, INSEAD + Advanced Management Program, Harvard Business School WORK + 1987-1990: Head of capital markets, CitiBank Portugal + 1991-1993: Corporate finance, Goldman Sachs in New York and London + 1993-1996: CEO, Banco Santander de Negócios, Portugal + 1996-1999: CEO, Banco Santander Brazil + 2000-2006: CEO, Banco Santander Totta, Portugal + 2006-2010: CEO, Abbey National, then Santander UK + 2011-present: Executive director, then CEO, Lloyds Banking Group

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One of Horta-Osório’s key achievements over four years of holding the reins of the Black Horse bank has been to slim it down to focus on domestic lending. The Portuguese banker has repeatedly spoken of his wish to trim the bank’s international ambitions and make it a “UK-focused retail and commercial bank”, and as a result has pulled out of many international markets – today, it operates in six, down from 30 five years ago. So Lloyds is on its way to being a high-street stalwart once again. Or maybe not – under the divestment plan, Lloyds spun off retail bank TSB (now run by Paul Pester, rather lower down in our list), but also announced plans to axe thousands of jobs and close branches as the bank moves towards digitising the business. Some things to work on. B

LANGUAGES Not only does the City alpha male speak six languages (thank work stints in Brazil and New York for that), but Horta-Osório is also not at all afraid to say what needs to be said – a useful skill when turning around an ailing bank. He sent a strong message to the rest of the City when in 2011 he was signed off sick after suffering from insomnia. He soon bounced back, though, with Lloyds chairman Sir Win Bischoff adding that he was “bushy tailed” at the thought of getting back into the office. We’ll give him extra marks for his levels of self-awareness and enthusiasm. The urbane Horta-Osório likes to lead by example. He has been an outspoken advocate of shifting Lloyds away from being a bloated

ICT Horta-Osório has embraced the digital revolution, committing £1bn over the next three years to taking the bank and its customers online. At the end of last year, Lloyds’ active mobile users jumped 29% annually, and more than 10.4 million customers actively use the online banking platform, in spite of a muted backlash at branch closures. There’s even a Facebook fan page in HortaOsório’s honour, though at the time of press he only had 759 likes. We’re yet to see him on Snapchat, but commend his digital efforts. Work in progress. B+

OVERALL Considering his four-year tenure has essentially comprised one giant to-do list, there’s no “must do better” finger wagging for Horta-Osório. Lloyds’ shares are up by almost 30% since he joined as chief executive in March 2011, the dividend has been reinstated and he’s pulled Britain’s biggest lender, kicking and screaming, back to profit. It’s perhaps no surprise then that he was voted ‘the most impressive CEO in financial services’ in an Ipsus MORI poll of British finance journalists. Having been touted as a replacement for Peter Sands at Standard Chartered earlier this year, he’s clearly hot property right now. But there’s still more work for him to do at Lloyds: for starters, moving the bank back to private ownership and securing it a clean bill of health. Given his track record, we wouldn’t bet against him. Excellent job. A ■

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Mark Carney

Bob Diamond

Paul Flowers

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A IN THE CITY GERAINT ANDERSON, AKA CITYBOY, ROUNDS UP THE

SQUARE MILE’S SPECTRUM OF PERSONALITIES FROM THE PAST 10 YEARS. IT AIN’T TOO PRETTY

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ILLUSTRATIONS by Mark Boardman

HEN THINKING ABOUT the good, the bad and the ugly characters and corporations that have made their mark on the City since this fine magazine first appeared ten years ago, I can’t help but think of Clint Eastwood, Lee Van Cleef and that excitable Mexican fella who starred in Sergio Leone’s classic western of the same name.

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But what always confused me about the film is that none of the three chaps were actually ‘good’. They were just different degrees of nasty – with badass Clint merely being the least despicable of the lot. And maybe that’s appropriate when trying to find ‘good’ guys from a decade in finance that has been tarnished by scandal, corruption and excess. ➤

see more on

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Heirloom 1932 Collection

88-90 HATTON GARDEN LONDON EC1N 8PN

SavvyandSand.com

TELEPHONE: 020 7242 6485


FEATURES

THE GOOD

Trying to find financial folk who come out of the past decade smelling of roses is a bit like trying to locate Italian war heroes, Scottish philanthropists, German humourists or all the other subjects of those ‘shortest books in the world’. Still, bearing that in mind, here are some high-flying players who, at the very least, were ‘less despicable’ than their peers.

MARK CARNEY Bad boy ‘Marky Mark’ did such as good job as governor of the Bank of Canada, shielding his country from the worst effects of the financial crisis that the Bank of England decided to end their 300-year-old Buy British policy and nicked him. Carney’s performance since his appointment in 2013 has been rock solid and has highlighted the sheer incompetence exhibited by his predecessors at the Bank of England. So far, so bleeding good.

NOURIEL ROUBINI AKA DR DOOM Many chancers claim they predicted the financial crisis but, like the number of East Enders who said they were in the Blind Beggar when Ronnie Kray shot George Cornell, you have to divide the number by 500 to find the truth. However, Dr Doom is one of few economists who genuinely predicted the banking disaster and its specific causes.

THE GEEZER WHO INVENTED PPI Where would Britain be without payment protection insurance? Granted, my phone would not be getting bombarded by inane prerecorded messages (the only landline calls I now receive in this world of mobile telephony) while I’m settling down to Sunday lunch. But how would the British economy have survived the credit crunch without the billions that have been handed out by banks who mis-sold these policies? I have no doubt every major retailer would have gone the way of Woolworths if the genius who invented PPI had stuck to conning pensioners out of life insurance or whatever scam it was he or she used to indulge in.

Robert Peston NEIL WOODFORD

BOB DIAMOND

Over my 12-year career I broked to a bunch of buy-side comedians who, after sniffly trips to the bogs, would shout at me about their ‘long-term performance’. In reality, consistent year-in year-out market outperformance is rarer than rocking-horse shit, but investment manager Woodford can’t help but deliver a low-risk 12%pa. The queen was so impressed with her returns she gave him a CBE.

Bob’s reputation as a dubious character was cemented when he was referred to as ‘the unacceptable face of banking’ by the notorious paragon of virtue Peter Mandelson (though his chief gripe seemed to be that the Barclays CEO earned shedloads of cash). The reason he makes this list is because of his unwavering lack of modesty, his somewhat premature pronouncement in 2011 that banks’ “period for remorse and apology needs to be over” – and the rather unfortunate subsequent revelations about his bank’s role in the Libor manipulation scandal while he was running the show.

ROBERT PESTON Luck is when preparation meets opportunity. And that cliché was never truer than when Bobby P (as he’s known in West Coast hip-hop circles) became the business editor for BBC News in February 2006, just before the smelly stuff hit the fan. He held Ordinary Joe’s hand as the world moved from crisis to crisis in the years following his appointment and told us about fun things such as collateralised debt obligations and credit default swaps. But more importantly than that, he spoke to us with such absurd intonations that it was impossible not to find everything he said hilarious. Thus, he made the credit crunch seem quite amusing and, arguably, in so doing, single-handedly dragged us out of recession.

THE BAD If I find a short-seller, I want to tear his heart out and eat it before his eyes while he’s still alive squaremile.com

There’s a fine line between being bad and ugly, but an important one. In The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, the ironically named Angel Eyes (aka the ‘Bad’) was a sadistic psychopath; the ‘Ugly’ was merely an amoral, oafish bandit who was prepared to kill to get what he wanted. Similarly, I think our chosen banking bad guys should exhibit genuinely vicious personalities while ugly financiers should be more clumsy than ruthless.

DICK ‘THE GORILLA’ FULD Surely one of the most nefarious sociopaths ever to enter the Square Mile (and the competition is pretty stiff) was the former Lehman CEO, aka the Gorilla. Anyone who has seen the sinister speech in which he declared that “when I find a short-seller, I want to tear his heart out and eat it before his eyes while he’s still alive,” can have no doubt that he was a mouthpiece for Beelzebub’s anal venting. And if anyone retained doubts, his willingness to blame everyone but himself for his bank’s demise when grilled by Congress shows the kind of remorseless modus operandi that Hannibal Lecter would steer clear of.

FRED ‘THE SHRED’ GOODWIN While no match for the ‘Gorilla’, our very own home-grown nutjob the ‘Shred’ showed some fairly brutal character traits. Fred was known as the ‘Shred’ because of his unerring ability to remove whole swathes of his workforce (while never ceasing to up his own salary) but he really came into his own in late 2007 with the truly insane purchase of ABN Amro just as the financial crisis was ➤

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FEATURES

It takes buffoonery on a biblical scale to engineer the first run on a British bank for 100 years ➤ hotting up. Fred’s arrogance was legendary, as was his willingness to spend vast sums of his shareholders’ money on fripperies such as celebrity endorsements (£200m) and a spanking-new HQ (£350m). Fred would eventually became the most-hated banker in Britain – an impressive feat in anyone’s book.

to understand exactly why he’s on this list (though his connection to City is admittedly a little tenuous). Black’s unbelievable life of luxury and excess was only rivalled by that of his wife Barbara, who had a penchant for gold-plated loos and was said to own hundreds of pairs of Manolo Blahnik shoes. The 2007 US conviction of the former head of Hollinger International for fraud and his six-and-a-half year prison sentence were apparently welcomed by anyone who had ever spent more than three seconds in this odious man’s company.

CONRAD BLACK It only takes a momentary glance at the photo of Baron Black of Crossharbour dressed up as the power-crazed Cardinal Richelieu

MervynKing

A fair number of the problems this country faced when the credit crunch rolled into town can be laid squarely at the feet of the former head of Northern Rock. It takes buffoonery on a biblical scale to engineer the first run on a British bank for more than 100 years. But, once again, it is our hero’s inability to face up to responsibility that helped secure his place on this list. Such was Applegarth’s rabbit-inthe-headlights befuddlement during those dark days, you almost felt sorry for the man.

GORDON BROWN

THE UGLY

The unfortunate members of this final group are more incompetent than outright insidious – rather more foolish than foul…

BERNIE MADOFF Dearest Bernie must surely sit astride the top of anyone’s list of the baddest financial scoundrels like a colossus – mocking wannabes like Kerviel and Leeson. Fuelled by cocaine and an ego of biblical proportion, Bernie made off with $65bn from the good and the great of America by using an old-school Ponzi scheme. The fact that for so long no-one questioned his impossibly consistent returns and became suspicious of this schoolboy scam until it was too late reminds us once again that in the world of finance, just like in Hollywood, ‘nobody knows anything’.

ADAM APPLEGARTH

PAUL FLOWERS Of all the financial dingbats to have graced the headlines over the past decade none come more absurd than the ‘Crystal Methodist’. Here was a middle-aged portly church minister and chairman of the so-called ‘ethical’ Co-operative Bank who was caught red-handed buying not just cocaine (a fairly common drug) but crystal meth – a hideously addictive and destructive stimulant that destroys lives. But not only was this pillar of the community a hypocritical drug addict, he also exhibited an ignorance of the company he supposedly ran that was truly breathtaking on many levels. Indeed, when he was asked by a Parliamentary committee what his bank’s assets were, he managed to get the answer wrong by a factor of 16. What a muppet.

The rise and fall of Gordon Brown will surely come to be seen as one of the most tragic tales in modern political history. The hyperambitious politician finally achieved his goal of becoming PM, only for the crisis that he helped engender when chancellor to bring his world crashing down around him. This Machiavellian schemer who believed he’d personally ended boom and bust may claim his policy response to the crisis ‘saved the world’, but he will forever be seen as the loser who helped get us into trouble in the first place.

MERVYN KING I’m sorry to include the ex-governor of the Bank of England on this list because he seems like a nice enough chap, but he is also, without doubt, a bit of a numpty. His extraordinary unwillingness to tackle the housing bubble in the mid-2000s (together with his compadre across the pond, Alan Greenspan) helped ensure that the ensuing financial crisis was deep and long. The release of documents in January 2015 have revealed that Mervyn and his mates at the Bank of England didn’t have any inclination of the impending disaster that was facing them. Nostradamus he ain’t.

THE FINANCIAL SERVICES AUTHORITY The FSA was not a malicious organisation, but a pointless one. It was formed in 1997 and, despite its head John Tiner declaring in 2007 that insider trading was rife, never secured a single conviction for said crime during its first ten years. The City regulator consistently failed to notice numerous other examples of financial wrongdoing (Libor manipulation, money laundering, etc) and flailed around like a teenager on ketamine when the financial crisis kicked in. It’s no surprise that the FSA was abolished in 2013 leaving a legacy as impressive as Eddie the Eagle’s. ■ Do you agree with Geraint’s list? Please email us your candidates for ‘the good, the bad and the ugly’ who made their mark on the Square Mile over the past ten years to letters@squaremile.com.

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THE CITY’S MOST ELIGIBLE BACHELOR WHOEVER SAID ALL THE GOOD ONES ARE TAKEN WAS CLEARLY TELLING PORKIES. CITY GENT JAMES BIAGIONI IS SINGLE – AND HE’S VERY DATEABLE INDEED, SAYS ABY DUNSBY

ILLUSTRATION by publinc larit em potinium vid ces blah

PHOTOGRAPHY: DAVID HARRISON GROOMING: FAREEN TEJANI

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ADIES OF LONDON: we’re about to make your day. We’ve found a 27-year-old City trader who’s single and available. We’re too good to you, we know. Better still – unlike the swathes of City lads that sway on the floor of Forge on a Friday night, James Biagioni is actually dateable. So dateable, in fact, that he’s been crowned the City’s Most Eligible Bachelor. And it’s not hard to see why. When he saunters into our south London studio for our photo shoot – chiselled, gleaming smile and coiffed locks – it’s hard to imagine that half-Italian James would struggle to impress the opposite sex. Not only does he look like a young Bradley Cooper (“I get that all the time,” he chuckles with a knowing look), but he’s also smart, funny and charismatic. Admittedly, he’s chosen those adjectives himself – they are the personal qualities he

THE TOP LINE DIGS: East London WHEELS: Mini Cooper S DINNER TIME: City Social DRINKING HOLE: Coq D’Argent SUIT OF CHOICE: Tom Ford WEEKEND WARDROBE: I like the casual look – an Oxford button-down shirt from Gieves & Hawkes, jeans by Dior, a sports watch from my Panerai collection and a pair of boots from Hostem.

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submitted for the City’s Most Eligible Bachelor competition, run in association with offline dating service Social Concierge. So no, he might not be the most modest of men, but luckily this charming Jack the Lad doesn’t take himself too seriously, either. “You’ve got to have a laugh in life, haven’t you?” he tells me in a strong East London accent. I ask if entering the competition was a laugh, too? “I was put forward by three guys at work”, he admits. “They said, ‘There’s this thing called ‘eligible bachelor’. We’re putting you in, pretty boy.’ I was like, ‘Oh, whatever. Just stick me in.’ I never thought I’d win.” Biagioni tells me he was so busy with work that he didn’t realise he’d got through to the next round, missing an Evening Standard photo shoot with the competition contestants. “I went into work on the day of the finalist’s party, checked my email, and found out I’d won it. It was all a bit of a surprise. It was nice to know that Nana [Wereko-Brobby, founder of Social Concierge] said it was because of the way I answered certain questions.” Aside from those killer cheekbones, Wereko-Brobby told Biagioni it was his fresh approach to women that won him the title. “I look for a laid-back attitude and approach to life, and a curvy figure – that’s important,” Biagioni tells me. “She’s got to be independent and have good sense of humour, too.” Since he’s been named the City’s finest catch, has he been inundated with numbers and date requests? “That’s life’s greatest problem, isn’t it, balancing pleasure and work?” he muses. “I have been asked on a few dates but I’ve been very busy with work, so I haven’t actually had the chance to act upon them. I work silly hours.” James works for a proprietary trading company in Tower 42, communicating with markets around the world, so he often works through the night. Yet surprisingly, he says that’s not the worst thing about his job. That dubious honour goes to the Central line in the mornings: “It got so bad that I drive to work.” So where would he take his ideal date? “I like City Social,” he says. “They’ve had a lot of money off me over the years: I might have been driving a Ferrari instead of a Mini if I hadn’t been going up there so much,” he laughs. “It’s nice and relaxed in there, so that’s an ideal opportunity to get to know someone.” If that someone were a celebrity, she’d be Sofía Vergara from US TV show, Modern Family. “She’s unbelievable. Wow,” Biagioni gushes. “If she reads this… well…” Don’t worry, James. Her copy’s in the post. Girls might want to date Biagioni, but guys would want him as a mate. During his photo

•• WHAT WAS MY WORST DATE? FINDING OUT THAT A JANE WAS ACTUALLY A JOHN. NEXT QUESTION… shoot, he jokes around with his childhood friend Jason, laughs at some of the shots – “I look like a right toff in that one” – chats about his love of poker and going to the gym, and shows us an Instagram profile that he’s created for his dog. As the banter levels soar, I manage to bring the conversation away from Vergara and her impending marriage, to ask him about how dating has changed lately. “Back when I first started going out, say 13 years ago, you had to get the home telephone number of the girl you met in your local club, get past the protective father on the phone and then arrange to meet up. Now it’s pick up your iPhone, log onto your dating app, search within two kilometres and away you go.” So aside from making the modern man more lazy, are dating apps a bad thing? “Not necessarily, but it depends what you’re looking for. It gives you greater accessibility to women, and women to men, so you can filter out people that you don’t like. You can end up finding the person you do connect with a lot quicker than you would normally. Although saying that, I’ve been on Tinder and it wasn’t any use to me, really.” Does this mean that the City’s Most Eligible Bachelor has had some bad dates, like the rest of us? Apparently so. “My worst experience was finding out that Jane was actually John,” he laughs. “Too many cocktails at City Social. Next question, please.” Sadly, we’d have to track down John to find out how that date ended, as Biagioni refuses to divulge further. But on the subject of bad dates, he continues: “My biggest turn-offs are fake tan, fake eyelashes and clip-in hair extensions. There’s nothing worse than seeing a hair extension hanging off. Or one falling into your Caesar salad.” If your extensions are glued in securely, and you fancy meeting the most eligible man in town, we’ve got a sneaking suspicion you should head to City Social. If your name’s John, wait until he’s had a few more Old Fashioneds before you go and say hi. ■ For more information, visit socialconcierge.co.uk

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DOUBLE TROUBLE: Double-breasted pin-stripe suit, Casely Hayford, ÂŁPOA, Hostem store, 41-43 Redchurch Street, London E2 7DJ, 020 7739 9733; hostem.co.uk

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ONE HUNDRED

IT’S A BIG NUMBER. AT LEAST, IT IS IN THE MAGAZINE PUBLISHING WORLD. MARK HEDLEY LOOKS BACK OVER HIS HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE PAST 100 ISSUES OF SQUARE MILE – ALL 12,632 PAGES OF THEM

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PHOTOGRAPHY (MAIN SHOTS) by David Harrison

There are no shortcuts. There is no magic NICOLA HORLICK, Newton Investment Management, on success in the City S QU A R E MIL E , IS S U E 1 ( AUG 2005) [ E DITO R A N D E D IT O R IA L DI RECTOR M A RK H E D L E Y’S 1 S T ISSUE. HE J OI NED T H E E D IT O R IA L T E A M OF THREE AS D E P U TY E D IT O R A N D IN THE FI RST W EEKS H A D A C A R D B O A R D B O X FOR A DESK AND H A D T O F IG H T F O R A P HONE LI NE]

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WON’T GET TO make an Oscars speech. Sadly, the height of my acting career was in the school nativity play when I played a tree – yes, a tree. So, here goes: I’d like to thank… Stephen Murphy and Tim Slee – the two chaps who came up with the whole idea in the first place. I could write an entire essay on the latter, but here’s not the place. Matt Guarente and Martin Deeson – my two predecessors and mentors. Jon Hawkins – a superb lieutenant and wise head. As for the magazine’s slick looks, that’s down to Matt Hasteley and his superb design team. All those sexy ads – that’s Mike Berrett and Alex Watson in action. Even our FD Steve Cole deserves a mention for ensuring we all still have jobs. There are many others to thank, but Matt has only given me this tiny body of text so, er, sorry. Anyway, over these 13 pages, I take a look back at the wit and wisdom from the past 100 issues. Enjoy.

•• It’s one of London’s greatest strengths: daft and anachronistic eccentricities happening side-byside with cuttingedge technology JANE CARRUTHERS, on the idiosyncrasies of the City S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 2 (SEP 2005)

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GRAFF DIAMONDS: Yup – those are all real diamonds. Considerably more than 100 of them. Read our exclusive interview with Graff’s CEO on p57.

•• A HUGE DEBT OF GRATITUDE IS OWED TO THE BANKING FRATERNITY IN THE POSTWORLD-WAR ERA FOR THEIR CONTRIBUTION IN REBUILDING UK PLC’S BUSINESS INFRASTRUCTURE AS WELL AS TO THE EXPANSION OF INTERNATIONAL TRADE

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I am looking forward to letting rip with the 800bhp of my Panzer 68 tank MICHAEL SAVORY, then Lord Mayor of the City of London, on driving his favourite tank S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 4 ( N OV 2 0 0 5 )

DAVID BUIK, then Marketing Director, Cantor Index, on City history

•• IF I WORKED IN THE CITY, I’D DRIVE THE NEW TOP-OFTHE-RANGE RANGE ROVER AUTOBIOGRAPHY, BECAUSE NOT MANY CITY TYPES HAVE IT – AND I’D WANT TO BE THE FIRST BROKER WITH ONE

S QU A R E MILE , IS S U E 3 ( OCT 2005)

JAY KAY, Jamiroquai, on cars S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 5 ( DE C /J A N 2 0 0 5 )

•• THE FSA IS THE LEAST POPULAR REGULATOR IN THE WORLD. EXCEPT FOR ALL THE OTHERS SIR HOWARD DAVIES, former chairman of the FSA, on its creation S QU A R E MIL E, I S S UE 6 (F EB 2006)

•• YOU JUST DON’T REALISE YOU’RE HEADING FOR A BEAR MARKET UNTIL YOU’RE RIGHT IN IT MARTIN GILBERT, CEO, Aberdeen Asset Management, on the split-caps debacle S QU AR E MIL E, I S S U E 7 (MAR 2006)

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•• I find it incredible that insurance has a reputation for being boring ROBERT HISCOX, chairman of Hiscox, defends his industry S Q U A R E MILE , ISSUE 8 ( APR 2006)

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EVERYTHING HAS CHANGED. BACK THEN, FOOD WAS ONE OF THE LEAST IMPORTANT PARTS OF PEOPLE’S LIVES. BUT NOW ATTITUDES HAVE COMPLETELY ALTERED. NEVER HAVE THE BRITISH EATEN SO MUCH GARLIC RAYMOND BLANC, on changing attitudes to food S QU A R E MIL E , IS S U E 10 ( J UN 2006)

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WE LIKE TO TALK ABOUT SUCCESS, RATHER THAN MONEY

PERRY LITTLEBOY, marketing director, Coutts, on client management SQUARE M I LE , I SSUE 9 ( M AY 2 0 0 6 )

DOLCE & GABBANA: Domenico Dolce and Stefano Gabbana aren’t exactly renowned for holding back when it comes to their fashion or their politics. There’s no questionning the quality of their clothes: check out our shoot on p132.

CHAPLINS: Interior design specialist Chaplins went to town on its Ameno Entertainment System by Spectral for this message. We asked how much it would cost for the real thing; they said we couldn’t afford it.

•• AT WORK, I USED TO OBSESS CONSTANTLY ABOUT BOND PRICES – NOW, I OBSESS CONSTANTLY ABOUT BOAT SPEED INSTEAD JOE MULVEY, Barclays Capital, on jacking in the City to join the Clipper Round the World Yacht race S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 1 2 (SEP 2006)

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PHOTOGRAPH by Steffen Jahn

CROWDS OF ENVIOUS SCHOOL KIDS STOOD NEXT TO ADMIRING HEDGE FUND MANAGERS: ALL WERE EQUALLY MESMERISED

•• SO MANY POLITICIANS JUST CANNOT RESIST THE URGE TO SPEND MORE OF YOUR MONEY FOR YOU, SAFE IN THE KNOWLEDGE THEY KNOW BETTER THAN YOU DO WHAT YOU WANT TO SPEND IT ON

MARK HEDLEY, on driving the Maserati Gransport from St James’s Square to Silverstone race circuit under a police escort

RT HON JOHN REDWOOD MP, on the decline in public services

S QU A R E MIL E , IS S U E 11 ( J UL/AUG 2006)

S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 1 3 ( OC T 2 0 0 6 )

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•• IN REGARD TO THE ENGLISH, IT’S A LOVE/HATE RELATIONSHIP: I LOVE THEM; THEY HATE ME SHANE WARNE, ahead of the 2006 Ashes S Q U AR E MIL E, I SSU E 14 (N O V 2006)

•• ANAL SEX AND CRACK COCAINE! FELIX DENNIS, on the subjects he suggested to a Radio 4 producer when she asked him to talk about something her listeners wouldn’t have heard before S Q U AR E MIL E, I SSU E 15 ( D EC/ J AN 2006/ 2007)

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•• We won’t make society better by pulling down those who are doing well GEORGE OSBORNE, on holding back from meddling with City bonus pools S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 1 8 ( A P R 2007)

•• We’re unlikely to get a period like that again in our lifetimes. It’s too fresh in anyone’s mind to let it happen again PAUL KILLIK, on 2000’s dot-com meltdown, 16 months before Lehman Bros collapsed S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 1 9 ( M AY 2 007)

CARAN D’ACHE: “From a 100-year-old to a 100-issue-old” – well said Caran D’Ache, which celebrates its own significant anniversary next year. This Caviar Fountain Pen in brass and lacquer retails for £625.

•• They could no more lay their hands on £20 than I could afford Roman Abramovich’s latest yacht JOHN HUMPHRYS, TV presenter, on the global wealth divide S Q U A RE MILE , IS S U E 1 6 (FEB 2007)

HARRY WINSTON: Thanks to the New York jewellery and watch house for its kind words of support. Harry Winston impressed at this year’s Baselworld. Check out p26 for more.

•• SURE, I’D BE ABLE TO BEAT TONY BLAIR IN A RACE ALASTAIR CAMPBELL, on fitness and politics S QU A RE M I LE , ISSUE 17 (MAR 2007)

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MIKE BOWRON, then commissioner, City of London Police

MOZ FABRIS, then CEO, Enigma Trading

DO WE HAVE A DRUG PROBLEM IN THE CITY? NO – BECAUSE YOU ALL TURN UP FOR WORK ON A MONDAY

S QU A RE M I LE , ISSUE 20 (JUNE 2007)

THERE WAS A TIME IN MY CAREER WHEN I TOOK WAY TOO MANY RISKS – WHICH I DON’T TAKE ON THE TRACK. IF I WERE 22 AND RACING CARS, I’D BE IN ALL SORTS OF TROUBLE

S QU A R E MIL E, I S S UE 21 (AU G 2007)

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BREMONT: Talk about going the extra mile: Bremont made us our own personalised anniversary edition of the Bremont ALT1-C/PW in polished stainless steel on the alligator strap. A standard example would set you back £4,495.

MB&F: Thanks to Maximilian Büsser and his many friends for their kind message. We’re big fans of MB&F’s seemingly endless well of creativity. This year, MB&F also enjoys its tenth anniversary. And like us, the company might have grown up a bit, but it’s still a big kid at heart – it even made a crazy mechanical robot clock to celebrate the milestone.

•• I HAVEN’T DONE ANYTHING THAT’S GOING TO BRING WORLD PEACE, BUT I HAVE MADE A LOT OF PEOPLE VERY HAPPY JAMES BROWN, founder of Loaded, on his career in publishing S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 2 3 ( OC T 2 0 0 7 )

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•• YEARS AGO, I REMEMBER BEING BLASTED BY THE LONDON OFFICE FOR BUYING A FAX MACHINE. THEY SAID IT WOULD BE A COMPLETE WASTE OF MONEY AS I WOULD BE THE ONLY PERSON WHO HAD ONE WAYNE LOCHNER, founder of Betbrokers, on being an early adopter of ‘modern’ technology SQUARE M I LE, I SSUE 22 ( SEPT 2 0 0 7 )

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I DON’T ASK THE CITY FOR MONEY. I JUST FEED THE CITY MARCO PIERRE WHITE, on his relationship with the banking community S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 2 4 ( N OV 2 0 0 7 ) [THE LEGENDARY MARTIN DEESON TAKES OVER AS EDITOR]

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I WANT TO GO DOWN AS ONE OF THE GREATEST FIGHTERS BRITAIN’S EVER HAD JOE CALZAGHE, boxer, on his career aspirations S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 2 6 ( FE B 2 0 0 8 ) [ A RT DI RE C TOR M ATTH E W H A S TE LE Y’S 1ST ISSUE; HE J OI N E D A S A RT E DI TOR W I TH A FU LL( I S H ) H E A D OF H A I R]

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YOU WON’T FIND ME ON A REALITY TV SHOW. NOR WILL YOU FIND ME GETTING MY KIT OFF FOR MEN’S MAGAZINES EVERY FIVE MINUTES GEORGIE THOMPSON, on her career choices S Q U AR E MIL E, I SSU E 28 (APR 2008)

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MECHANISMS ARE NO GOOD WHATSOEVER IF THEY DON’T MAKE US WANT TO STROKE, TOUCH, FONDLE, FIDDLE, GURGLE, PURR AND COO STEPHEN FRY, on his love of gadgets S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 2 5 ( DE C 2 0 0 7 )

•• THE CITY OF LONDON WASN’T MADE RICH BY THE ACTIVITIES OF POLITICIANS; IT WAS BY THE GENIUS, ENERGY, AND ENTERPRISE OF THE PEOPLE WHO WORK IN IT BORIS JOHNSON, in support of the City S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 2 7 ( MAR 2008)

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•• DUE TO ITS NAME, THE GOODWOOD FESTIVAL OF SPEED INEVITABLY ALWAYS ATTRACTS A FAIR NUMBER OF DISAPPOINTED AMPHETAMINE ADDICTS RICHARD MACKNEY, Guide to the Season S Q U A R E MILE , IS S U E 29 ( M AY 2008)

•• THE WAY I LIKE TO DRINK WINE IS INVITE OZ CLARKE AROUND AND I’LL SAY, ‘I’LL MAKE PIE AND PEAS, IF YOU’LL BRING A BOTTLE.’ HE INEVITABLY TURNS UP WITH SOMETHING FANTASTIC JAMES MAY, on developing a taste for – and tactics for acquiring – fine wine SQUARE M I LE , I S S U E 3 2 ( S E P T 2 0 0 8 )

•• IN BUSINESS, PEOPLE LOOK AT IT AS A BATTLE, SO WAR ANALOGIES REALLY WORK ANDY McNAB, former Special Air Service (SAS) sergeant and author, on the similarities between being a soldier and being in the City SQUARE M I LE , I S S U E 3 3 ( OC T 2 0 0 8 )

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SOME WORKS OF ART AREN’T ANY GOOD. YOU’LL SOON GET TO KNOW WHAT THEY ARE – YOU MAY EVEN BUY THEM AT FIRST MATTHEW COLLINGS, TV presenter and art critic, on starting out as an art investor S QU A RE MIL E , I S S U E 3 0 (JU N 2 0 0 8 )

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IN BUSINESS, IF I SEE SOMETHING THAT’S NOT BEING DONE WELL, I’LL SEE IF WE CAN DO IT BETTER RICHARD BRANSON, on expanding his massive empire SQUARE M I LE, I SSUE 31 ( J UL 2008)

DONALD TRUMP, on his ambitious plans for the The Palm Trump International Hotel & Tower in Dubai. The project was officially cancelled in February 2011 S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 3 6 (F EB 2009)

•• IF YOU CAN SHOOT FISH IN A BARREL, WHY GO AND LOOK FOR THEM IN A RIVER SIMON CAWKWELL, the legendary bear trader, on shorting Northern Rock S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 3 7 (MAR 2009)

•• THE CITY OF LONDON WILL COME BACK WITH A ROAR – THERE’S A HUGE AMOUNT OF TALENT HERE ROBERT TAYLOR, then CEO of Kleinwort Benson, on the return of the Square Mile S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 3 8 (APR 2009)

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You never want to have to depend on the kindness of strangers in the financial world WARREN BUFFETT, nuff said SQUARE M I LE , I S S U E 3 4 ( N OV 2 0 0 8 )

PATEK PHILIPPE: We are relative tiddlers compared to Patek, which has just celebrated its 175th anniversary. While we’re just throwing a party for a few hundred of our mates, Patek is bringing it to the next level with its Grand Exhibition taking over the whole Saatchi Gallery from 27 May to 7 June.

S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 3 5 ( DE C 2 0 0 8 )

•• HELL, EVEN USELESS FREELOADING MAGAZINE TYPES LIKE ME LOOK DOWN UPON YOU ALEX BILMES, now editor of Esquire, on the City’s need for an image makeover S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 3 9 ( M AY 2009)

•• I’M PUNCHING MY FISTS IN THE AIR AND THRUSTING MY HIPS OUT! WHEN I WATCH THE HIGHLIGHTS, THE THINGS I DO ARE REALLY EMBARRASSING FREDDIE FLINTOFF, former England cricketer, on seeing his after-match celebrations on TV S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 4 0 ( J U N 2 009)

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PHOTOGRAPH by David Harrison

•• Many of my most inspired investment decisions have come as a result of a strategic lunch ALEX, cartoon, on gaining the upper hand by out-drinking FTSE 100 finance directors

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•• WE’RE BUILDING IN THE MIDDLE OF THE OCEAN. NO ONE HAS SEEN THAT BEFORE


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•• ONE OF THE BIGGEST STRENGTHS OF AN ENTREPRENEUR IS HAVING THE ABILITY TO MAKE MISTAKES GRACEFULLY JAMES CAAN, on being a better entrepreneur S QU A R E MIL E , IS S U E 41 ( AUG 2009)

•• THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FINANCIAL AUTHORITIES AND FINANCIAL MARKETS IS AN ONGOING REFLEXIVE PROCESS. BOTH ACT WITH IMPERFECT KNOWLEDGE, AND BOTH ARE SUBJECT TO THE DISPARITY BETWEEN REALITY AND PERCEPTIONS OF REALITY GEORGE SOROS, on the interplay between markets and authorities S QU A R E MIL E , ISSUE 42 (SEPT 2009)

•• IT’S LIKE A BALANCE SHEET – IF I CAN SEE MORE POSITIVE THAN NEGATIVES, THEN I AM GOING TO PLAY DECENT GOLF MR PORTER: Thanks to the style gurus at Mr Porter – and, by extension, Persol, Montblanc, Berluti, Junghans, Hasselblad, Smythson and Bottega Veneta – for this suitably slick message of support.

JUSTIN ROSE, pro golfer, on mental strength under pressure SQUARE M I LE, I SSUE 43 ( OCT 2009)

•• WE SELL DIAMONDS BECAUSE THEY’RE BEAUTIFUL, BUT IF YOU LOOK AT THEIR PRICE, THEY’VE HELD UP REMARKABLY WELL MICHAEL WAINWRIGHT, managing director of Boodles, on diamond investment S QU A R E MIL E , I S S U E 4 4 (N O V 2 0 0 9 )

•• THE POLITICIANS ARE LOOKING TO NEXT SPRING’S ELECTION AND WE BANKERS ARE JUST TRYING TO GET ONE MORE BONUS UNDER OUR BELTS BEFORE THINGS REALLY GO BELLY UP ALEX, on a shared short-termism

AUTO VIVENDI: the City’s top supercar club took its new Range Rover Vogue Autobiography to the beach to celebrate our 100th issue. Great work.

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SQUARE M I LE , I SSUE 4 5 ( J A N 2010) [ DEPUTY EDI TOR, J ON H AW KI N S J OI NS T H E TE A M A S CI TY EDI TOR A N D I M M EDI ATE LY TA KE S THE CROW N FOR M ESSI ES T DE S K I N THE TE A M ]

•• TIME WAS YOU COULD WALTZ AROUND THE CITY WEARING A SUIT WITH STRIPES WIDER THAN THE M4 AND A LINING SO SCARLET IT WOULD MAKE A BULL MORE CONFUSED THAN ANGRY. NOT ANY MORE JON HAWKINS, on the changing fashions in the City since the recession hit S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 4 6 ( FE B 2 0 1 0 )

•• I ONCE SAID ‘GREED IS GOOD’. NOW IT SEEMS IT’S LEGAL GORDON GEKKO, returning to cinema screens in Oliver Stone’s Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps S QU A RE M I LE , ISSUE 47 (MAR 2010)

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THE REALITY IS WE NEED THE BANKS MORE THAN THEY NEED US NICK ANSTEE, then Lord Mayor, on whether the British public accepts that bankers deserve bonuses S Q U AR E MIL E, I SSU E 48 (APR 2010)

•• AFTER THE SUCCESS MY COMPANY HAS HAD AND OUR ADMINISTRATION HAS HAD, WHY DO YOU THINK I WOULDN’T BE QUALIFIED TO BE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES? MICHAEL BLOOMBERG, on the rumours of him running for President S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 4 9 ( M AY 2 0 1 0 )

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•• MY MESSAGE TO THE GOVERNMENT IS: DON’T OVERREGULATE THE BANKS; DON’T SLAM THE DOOR BORIS JOHNSON, on making sure Britain doesn’t lose its bankers S QU A RE MIL E , I S S U E 5 0 (JU N 2 0 1 0 )

•• A RUGBY WORLD CUP FINAL IS A STROLL IN THE PARK WHEN COMPARED TO WORKING ON THE LIFFE FLOOR WILL GREENWOOD, discussing his life in the City as a trader before becoming a fulltime professional rugby player S Q U A RE MILE , I S S U E 52 (O C T 2 0 1 0 )

GIEVES & HAWKES: The quintessentially British tailoring brand doesn’t just make suits – it can rustle up a mean pair of velvet slippers, too. These SM monogrammed specials would set you back £395. A small price to pay to walk in our shoes for the day, right?

•• IN FIVE YEARS, BRAZIL WILL BE THE WORLD’S FOURTH OR FIFTH LARGEST ECONOMY

•• MY OWN PAGE IS EDITED SOMETIMES, BUT I’M BORING JIMMY WALES, founder of Wikipedia, on the most edited pages on his site S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 5 5 ( FE B 2 011)

CONRADO ENGEL, then CEO of HSBC Bank Brazil, on his home country’s economic growth. It’s currently the 7th. Close, but no cigar.

JM WESTON: A bespoke pair of boots from JM’s Michel Perry.

SQUARE M I LE, I SSUE 51 ( AUG 20 1 0 )

•• THERE HAVE BEEN SOME ORGANISATIONS THAT HAVEN’T HAD THE PERFORMANCE AND THEY SHOULD RIGHTLY BE CALLED ON THE CARPET BOB DIAMOND, on bringing the banks – rather than bankers – to justice SQUARE M I LE, I SSUE 53 ( NOV 2010)

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Heaven forfend that economists should ever agree on things: that would bring the financial system to a halt ALEX, on economic uncertainty SQU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 5 4 ( DE C 2 0 1 0 )

•• A LUXURY BRAND SHOULD NEVER RUSH TORSTEN MÜLLERÖTVÖS, CEO, Rolls-Royce S QU A RE M I LE , ISSUE 56 (MAR 2011)

•• WE SOLD OUR SOULS TO THE CITY BECAUSE THE PIN-STRIPED DEMONS THERE WERE OFFERING THE BEST PRICE GERAINT ANDERSON, aka Cityboy, on escaping the City. Eventually. S QU A RE M I LE , ISSUE 57 (APR 2011)

•• IT’S EXCITING FOR ME TO BE ABLE TO BE IN A BUSINESS WHERE, IF WE ARE SUCCESSFUL, WE ARE DEFINITELY GOING TO BE ABLE TO CHANGE THE WORLD BEN GOLDSMITH, founding partner of WHEB, on ethical venture capitalism S QU A R E MIL E, I S S UE 58 (MAY 2011)

•• WHEN I ARRIVED HERE, I BROUGHT ALL MY PREJUDICES WITH ME: MY DESIGN SCHOOL WAS STRAIGHT ITALIAN ANGELO GALASSO, designer, on London S QU A R E MIL E, I S S UE 59 (J U N 2011)

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•• BRITAIN IS ALSO A VERY RESILIENT COUNTRY, WHERE PEOPLE FORM AN ORDERLY AND WELLMANNERED QUEUE EVEN DURING A RUN ON THE BANK PROF DANNY DORLING, Oxford University, on Britain bouncing back

•• IF YOU MAKE WATCHES WITH LOVE THEN THEY WILL BE SUCCESSFUL – BECAUSE ALL PEOPLE NEED IS LOVE JEAN-CLAUDE BIVER, CEO of Hublot, on watchmaking mastery SQUARE M I LE, I SSUE 64 ( DEC 2011)

S QU A R E MIL E , I S S U E 6 0 (JU LY 2 0 1 1 )

•• You have to have the money, the time and the stomach for it DAN WATSON, SafetyNet Technologies founder, on angel investing SQUARE M I LE , I SSUE 6 8 ( M AY 2 0 1 2 )

•• FOR MOST PEOPLE IN THE CITY, MY STORY EXISTS ON AN EDUCATIONAL LEVEL, BECAUSE IT’S IN MOST LAW AND ECONOMICS BOOKS NICK LEESON, on bringing down Barings Bank S QU A R E MIL E , IS S U E 61 ( SEPT 2011)

•• IF YOU SAY A STOCK IS GOING UP, AND YOU HAVE A TEAM OF SMOOTH-TALKING BROKERS SELLING IT ROUND THE CLOCK, IT PROBABLY WILL GO UP JORDAN BELFORT, aka the Wolf of Wall Street, on how the system works S QU A R E MIL E , I S S U E 6 2 (O C T 2 0 1 1 )

•• A SURVEY CONDUCTED AT OXFORD UNIVERSITY REVEALED NOT ONE OF 500 RESPONDENTS REGARDED BANKS AS ETHICAL DAVID ROTHNIE, US professor, on the need for banking reform S QU A R E MIL E , IS S U E 63 (NOV 2011) [ D E PU T Y A RT DIRECTOR, LUCY P H I LLIP S , JO IN S A S S E N IO R D E S IG N E R A N D B E C O ME S T H E P R E MIE R O F F IC E M O O N WA L K E R ]

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•• I FIND IT HARD TO TALK ABOUT THE SIZE OF MY PAY PACKET WITHOUT REACHING A HEIGHTENED STATE OF SEXUAL AROUSAL MODERN TOSS’S BUSINESS MOUSE, on his considerable package SQUARE M I LE, I SSUE 65 ( FEB 2 0 1 2 )

•• I’VE BEEN WATCHING EAST LONDON’S TECHNOLOGY START-UP SCHEME – THESE FIRMS HAVE BEEN GETTING ON WITH THE HARD GRAFT

BOODLES: British jeweller Boodles has been a kind supporter to square mile since we began in 2005. They even bigged us up on their advert at the beginning of this issue. Managing director Michael Wainwright is one of the nicest guys in the business. But we’re still waiting for our mates’ rates discount, though. One day, maybe.

•• IT’S NO SURPRISE THAT THE US HAS LITTLE PATIENCE WITH THE NEVERENDING SOVEREIGN DEBT STORY ANGELA KNIGHT, the then CEO of the British Bankers’ Association, on the US looking to its economic bounceback S QU A RE M I LE , ISSUE 69 (JUN 2012)

•• DRAW IT OUT ANY WAY YOU WANTED, THIS WAS GOING TO BE HELLISH. GOING TO PRISON IS SHIT

•• A LOT OF GUYS IN THE CITY EARN A FORTUNE SO THEY CAN PAY PEOPLE LIKE ME TO SAIL THEIR BOATS

GARY MULDREW, one of the Natwest Three, on the days leading up to his jail sentence

BEN AINSLIE, Olympic sailor, on his career

SQUARE M I LE, I SSUE 67 ( APR 2012 ) [ SQUARE M I LE’S I NAUGURAL iPAD E DI TI ON ]

S QU A RE M I LE , ISSUE 70 (JUL 2012)

ROBERT TOMEI, chairman of Advanced Capital Group, on where he sees the greatest areas of growth SQUARE M I LE, I SSUE 66 ( M AR 201 2 )

•• IF LONDON EVER LOSES ITS PRE-EMINENCE IT WILL ONLY BE OWING TO THE ACTIONS THAT WE IN LONDON TAKE – MARKET PARTICIPANTS, POLITICIANS AND REGULATORS XAVIER ROLET, CEO, London Stock Exchange, on regulation in the City S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 71 (SEPT 2012)

•• This is the most dramatic shift in governance of the banking system since the Great Depression VIKRAM PANDIT, then CEO of Citigroup, on regulation and corporate governance S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 72 (O CT 2012)

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ASPINAL OF LONDON: Leather specialist Aspinal of London sent us this handsome Berkeley journal. If you want your own, it will set you back £125. We’ll definitely be using ours to document our deepest, most inspired thoughts. So, that means it will largely consist of smutty doodles, then.

•• FEAR OF FAILURE IS ONE OF THE CITY’S BIGGEST PROBLEMS – A FAR LARGER CONTRIBUTOR TO THE 2008 CRASH THAN GREED. IT EXPLAINS ALL THOSE ROGUE TRADER SCANDALS, MOST OF WHICH STARTED LIFE WITH A COVER-UP ROBERT KELSEY, banker turned author, on the fear of failure S QU A R E MIL E , IS S U E 73 ( NOV 2012)

•• MARKETS COULD BE USED TO PRESERVE RAINFORESTS. THIS IS THE POWER OF PRICE TO CHANGE BEHAVIOUR RICHARD SANDOR, US economist, on good derivatives S QU A RE MIL E , IS S U E 7 4 (DEC 2012)

•• Management is not just a case of saying ‘this is how we do it’; one size definitely does not fit all DAVE BRAILSFORD, then Olympic Team GB cycling coach, on the secret of his success S QU A RE MIL E , I S S U E 7 5 (JA N 2 0 1 3 )

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•• MOST GENTLEMEN’S CLUBS HAVE THEIR BORES WHO ARE KNOWN TO EVERYONE EXCEPT THEMSELVES ANTHONY LEJEUNE, writer, on the changing face of London’s clubs SQUARE M I LE, I SSUE 76 ( FEB 2013)

•• I DON’T THINK TURNING A RETAIL BANK INTO A GIANT HEDGE FUND IS SENSIBLE JOHN NELSON, then chairman of Lloyd’s of London, on where the City went wrong SQUARE MI LE , I SSUE 77 (M A R 2 0 1 3 )

•• Corporate citizenship is not a fashionable exercise, nor is it a hair-shirt we can pull on in order to demonstrate we have a conscience COLIN GRASSIE, UK CEO of Deutsche Bank, on how the artist formerly know as Corporate Social Responsibility is not just a publicity stunt S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 7 9 ( M AY 2 0 1 3 )

•• THERE’S SO MUCH MORE HERE NOW THAN KIDS ON DRUGS LISTENING TO COMMERCIAL DANCE MUSIC RICHIE HAWTIN, DJ, on the diversity of Ibiza’s clubbing scene S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 8 0 ( J U N 2 0 1 3 )

•• YOU ALWAYS HAVE TO HAVE REAL PRESENCE: STAND TALL AND LOOK THE BATSMEN IN THE EYE STUART BROAD, cricketer, ahead of the England Ashes victory in summer 2013 S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 8 1 ( J U L 2 0 1 3 )

•• IT IS ABOUT GIVING CLOTHES RESPECT AND TREATING THEM LIKE PIECES OF ART BRENDAN MULLANE, creative director at Brioni, on the fundamentals of a Brioni suit S QU AR E MIL E, I S S U E 83 (O CT 2013)

•• HAVING A HOME WITH WOW FACTOR IS NOT ABOUT HAVING GOOD TASTE – IT’S ABOUT HAVING CONVICTION KEVIN McCLOUD, presenter, on the making of a grand design SQUARE M I LE , I SSUE 78 ( A P R 2 0 1 3 )

TOM DAVIES: These limitededition buffalo horn sunglasses were made by spectacle designer Tom Davies especially to celebrate our 100th issue. Its full range of bespoke buffalo horn spectacles can be purchased from the TD Tom Davies Flagship Store at 54 Sloane Square, SW1W 8AX.

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100 SPECIAL

•• If I lose, I will get loads of stick in the office. That might be scarier than the fight itself

•• IT’S A MYTH THAT GREAT STYLE REQUIRES CONSTANT REINVENTION TOM FORD, designer, on how to maintain a consistent personal style SQUARE M I LE, I SSUE 87 ( FE B 2 0 1 4 )

•• THE CARS, THE MONEY, AND THE FOOD CHAIN IN THE CITY – I’VE ALWAYS FOUND THEM TO BE QUITE FASCINATING

JAMES BREWINS, partner at Alesco Risk Management Services, on white-collar boxing

SPENCER MATTHEWS, on his career as a broker at ICAP before Made in Chelsea

S Q U A R E MIL E , IS S U E 82 (SEPT 2013)

SQUARE M I LE, I SSUE 88 ( M A R 2 0 1 4 )

•• A LOT OF PEOPLE MAKE A LOT OF FUCKING EXCUSES NOT TO DO ANYTHING

•• MOVING TO LONDON AND TAKING UP THE POST AT THE OLD VIC WAS THE BEST DECISION I EVER MADE

ASHTON KUTCHER, on a lack of entrepreneurial spirit among the youth of America S Q U A R E MIL E , I S S UE 8 4 (N O V 2 0 1 3 )

•• IF WE’RE ALL HAVING A GOOD YEAR, WE’RE BACK TO THOSE IN THE CITY GETTING FAIR REWARD THROUGH BONUSES

KEVIN SPACEY, on his long spell in the capital

JOHN CRIDLAND, director general of the CBI, on the return of the good times

SQUARE M I LE, I SSUE 89 ( APR 2014)

SQ U A RE M I LE , I SSU E 9 0 ( M AY 2 0 1 4 )

••

I WAS THREE YEARS OLD WHEN MY FIRST SKIS WERE FITTED. IN VAL D’ISÈRE SKIING WAS NOT A CHOICE – IT WAS A FACT OF LIFE

BAUME ET MERCIER: The Swiss luxury watch brand has long been a supporter of square mile – and celebrates its 185th anniversary this year. Last issue, we included the manufacturer in our round-up of the top timepieces from this year’s SIHH watch fair. Our favourite was this – the Clifton in red gold. Genuinely timeless.

JEAN-CLAUDE KILLY, Olympic ski racer, on growing up in France S QU A R E MIL E , IS S U E 85 ( DEC 2013)

•• GREED HAPPENED LONG BEFORE CIVILISATION. I’M NOT JUDGING – IT’S AN INHERENT CHARACTERISTIC OF SOCIETY

•• We need to find a more balanced, more longterm way of rewarding our colleagues

LEONARDO DiCAPRIO, on Wall Street

SQUARE M I LE, I SSUE 91 ( J UN 2014)

S QU A R E MIL E , IS S U E 8 6 ( JA N 2 0 1 4 )

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PAUL PESTER, CEO of TSB, on the bonus debate

•• It’s going to be fun to play different roles and let loose in ways that Don Draper never could

•• THERE’S SO MUCH MORE I STILL WANT TO ACHIEVE IN FORMULA ONE – TO START WITH, WINNING RACES JENSON BUTTON, on progressing his motor-racing career S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 9 3 (SEPT 2014)

JON HAMM, on saying goodbye to Mad Men and hello to his career in Hollywood SQUARE M I LE , I S S U E 9 2 ( J U LY 2 0 1 4 )

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•• WE WANT THE MONEY, THE DEALS AND THE TRADES BRADLEY COOPER, on the ambition required to make it as a successful actor in Hollywood. His father was a stockbroker on Wall Street

•• THE JOB OF GREAT ACTING IS TO HAVE GREAT LINES, BUT MAKE THEM LOOK LIKE THEY’RE IMPROVISED CLIVE OWEN, on his new TV series, The Knick SQUARE M I LE, I SSUE 95 ( NOV 20 1 4 )

S QU A RE MIL E , I S S U E 9 4 (O C T 2 0 1 4 )

•• EVEN PLAYING A WOLF IN A FILM ABOUT PENGUINS, YOU CAN’T PUT YOUR VOICE IN A JAR AND SEND IT TO THE STUDIO BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH, on using all your physicality to be a good actor S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 9 6 ( DE C 2 0 1 4 )

ABOVE: Rampley & Co, maker of many an elegant pocket square, sent us this 100th issue special of its Battle of Trafalgar as painted by Turner. (£69) BELOW: Vacheron Constantin celebrates its 260th anniversary this year. Puts all this in context really.

•• I WANTED TO DO SOMETHING ICONIC DAVID GANDY, on his career shift from model to fashion designer S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 9 8 ( FE B 2 0 1 5 )

•• YOU FOCUS ON THE THINGS YOU HAVE CONTROL OVER – NOT THE CROWD, OR THE FACT IT’S THE OLYMPICS CHRIS HOY, on how he won all those Gold medals S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 9 7 ( J A N 2 0 15)

•• APPLE CAME ALONG AND DESTROYED THE FUCKING WORLD. YOUTH CULTURE IS PRETTY MUCH NON-EXISTENT ANYMORE NOEL GALLAGHER, ‘on one’ S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 9 9 ( M AR 2015)

DEAKIN & FRANCIS: The Birmingham cufflink makers have been at it since 1786. It was very kind of them to spare their expertise to celebrate our 100th issue in sterling style.

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•• I’VE ABSOLUTE ADMIRATION FOR THOSE GUYS. IT’S A PRESSURE JOB AND PROBABLY NOT MY SORT OF THING – I’M DEFINITELY TOO LAID BACK TO BE LEFT IN CHARGE OF SOMEONE ELSE’S MONEY IDRIS ELBA, on traders in the City S QU A RE M I LE , I S S U E 1 0 0 ( A P R 2 0 1 5 ) ■

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FORMING THE FUTURE OF FINANCE The financial services industry has an unprecedented opportunity to help change the world for the better. With the right mind-set we can deliver positive change that will last for generations to come.

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PAUL OAKENFOLD ART KANE IDRIS ELBA KIT HARINGTON SS15 STYLE

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Pitch Perfecto TO MARK THE 25-YEAR MILESTONE SINCE HE STARTED HIS LABEL PERFECTO RECORDS, SUPERSTAR DJ PAUL OAKENFOLD REMINISCES ABOUT SWEATY LONDON CLUBS AND IBIZA BEATS WITH GARY OGDEN PHOTOGRAPHY: RYAN DINHAM

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HEN YOU THINK of a musical genre, often a name immediately and unavoidably springs to mind. Rock music? It might be Alice Cooper. Soul? Think Ray Charles. Hip-hop? Jay-Z. Deep, symphonic black metal? Obviously Cryptik Howling. OK, maybe it’s just me with that last one, but the same still applies when you think of electronic dance music. It’s Paul Oakenfold. No question. It may depend on your age (no, Skrillex didn’t invent music as we know it), but for those in the know, and even for most of those who aren’t, Oakenfold’s name is dance music. It’s a clichéd thing to say, but if it weren’t for him, chances are that modern electronic music would have turned out very differently. So as Perfecto Records – the label he founded – has just turned 25, it seemed like the perfect time to join him for a chat. Oakenfold marked the occasion by releasing a compilation album last month, and we’re all about celebrating landmark achievements. (Did we mention it’s our 100th issue, btw?) So how do you boil down a quarter of a century’s work into one album? “It’s tracks from the label that we thought defined who we are,” explains Oakenfold. “It’s been an amazing 25 years, with millions of records sold, so it was very hard to pick, but I believe we came up with an amazing compilation. It features everyone from Ce Ce Peniston to Paul van Dyk, to Tiësto to Robert Owens.” But let’s rewind. It’s all well and good lasting all this time at the top of your game, but how did it all start? How did Oakenfold go from a young kid using a fake NME ID to get into New York clubs to the first DJ to ever headline Glastonbury? “It was through my friend called Trevor Fung,” says Oakenfold. “He was an old soul boy. Trevor was in Ibiza in 1987 when I, Danny Rampling, Nicky Holloway and Johnny Walker went over for my birthday. I’d been to Ibiza once before, but this was my first proper trip and it really set the blueprint for us.”

PAUL’S PLAYLIST OAKENFOLD’S TOP-FIVE TRACKS RIGHT NOW

+ Grace – Not Over Yet + Robert Owens – I’ll Be Your Friend (Glamorous Mix) + BT – Loving You More (Man With No Name Mix) + Hibernate – Lux Tua + Paul Oakenfold feat. Angela McCluskey – You Could Be Happy (Future House Mix)

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Aside from that crew being an enviable who’s-who to go anywhere with, it also confirms what is still true today – Ibiza is the spiritual home of dance music, and the careers of many a great DJ can be traced back to its hallowed (and not-so-hallowed) clubs. But it would be remiss of us to slather all the recognition onto the White Isle – Oakenfold is from London (as are his Ibiza mates, Rampling, Holloway and Walker) and that’s where it all began happening for the ‘Ibiza Four’ who brought Balearic beats back to the city. “London was where it kicked off for me. It’s in my blood and very much an enormous part of my career. I started Perfecto Records here in 1989. The city has been a base for me and as well as being where I grew up, it continues to be a big source of inspiration in my life. I always look forward to coming back to the UK for gigs. Perfecto is still based in the UK and continues to support UK artists to this very day. I’m very proud of that. “Being born and bred in London, the scene here has really shaped my career and life. I’m very proud of my British roots and have always championed our music – and our music scene – to the rest of the world.” That very music scene evolved, grew and even went full circle as Ibiza begun absorbing the London sound. As a result, there wasn’t really any scope for future London DJs to ‘bring back’ anything completely new from Ibiza – it had already been done. The London influence had affected the world’s rave scene irreversibly. For Oakenfold, his hub was Spectrum at Heaven: “It holds so many incredible and life-changing moments for me.” He’s referring to the club night he started in 1988, which made an indelible mark on the UK dance music scene. This was despite being held on a Monday night. Ravers gotta rave, right? The London-centric takeover has continued to this day, and Oakenfold agrees, “London for many years has been the pioneering city for electronic music. We have such a rich and vibrant history in it.” As a city, it remains a must-visit destination for dance music fans around the world, down to its veritable arsenal of top-class clubs such as Ministry of Sound and Fabric, and its numerous planetdominating DJs. It’s of no doubt Oakenfold had a huge knob-twiddling hand in it. So after contributing so much to London’s and, subsequently the world’s, dance music scene, where was next for Oakenfold? The US, it seems: “I’m currently based in LA. It’s a place where a lot of creative, talented and interesting people reside or visit, meaning there is always something happening. It’s a great city if you understand it.” This isn’t the

London is a destination for dance. Oakenfold had a huge knobtwiddling hand in this first time Oakenfold has been based in the US, though – it’s a little-known fact that he used to work as an A&R man for Champion Records in the early 1980s. While there, he managed to sign a small, underground act called DJ Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Prince – we’re not sure what happened to them, though. LA’s not cheap, so surely growing to be one of the biggest DJs in the world would contribute to enabling a lavish lifestyle and all the appropriate spoils? Asking Oakenfold about the luxuries in his life therefore brings the expected answers, “I wear a Hublot Original in Chelsea FC Blue,” he says, and a look through his Instagram account uncovers that very watch taking pride of place in between snaps of him and just about every other famous musician on the planet. Further probing reveals more rewards, including his Aston Martin Vanquish, or on a much smaller scale his V-Moda Crossfade M-100 headphones – only the best will do for a man who is still one of the world’s top DJs. Yet, as an in-demand party-starter, does he still revel in the midst of the raves he most famously kicked off in the halcyon days of trance music? When asked where he frequents during his time in the city, he replies, “I’m more into finding new restaurants and new bars nowadays, I love to see what’s happening.” When you’re a mainstay at the celeb parties and high-class cocktail bars of LA, maybe returning to Piccadilly to dive into a sweaty mass of heaving ravers doesn’t hold the same appeal as it once did. Which is fine, of course – when you’ve been there, done that, invented the t-shirt, there’s nothing better than to sit back and admire your work from afar. “The dance music scene is much healthier than it used to be,” he explains. “At the moment, it’s global domination. It is incredible to see the impact that electronic music is having all around the world.” If only every twenty-something who went to Ibiza could bring back something, make it their own, and then allow it to spread like wildfire. On second thoughts… ■ Paul Oakenfold presents 25 Years of Perfecto Records is out now. (£11.99; amazon.co.uk)

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DJ AWESOME: In the late 1990s, Oakenfold was voted top DJ in the world – twice. He’s played all over the world, but maintains that his favourite gig ever was when he performed to 90,000 sweaty revellers at Glasto in 1995.

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Knock Out

ART KANE WAS ONE OF THE MOST PROGRESSIVE PHOTOGRAPHERS OF THE 1960s AND 1970s. MIKE GIBSON LOOKS BACK AT HIS PROLIFIC CAREER 106

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WHO KILLED DAVEY MOORE? 1970: This shot, from an Esquire feature that brought Bob Dylan lyrics to life in photography, is a great example of Kane’s perspective play. “Inverting the photo like this amplified the power of the image and made the boxer fly out of the frame,” says Anderson.

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HE PAGES OF square mile have been graced

by some truly great photographers lately: Terry O’Neill, Guy Bourdin and Kevin Cummins, to name a few. And while all of them are captivating, identifiable and eradefining in their own ways, none of them can lay claim to a body of work as expansive and eclectic as that of the late, great Art Kane. A New York native, Kane made his name as an art director initially before moving to photography, and in the 1960s and 1970s became one of the medium’s greatest pioneers.

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Kane described himself as a “conceptual photographer”, and his vast portfolio encompasses everything from rough-andready shots of the nascent Rolling Stones to provocative high-fashion campaigns, surrealist photos of cows being airlifted off mountains and sweeping, perspective-skewing compositions that look more at home on a gallery wall than the pages of magazines. It’s difficult to summarise a career that covered so much, but that’s no reason not to try. Some of the artist’s most iconic work is

collated in a brand new retrospective, curated in part by his son Jonathan. Co-writer Holly Anderson says of the book: “Art Kane’s impeccable eye lives on in our new book to inspire new image-makers, whatever their medium, to tell stories that will remain timeless – like Art’s most resonant work.” The book is entitled, simply, Art Kane – a name that’s perfectly befitting for the work of a man who needed no introduction. ■ Art Kane by Jonathan Kane and Holly Anderson is available now (Reel Art Press, £60); reelartpress.com

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FASHION, 1962: This photograph was published in Vogue against the editor-in-chief’s wishes. Kane’s use of the wideangle lens was considered to be ‘anti-fashion’, but that didn’t stop fashion houses and magazines all over the world copying the technique for years afterwards.

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LONDON, 1968: Taken from another musicfocused feature, this time about Beatles songs in Life magazine, this arresting shot manages to capture a quintessentially British essence in its costuming, setting and feel – no mean feat for a New Yorker such as Kane.

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THE ROLLING STONES, 1966: Kane wasn’t averse to a visual nod, in this instance referencing the iconic band’s name in the shot’s ‘rolling’ composition. Like many of his shots, it’s been imitated by countless photographers in the years since it was taken.

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BADWAY

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FASHION, 1970: Another flipped perspective shot, this was taken for the UK edition of Harper’s Bazaar. Sand and sky are inverted – and the model looks like she’s bound by some anti-gravitational force. The shot showcases Kane’s highly progressive style – it looks like it could have been shot yesterday.

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UNTITLED, 1960: If you’re a fan of northern rock (the music, not the bank, obviously) then you may recognise this image – it was used as the cover for Sheffield band The Violet May’s debut EP titled TV.

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THE LOOK OF LOVE.

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THE MAN

OF THE MOMENT IDRIS ELBA IS AN EAST-END BOY WHO MADE HIS WAY TO WORLDWIDE FAME. THE ACTOR, DJ AND SINGER SPEAKS ON TRADING, LAZINESS AND JAMES BOND. BY TIM ALDRED

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PHOTOGRAPHS by Uzo Oleh/Chilli Media

HERE’S NO-ONE QUITE like Idris Elba. The name – it’s short for Idrissa, for the record – is unique; his gruff, gravelly patter holds in it a curious appeal, and with a look that sways wildly, yet somehow comfortably, between rugged and polished, it’s little wonder the Londoner has emerged as something of a style icon for the modern elite. Elba’s breakthrough on the small screen was as the business-savvy Stringer Bell in what became one of the most highly acclaimed

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TV series in history, HBO’s masterpiece The Wire. It was a pivotal casting that saw his star ascend across the Atlantic at a time when he would rarely garner column inches in the entertainment pages over here. Five series and 60 episodes later, he flew home, switched sides, and became arguably the coolest and most abrasive British modern-day detective since Robbie Coltrane’s portrayal of Dr Eddie Fitzgerald in Cracker, when taking up the title role in cult classic Luther. ➤

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➤ Elba will reprise that character this year when the new mini-series airs. These days it’s a passion project, after all – he’s now a bona-fide Hollywood name who could well afford to leave detective work on the mean streets of London. But the capital remains his home. For Elba the strength of Hackney, of London itself, is worth more than any hilltop mansion overlooking Beverly Hills. “It’s always the people who make a place what it is,” he begins. “Forget everything else. I’ve visited social housing initiatives in east London that have more heart and soul than any other place I’ve been to, and that’s what life should be about.” The reality is Elba spends most of his time racing fast cars, making millions as a bad guy or exciting millions as the good guy; the actor rarely has a moment when he isn’t behaving like the icon you wish you had on speed dial. A passionate Arsenal fan (OK, so he’s not perfect), his association with the Gunners even sparked a friendship with possibly one of the most laid-back and gifted men to ever play the sport – all-time top scorer Thierry Henry. Even when Elba wore a red woolly hat to the NME Awards – not his finest sartorial moment – he still managed to come out on top after having a bit of a barney with Liam Gallagher over it. Money, cars, looks. Elba is, to many, the epitome of the modern day geezer – a contemporary, albeit original, James Bond figure. More on that later.

ELBA WAS A tough kid growing up in an equally uncompromising area. Hackney in 1972 wasn’t for the faint of heart, and the skinny student set his stall out early by getting into a fight on his first day at school. He has commented in the past about a reputation for getting into trouble. “I never looked for it,” he insists, “but you can’t back down from it either. I got a reputation as someone who wouldn’t take any shit, and that was fine by me. I guess I was fortunate in that Miss McPhee, my teacher, thought that I had talent and pushed me towards acting.” It follows that, these days, Elba is keen to ‘pass it on’. He regularly champions the Prince’s Trust, the organisation that helped him gain a place at the National Youth Music Theatre. He’s a passionate advocate for youth engagement, and he doesn’t necessarily subscribe to the traditional avenues when it comes to getting spotted. “What the internet has given us is a platform to showcase what we can do. Musically, it’s been going on for years, but in drama now you can get spotted from your own bedroom; it’s incredible.” Despite the leg-up Elba received, acting roles didn’t come easily, and while earning

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a few seconds of screen time on The Bill and 2point4 Children, as well as portraying the odd unsavoury type in BBC Crimewatch reconstructions (an early precursor to the character roles that would follow, it seems) he took to cold-calling advertising sales, night shifts at the Dagenham Ford plant and stints as a wedding DJ in order to make ends meet. Silent Witness and Dangerfield followed, but venturing Stateside ultimately set Elba up for his next chapter. He landed a one-off appearance in Law & Order, a booking that would soon see him recruited for The Wire. Thrilled to land his first major US gig, Elba celebrated his first Stringer Bell pay cheque by placing on the driveway a “humungous” Dodge Ram 1500 truck. And that was before the show had passed the pilot stage. “When the series got picked up, it felt like winning the lottery. We had no idea how it would do, but

I’ve always been creative rather than structured. Do I have a head for figures? Not really. But do I have ideas and energy? Definitely. you could see there was something behind it.” His portrayal of Baltimore gangster boss Bell was one of the most applauded in modern drama. Stringer is a bad boy with business smarts, trying to teach his army of drug dealers about market saturation and his childhood friend about diversification, while struggling to get city officials to allow him to make legit money in property development. When quizzed, the actor is coy about how well he’d fare as an entrepreneur in real life. On the one hand, he says his biggest downfall is his procrastination. “I’m lazy,” he says bluntly. “‘I’ll get round to it,’ is a phrase I say far too often.” Is this the truth, or just selfdeprecation? After all, this is clearly a man with die-hard ambition and talent to match. “I’ve always been creative rather than structured; I wasn’t academic in that sense, but I liked challenges. Do I have a head for figures? Not really. But do I have ideas and energy? Definitely. You don’t meet many people who

can combine the two – I’m more than happy being the way I am.” That’s not to say Elba hasn’t seen a side of the commercial world that resonates with some of his former peers who grew up around east London. The trading floor certainly feels an appropriate stablemate for an actor whose characterisations often end up with the star using a chink of insight on his way to, ultimately, spin the wheel of fortune. And when invited to visit BGC Partners’ trading floor in Docklands along with a party that included Princes William and Harry, Rod Stewart with his wife Penny Lancaster, and fellow actress Helen McCrory, Elba really made himself at home. “I could relate to it – it didn’t feel too alien,” he admits. “What I found really fascinating was that this was a world when everyone was working to feed a colossal global force – finance. Yet you look at what each person was doing and, ultimately, these were individuals, some completely isolated from their workmates. “You can get quite philosophical about it but I liked that idea of individuals ultimately making the team, because that’s what we do in film or music. It’s several people’s creativity being channelled and feeding the machine.” The annual BGC Charity Day raises funds for charity in memory of the 658 Cantor Fitzgerald and 61 Eurobrokers employees who lost their lives in the New York World Trade Center terrorist attack in 2001. To date, it has raised more than $110m. “I’ve absolute admiration for those guys. It’s a pressure job and probably not my sort of thing – I’m definitely too laid back to be left in charge of someone else’s money,” says Elba. So if Bell’s passion for macroeconomics hasn’t rubbed off on the man who played him, what does Elba take from the drug kingpin? “The influence that The Wire had was spectacular. You know, I had been knocking on doors in the States for four years and it wasn’t working, and I’ve said it before, but for me it was a complete lifeline, and that was how I regarded it at first. But it quickly became so much more than that when I saw how people were really taking it forward. It’s a few years on now but you bump into people and they still define you by it, despite all the other stuff I’ve done. And that’s fine by me, I like that. It’s all about what someone wants to take out of it.” If one of the actor’s current projects is even half as well received he’ll have a hit on his hands. He’s unleashing his motorsport ambitions with a debut at the Circuit of Ireland Rally, under the tutelage of Jimmy McRae, father of the late world champion Colin, no less. Then there’s his return to the big screen ➤

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➤ alongside Javier Bardem, Sean Penn and Ray Winstone in The Gunman, a predictably bullet-strewn chase across Europe in which our man plays a mysterious and ruthless operative named Dupont. And within a month he’s back on the silver screen again in Avengers: Age of Ultron, among a cast so unapologetically ‘large’ (in every sense) it simply furthers the reality of Elba’s career trajectory – imagine sharing script rehearsals with the likes of Robert Downey Jr, Scarlett Johansson, Chris Hemsworth, Chris Evans, Mark Ruffalo, Samuel L Jackson and Hayley Atwell.

IT ALL SEEMS a long distance from when the first batch of film offers began dropping on the doormat. Elba found himself drafted into 28 Weeks Later, the sequel to 28 Days Later which, while successful, failed to live up to the heights of its predecessor; while RocknRolla and The Losers were mediocre handgun-heavy efforts. “It was good getting a taste – I enjoyed those projects a lot and I was keen to see what would come afterwards. Film remains a completely different animal to television and it takes a while to get your head around the

QUICK FIRE ON BEING A DJ: “I’ve always DJed. I’ve been a bedroom DJ for a long time. When I was really young I was on pirate radio. But my career as an actor took off and there wasn’t really much time to do it. I remember, though, at one stage in my life, just when I’d moved to America, I couldn’t get much work as an actor and it was my DJing that literally saved my life. I know it sounds corny but a DJ did save my life – it was myself.” ON LONDON: “I love the Angel area, I’ve hung about there; Hackney is my old area – I love that. I love what’s happening on the South Bank as well. When I was a young actor, I’d go there to watch plays at the National Theatre – they didn’t have the sort of social scene they have now.” ON TWITTER: “It’s almost like a new currency – like when you’re exploring how popular something is. I love it for that – the feedback, the instant feedback. You really get a sense of how the audience are responding or feeling about something – in real time.”

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demands.” As it materialised, the next step was Luther, playing a detective attempting to solve murders in his own ‘punch them in the mouth, dodge questions later’ style. Elba agrees that reinventing and reviving the 1970s interpretation of the tough English cop could be the thing that draws us to the troubled protagonist the most. “It’s that, but it’s also looking at how grandiose some of the crimes are. The writing is so good and so dark. It’s like watching a comic book version of Columbo. It’s slightly cooler, and just as weird and troubled. I love Luther.” Not one to do things by half measures, Elba agreed to not just star in, but help create, the US version of Luther. It’s a huge gamble. Luther already has a Golden Globe award in the States, so with nothing left to prove could it be about to follow in the footsteps of Gracepoint, the US version of Broadchurch, which was scrapped after one series? Like Luther, Gracepoint was a minor hit in the US. Gracepoint also imported its director, and its British lead David Tennant. Despite positive reviews, though, it never found an audience. But Elba has more of a chance than most. After all, many credit him as starting a new revolution of British actors in the US. Where once we exported Hugh Grant et al as foppish if essentially loveable rom-com characters, Elba and his Wire co-star Dominic West shot, shagged and drank their way to anti-hero cult status. In doing so, they paved the way for the likes of Elementary’s Jonny Lee Miller and Homeland’s Damian Lewis. “I think it needs a couple of exports to really take the lead; that then sparks an interest. It kind of validates what we’ve got going on over here, and we should be proud of that.” Certainly in the context of the film industry in 2015, Americans, it seems, now want to be wowed rather than wooed by their British men. Elba adds: “I believe the industry is much more open than it ever was in the past. Nationality and geography don’t really come into it anymore, and why should they?” Although the actor’s representation of the late Nelson Mandela, in Long Walk to Freedom, received mixed reviews, he has clearly ascended to a level of performance that brings about continued speculation of him taking the MI6 reins from Daniel Craig. Of course, there’s a race card that inevitably comes into play. No sooner had Elba himself responded to rumours from a leaked Sony HQ email that had him scoped as 007, were some commentators noting that Ian Fleming’s vision for the hitman was a white man from Scotland. That’s all very well, but Pierce Brosnan is Irish, Timothy Dalton Welsh, and Craig hails from

The industry is much more open – nationality and geography don’t really come into it those tartan-clad climes of, er, Chester. But Elba isn’t hung up on the Bond speculation. For a start, he’s far too busy experimenting with his other hobbies. His passionate love of making music has been brewing since he was a teen, and he put out his own album, Mi Mandela, to coincide with the biopic of the South African president. Elba has also progressed from manning the decks at marriage receptions to some of the hottest clubs in London and Ibiza. It’s difficult to tell whether he’s a draw because he’s a star – he often gets asked for autographs and to pose for pictures while he’s performing live – or whether he’d have made it as an unknown. Most agree that he has real musical talent, however, and he deserves his opportunity. “You have passions and they rarely go away. My passions were music and acting. Can I believe I’m in a place where I get to live out both? Probably not. But I’m not going to sit around thinking about it; I just want to get on with enjoying the opportunities.” And that’s him in a nutshell. Elba will never be afraid to roll the dice, to get stuck into a project that is meaningful, even if success is far from guaranteed. And above the music and everything else, you sense his true focus will always remain fixed on acting. Just as well – his fans won’t be satisfied until he slips into a tux and orders a martini, shaken not stirred. But it seems they may be waiting a long time: “I just don’t want to be the black James Bond,” he’s admitted. “Sean Connery wasn’t the Scottish James Bond and Craig wasn’t the blue-eyed James Bond. If I played him, I don’t want to be called the black James Bond.” That said, when quizzed by fans in a Reddit Q&A as to whether he’d be willing to take on the role, he said: “Yes, if it was offered to me, absolutely.” Cryptically, his final word on the matter so far has come from his Twitter account: “Isn’t 007 supposed to be handsome?” Why yes, Mr Elba, he sure is. And suave. And unafraid to break the rules. Hmm. Sounds familiar. ■ The Gunman is out at cinemas nationwide now. Avengers: Age of Ultron is out on 23 April 2015. The two-episode special of Luther will air later this year.

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ALL HAIL KING KIT

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PHOTOGRAPH by Phil Fisk

KIT HARINGTON, BEST KNOWN AS THE INIMITABLE JON SNOW IN GAME OF THRONES, IS CONTINUING HIS RISE TO SUPERSTARDOM WITH A ROLE IN SPOOKS: THE GREATER GOOD. ANTHONY PEARCE ASKS IS THERE ANYTHING HE CAN’T DO? WELL, YES: HE’S NOT ALLOWED TO CUT HIS HAIR

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T

HE GAME OF THRONES fanbase is easier

PHOTOGRAPH by Liam Daniel/Pinewood Pictures

to define by its numbers than its characteristics. The HBO show’s cocktail of extreme and indiscriminate gore, incidental nudity and fantastical elements is as enticing to some as it is off-putting to others. But the series, based on George RR Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire, is a multi-award winner and a viewing-figure record-breaker; a sort-of catchall masterpiece that has both Breaking Bad’s cool and Star Trek’s geeky appeal. Whether they’re convention-dwellers or serial box-set obsessives, its hardcore viewers are as fanatical as they are disparate. Which is how Kit Harington – the London-born actor who plays Jon Snow, a survivor in a show that isn’t at all sentimental about knocking off even its leading characters – has found himself to be a genuine superstar on a global scale. “I have to prepare myself for the madness of when Game of Thrones comes out more so than I have to prepare myself for the actual doing of it, which seems like the wrong way round, really,” the actor says, ahead of the fifth season, starting this month. “It suddenly becomes very present in everyone’s heads when it’s on. I say ‘everyone’; not everyone watches it. But it’s suddenly back on and you’re in the limelight again, which is always an odd thing every year. But I’m getting used to it. It’s when we stop getting that hysteria that we want to start worrying.” It puts him in a strange position. To some it’s “Kit who?” while to others he’s a hero, a demi-god and a sex symbol. He baulks at the idea of being a pin-up – “I absolutely hate to think of myself as that” – but recognises it is part of his ever-growing stock. “Any actor who is taking on lead roles is probably going to have that sort of term attached to them and it’s often something that they have to fight against a lot of the time, but it’s not something that I ever think of myself as. “It doesn’t help to sell sex, it helps to sell a story and sell a character. People are oversexualised in this industry a lot of the time and that’s something that we, as young actors, have to really be aware of,” he adds, rather piously, given David Benioff and DB Weiss’s fondness for full-on female nudity in Game of Thrones in contrast to not much male nudity. Sex symbol or not, Harington’s career has rocketed in the past 12 months. The actor starred in Testament of Youth, last year’s stirring first world war drama; the epic Seventh Son, which arrived earlier this year; and will be appearing in the forthcoming Spooks: The Greater Good movie. Pompeii, his first post-GoT fame action movie, however, was something of a mis-step

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THE WAR ON TERROR: Spooks: The Greater Good follows disgraced MI5 intelligence chief Harry Pearce (Peter Firth, left) and his protégé Will Crombie (Harington, right) as they hunt for an escaped terrorist who is planning an attack on London. The film is due in cinemas on 8 May.

– a macho, all-action, no-brains thriller about the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD – although, he’s quick to defend it. “It did really well money-wise,” he says, “but it was expected to make more. I didn’t know what to expect from Pompeii. I enjoyed making it; it had an audience; and it was a really fun movie. It wasn’t trying to make any major statements about anything.” However, playing the armour-clad lead character Milo certainly didn’t harm Harington’s rising trajectory, or that pesky status as a heartthrob. “It was a good disaster movie and I enjoyed making it. And, actually, as far as my profile went, you always have worries about movies, like how it will affect your career,” he says, still relatively nonplussed. “Looking back on it, I was on buses and billboards all over London for a month, which, whether I like it or not – and it’s not always a pleasant thing – gets your name out there. And that’s a good thing. And I was proud of it; I’m always proud of everything I do, no matter if it’s critically acclaimed.” Apart from Game of Thrones, Testament of Youth is perhaps Harington’s finest work to

It doesn’t help to sell sex, it helps to sell a story and sell a character. People are over-sexualised

date, where removing himself from his swordswinging comfort zone has clearly reaped benefits. “It was still a period drama and set 100 years ago, but I had very much come from Thrones and Pompeii, so I did get a lot of offers for lots of swords-and-sandals movies; it was becoming a thing. And as good as some of these movies looked, I didn’t want to be that person, only ever playing the antiquated hero and playing at sword fighting. “I love it, but I get to do that every year with Thrones, so for me, it was important to step out of that – and do something that was essentially more character-driven. “Where I am this year: I’ve done one contemporary piece, so I’m not on the lookout for more up-to-date modern films.” He’s referring to his role in Spooks: The Greater Good, a movie spin-off of the hit BBC One series, and his first modern-day role. “It follows on from the TV show; I play a new character who is kind of a renegade. He’s an aggressive young spy who has been kicked out of the force and now he’s been brought back in for a certain purpose,” he says. “It’s a high-octane, fun, action-packed, thriller, with resonance today as well.” The question has to be asked as to whether Harington is a fan of the original, iconic BBC series. “I hadn’t watched a lot,” he admits. “And the director told me not to, because he wanted me to come to it fresh. I remember being impressed by the writing and the structure of the story. I read the script and really liked it. I like action roles and I like interesting, damaged characters.” It sees him trading in the sword for the gun – but which is mightier? “A sword,” he says, ➤

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Pull quote Min con nos voluptium lacerum que estet qui sam, quis sinima audicat enihilia THE MAN IS

SNOW JOKE: Harington as Jon Snow in season three of Game of Thrones. The season ended with the infamous Red Wedding scene, in which producers killed off a swathe of key characters in a bloody massacre, to the surprise of even the most dedicated fans.

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and everyone in between got bumped off – Harington is promising the upcoming season five of GoT won’t take its foot off the gas. “The filming was pretty intense,” he says. “It was the most I’ve done for any season. So many people have died now that we’ve all been given bigger story lines. It was great; I can’t really say too much about it, but in scale it was huge, it was really huge – the amount of money, the size – it’s almost double last year.” One thing is for sure, life won’t be easy for Jon Snow this time around. “He gets a bit harder each season because of the things that happen to him. And now he’s lost Ygritte, he hardens even more. But he’s in a really difficult place this season; he has to deal with being a politician and that’s not something he’s good at – so you’ll see his weak side.” The show, with its depictions of violence and fantasy setting, would be an unlikely success story if it wasn’t for its quite clear appeal – it’s far and away one of the best things on TV and thus beloved by even those usually turned off by the genre. “Some people are now likening the series to sport – you don’t

Don’t get me wrong, I love GoT more than anything, but I wish Jon would just shave it all off

You can watch every episode of Game of Thrones so far on demand through Sky Box Sets and NOW TV before season five starts on Monday 13 April on Sky Atlantic. Spooks: The Greater Good is out on 8 May.

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PHOTOGRAPH by Helen Sloan courtesy of HBO Enterprises

➤ “because it feels so much more natural for me. But I did spend so much time learning how to dismantle a gun and put it back together again, disarm someone, and how to fire. I got pretty proficient at it,” he adds, sounding far more sinister than he really is. Born into a well-off London family, his mother Deborah Jane is a playwright. His family has ancestral ties to King Charles II and John Harington, writer and confidant of Elizabeth I, while his uncle is Sir Nicholas John Harington, the 14th Baronet Harington. He landed the role of Albert in the Olivier Theatre’s adaptation of War Horse while still studying at Central School of Speech and Drama; Posh followed at the Royal Court Theatre, before Game of Thrones came around in 2011. As he survived the culling of some of the show’s best-known stars, his character Jon Snow – the illegitimate son of Eddard Stark, the honourable lord of Winterfell – he has become one of the programme’s most liked and recognisable characters. His floppy hair and well-maintained beard are part of a look viewers have bought into – even if Harington has not. “It’s so big now and takes a lot of upkeep,” he sighs, discussing his trademark hairstyle. “There’s so much maintenance and it takes a lot of time. Don’t get me wrong, I love Game of Thrones more than anything, but I wish Jon would just shave it all off.” The actor is in fact contracted to maintain his flowing locks. “There was a tricky conversation with Thrones producers that happened behind closed doors.” After the orgy of violence that was season four – where your favourites, least favourites

know what will happen next, and it has literally become a sport for a nation and fandom around the world,” he says. “It’s got to a stage now where it snowballs. Everyone who’s being told about it has hopefully now watched season four and caught up with it, so there will be more people for season five – it just gets bigger and bigger. And there is pressure there but, actually, I don’t really feel it. “If I was to think too hard about the size of it, the number of people watching it, and the importance to the future of me as an actor and what people think of me, it wouldn’t do me any good at all. It’s powerful when people come up to you. You feel it. Obviously, it has its hazards but I can’t say I have felt overwhelmed by it.” Actors often speak of the family unit that emerges on TV sets – particularly the modernday HBO mega shows, which can run six series or more. But Game of Thrones is a programme that has redefined the idea of main characters – just as you’re getting to really like one, they might get killed off. For Harington, it’s just another day at the office. “Yeah, we lost Mark Stanley, who plays Grenn, we lost Josef Altin – we lost a lot of people last year. I could name loads,” he says. “You have to get used to losing your friends on this show. It was an emotional season last time. You become very good friends – but you stay in touch. I’m still very much in touch with Richard Madden after two seasons.” Jon Snow’s longevity is, of course, a great thing for both Harington and the fans alike. Let’s face it, this season – which will undoubtedly be the most-watched on TV so far – isn’t going to do his CV any harm. Of course, there are some downsides to the show’s popularity. Harington is often confronted by fans repeating Ygritte’s famous line: “You know nothing, Jon Snow.” “That does get a little annoying,” he admits. “I don’t know why people make catchphrases out of a thing – just enjoy the line on the show!” Snow may be one of the show’s more affable – even sweet – characters, but anyone who’s seen the actor, muscles bulging, on the Pompeii posters, will infer that he can handle himself. Through his work, he has undergone some extensive training, which includes knowing exactly what to do in a confrontation. “Oh yeah,” he smiles, “to a dangerous extent, that if I get held up on the street… I hope I won’t attempt anything. One too many ‘You know nothing, Jon Snows’ and, yeah, we’ll see what happens…” ■


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FAR LEFT Suit: Louis Vuitton / Shirt: Dolce & Gabbana NEAR LEFT Suit: Thom Sweeney / Shirt: Louis Vuitton NEAR RIGHT Suit: Hugo Boss / Shirt: Paul Smith FAR RIGHT Suit: Thom Sweeney / Shirt: Hugo Boss

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The Home Guard AN EVENING AT HOME HOUSE, ONE OF LONDON’S TOP PRIVATE MEMBERS’ CLUBS, AND FOUR MEN ABOUT TOWN: A PERFECT COMBINATION FOR SHOWING THE TOP CROP OF SS15 STYLE

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PHOTOGRAPHY: PAUL FARNHAM CREATIVE DIRECTION & STYLING: LAOURA STARLING PRODUCTION: LAVINO MODA; LAVINOMODA.COM LOCATION: HOME HOUSE; HOMEHOUSE.CO.UK squaremile.com

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LEFT Suit: Dunhill London / Shirt: Louis Vuitton / Tie: Thom Sweeney THIS PHOTO Shirt: Louis Vuitton / Blazer: Banana Republic / Tie: Turnbull & Asser

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LEFT Suit and shirt: Dolce & Gabbana / Bow tie: Duchamp London MIDDLE Suit: Paul Smith / Shirt: Hugo Boss / Bow tie: Duchamp London RIGHT Suit & bow tie: Dolce & Gabbana / Shirt: Dunhill London

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THIS PHOTO Waistcoat and shirt: Dolce & Gabbana / Bow tie: Duchamp London

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FEATURES LEFT Suit & bow tie: Dolce & Gabbana / Shirt: Hugo Boss MIDDLE Suit & bow tie: Dolce & Gabbana / Shirt: Paul Smith / Pocket square: Turnbull & Asser RIGHT Suit: Paul Smith / Shirt: Dolce & Gabbana / Pocket square: Paul Smith / Bow tie: Duchamp London

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LEFT Suit: Louis Vuitton /Shirt: Dolce & Gabbana / Tie: Turnbull & Asser THIS PAGE Shirt: Dolce & Gabbana / Blazer: Paul Smith / Trousers: Burberry / Shoes: Jimmy Choo CREDITS Creative director and fashion stylist: Laoura Starling / Photographer: Paul Farnham / Make-up & hair stylist: Rebecca Doney; Bumble and Bumble hair products; Sisley Paris skincare / Models: Tom at FM London; Jordan, James and Rob at Premier Model Management / Production assistants: Bianca Stewart and Olga Kott LOCATION Home House; homehouse.co.uk

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NATIONAL SPIRIT . 144 PHOTOGRAPH by James Lipman


MOTORS ROLLS-ROYCE

THE ROYAL TREATMENT

Not all cars prompt curtseys from pedestrians, but a Rolls-Royce isn’t just any car, says MARK HEDLEY . Please be upstanding for the Ghost Series II

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ROLLS-ROYCE GHOST SERIES II

ASSETS

ENGINE

V12

TWIN-TURBO

POWER (BHP)

563

AT 5,250RPM

TORQUE (LB FT)

575

AT 1,500RPM

0-62MPH

4.9

SECS (APPROX)

TOP SPEED

155 MPH

COST FROM

£232k APPROX

T

HE THING ABOUT a Rolls-Royce is that it

doesn’t half make you feel special. Sure, some cars may make you feel powerful – a Mercedes S-Class, for example, has a certain autocratic panache. Others can inject you with obscene smugness – a long-wheelbase Range Rover is so large and capable that if people don’t get out of your way, you could just drive over the top of them. But a Rolls-Royce makes you feel genuinely, royally, spectacularly special. And not in a remedial way. The first time I drove a Rolls was an eyeopener. It wasn’t (just) the quality of the car that stood out immediately; it was the reaction to it. Within five minutes of sitting behind the wheel, I had pulled up at a zebra crossing; rather than walking across, the female pedestrian waiting curtsied and waved me on. Five minutes later I was at some traffic lights and a tramp gave me a salute – and not even a two-fingered one. This would not have happened if I was driving any other car. A Rolls-Royce has two things in abundance – presence and personality. The new Ghost Series II is no exception. Just look at it. It’s the only car that can make a City skyscraper look a bit, you know, meh. At 17ft 8in long, it’s not much smaller than one, either. With its huge glistening grill, it shouts money louder than any barrow boy on a trading floor – although, no doubt it uses far more gentrified language as it does so. The Rolls is more of a family wealth manager than some flash-in-the-pan trader. It has heritage in spades and, despite being a thoroughly modern car, upholds many old-school charms. For instance, the gear selector is an elegant stalk off the steering wheel – not some unsightly knob. The cold light of the central display screen can be shielded from view by a wooden panel at the press of a button. The heating sliders say ‘soft’ not ‘low’. It has heating sliders, for God’s sake. And those are just the things you can see. Press a button on the front door sill and an umbrella will fire out. Pull down on the leather ring between the rear seats and you’ll find another treat: a two 35cl-bottle champagne fridge. In the rear armrest there’s a hidden drawer: one press for the ashtray, two ➤

PHOTOGRAPH by James Lipman/jameslipman.com

I was at traffic lights and a tramp gave me a salute – and not even a two-fingered one squaremile.com

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ASSETS

HOW WE ROLL: (clockwise from this image) Rolling through the Square Mile – there are five wheel designs to choose from, all with self-righting centres displaying the famous ‘RR’ monogram; the Ghost Series II blending in between the City’s skyscrapers; screens in the backs of the seats

➤ presses reveals a secret compartment (OK, not that secret now I’ve told you about it). There’s a lot of theatre about a RollsRoyce. The Spirit of Ecstasy, in its perpetual bow, rises from the bonnet as you unlock the car. The elegant statue is lit up at night by a blue halo of light emitted from around its base. The bonnet of the new Ghost even has two channels sculpted into it – designed to emulate a jet stream in the wake of the Spirit’s outstretched wings. As I say, theatrical stuff. The styling of the Ghost Series II is a little more aggressive than its predecessor. The headlights are new curved LED units with unbroken daytime running lights around the frame. Every panel of the front has been updated – where the Series I looked a little passive, there’s no doubt the Series II has intent. And, fortunately, it’s not all show. Under that prolific aluminium bonnet is a twin-turbo, 6.6-litre powerplant that takes

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even see it. It then changes to the best gear for the job, depending on your driving style. For example, if you’re coming up to a roundabout, it will change down a gear or two, so you don’t have to trouble yourself to brake too hard. Almost like a trusted advisor: “Don’t you worry about this, sir – I’ve got your back.” Of course, you do have to remember to give way. Although, in a car like the Ghost, you feel like everyone should give way to you in principle. The tech doesn’t end under the bonnet: the car recognises simple voice commands (ensure you adopt the Queen’s English for speech); there’s on-board wifi allowing numerous devices to hook up; and then there’s that sound system. Rather than hiring in an external company to make it, Rolls has done the work in-house. Like a watch manufacture making all its own parts, Rolls believes in authenticity at every level. The music you most love sounds better than you’ve ever heard it. Turn up the volume on the 18-speaker system, and it’s like the O2 arena sound stage has been parcelled up and unleashed in the cabin. It is, like everything else the car does, genuinely special. It was in no small way thanks to the Ghost Series I that Rolls-Royce’s profits have been as impressive as they have for the past decade. Big things were expected of its successor, and with the Series II, it would seem that the company’s future is in very safe hands. ■

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PHOTOGRAPHS by James Lipman

The Ghost Series II is smoother than silk wrapped in cashmere, on a bed of velvet

the Ghost from 0-62 mph in a whisker less than five seconds. No clunky V8 here, thank you very much. This sizeable V12 is more of a purrer than a, er, growler. Foot down and you can hear it – just about – rolling its Rs, a charismatic ‘R-r-r-r-r-Rolls-r-r-r-r-Royce’. The drive is smoother than silk wrapped in cashmere on a bed of velvet. As my fatherin-law put it: “It’s like someone has gone out ahead of you and ironed all the roads.” You just don’t feel bumps anymore. You’re vaguely aware that they’re out there – in the same way you’re aware of, say 4G, or infrared rays – but you’re so anaesthetised from them that they barely make it into your consciousness. Despite this, though, you’re not as disconnected from the driving experience as you might expect. It still feels like a precise machine: it darts into corners in a far more eager way than you’d expect for something that weighs the best part of two-and-a-half tonnes. In fact, the Ghost Series II is one of the most driver-focused cars the marque has made. There’s head-up display, so details including your speed (and the limit), sat-nav instructions, proximity and danger warnings float at the bottom of the windscreen. The ZF eight-speed automatic gearbox is whippet fast, too – and has the latest satellite technology incorporated. This means the car can anticipate a sharp corner before you can


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MOTORS BMW

ELECTRIC DREAMS

The BMW i8 makes KEVIN HACKETT ’s list of trailblazers for its expert design and energy that knows no bounds

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BMWi8

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ENGINE

1.5

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WEIGHT

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ERY FEW AUTOMOBILES throughout history can stake a claim to being a trailblazer. Jensen’s FF, the first Range Rover, Lamborghini’s Miura and the Tesla Roadster all make the grade because they brought to the market something entirely new, whether it was previously unheard of technology, an entirely new genre of motoring or enormous speed without an internal combustion engine. But that limited trailblazer honour roll has a new entry: the BMW i8 – a car like nothing else you’ll have seen, let alone driven. BMW says it’s a supercar, and certainly the basics are there. It has a twin-turbocharged engine that’s mounted amidships; it has perfect 50:50 weight distribution; it will reach 62mph from rest in just 4.4 seconds; it looks like something from a Dan Dare comic; and its doors open outward and upwards, just like those of a McLaren. It has almost no luggage space and, while it does have two rear seats, they’re really there for symbolic value. It also has a striking body constructed from carbon fibre and composites, making it incredibly light and stiff. It’s all extremely sexy, exciting stuff. However, there are a number of things about the i8 that would ordinarily deny it supercar status. Its engine is basically the same as the one Mini fits in the new Cooper (and no, it isn’t even the Cooper S), which means it is a 1.5-litre, turbocharged three-cylinder unit. Yes, this supercar has half the cylinder quota of most BMW 3 Series. It has skinny tyres, no visible exhaust pipes and, when you start it, it’s silent and remains so as you start to move. Then, too, consider that it’s entirely capable of returning fuel economy to the tune of 135mpg and, if you only ever use it for shortish commuting (a maximum of 23 miles per day), your tank of fuel would probably last forever. The i8’s hybrid powertrain is extremely impressive. In essence, the tiny engine is supplemented by an electric motor, which comes on stream as and when the car’s onboard computers decide it’s required, working in conjunction with the driving mode you personally select. For example, for ultimate performance, you can choose for everything to work together at the same time, or you can simply cruise around in all-electric mode. And, no matter what mode you’re in, the car has its torque instantly on tap – that’s the beauty of electro-motive force. With the engine powering the rear wheels and the motor turning the fronts, it’s effectively four-wheel drive when you’re really gunning it, too. The batteries are, as one would expect, topped up when the petrol engine is running but with the potential abundance of solar generated power in this part of the world –

we’re on the Californian coast for the launch – there are bound to be owners tempted to use it only as an electric car, with the engine being there as a back-up to negate any possible ‘range anxiety’. Either way, the message from BMW here is loud and clear: efficiency is the order of the day. Go clean or go home. It’s impossible to overstate the lengths BMW has gone to in order to make everything work just so; to make the i8 feel and work like any other BMW and the way the car shifts between different power sources is impressive. My first drive takes place in Malibu – where a car only turns heads if it’s truly stunning – and the i8 proves to be constantly surrounded by crowds of gawking onlookers. The elderly stop, stare and point; joggers collide with lampposts; women shout “that’s preeddeeee” in appreciation; and a thousand smartphones are pointed in its direction to capture the moment of its passing for posterity. Only supercars can do this – things are looking up. It’s easy to see why everyone is so taken with the i8 and, truth be told, it looks better in person than in any photograph. It has all the visual characteristics of a desirable sports car, with a long wheelbase, short overhangs and a mean, solid stance. The nose appears extremely low and wide, but this isn’t simply to make it look aggressive – everything with this car is designed to be optimally aerodynamic. At the sharp end, a prominent doublekidney grille tells us this is a BMW, even though there’s no radiator behind it, and a V-shaped ‘black belt’ starts on the bonnet, leading the eye and the rushing air around the body to the rear via a rollercoaster of curves. Viewed from either side, there is an exaggerated wedge shape and long, drawnout lines that shout ‘performance’, and all the surfaces join together in a cohesive whole that lends it a truly unique appearance. And before you start thinking some aspects of its design are rather contrived or unnecessary, they’re not. Every curve, crease, channel, dip, bump or flat expanse has been designed that way for a reason: maximisation of efficiency, which has resulted in a drag coefficient of just 0.26 – highly appreciated by the Californian populace who have fanatically taken to hybrids. ➤

A V-shaped ‘black belt’ leads the eye around the body to the rear via a rollercoaster of curves 149


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➤ Getting into the i8 isn’t a particularly glamorous affair, though. With the ‘dihedral’ doors swung up (allow plenty of room for this, as they need 552 millimetres of space to open outward and upwards) you enter posterior first. Once your bottom is in place, you bring your legs gracefully up and over the wide sills, and then you’re good to go. It takes a couple of tries to perfect it, but it’s the only way if you don’t want to end up on a chiropractor’s bench. Pull down the door and you’re surrounded by a beautifully minimalist interior, slightly reminiscent of the 6 Series, but much cleaner in design, where cool blue light bathes the sculpted surfaces. An analogue power indicator within the driver’s main instrument binnacle displays electric power inputs and outputs, as well as showing what’s left in reserve. It’s all very elegant and intuitive but, after the future shock visuals outside, it’s perhaps a little unimaginative and BMW has

Unstoppable torque thrusts the car with tremendous force, with or without the engine squaremile.com

missed a trick by not radically changing the concept of car interiors while it had the chance. Starting the i8 is an exercise in zero aural drama. With the instrumentation telling you you’re in Drive, that’s all there is to it – no blare of quad exhausts, not even any revcounter action – and, as you ease away from wherever it was you were parked, all you can hear is the clatter of underbody mechanicals that are normally drowned out by the sound of an engine. Silent electric propulsion soon gives way to a pleasing rush as the air passes over the cabin. Sink the throttle and there’s an uninterrupted burst of acceleration as the i8 gains speed at an alarming rate, with the engine joining in whenever you’re in danger of flattening the batteries. And that engine, despite its specification, sounds terrific – gruff and raucous, like a proper sports car should. The engine noise is channelled into the cabin via the car’s speakers. But while the soundtrack is somewhat contrived, what could never be faked is the way that this car moves when you keep the throttle nailed. Its performance is – ahem – electrifying. Unstoppable torque thrusts the car with tremendous force, with or without the engine. It’s incredibly quick, especially on these canyon switchbacks, and feels boundless in its energy. Try as I might, I cannot find a chink in the i8’s impressive armour and I just want to

keep on driving and driving, seeking out its flaws, exploring its depths and plumbing its reserves of character and sheer intelligence of design. It’s not a car that could bore you; it’s such a uniquely entertaining steer that BMW’s age-old ‘Ultimate Driving Machine’ advertising slogan is entirely appropriate. But find a chink I inevitably do and it’s nothing to do with the way the i8 goes in a straight line. The twisting roads that snake through the hills above the California coastline expose the car’s narrow tyres (less rolling resistance equals greater efficiency) as an area for improvement. They don’t take long to start squealing in protest and understeer is prevalent. Steering on the throttle, performing donuts or tyre-smoking drifts is out of the question here because, well, they’re not the most efficient way to drive, are they? This is, in light of the quantum leap the rest of the i8 represents, merely nitpicking because right here and right now, it really does feel like the future of the performance car. It’s not perfect – its handling prowess isn’t quite the match for a 911 or an F-Type – but it’s almost there, and I don’t doubt for a second that BMW is listening to critics and customers alike, already planning for its next generation. If the i8 right now is anything to go by, it could completely alter the supercar forever. It’s a trailblazer in every respect. ■

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BEST COAST: Looking south to Bixby Bridge is one of the most iconic views of Big Sur. Built in the 1930s on the Cabrillo Highway just south of San Francisco, photogenic Bixby is one of the world’s tallest single-span concrete bridges, and the gateway to the Big Sur.

TRAVEL US ROAD TRIP

SIZE DOES MATTER… PHOTOGRAPH by Andreas Hub / laif

Bombing down the West Coast’s Highway 1, JON HAWKINS ticks the quintessential American road trip off his travel bucket list

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W

HAT ARE YOU driving?” the woman in

the winery asks when I explain where we’re going next. She’d winced when I told her we were off to Big Sur – a 90-odd-mile strip of coastline so beautiful that the road that wraps along it has stopping points every few metres so you can screech to a halt and gawp – her arms waving theatrically as she mimed the perilously narrow width of the road. “Oh, you’ll be fine, it’s tiny,” she says as I point to the silver Chevy my wife and I are driving – a car so large you’d probably need a Heavy Goods Vehicle licence to drive it in the UK. You have to recalibrate your brain in California, where the default size and impact of just about everything is ‘epic’. This includes the roads (Big Sur’s tight and winding roads are vast by British standards), the cars, and most of the scenery, for that matter.

This, though, is why California’s coast is the road trip capital of the world – a place that seems to have been created for the kind of free-spirited mile-munching journey anyone who drives in London can only dream about. And at its centre is Highway 1. Beginning in the tiny town of Leggett in the north of the state, ‘The One’ traces the coastline as far as Dana Point – roughly half-way between LA and San Diego – and, depending on where you are, it gets called the Coast Highway, the Shoreline Highway, the Cabrillo Highway and the Pacific Coast Highway. Along its considerable length it winds up coastal mountains, runs along beaches, bisects cities and occasionally gets momentarily engulfed by other, bigger highways, but it’s never less than interesting. Most of the time, in fact, it’s spectacular. ➤

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➤ CALIFORNIA SOUL The trip begins with a night drive from Los Angeles to our first stop on the northern outskirts of San Diego. The city has a laidback, unassuming charm running through its beaches, historic streets and people. No doubt the scorching sun and vast coastline help, but the 85-odd craft breweries in the area might have something to do with it, too. Even if you weren’t aware that San Diego is kind of a big deal on the beer scene (the city took home 11 awards in last year’s World Beer Cup, while brewers from across the UK won just five) you’d figure it out pretty quickly. Go into any bar or restaurant, and the beer list will run to the length of a decent, leatherbound wine list in London. There’s culture, too; in the middle of the huge Balboa Park (home of the city’s famous zoo) you can find museum after museum, covering everything from science and anthropology to modern art and history. We park up on a nearby street and walk the length of the park before the strength of the sun forces us to seek solace – we’re Brits, remember – in the one thing San Diego does better than beer: the beach. Some of the region’s best beaches can be found to the north of the city, starting with the kitsch but fun seaside towns of Mission Beach and Pacific Beach. We stay just long enough to pick up sunburn and frozen yogurt, before heading further north to chilled-out, upscale La Jolla, where the scene couldn’t contrast more with its coastal neighbours – instead of taquerías, surf shops and groups of kids, there are bistros, pristine shopping boulevards and seals playing in the surf.

STAR QUALITY By the time we leave San Diego, we’re ready to make our acquaintance with the Pacific Coast Highway, which takes an impossibly

You don’t really arrive in Big Sur – it gradually dawns on you as the mountains get bigger and the sea gets bluer photogenic route north through the city beaches of Orange County. Laguna Beach, Newport Beach and Huntington Beach are the sort of towns you can imagine retiring to and spending your days guzzling coffee, playing volleyball and polishing your Mustang. Before long, the vast expanse of LA opens up in front of you. Whatever people say about the second-largest city in the US, it has undeniable presence. The palm-lined boulevards, looming downtown ’scrapers, gritty streets and lush hills studded with mansions stretch out into the hazy distance and, perhaps more than anywhere else, the question of where to start nags immediately. Things become a little easier to get your head around once you break the city down into its constituent parts, each with a personality of its own. The fact that West Hollywood (or WeHo), where we’re based, was the 84th of 88 cities in LA County to be founded gives you an idea of the scale of the place, but it’s usefully central

in terms of location and importance, the latter thanks to the notorious hotel, bar and nightclub-lined Sunset Strip, and a rich history as a counter-cultural and creative hub. It’s both a great place to hang out and soak up the city’s considerable atmosphere, and a good starting point for just about everything LA has to offer, from vista-filled hikes up nearby Runyon Canyon in the company of the beautiful, Lycra-clad people, to a trafficclogged drive down Sunset Boulevard, via Santa Monica Boulevard, towards the beach. We soon find ourselves jostling with weightlifters, skateboarders, peddlers of medicinal weed and hordes of gawpers like us on the touristy but fascinating Venice Beach. Luckily, it’s only a couple of blocks from the rather more sedate Venice canals, built in the early 20th century by Italophile developer Abbot Kinney. We drive north out of the city via the huge mansions tucked away in gated drives on the Hollywood Hills – all of which, I imagine, contain at least one Kardashian – until Sunset Boulevard hits the Pacific Coast Highway once again and the bustle and density of LA gives way to relaxed beach towns, and the urban seafronts soon become increasingly wild. It’s also where wine country proper really begins, and once you venture away from the coast you soon encounter vineyard after vineyard offering tours and tastings amid rolling hills baked by the Californian sun and rows of packed, green vines. ➤

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PHOTOGRAPHS by nobleIMAGES / Alamy; Brad Perks Lightscapes / Alamy

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GOING BIG: (this image) Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park along the rocky Big Sur shoreline. The park’s hiking trails are known for ridges, sea views from granite cliffs and an epic 80ft waterfall that drops into the Pacific Ocean; (below) the Santa Monica Freeway at sunset


Travelling together on the open road certainly has its rewards.

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PARK LIFE: (clockwise from main) Yosemite National Park; the Oakland Bay Bridge at twilight with the San Francisco skyline behind; San Francisco’s Victorian ‘Painted Ladies’ houses

A troop of worryingly happy-looking people in skin-tight athletic gear line up in front of us 156

pong (a Henry Miller reference) and aerating the lawn (which almost certainly isn’t). Much as Big Sur rises gradually up in front of you as you enter, it slowly falls back, via historic bridges and rocky coves, to sea level as you exit to the north. We’re spat out into the pristine town of Carmel before heading on our longest drive yet, west through mile after mile of flat agricultural land towards Yosemite National Park. If Big Sur blows the mind with its scale and beauty, Yosemite blows your whole body to smithereens – just looking at it is like swallowing an entire geology textbook whole. Its lush green meadows and the valley’s soaring granite cliffs and peaks – beloved by ant-like climbers and made famous by pioneering photographer Ansel Adams – are the stuff of legend, but the sheer drama is something it’s impossible to comprehend until you see it first hand.

ABOUT A BAY At this point, the idea of returning to the urban sprawl couldn’t be less appealing, and our fears are confirmed as we make our way through unremarkable inland towns and get stuck in crawling traffic on our way back towards the real world. Our base is Sausalito, a short hop over the Golden Gate Bridge to

the north of San Francisco, and fortunately any concerns are steamrollered the minute we catch sight of the city. San Francisco is, in its own way, as visually striking as the state’s natural wonders, with its collision of coastal peninsulas and estuarine bays, joined up by a network of bridges and dotted with islands. After a mammoth walking session that takes in wildly varying glimpses of the east side of the city – from the farmer’s market at the Ferry Building to the boho bars of Hayes Valley via colourful Chinatown – we flake onto a bench at the top of Telegraph Hill. The view stretches out over rooftops, down perilously steep streets and out over the bay. Or it does, until a troop of worryingly happylooking people in skin-tight athletic gear line up in front of us. “Raise yourself up to the sky,” says a lone voice, and in unison around a dozen pairs of arms lift up and hang in the air. I ask a lost-looking tagger-on what they’re up to – yoga hiking tours, apparently. “Perhaps we should have done that,” my wife says as they bound energetically onto their next stop. Anywhere else in the world, at any other time, I’d have laughed. But in California, on this road trip? Sure. Not that we did, of course – I’m still not that Californian. Well, not yet. ■ For more information, go to visitcalifornia.com

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PHOTOGRAPHS by Banana Pancake / Alamy; Andreas Hub / laif; Brian Jannsen / Alamy

➤ BIG IS BETTER You don’t really arrive in Big Sur – the place just gradually dawns on you, as the mountains get bigger, the hills get greener, and the sea gets bluer, and Highway 1 wraps its way along the whole thing. While the roads aren’t quite as narrow as our winemaking friend had suggested, it’s not an easy drive, as your gaze is so frequently wrenched away from the road towards the steep cliffs shelving the Pacific. Big Sur is freakishly, jaw-droppingly beautiful and it’s unsurprising to learn that generations of free-spirited creative types have headed there to work, walk, think and generally cut themselves off from civilisation. At the small and folksy Henry Miller Library (the writer lived in Big Sur between 1942 and 1962) we’re greeted by the surreal sight of the next generation of young hippies playing ping


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THE BIG ONE: New York is one of the most exciting – if intimidating – cities in the world. Whether you’re there for a week or a stopover, we’ve picked our favourites from the huge panoply on offer there.

TRAVEL NYC

ABSOLUTELY NO SLEEPING ALLOWED

Ten Lifestyle’s ALEX DALZELL taps into his Wall Street colleagues’ little black books for the best places to eat, drink, and party in New York City. You may as well leave your alarm clock at home for this one

A

S WELL AS being a financial dynamo,

New York hums with creativity, worldclass art museums, a restaurant scene that’s the envy of every city on earth (apart from London, perhaps), and underground cocktail bars that transport you back in time. The city has a bewildering amount of choice – and local knowledge is key to making the most of your time there.

PHOTOGRAPH by Vivienne Gucwa/Stocksy

EAT Keeping on top of New York’s dining scene is no mean feat – there aren’t enough days in the year to try all the new spots. However, there are a few iconic places that will always guarantee quality. Of these, Parisian-style brasserie Balthazar is a must for its seafood platter alone, and Daniel – from Manhattan

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restaurant royalty Daniel Boulud – is another fail-safe, despite falling out of favour with the Michelin inspectors last year. To be on the pulse, book in at Santina, a glass box tucked under the High Line brightened by splashes of pastel colour and easy-going staff. The Italian-tinged Mediterranean cooking looks to the sea for its headline ingredients and the bold small plates are similar to what Bobby Flay is doing at Gato in Greenwich Village, to equally high acclaim. Both are impressive, but Financial District stalwart North End Grill looks like it will draw away some of the attention with its new chef and revamped menu. If you’re looking to impress a date or picky client, bagging a reservation at the dimly lit Minetta Tavern will do the trick. It began life

as a speakeasy in the 1920s and was skilfully revamped in 2012 by Keith McNally to become one of the most revered reservations in Manhattan. It’s up there with Gramercy Tavern, another heavyweight with dishes that wow even NYC’s most hardened food snobs. For a real Wall Street classic, order the rib-eye at Delmonico’s steakhouse. All dark wood, golden light and red leather, it’s the kind of place you’d expect to see Patrick Bateman courting his next victim.

DRINK From 5pm on Thursdays and Fridays the Financial District bars are crammed with postwork drinkers. While office workers will head straight to their closest bar, it’s well worth straying further afield for more authenticity. ➤

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LET’S HEAR IT FOR NEW YORK: (clockwise from this image) the Empire State of mind; The Standard Hotel above the High Line Park in Manhattan’s Meatpacking District; Marquee nightclub in Chelsea

➤ Pull up a stool at 120-year-old PJ Clarke’s on Third Avenue for legendary cheeseburgers washed down with craft ale. Its Irish American roots are obvious, as is the case at The Dead Rabbit on Water Street. Owned by two Belfast bar veterans, it specialises in resurrecting long-forgotten drinks – and the whiskey-laced John the Baptist is something special. For more well-balanced mixes, Weather Up in Tribeca is the area’s number one, but the Brandy Library and its tome-sized drinks menu comes a close second. Across town, the East Village has New York’s highest concentration of innovative cocktail bars, with Death & Co, The Wayland and Amor y Amargo leading the pack. If you want to head high and make the most of the balmy summer evenings, the rooftop

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If you’d rather slink into a barely lit jazz club and sip bourbon until the wee hours, go to Village Vanguard, an old stomping ground of Miles Davis and John Coltrane, or try the old-world Smoke Jazz Club on Broadway.

PARTY Nightlife in the Big Apple has changed considerably since the days when it was the clubbing capital of the world. The closure of Studio 54 and Danceteria in the 1980s saw that title head east to London and Berlin, but there are still plenty of places to party – this is, after all, the city that never sleeps. A handful of clubs embody the same philosophy of the old-school hangouts, and Cielo in the West Village is one of them. It still welcomes New York DJ veterans such as Tedd Patterson and Masters at Work’s Louie Vega, and the atmosphere on the sunken dancefloor is always attitude-free. If you want to hunt down the sounds of the underground, follow the bleeps, squeaks and bass to the Bossa Nova Civic Club over in Brooklyn. For bottle service and heaps of glamour, the revamped Marquee and Tao Downtown tick all the boxes, but the hottest ticket is still The Box. With an outpost in London, the Lower East Side original is where the debauchery began, and if you can get past the bouncers it’s an experience that’ll stick with you for a while.

STAY To stay right on Wall Street, choose Andaz, with its airy, loft-like rooms featuring automatic blackout screens and handy onetouch light settings for weekend lie-ins. If you’d prefer to be in the heart of Manhattan cool, opt for the Gansevoort in the Meatpacking District. The ‘urban resort’ is far more than a place to rest your head. Nab a spot on the fashionable rooftop terrace in the late afternoon sun, or the garden later in the evening when the city lights up. There is also a 45ft heated rooftop pool (open year-round) and the excellent Exhale Spa. For one of the most eye-popping wake-ups, check into a park-facing room at the Mandarin Oriental for floor-to-ceiling panoramas of Central Park and the Manhattan skyline. Located on the 35th floor of the Time Warner Center, even the bi-level spa and indoor pool have views over the Hudson. ■ Ten Lifestyle Concierge is the world’s largest lifestyle concierge provider. For more info: 0845 020 5270;

membershipenquiries@tengroup.com

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PHOTOGRAPHS by Westend61 GmbH; P. Batchelder / Alamy

If you’d rather slink into a barely lit jazz club and sip bourbon until the wee hours, go to Village Vanguard

bar at The Standard is yet to be beaten for al fresco thrills, but The Delancey on the Lower East Side and Chelsea’s PH-D are good backups should you struggle to get a seat.


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SPIRITS GIN

ORIGINAL GIN MIKE GIBSON visits a distiller

making fine gin right on the City’s doorstep. We’ll drink to that…

GIN CITY Back in the good ol’ 1700s there were gin distilleries and gin shops on every street of the City. God, we miss those days. But after a series of acts of Parliament and high taxation, the last distillery closed in 1825. No gin was made in the City for the next 187 years. This all changed in 2012 when Jonathan Clark installed a micro gin distillery in his speakeasy-style bar City of London Distillery (COLD) at 22-24 Bride Lane, EC4Y 8DT.

WHAT’S IN A NAME Clark’s two copper stills are set behind floor-to-ceiling bombproof glass at COLD. His first product was the aptly named City of London Dry Gin. A Sloe Gin came next and then, most recently, the super-premium Square Mile Gin was launched. Needless to say, we approve of the name on the bottle as much as the gin inside it. ■ £45; cityoflondon distillery.com PHOTOGRAPH by David Harrison

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PRIZE BOTTLING IT: For your chance to win a bottle, click on the Competitions tab on squaremile.com and answer the simple question. Also, COLD is offering £5 off a bottle of Square Mile Gin to anyone who presents this magazine in person at the bar. T&Cs apply. Offer ends 31 May 2015.

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FOOD & DRINK REVIEWS

SIX AND THE CITY

BARRAFINA ADELAIDE ST BY NICK SAVAGE Sometimes you find counter culture where you’d least expect it: Covent Garden, for one. And not the bearded, overcaffeinated kind you’d expect from somewhere like Dalston. Barrafina, the tapas counter in Soho, won a Michelin star in late 2014 for its beautiful Iberian small plates, and opened its second outpost on Adelaide Street around the same time. This venture is a bit larger. Well, it boasts 29 stools as opposed to 23, but the scope of the cooking is also broader, with off-piste menu options including chargrilled lamb’s kidneys and delicious deep-fried sea anemone. Much has been made of the queues but it’s quite pleasant standing at the window counters, drinking Galician beer and ordering from the ‘para picar’ menu. Do as the Spanish do and arrive after work at 5.30pm or later at 10pm and you may not have to wait. It sure beats languishing in Dalston, anyway. ■

With ambitious menus inspired by six countries, M Restaurants is a great addition to the City’s steakhouse scene, MIKE GIBSON writes

PHOTOGRAPH (Barrafina) by Paul Winch-Furness

The steak’s fat gently crackles between the teeth, and the meat’s sinews part easily squaremile.com

tender, and is flanked by the show-stopping chicken karaage with ginger and wasabi sauce, but also smoked duck with boudin noir. The karaage is fantastic, and it’s made better still by a silky, beautifully complex 2010 Newton unfiltered chardonnay. The culinary journey continues with the main event – an Argentine wet-aged black angus sirloin and a South African rib-eye. The fat gently crackles between the teeth, the meat’s sinews part easily – this is steak at its opulent, juicy best. We’re even treated to a piece of wagyu that can be cut with a fork. Sides are similarly well-judged, for the most part. Creamed spinach is OK; smoked mashed potatoes are an entirely different proposition – luscious, gorgeously tinged with the kind of smokiness only real woodchips can provide, and endlessly moreish – and a Château Grand Village Rouge 2010 is both a great pairing and a refreshing departure from malbec. I leave sated, but also converted: after all, why limit yourself to the best of one nation when you could have the best of six? ■ 2-3 Threadneedle Walk, 60 Threadneedle Street, EC2R 8HP; 020 3327 7770; mrestaurants.co.uk

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OR A GLORIOUSLY simple foodstuff, beef can be a divisive little devil. It’s revered in countries around the world, each of which has its own unique tradition – so when former Gaucho head honcho Martin Williams set up his own shop last year, he sought to go further than other steakhouses, and give his patrons access to more than just one nationality’s ideal. The result was M Restaurants – a venue whose huge room plays host to M Bar, M Raw and M Grill, which serve up food and drink representing not one, not two, but six countries: the US, Argentina, Japan, South Africa, Australia and France. This is evidenced in our starter: a yellow fin tuna sashimi with ground wasabi is gloriously

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GOLF GOLF MASTERS

HIGHLAND SWING NICK BAYLY takes his pick of Scotland’s finest golf

resorts, home to some of the most iconic links, the best hotels and wonderfully distracting scenery

GLENEAGLES, PERTHSHIRE While Gleneagles was a world-renowned destination long before it hosted the 2014 Ryder Cup, its status as Europe’s most luxurious sporting estate reached rarer heights after it staged golf’s most hotly contested team event last September. While Rory McIlroy et al tackled the Jack Nicklaus-designed PGA Centenary Course, the Perth-based five-star resort also offers two other impressive 18-hole tracks, in the shape ➤

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QUEEN OF SCOTS: (Clockwose from this image) The Royal Hotel and surrounding buildings from across Kintyre’s Campbeltown Harbour, five miles from the Machrihanish Dunes course; the rolling links at Trump International; Archerfield

➤ of the King’s and Queen’s courses, which many astute observers rate even more highly. Whichever combination you play, you can be guaranteed a good night’s sleep afterwards in a choice of luxury accommodation. Guests can rest up in one of the hotel’s 232 recently upgraded rooms and suites, or rent one of the luxury lodges that are located on the estate. Boasting four dining options – including Scotland’s only two-Michelin-starred restaurant, Andrew Fairlie – and a 1920s-inspired art deco bar with more than 120 different whiskies, there are plenty of reasons not to leave the hotel’s tartan-clad comfort. But with so many traditional Scottish country pursuits on your doorstep, it would be foolish not to venture out for a spot of huntin’, shootin’ and fishin’ on the 850-acre estate. gleneagles.com

MACHRIHANISH DUNES, KINTYRE The only course in Scotland to be built on a Site of Special Scientific Interest, Machrihanish Dunes transports visitors back 120 years to a time when golf was at one with nature. No chemicals, pesticides or irrigation systems are allowed on the 18-hole course, which is adjacent to the original 12-hole layout built by Old Tom Morris back in 1879. Amazingly, only seven of the 260-odd acres of the site have been disturbed to make way for the rumpled fairways and punchbowl greens of the David McLay Kidd-designed 7,082-yard course, which makes for a truly unique links experience, and one that requires pinpoint accuracy to score well, especially when the wind gets up, as it often does on this remote outcrop, where just getting there seems like a moral victory. Away from the course the resort has a real village atmosphere, with numerous whitewalled cottages to rent, two beautiful hotels – The Ugadale and The Royal [the latter is

PHOTOGRAPH (Machrihanish) by Brendan MacNeill

squaremile.com

pictured above] – and even its very own pub in which to celebrate (or commiserate) after a fantastic (or terrible) round. machrihanishdunes.com

ARCHERFIELD LINKS, EAST LOTHIAN Sharing the same stretch of coastline occupied by the majestic links at Muirfield and North Berwick, Archerfield is a relatively new kid on East Lothian’s golfing block. Opened just ten years ago, it is home to two outstanding layouts – the Fidra and Dirleton – which provide high-quality entertainment for its exclusive membership and honoured guests. Stars of the European Senior Tour will also be testing their skills on the pristine fairways when the Scottish Senior Open takes place here in August this year. At just shy of 7,000 yards, the Fidra is the main golfing draw at Archerfield, with its combination of tree-lined fairways (for the first 11 holes), and bump-and-run approaches to large, contoured greens, requiring a variety

of shot-making skills to score well on a course that is almost unique to Scotland. Clubhouse facilities are housed in the grand Archerfield House, while visitors can stay in a choice of accommodation, from 15 rooms in the main house to apartments in the Pavilions, or a selection of three and four-bedroom luxury lodges dotted around the estate. The club is also home to Nike Golf’s stateof-the-art UK Performance Fitting Centre, as well as a spa to relax in after a hard round. archerfieldhouse.com

TRUMP INTERNATIONAL GOLF LINKS, ABERDEEN Opened amid a great deal of controversy in 2012, Donald Trump’s stunning links on the northeast coast of Scotland seems to have been worth the trouble – it’s an instant classic. Taking its lead from the mountainous sand hills that were there at the outset, most of the holes on the 7,400-yard Martin Hawtreedesigned links follow the valley floor, with the fairways rippling gently under your feet like ill-fitting carpets. It’s a classic ‘out-and-back’ design, with only the 13th veering from west to east within the site’s narrow confines. Those looking for weak holes soon accept that they’re just not there. From the showstopping short third, to the majestic parfive fourth, it challenges at every turn, with heather, rough and pot bunkers to catch every errant shot. Thankfully there are six different tees to soften the challenge, but once the winds gets up no hole can be too short. Once the course has beaten you up, weary golfers can retire to the cosseted luxury of the nearby MacLeod House & Lodge, Trump’s luxury 19-bedroom hotel, which has recently been awarded five-star status. Brimming with period features, and featuring Italian marble ➤

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➤ bathrooms, each room is lavishly furnished with Trump-branded items at every turn, just in case you forget who owns the joint. trumpgolfscotland.com

TURNBERRY, AYRSHIRE

GOING SCOTCH: (clockwise from this image) The Fairmont St Andrews Hotel in Fife; Carnoustie, also in Fife, which is due to host The Open Championship in 2018; Turnberry’s 18-hole Ailsa course, named after the Marquess of Ailsa, who owned the land previously

Host of umpteen Open Championships, most recently in 2009, when Tom Watson’s fairytale sixth Claret Jug slipped away from him at the end, Turnberry is an iconic venue for golf fans the world over. It’s also another of Trump’s golfing resorts, which he purchased in 2013. Whether you want to recreate the famous 1977 ‘Duel in the Sun’ on the Ailsa Course, or tackle the equally majestic Kintyre, Ayrshire’s dramatic coastline provides a stirring backdrop to any round. For less-assured players, there’s also the 9-hole Arran course. The clay-tiled hotel, which dominates the skyline inland, is equally iconic, and provides suitably comfortable lodgings in which to recuperate between rounds. The five-star resort has undergone a significant transformation in the past two years, so whether you opt for the convenience of the hotel or the self-catering lodges located directly opposite the clubhouse, you will be staying in considerable style. After a game, guests can sup on a single malt in the Ailsa Bar, before sitting down to dinner in the 1906 Restaurant, from where you can watch the sun set over Ailsa Craig and the Isle of Arran. For the more active-minded the same view is also available from a 20-metre glass-walled indoor pool, which is part of the award-winning ESPA spa. turnberry.co.uk

CARNOUSTIE, FIFE The Championship course on which Padraig Harrington enjoyed one of his finest hours in 2008 has been described as the ‘supreme test’, and was rated by Walter Hagen as ‘the greatest course in the British Isles’. At 7,421 yards off

TITLEIST SCOTTY CAMERON GOLO PUTTERS: Scotty Cameron is a god of the green. His latest range, an updated version of the GOLO, is an object of sheer beauty, featuring a melding of angled aluminium and stainless steel that will have golf balls purring off the face and rolling into the bottom of the cup. £315, titleist.co.uk

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the back tees, it is the longest track on the Open rota, with one of the toughest closing stretches in the business, as hapless Frenchman Jean Van de Velde will no doubt testify. The Championship course is one of three on offer, with the Buddon and the Burnside combining to offer three superbly differing tests of true links golf. Four-star accommodation can be found right behind the Championship course’s 18th green at the Carnoustie Golf Hotel, which has 75 bedrooms and ten suites, many of which offer stunning views over the courses. There is also an excellent Dalhousie restaurant serving a variety of locally sourced food. The hotel is owned and managed separately to the publicly owned golf courses, but there are plenty of allinclusive golf packages to chose from. carnoustiegolflinks.co.uk

FAIRMONT ST ANDREWS, FIFE Those wishing to stay a short distance away from the drunk uni students of downtown St Andrews during the Open can avail

themselves of the five-star accommodation on offer at Fairmont St Andrews, where 209 guest rooms, a spa, six restaurants, and two 18-hole championship courses await. There’s little difference between The Torrance and The Kittocks courses, which is a good sign, as both offer superb examples of clifftop golf, with springy, links-like turf and fast-running greens. Both courses boast great views over St Andrews Bay to the town in the distance, while stone walls and bridges spanning the burn that runs through The Torrance give it a distinctly Scottish feel. The clubhouse enjoys splendid isolation from the hotel, with dreamy views out to sea from the bar and brasserie, while back inside the imposing and somewhat corporate hotel, it’s all cosy tartans and conference rooms. The highlight among the many dining options is The Squire restaurant, which offers locally sourced Scottish fare with a modern twist, while the cook-to-order breakfasts in The Atrium are more than noteworthy. ■ standrewsbay.com

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GOLF THE OPEN

THAT’S OUR KIND OF PILGRIMAGE The Open Championship’s return to St Andrews, the spiritual home of golf, never fails to excite and enthrall, and this July’s renewal will be no different, with or without Mr Woods, says NICK BAYLY

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A St Andrews Open is like no other. From the double greens, to the world’s widest opening hole, from the Road Hole bunker to Swilcan Bridge, the course is full of familiar furniture. Then there’s the party atmosphere of a university town where pubs only just outnumber shops selling tartan golf trews. While the eight other clubs on the R&A’s list of host venues have to wait around a decade between staging the game’s oldest major, St Andrews has the privilege every five years. With such frequency comes not only the chance to build up a rich and varied history, and for armchair fans to get to grips with the somewhat idiosyncratic layout, it also allows players to become ‘Old Course specialists’. With many pros enjoying 30-year plus careers these days, and former champions being given a bye, an Open at the Old Course offers an unchanging backdrop to a surprisingly consistent cast list. It’s a cosy, comfort blanket of a tournament.

Yet this year, more than perhaps any other in recent history, offers the prospect of change. While the R&A has managed to avoid the event being overshadowed by criticism of its male-only membership following last year’s historic vote to allow women to join its ranks, there will be much gnashing of teeth in the corridors of power if Tiger Woods, the person who changed the face of golf with his devastating eight-shot victory in 2000, is not in the starting line-up when the action gets underway on 16 July. Woods is box office gold, and more than ever golf needs box office material with which to satiate the crowds and the TV-viewing public. With the BBC bowing out of covering golf in 2016, this seems like a last hurrah in many ways, but even if Tiger fails to make the starting line-up, the game’s greatest stroke play event will go on without him, and I can’t advise you strongly enough to cross off these four days in July and make the trip to Fife. ■

squaremile.com

PHOTOGRAPH by Action Images / Andrew Couldridge

HILE THERE ARE fierce clubhouse debates to be had as to precisely where or when golf was first played, there can be no arguments that St Andrews is where it all begins and ends as far as true aficionados of the game are concerned. Forget your cave paintings depicting men with hairy backs belting a rock around a field with a length of mammoth tusk, St Andrews – more specifically its Old Course – is the Centre Of The Known Golfing Universe. Football has Wembley, tennis has Wimbledon, snooker has The Crucible and darts has Frimley Green. Golf has St Andrews. Thankfully the great Scottish electorate saw sense in last September’s vote, and English visitors making the pilgrimage to this year’s Open will be able to drive across the border without a passport or needing to change their pounds for whatever kind of currency former SNP leader Alex Salmond had up his sleeve. And boy, will they come.


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Pool has never looked so a-peeling. We’re ready to chalk up our cues for a game on this very inventive table. It’s top banana, says ABY DUNSBY

RIPE FOR THE TAKING Pool is one of God’s great games – well, if God was a pub landlord, that is. We reckon we’d need some divine intervention to figure out the angles on this table, though. Either way, there should be plenty of opportunity to play some innuendo bingo.

GIVING US THE SLIP

PHOTOGRAPH by publianc larit em potinium vid ces blah

Cléon Daniel’s £6,000 banana pool table had people grinning when it went on display at the London Design Festival last summer. We asked the office their thoughts, and opinion was, er, split. Either way, we have pockets in our banana and we are pleased to see you. cleondaniel.com

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“We shape our buildings Thereafter they shape us“ Winston Churchill

se u o h w 015 o Sh ly 2 K U Ju w g e nin n g pe n i t i be o c x E ill w www.huf-haus.com


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THE EDGE OF GLORY Ever looked at your living room walls and thought, crikey, they’re really straight and boring. Well, that certainly seems to have crossed the mind of Japanese architect Chiaki Arai. He designed the enormous, verging on brutalist Kadare cultural centre in Yurihonjo. The building is characterised by strong, dynamic lines and angles. How hard can it be? You don’t even need a spirit level. ■ For more inspiration, pick up a copy of Architecture Now! Vol. 9 by Philip Jodidio (Taschen; £35)

ARCHITECTURE CHIAKI ARAI

HARD LINES PHOTOGRAPH by Sergio Pirrone

Ruthless edges and stony greys define the striking design of this cultural centre in the Akita province of Japan, finds CLARE VOOGHT

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THE PENTHOUSES AT 21 WAPPING LANE CONTEMPORARY LUXE WITH 360O VIEWS ACROSS LONDON Photo: Howard Kingsnorth


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HOLDINGS

THE PAD HAMPSTEAD

NEW DIGS ON THE BLOCK Forget fusty Victorian abodes: we’re fully embracing the new build in the form of this Hampstead Heath mansion. Its shiny new features and myriad rooms make it a place to write home about, says ABY DUNSBY

O

LD LONDON HOUSES can be overrated. All those original features and that so-called ‘period character’ might sound quaint and appealing – until you have to call in the builders because the ceiling has caved in. Luckily, ‘new build’ no longer equals ‘bland build’ – in fact, we’ve found the ideal shiny new home, and it’s got character by the bucketload. You’re welcome. Behind a deep carriage driveway and electric gates, in the heart of one of London’s most desirable neighbourhoods – Hampstead Heath – is this detached, double-fronted house. Modest, it is not: set over more than 12,400sq ft, it’s vast enough to house a family the size of the Waltons – or worse, the Kardashians. We shudder at the thought. Step into the gleaming galleried entrance hall and walk through to a giant double L-shaped drawing room, or climb the stairs to gawp at the seven bedrooms on the two floors above, one of which has a dressing room. We could while away many a happy hour on the mansion’s lower-ground floor: play a quick game of pool in the games room, then nip to the gym next door, before diving into the pool for a swim. Later, we’d saunter over to the staff room to ask someone to rustle us up a snack from the second kitchen (caviar on toast, obvs), before unwinding in the spa and catching a film in the home cinema. We’re tired just thinking about it, but luckily there’s a lift to whisk you upstairs to the bedrooms. Additional features include a wine cellar, under-floor heating, and an integral garage. There’s also room for ten cars behind the mansion’s gates – so investing in this pristine new build will give you the perfect excuse to expand your classic car collection. ■

OUT WITH THE OLD: (clockwise from main) this brand new West Hampstead house is beautifully proportioned; the airy reception area; the gym and indoor pool

Price: £18.95m. For more info: savills.com

••

We could while away many a happy hour unwinding in the spa, followed by a latenight cinema session 190

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HOLDINGS

INTERNATIONAL PORTUGAL

GET THE HOLE PICTURE With the fairway close enough to see from your own private infinity pool, this four-bedroom house in Quinta do Lago is ideally located for golfers – that is, if you can bring yourself to leave its luxurious clutches

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PHOTOGRAPHS by Marcelo Lopes

ORTUGAL’S ALGARVE WASN’T always big on golf: until three-time Open champion Sir Henry Cotton fell in love with the region, it was largely made up of fishing villages and the odd ‘sand and oil’-type course. Then, in 1966, Cotton opened the Penina resort, sparking the Algarve golf boom as local authorities saw the money-making and environmental advantages. Now, thanks to a host of excellent courses, the area is often voted one of the world’s top golf destinations. One of such tracks is the manicured San Lorenzo in Quinta do Lago, with naturally beautiful details – umbrella pine borders, saltwater lagoons and Atlantic-ocean views. Overlooking the course from its open-plan, glass-walled living, dining and kitchen area is a Parque Atlântico property that also thrives on the impressive details. The glass walls are squaremile.com

button-operated and slide open to the terrace, where the finishing touches are an infinity pool and a great big circular fire pit. Wow-inducing details continue inside the £6.9m pad. Take the glass staircase, or glass lift, upstairs to the partially glass-walled master suite (there are four bedroom suites in total), which is cantilevered over the pool. Don’t feel like schlepping all the way back down for a swim? Then don’t: there’s a Jacuzzi on the master suite’s terrace. There is an office; not that you’ll feel like working, because the games room, wine cellar, spa, gym, sauna and steam room will provide adequate distraction. If you manage to tear yourself away, beaches are nearby, as is the Unesco-protected Ria Formosa nature reserve. But you’d be forgiven for staying inside. ■ Savills Algarve +351 289 396 073; savills.com

PERFECT PORTUGUESE: [above] The house’s glass walls on the upper and lower levels reveal an outside area that has been landscaped in a minimalistic style, intended to complement the house’s unique design and blend in with the surrounding Ria Formosa nature reserve; [left] the contemporary, hanging ‘Crest’ light fitting over the table in the open-plan, glasswalled dining, kitchen and living area.


Beautifully converted warehouse building next to Aldgate and two minutes walk from the City of London. 13 luxuriously finished apartments. Beautiful to live in, or wonderfully high rental yields. Prices from ÂŁ750,000. Available immediately, three already sold.

www.hanovercapital.co.uk joel@hanovercapital.co.uk 0207 842 8522


+ TO ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION PLEASE CALL RICHARD ON 020 7819 9999

37 JERMYN STREET, LONDON,SW1Y 6DT +44 (0) 20 7734 4707 WWW.BATES-HATS.COM

A beautiful, petite diamond pendant. Each Fiorella pendant is individually made for you from a selection of natural fancy pink diamonds. Rare pink diamond and fine white diamond set in platinum.

sw-jewellery.com +44 (0) 207490 0665

FOUNDATION TO PERFECTION 020 8543 9083 info@abbotswoodflooring.co.uk 258 - 260 The Broadway, London, SW19 1SB

Alfred Sargent Exclusive and Country ranges - Sanders Shoes - Saphir Polish Valet boxes - La Cordonnerie Anglaise brushes - Corgi socks - Abbeyhorn shoehorn Free International Shipping & Free Shoe Trees with all Footwear

info@afinepairofshoes.co.uk – 01926 356222 – www.afinepairofshoes.co.uk


+ TO ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION PLEASE CALL RICHARD ON 020 7819 9999

‘A new name to know in the world of men’s shirting’ – Vogue w: frangipani-style.com fb: facebook.com/frangipani-style

HELPING YOU DISCOVER UNDERWEAR, SOCKS, AND GROOMING PRODUCTS THAT YOU’LL LOVE MensPackage helps you discover luxury underwear, socks and grooming products and more personalised to you. Join the club for monthly gifts or shop online for something new! BRANDS INCLUDING:

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Please call to arrange an appointment one of our highly experienced dentists or doctors 82 LONDON with WALL, LONDON, EC2M 5ND Only a few minutes walk away from Moorgate, Bank and Liverpool Street underground stations 82 LONDON with WALL, LONDON, EC2Mexperienced 5ND Please call to arrange an appointment one of our highly dentists or doctors Only a few minutes walk away from Moorgate, Bank and Liverpool Street underground stations

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ESSENTIALS

+ TO ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION PLEASE CALL RICHARD ON 020 7819 9999

THE YURT RETREAT ‘Experience nature in luxury’ Escape to the country in style. Set in the stunning Southwest on an Organic farm you’ll discover our extravagant Yurts, Shepherds Huts and, new for 2015, our incredible Treehouse. Getting away with friends or just getting away from it all?

FENTON TOWER

16th Century history with 21st century conveniences! A home that has played host to a King and paid the price! This is your chance to be part of history. One of Scotlands most exclusive private homes could be yours for a weekend, and will leave you with memories to last a lifetime.

T: 07773505671 W: www.theyurtretreat.co.uk

T: 01620 890089 E: manager@fentontower.com W: www.fentontower.com

FELIO SIBY

DU MAURIER

Felio Siby creates clothing for confident men on the move. Savvy and stylish, this exclusive brand of handmade clothing is made exclusively in America, but incorporates all the worldly wonder of African, European and American culture.

Du Maurier Watches presents the Maxim Black II. Swiss made, multi-layered sapphire glass and 316 surgical grade steel offsets the stunning, jet black, textured dial. Designed by English talent, Ned du Maurier Browning. Available on black, brown or blue strap. Maxim Black II men’s watch £445

T: (305) 714 - 9361 E: sales@feliosiby.com W: www.feliosiby.com

T: 0845 5193074 W: www.dumaurierwatches.com

IZITU

CIMA AZIMI

IZITU furnishings featuring the designs of Rowie Marchant. Offer hand printed and painted bespoke designs for your home and garden. Demonstrated is a directors chair from the Road Art Collection. We can also accommodate individual commissions.

Contemporary British artist Cima Azimi’s paintings explore the abstract and representational through a combination of painting techniques using mixed media such as oil paint, acrylic, ink, spray paint, batik, mono printing, heat transfer, and screen printing.

T: 07796 355 218 W: www.izitu.co.uk

T: 0745 5097 102 E: cima.azimi@live.co.uk

LAZYJACK PRESS

SALAMEKA

Buckwild Tie Check us out at www.lazyjackpress.com

Jam Space Shop - 118 Fulham Road - London SW36HU T: 00201223905020 : Salameka home accessories

SALLY LEES LONDON

SARA RAINOLDI

T: 07788703601 E: sally@sallylees.com W: www.sallylees.com

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Lazyjack Press designs punchy and irreverent ties, bow ties, and pocket with patterns such as “Foreplay,” “Spread Eagle,” and “Blue (Golf) Balls.” Most importantly, our quality is top notch. Our goods are made in Italy on Hermes silk. These ties will go from the boardroom to happy hour. Lazyjack Press is Italian elegance with modern American guts.

London designer maker Sally Lees creates hand crafted jewellery and cufflinks in combinations of silver, gold and aluminium dyed and printed by hand. Commissioning a bespoke item for your loved one or for your most valued clients couldn’t be easier just contact Sally.

Inspired by the mystique of Middle Eastern souks, SALAMEKA embodies ethnicity in intricately hand-crafted, unique home pieces from brass hammered products to tableware products creatively sketched by founder and designer Salma El Feki and implemented by the hands of her hometown, Egypt’s, most talented and experienced craftsmen.

My art is all about my energy and mood, I try to encapsulate this through my brush-strokes, colors and materials. I am inspired by a human pose or an image inside my mind. In each of my paintings there is a special undercover message that I want spectators to observe, feel something and get an emotion and find the secret figures, becoming a game between the painting and the observer.

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SWISS ARTIST

Presents The Golden Iconic Sportscar Sculptures (Limited Edition)

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+ TO ADVERTISE IN THIS SECTION PLEASE CALL RICHARD ON 020 7819 9999

The Art of Living in Camberwell on the Green.

LonDon SE5

Launching 20 & 21April 5–9pm at The Montcalm, 52 Chiswell Street EC1Y 4SA

• Featuring studio, one, two and three bedroom apartments, suited to a range of buyers and lifestyles. • Overlooking Camberwell Green, apartments are at the heart of vibrant South East London whilst being surrounded by numerous shops, restaurants and cafés.

Oval

Elephant and Castle

Borough

London Bridge

Bank

Old Street

A Development by the award winning Frasers Property. Winner Sunday Times British Homes Awards for Riverside Quarter and United Kingdom Property Awards for Vauxhall SkyGardens.

• With excellent transport links, key destinations such as Bank, St Pancras International and Knightsbridge are all reachable by tube in less than 20 minutes from Oval. • Other local amenities include a state-of-the-art library, Camberwell Arts College and King’s College Hospital, all of which are a few minutes’ walk from Camberwell on the Green.

King’s Cross St Pancras

For further information regarding the launch or the development, please contact:

020 7437 1000

Stockists of Men’s Designer Jewellery by Aagaard a stylish and contemporary combination of leather and stainless steel bracelets and links STORY by Kranz and Zeigler ◆ Missoma ◆ Daisy London ◆ UNIQUE ◆ Penny Levi and more

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At EG Chauffeurs we offer a luxury, secure and discreet chauffeur service in London and UK wide, with an exceptionally qualified and reliable team to truly boast about. Whether you require a business chauffeur, leisure travel or a chauffeur for that special evening out, we are confident we can meet and even exceed your expectations. Our large fleet of top-of-the-range vehicles are nothing short of impressive, and everybody receives the VIP treatment. For London’s finest chauffeurs please call us on: 0207 117 2905

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Spring 2015 squaremile.com |

London Craft Week

ON THE TOWN

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: A Princess yacht; artist Tommy Clarke will exhibit at The Other Art Fair; baristas at the London Coffee Festival; the Boat Race teams on the River Thames

EVENT

LONDON CRAFT WEEK 6-10 May

PHOTOGRAPHS: Princess Yacht, Mark Bramley; ‘Coloured Containers’ by Tommy Clarke, The Boat Race, Action Plus Sports Images / Alamy

LONDON YACHT, JET & PRESTIGE CAR SHOW

THE OTHER ART FAIR

Old Billingsgate and St Katherine’s Dock, 8-10 April

Victoria House, 23-26 April

Planning on buying a super yacht? We thought so. You’ll want to pop along to the London Yacht, Jet & Prestige Car Show, then, which will include launches from the world’s leading luxury yacht builders – including Princess [pictured above] – as well as charter agents and private jet makers.

The annual artist-led fair is back in a new Bloomsbury venue for its eighth edition this year. Featuring 120 unrepresented artists selected by experts including artist Gavin Turk and the Courtauld Gallery’s curator Dr Stephanie Buck, the fair gives visitors the chance to speak directly to the artists, and join in with talks and performances.

londonyachtjetandpresitgecarshow.com

theotherartfair.com

LONDON COFFEE FESTIVAL

THE BOAT RACE FESTIVAL

Old Truman Brewery, 30 April-3 May

The Old Ship W6, 11 April

Those desperate for multiple caffeine fixes should head down to the London Coffee Festival, back for 2015, to celebrate the world’s best beans. Get your buzz from gourmet coffee and speciality tea, before watching demos from world-class baristas. There’ll also be a ‘lab’ seminar programme for those that take their caffeine seriously.

The annual boat race is an institution – and this year you can celebrate it with a bevvy in hand at this Hammersmith pub’s Boat Race Festival, which incorporates lots of beer, live music and fantastic riverside views of the action. Blink and you’ll probably miss the men’s and women’s teams go past, but hey, we’re only here for the beer.

londoncoffeefestival.com

oldshipw6.co.uk

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London’s had a Fashion Week and a Design Week for years – now it’s time for Craft to have its turn in the spotlight with the arrival of London Craft Week. This new annual festival will showcase the best of craftsmanship at exhibitions and events across London, recognising old and emerging talent. From 7-9 May, founding partner Vacheron Constantin will play host to presentations from two of the Swiss watchmaker’s craftsmen – a watchmaker and an engraver – at its Bond Street store. Two of its limited edition pieces will also go on display at the V&A for opening night. For more info: londoncraftweek.com

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FOR MORE EVENTS, SCAN THIS:

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The original artworks - Roma - Amor (80 x 100 cm) & You are Enough (80 x 100) - are part of Sirenes Flower Power Collection


The original The original artworks artworks - Happy - Happy (80 x 100cm) (80 x 100cm) & Thank & Thank You AllYou (70All x 100 (70 xcm) 100- are cm)part - areofpart Sirenes of Sirenes FlowerFlower PowerPower Collection Collection

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EVERY SATURDAY FROM 6PM GENERAL ADMISSION £30 DINNER & SHOW £75 — £95

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square mile Photography Prize see more on

squaremile.com

squaremile.com |

SEND IN YOUR ENTRIES THIS MONTH

COMPETITION

PHOTOGRAPH by Mark Hedley

Happy snappers, shutterbugs, semi-pros and, well, anyone with an iPhone: send us your photos! The square mile Photography Prize celebrates the best shots of the City. Whether they’re taken of the architecture, the workforce or just a pub you spend far too much time

squaremile.com

in, send us your best images by 20 April and you could be in with the chance of winning an awesome prize – details to be announced online – plus the bragging rights. ■ Send your high-res images to

letters@squaremile.com. Or tweet/Instagram #SMPhotoPrize

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Go the extra mile squaremile.com |

READER COMPETITION

PRIZE

WIN!

Send us your best ‘Extra Mile’ photos for your chance to win an Aspinal of London Travel Collection worth £185. The prize includes: a black Aspinal classic travel wallet luxuriously lined in silk and contrasting cobalt blue soft-suede; an Aspinal deluxe passport cover featuring a contrast ribbon marker and silk lining; and two luggage tags – one large for suitcases, and one small for carry-on bags. To enter, just take a great photograph of you or a mate holding your latest copy of square mile, then tweet #extramile to

@squaremile_com or email us on

letters@ squaremile.com

Every month for the last two years, we’ve been asking you to head out into the world, square mile in hand, and share your journeys with us. For our 100th issue, we thought we’d show you what we’ve been up to, kicking off with our CEO Tim Slee. When he went to Burning Man in the Black Rock Desert last year, Tim seemed to forget his clothes, but he did remember his trusty copy of square mile. Thank God. Deputy art director Lucy Phillips was visiting our Wall St cousins last month [top right]; meanwhile, editor Mark Hedley enjoyed his December in the Everglades. Shame he couldn’t find a bigger car. ■ Next month, it’s back on you: send us your highresolution jpegs with the subject header ‘Go The Extra Mile’ to letters@squaremile.com or tweet #extramile to @squaremile_com

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Square Mile - 100 - The Power 100 Issue  

Square Mile Issue - Issue 100 - The Power 100 Issue

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