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foodism uses paper from sustainable sources

Ask me what my favourite film is, and I’ll probably say Unforgiven (Eastwood, Freeman, hats). Or maybe 2001: A Space Odyssey (duuuuuummmmmm, duuuuuummmmmm… DUM DUM!). Or, actually, how about Kurosawa’s Kakushi-toride no san-akunin (no idea, never seen it). But press me, and ask me what it actually is, and I’ll say The Jungle Book. (Or maybe She’s All That, but for the purposes of this laboured point, let’s go with Baloo et al.) Mostly, that’s all down to one scene – the bit where King Louie, the king of the apes, tries to get orphaned child Mowgli to teach him how to make fire. “Now don’t try to kid me, man cub,” he sings in undisputedbest-song-in-a-film-ever I Wanna Be Like You. “I made a deal with you. What I desire is man’s red fire, to make my dream come true.” The implication in the film is that his dream is to be more like a human, but I don’t buy it. I think the big orangutan wanted those flames so he could get some friends round, open a few cold beers (IPA, probably, seeing as he was in the middle of the Indian jungle) and barbecue a massive slab of brisket. That, at least, is the first thing I’d do if I’d freshly harnessed the power of fire. Getting back behind the grill is just one of the reasons we can’t wait for another huge summer of eating and drinking in London. Head to page 38 for our pick of what’s going on, with essential tips from those in the know. Not King Louie, though – he never did get that BBQ going. f

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FRONT COVER: Photography by David Harrison

5


050 A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT

GRAZING

FEAST

EXCESS

011 THE FOODIST

036 THE GREAT BRITISH SUMMER

070 STREET FOOD IN PALERMO

012 LOCAL HEROES

046 PIE MAKING IN MELTON MOWBRAY

076 BOTTLE SERVICE

014 STREET FOOD FIGHT 017 THE RADAR 020 WEAPONS OF CHOICE 027 RECIPES

6

050 A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT 056 THE PINK LADY FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY AWARDS 062 MIXOLOGY

083 IN THE DRINK 090 THE SELECTOR 098 DECONSTRUCT


011 THE FOODIST | 012 LOCAL HEROES | 014 STREET FOOD FIGHT 017 THE RADAR | 020 WEAPONS OF CHOICE | 027 RECIPES

— PART 1 —

GRAZE “IF YOUR FINGERS ARE IN THE LASERS THIS SUMMER, CHANCES ARE THEY’LL BE LICKED CLEAN” THE FOODIST, 011


LOCAL HEROES

THE FOODIST

F ISH SUPPE R

Goodbye dubious burgers, hello street food mecca. It’s festival season, and the gettin’s mighty good

1 POPPIES Hanbury Street, E1

F

OR SOME REASON, I remember the Sunday of Reading festival 2006 like it were yesterday. Hastily-bought food supplies completely gone, I was forced to turn to a group of yellowing white vans with open hatches – salvation in the form of a substandard doner kebab. £8. Thanks very much. It was hellish; the kind of food that would have been terrible value if it were free. But in the last few years, something’s changed: that particular breed of food truck – the one with the questionably-textured burgers and the hygiene rating scrawled on blank paper with a Sharpie – thankfully, seems to have been relegated to feeding fans at the football (and, as a season ticket-holder, I can say even that offering’s slowly improving). Meanwhile, the festival food scene is absolutely booming. By the time you read this, east London’s Field Day (fielddayfestivals.com) will have been fed by an eclectic line-up of traders

CHART ATTACK It’s pretty difficult knowing which foods are cool to eat, let alone which ones are tasty. So we’ve devised this handy matrix to help you know when you’re not allowed to eat something, even if you really like it. You can thank us later.

curated by the king of London street food, Street Feast (streetfeastlondon.com). Later in the year, On Blackheath will usher in chefs and restaurant pop-ups to rival some of the capital’s biggest food events; Grillstock (grillstock.co.uk) is a music festival borne out of the food scene, rather than vice versa. Further afield, Secret Garden Party’s (secretgardenparty.com) part to play in festival food gentrification continues with the launch of Soul Fire, its Italian fine-dining hub that overlooks a massive, tranquil lake; and Festival Number 6 (festivalnumber6.com) is holding ‘long-table banquets’ as well as a Welsh Produce Market and a huge bill of delicious, albeit largely pun-led, street food vendors (Piggie Smalls, anyone?). If your fingers are spending some time in the lasers this summer, chances are they’ll be well and truly licked clean. Amen to that. f Read more on the best festivals for food on p45

POT NOODLE

2

HOOK Brixton Station Road, SW9

“There’s been a terrible shipping accident,” is something you might say when you see Pop Brixton, a space made up of repurposed sea containers and playing host to a wealth of great restaurants, among them fish bar Hook’s second London location. hookrestaurants.com

INSTANT RAMEN

TASTY

CHEAP FRIED CHICKEN

Owner Pop Newland has been cooking up classic East-End fish ‘n’ chips all his life, and some time ago he decided to ramp up the quality, bringing in fish from Peterhead Fisheries via Billingsgate Market and recreating a 1940s feel in his two restaurants and takeaway counter in Spitalfields. poppiesfishandchips.co.uk

BUTTERMILK FRIED CHICKEN

UK SWEETS ANGEL DELIGHT

QUINOA

UNCOOL

‘COOL’ SWEDE US SWEETS

COW TONGUE SEMOLINA

DUCK TONGUE

DISGUSTING

TOFU

11


LOCAL HEROES + F I SH S UPP ER

3

4

ON THE ROOF WITH VINTAGE SALT

Des McDonald has been one of the true champions of the fish ’n’ chip cause since opening his first restaurant, The Fish & Chip Shop, in May 2013. Now, his restaurants are so popular that he’s been (not literally) forced to open pop-ups to satisfy the demand. The latest takes place on prime real estate – the rooftop at Selfridges – until the end of September. selfridges.com

FOODISMUK

KERBISHER & MALT

5

Rosebery Avenue, EC1R

KRUG & CHIPS Covent Garden Market, WC2E

Posher still is this swanky pop-up brought to you by Krug champagne alongside Tom Sellers, chef-patron of acclaimed Bermondsey spot Restaurant Story. It’s the continuation of an annual initiative, in which Krug chooses an ingredient and a chef to curate a menu. This is, at least in Krug’s eyes, the year of the potato, and the resultant menu will include simple classics, as well as dishes like monkfish cheek curry with matchstick fries and lobster claw and potato spaghetti with tartare sauce. Hurry, though – it’s only running from 8-12 July. krug.com/krugandchips

TREND #1: KEEP ON TRUCKING

TREND #2: POPPIN’ FRESH

How food truck location affects taste

How good something is if it ‘pops up’ WOW

SHOREDITCH A FESTIVAL

PC WORLD CAR PARK

A RESTAURANT A BOOK

OH DEAR

VILE

12

#AMAZING

Wait – you’re eating what? In what part of London? In an actual, permanent restaurant? Oh, God – it’s worse than we thought. Luckily, we’ve crunched some numbers and our crack team are here to help you navigate the culinary minefield with your street cred (virtually) intact.

@FOODISMUK

With a host of US classic foods put one-by-one on an enormous pedestal recently (brace yourselves for the full-scale invasion of the hot dog later this year), our humble fish ’n’ chips often take a back seat. Not if Kerbisher & Malt has its way, however – the restaurant group is quietly turning the original British seaside staple into a seriously good dinner, not just a guilty pleasure, with a burgeoning restaurant empire. Its fifth location is the first outside of west and south-west London, slap-bang in the heart of the City. kerbisher.co.uk

Oxford Street, W1A

CHART ATTACK

FOLLOW US

A BOUT OF HIVES


give your taste buds a spanking.

all the flavour. half the fat.


STREET FOOD FIGHT

Vietnam takes on Taiwan in this epic battle between bread and bun. Who will take the ‘East Asian carbs and filling’ mantle? It’s going to be a cracker

BÁNH MÌ

Traditional Vietnamese baguettes The term ‘less is more’ doesn’t apply to bánh mì, which are literally bursting with outrageous numbers of tastebud-tantalising ingredients. Fancy a meatball in your sandwich, some paté, or perhaps a slice or two or pork belly? Why bother agonisingly choosing between them when you can have all three? And don’t forget a liberal handful of pickled carrots, chilli and cucumber for good measure.

◆◆ Whaam Banh Mi;

40 Great Windmill St. Tom Barlow’s Whaam is a shrine to bánh mì, with pop art murals and a quick-service counter for the hungry hordes. whaambanhmi.com

Biblical restaurant where gourmet chefs serve top-quality food and premium judgement. Highlights include Noah’s Whale (with real whale), Eve’s apple temptation crumble and Christ pudding.

Having started as a street food stall at Broadway Market, Banhmi11 is now at the forefront of bánh mì brilliance, with two standalone cafes.

VS

BAO

Pillowy, steamed Taiwanese morsels The words ‘steamed’ and ‘bun’ may not have you drooling, but these soft, pillowy and pleasingly malleable buns come filled with an array of punchy fillings, the most popular of which feature pork or duck in some guise or another. Extras include herbs, crushed peanuts or crispy-fried shallots.

◆◆ BAO; Lexington St.

There’s a reason there were queues outside before BAO even opened. There’ve been rave reviews, too. baolondon.com

T HE W INNE R IS

◆◆ Yum Bun; various.

Accolades for this street food stalwart are many – its signature duck and hoi sin bao is a winning one. yumbum.co.uk

BA O

Try as we might, we just can’t resist these totally moreish filled parcels.

14

CORDEN BLEU James Corden brings his ‘winning’ charm back to the UK with his new concept restaurant. All the food’s blue, from the steamed quail to the seared jackfruit, and the funnyman himself waits tables, pours drinks and engages in ‘hilarious’ banter with the clientele.

CAIN & ABLE

◆◆ Banhmi11; various.

banhmi11.com

RESTAURANT CONCEPTS WE’D LIKE TO SEE

OLD SALT Eschewing the current trend to reduce salt in cuisine, Old Salt has it in heaps. Salt cakes, salt beef, salt water. Even the waiters are salty. Just don’t lick them.

SOLDIER, SOLDIER Ex-members of the forces provide breakfast, with bacon butties, black pudding and, of course, eggs with soldiers. It’s free, but customers must pay by cleaning their own plates and doing sit ups. BITE-SIZED

FOODISM.CO.UK/ NEWSLETTER


children’s

sto

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Ge t

o ok

yo

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yb

F ur

on

lin

e at

K e r r y gold.

c o.

uk

Kerrygold works with small co-operative farms where cows are free to graze on lush green grass, giving Kerrygold butter its deliciously unique taste.


DRINKING GRAZING DINING TRENDING

THE RADAR @NewOpenings picks out the best restaurants opening their doors to the hungry masses this summer

Dining

Grazing

AUGUST

OPEN NOW

Fans of Spanish restaurant Donostia rejoice – the much-loved Basque spot is expanding, and new offering Lurra is located just across the road. Literally. Food at the new site is influenced by erretegias, the charcoal and wood grills found all over the Basque Country, so expect to see an array of fish and meats sizzling away, including whole turbot grilled in fish baskets (below). There will also be a wine-tasting cellar in the basement, and a chef’s garden outside. W1H 5BA; lurra.co.uk

This Japanese/Latin raw bar and grill is the latest addition to Clapham’s eclectic food and drink scene, and with an upbeat atmosphere and sharing plate concept, it promises to fit right in with the sociable vibe of the area. Ceviche and sushi take centre-stage on the food menu, alongside hot specials from the robata grill, while over on the drinks side, choose anything from a pisco sour or Japanese craft beer to a positively virtuous pressed cane juice. SW4 7UR; wearemommi.com

L URRA

M OM M I

Dining

254 PARADISE Trending

B ONE DAD DI ES O LD STRE ET

AUGUST

This, the third Bone Daddies to open in London, completes a holy trinity for the ramen aficionado. Located in the much- hyped Bower development, the new restaurant will serve its (much-Instagrammed) bowls of ramen (above), alongside dishes developed specifically for the site. Thirsty? The chain’s signature Yuzu Margarita will be making the migration east too. EC1; bonedaddiesramen.com

JULY

Much-lauded Clapham favourites the Dairy and the Manor have secured Robin Gill’s place on the culinary map and, having well and truly conquered SW4, he’s set about taking his empire a bit further east. Opening under a railway arch in Bethnal Green (of course), 254 Paradise will channel the spirit of its Clapham counterparts, with the addition of an open kitchen where you can sit up on the pass. E2 9LE; @paradiserow254

17


Grazing

Trending

JULY

JULY

After a successful pop-up last year, 2011 Masterchef winner Tim Anderson is finally opening a permanent restaurant in the ever-evolving surrounds of Brixton. Go along expecting first-rate ramen and dishes inspired by traditional regional Japanese cuisine. SW9 8LF; @nanbanlondon

Founded in Japan in 1985, ramen specialists Ippudo has made its way to Canary Wharf. Specialising in two pork-based broths – the Shiromaru Classic, a traditional white pork-based broth, and Akamaru Modern, a richer concoction seasoned with Ippudo’s secret miso paste – the comprehensive ramen menu sits along a selection of smaller plates. E14 5AR; ippudo.co.uk

N A N BAN

Dining

R E D’S T RUE BA R B EC UE

JULY

London’s appetite for grilling shows no signs of abating, and the latest joint to join the club is Red’s True Barbecue. But what makes it stand out from the rest? How about an ‘ox cheek bone luge’, complete with bone-marrow canoe and bourbon shot? Alternatively, throw calorie caution to the wind with a doughnut burger. Yes, that’s meat in between two glazed doughnuts. Not for the faint-hearted. EC2A 3EP; truebarbecue.com

Grazing

WRIGHT B RO THE RS SO UTH K E NSINGTO N

AUGUST

In 2002, brothers-in-law Ben Wright and Robin Hancock opened Wright Brothers, with the aim of reviving the UK’s love of oysters. Thirteen years and five restaurants later, it’s fair to say they’ve stayed true to their word... Their newest site in South Ken will feature an independent bar, where you can pop in for a glass of wine and ‘pound a pop’ oysters. How civilised. SW7 3DY; thewrightbrothers.co.uk

Dining

P I Q U ET AUGUST

Allan Pickett - former head chef at Plateau has joined forces with king-of-ribs André Blais (he of Bodeans-founding fame) to bring London the “best culinary traditions from England and France” at new restaurant Piquet. The duo promise a menu showcasing the seasonality of fresh British ingredients, in a relaxed and friendly setting. W1T 3EZ; @PiquetLDN

Grazing

BAR RAF INA DRU RY L ANE

Trending

JULY

PIZZAB UZZ

Those who have queued to secure a coveted seat in one of Barrafina’s current two London sites may be pleased to know a third restaurant is on its way. While we can’t promise the wait time will be any shorter, what you can be sure of is the same stunning array of tapas, with some new dishes thrown in for good measure. WC2B 5AJ; barrafina.co.uk

JULY

A fun concept – all in the pursuit of pizza perfection – this City newcomer will give diners the opportunity to customise their pizzas in-house, choosing from a selection of five different bases (including gluten-free) and toppings ranging from bacon jam with balsamic and wild rock shrimp marinated in garlic, to white figs, aubergine and Pecorino Romano. You could just get a margherita, but that would be boring, right? EC2A 2AH; pizzabuzz.co.uk

STAY INF OR M ED

FOLLOW US @FOODISMUK

FOODISMUK

Follow @NewOpenings on Twitter or subscribe to the newsletter at newopenings. london for all the latest bar, restaurant and hotel openings and news.

Photograph by Mark Mercer; Ming Tang-Evans

18

IPPUDO


GET CLOSER TO YOUR COOKING WITH

“i love to add a modern twist to my grandma's classics” laura

COOKAHOLICS USE SLIDE&HIDE ®: THE ONLY OVEN WITH THE DISAPPEARING DOOR As a Cookaholic, your time in the kitchen is all about being creative. That’s why we’ve designed our new oven with the unique Slide&Hide® door. It lets you get closer to your cooking. To see more of our amazing ovens and view our Cookaholics in the kitchen visit youtube.com/bakeityourself Cooking inspires people. People inspire us.

ACCESSIBLE

SPACE SAving

UNIQUE


WEAPONS OF CHOICE Ice cream, barbecue and, er, coffee. We’ve got all your kitchen needs covered this summer PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID HARRISON

20


F R OZ E N SOL ID SAGE BY HESTON BLUMENTHAL SMART SCOOP ICE CREAM MAKER, £349 Beautiful in its simplicity, this Rolls-Royce of an ice-cream maker could well make your summer. selfridges.com

AUTEUR THERMO-RING ICE CREAM SCOOP, £25 Photograph by ###

No need for a sore elbow – a heated ring on this scoop makes cutting through ice cream easy. selfridges.com

21


Starts July 2nd 10PM


F UL L OF B E ANS 1. OXO GOOD GRIPS COLD BREW COFFEE MAKER, £44.99 This brewer creates cold coffee with low acidity. lakeland.co.uk

2. IKAWA HOME ROASTER, £600 Coffee geeks everywhere rejoice; home roasting just got easy. ikawacoffee.com

3. KRUPS BURR GRINDER, £40.99

2

1

3 4

You’ve roasted your beans, now to grind away. lakeland.co.uk

4. ZWILLING J.A. HENCKELS WHISTLING KETTLE We still boil the old way, as the saying goes... selfridges.com

23


T HE COAL TRUTH WEBER SMOKEY MOUNTAIN, £299.99 Once upon a time you had to make a DIY smoker out of a filing cabinet if you wanted delicious, slow-smoked meats. These days, it couldn’t be easier – this beautiful unit from Weber is perfect for low-and-slow cooking. weberbbq.co.uk

LOTUS GRILL, £140 A barbecue without the smoke? We’ve got to be joking. Actually, we’re not – this grill from Lotus uses a bellows effect to force air over the coals and bypass the smoke. selfridges.com

LANDMANN BBQ BASTING BRUSH, £6.99 All the dexterity you need without the risk of getting too close to the coals. sizzle.co.uk

HESTON KITCHEN STEEL 13CM UTILITY KNIFE, £24 Every barbecue chef needs a handy knife on them. This one from Heston Kitchen Steel will take on all comers. sizzle.co.uk

24


SUM MER BBQS O N CL UB N IG HTS AT...

WHAT’S THE DEAL?

A cocktail on arrival, a delicious three course BBQ dinner and entry to The Club after 10pm

HOW MUCH?

From £55 per person, based on a minimum of 10 people

WHEN?

Friday and Saturday nights, May - September 2015

BOOKINGS:

Phone 0207 368 3960, email victoria.l@roofgardens.virgin.com

Terms and conditions apply. Subject to availability. The Roof Gardens, 99 Kensington High Street, London W8 5SA www.roofgardensclub.com |

@theroofgardens


biggreenegg.co.uk

Big Green Egg Bringing Michelin Star Cooking into the garden

“It’s the most magical piece of kit, it’s taken our flavours to another level” – 2 Michelin Star chef/patron Daniel Clifford, Midsummer House, Cambridge


CLICK

FOODISM.CO.UK

Recipes

PUT A SPRING IN YOUR STEP Skye Gyngell’s Spring has given Somerset House the dining destination its Thames-side setting deserves. Now you can bring it into your kitchen

A

USTRALIAN CHEF SKYE Gyngell has never done things on anyone else’s terms. Case in point: unhappy with the weight of expectation that winning a Michelin star put on her Richmond restaurant Petersham Nurseries Café, she left her post as head chef in 2012 to start something new. As you’d imagine, she wasn’t out of work for long – after continuing with food writing and collaborations with other chefs, venues and brands, she opened the long-awaited Spring at Somerset House in November 2014, to rave reviews and industry fanfare. The accompanying Spring: The Cookbook delves deeper than just the restaurant’s signature recipes; through snippets between each chapter, the book showcases the whole makeup of Gyngell’s approach to her restaurant, from the kitchens to the tables to the gardens, with no small detail spared. We’ve brought you three recipes we think sum up Gyngell’s ethos – a starter, a main and a dessert, all bursting with the colour, vibrancy and freshness she has made her signature. Good luck, and bon appétit. f

G ET EVE N M OR E R E C IPE S Spring: The Cookbook by Skye Gyngell is available now (Quadrille, £25). Photography by Andy Sewell

27


Skye Gyngell’s

SALAD OF BEETROOT WITH TOMATOES, GOAT’S CURD AND RADICCHIO

INGREDIENTS ◆◆ 12 small beetroot (a mix of ruby,

yellow and Chioggia varieties) ◆◆ 2 tbsp red wine vinegar ◆◆ 50ml extra virgin olive oil ◆◆ 200g baby broad beans, freshly

podded ◆◆ 8 large radicchio leaves ◆◆ 8 little gem lettuce leaves ◆◆ Juice of ½ lemon ◆◆ 4-6 ripe tomatoes ◆◆ 200g goat’s curd or young goat’s

cheese ◆◆ 2 tbsp good quality black olives,

pitted (optional) ◆◆ Small handful of basil leaves ◆◆ Sea salt and ground black pepper

For the basil oil ◆◆ A bunch of basil, leaves only ◆◆ 100ml extra virgin olive oil

BITE-SIZED

FOODISM.CO.UK/ NEWSLETTER

N

OTHING SAYS ‘SUMMER’ quite like a fresh, vibrant salad. Gyngell describes this one as “an excuse to put as many beautiful summer vegetables on the plate as possible.” A treat.

Method

INFO Serves ◆◆ 4

28

1 Scrub the beetroot well under cool running water, then place in a saucepan and pour on enough water to cover. Add a good pinch of salt and bring to the boil over a medium heat. 2 Lower the heat slightly and cook for about 35 minutes, until just tender when pierced with a sharp knife. 3 Once cooked, drain the beetroot and place in a bowl. Add the wine vinegar and

about 2 tbsp of the olive oil, season with salt and pepper and toss gently to coat the beetroot in the dressing. Set aside to macerate and cool. 4 Blanch the broad beans in boiling water for 1 minute, then drain and refresh in cold water. Drain well. 5 Put the radicchio and lettuce leaves in another bowl. Dress with the lemon juice, remaining olive oil and some salt and pepper, and toss lightly using your hands. Slice the tomatoes or halve them if small. 6 For the basil oil, pound the basil leaves using a pestle and mortar to bruise and break up, then gradually work in the olive oil for a lovely, sludgy sauce. 7 To assemble, arrange the salad leaves on serving plates with the beetroot and tomatoes around them. 8 Add the goat’s curd or young goat’s cheese and scatter over the broad beans and the olives. Spoon on the basil oil, finish with the basil leaves and serve. f

FOOD ON FILM F IL M A N D TV FOOD W E R EA L LY WANT TO E AT THE BIG KAHUNA BURGER FROM PULP FICTION “That’s that Hawaiian burger joint. I hear they got some tasty burgers.” – Jules CUP O’ PIZZA FROM THE JERK “This guy is unbelievable. He ran the old Cup ‘o Pizza guy out of business.” – Navin TUBBY CUSTARD – TELETUBBIES

“TUBBY CUSTARD! TUBBY CUSTARD!” – PO STEAMED HAMS FROM THE SIMPSONS “Seymour, you’re an odd fellow, but I must say you steam a good ham.” – Superintendent Chalmers THE APPLE PIE FROM AMERICAN PIE “We’ll just just tell your mother that... we ate it all.” – Jim’s Dad


Skye Gyngell’s

SKIRT STEAK

INF O Serves ◆◆ 2

@FOODISMUK

FOODISMUK

INGREDIENTS ◆◆ 400g skirt steak, trimmed ◆◆ 100-125g white rice ◆◆ ¾ tbsp black peppercorns ◆◆ 25ml mild-flavoured oil, such as

sunflower or corn ◆◆ Sea salt

For the dressing ◆◆ 80ml tamari or light soy sauce ◆◆ 100ml verjuice or rice wine ◆◆ ½ garlic clove, peeled and crushed

To serve ◆◆ 2-4 tbsp kimchi to taste

M

ORE COMMON IN the Americas than on these shores, skirt steak is a fantastic cut that holds beautiful texture and mouthwatering flavour when cooked correctly. “It must be cooked for the shortest possible time in a very hot pan,” Gyngell warns in her introduction to this uncomplicated recipe, “as overcooking renders it tough and unappealing.” Luckily, Gyngell is on hand to show you how to nail the cooking, with a simple dressing and kimchi to accompany it.

Method

1 Have the skirt steak at room temperature ready to cook. Steam or boil the rice in the usual way until tender. 2 Meanwhile, for the dressing, pour the tamari or soy sauce and verjuice or rice wine into a large bowl. Add the crushed garlic and stir well to combine. Set aside while you prepare the meat. 3 Using a pestle and mortar, pound the peppercorns until thoroughly cracked. 4 Place a heavy, non-stick frying pan over a high heat. Once the pan is smoking hot, season the meat with the pepper and a good pinch of salt – the steak should be really well coated in the pepper, almost like a crust. 5 Add the oil to the pan and, once hot, add the meat. Cook, without moving, for 2 minutes, then turn and cook for a further 3 minutes on the underside. It is important to avoid moving the meat any more than necessary, to ensure that you get the hard crust that makes this dish so delicious. 6 When the meat is ready, remove it from the pan and place it in the dressing. Turn to coat and let it sit for 5 minutes. 7 To serve, lift the meat out of the dressing, slice it in half, then cut each portion lengthways into two or three thick slices. Arrange the rice on a plate, rest the meat alongside, spoon over the dressing, finish with a little kimchi and serve. f

30

Guitars + singing = hunger, apparently OK, most old rockers spent their time drinking, rather than eating. Not these ones, though…

WITH RICE AND KIMCHI

FOLLOW US

ROCK ’N’ ROLLS

I’ll have some clam chowder, followed by beef steak on rye, Pumpkin pie, whipped cream and coffee, I wanna green salad on the side, Don’t forget the french fries THE KINKS – MAXIMUM CONSUMPTION Now the waitress said, “Eggs and sausage and a side of toast, Coffee and a roll, hash browns over easy, Chilli in a bowl with burgers and fries, what kind of pie?” TOM WAITS – EGGS & SAUSAGE TV dinners, I’m feelin’ kinda rough, TV dinners, this one’s kinda tough, I like the enchiladas and the teriyaki too, I even like the chicken if the sauce is not too blue ZZ TOP – TV DINNERS T-bone steak, french fries for heaven’s sake, Your belly’s bigger than your eyes LLOYD COLE – EAT YOUR GREENS


FOR YOUR BBQ CRAVINGS ALL YEAR ROUND...

AUTHENTIC LOW-’N’-SLOW BBQ 198 HOE ST, WALTHAMSTOW, E17 4BF No reservations so just turn up and eat some great BBQ


WEAPONS OF CHOICE

Perfect gadgets for your summer libation

Skye Gyngell’s

SUMMER PUDDING WITH RED AND BLACK SUMMER FRUITS

Corkatoo Corkscrew, £14.99 It’s nice to have a mascot – not least when you’re drinking. We’d recommend not perching him on your shoulder. Or trying to make him ‘fly’. rigbyandmac.com

Bar10der Bartending Tool, £29.95

This’ll put your old Swiss army knife to shame. Small enough to hold in one hand, this contraption holds not one, not two, but ten different bar tools. harveynichols.com

Barcraft stopper and pourer, £2.99

One-glass-a-night kind of person? We envy your self-discipline. This little gadget forms an airtight seal, and also aerates your wine as your pour it. lakeland.co.uk

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INGREDIENTS For the sponge ◆◆ 15g unsalted butter, plus extra

to grease ◆◆ 7 organic free-range medium eggs, separated ◆◆ 375g caster sugar ◆◆ Small pinch of salt ◆◆ 360g plain flour, sifted ◆◆ 5 tbsp warm water For the fruit ◆◆ 300g blackcurrants ◆◆ 250g caster sugar ◆◆ Finely grated zest and juice of

1 lemon ◆◆ 200g blackberries ◆◆ 200g raspberries ◆◆ 100g strawberries

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HIS CLASSIC DESSERT is British summertime on a plate – a harmony of sweet and tart fruits offset by luxuriantly rich yet delicate sponge.

Method

1 For the sponge, preheat the oven to 180°C/gas mark 4 and grease a 33 x 23cm baking tin. Melt the butter in a small pan over a low heat and set aside to cool. 2 Using an electric mixer, whisk the egg yolks with half the sugar until pale and thick enough to leave a ribbon trail on the surface when the whisk is lifted. 3 In a separate, clean bowl, whisk the eggs whites with a pinch of salt and the remaining sugar – slowly to begin with, then increase the speed slightly after a minute or two. Continue to whisk until the mixture holds stiff peaks. 4 Fold the flour into the egg yolk and sugar mix, a third at a time, alternately with the water. Fold in the whisked whites, third at a time. Finally, fold in the melted butter. 5 Spread the mixture thinly and evenly in the prepared baking tin. Bake on the middle shelf of the oven for 8-10 minutes or until the sponge is just golden and dry to the touch. Leave in the tin for a few minutes, then turn out and cool on a wire rack while you prepare the fruit. 6 Place the blackcurrants and redcurrants in a saucepan with the sugar and lemon juice and cook over a medium heat until the fruit just starts to release its juices. Remove from the heat and add the rest of the fruit and the lemon zest. Let it stand to

INF O Serves

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FOODISM.CO.UK/ NEWSLETTER

allow the flavours to develop. 7 Line a 1-litre pudding basin with clingfilm, leaving plenty overhanging all around. Using a pastry cutter, cut two rounds of sponge – one to fit the bottom of the basin and one the diameter of the top. Place the smaller disc in the bottom of the basin. Now cut long, tapering strips of sponge and use them to line the sides of the basin, overlapping them slightly and pressing tightly to ensure there are no gaps. 8 Using a slotted spoon, put the fruit into the sponge-lined basin, filling it to the brim. Spoon on the juices, reserving a few spoonfuls for serving. Lay the other sponge disc on top. Fold over the clingfilm to seal and place a saucer on top that just fits inside the rim of the basin. Weigh down with a tin (or something similar) and refrigerate overnight. 9 To serve, fold back the clingfilm and invert the pudding onto a deep plate. Using a pastry brush, smear any pale areas of sponge with the reserved juice. f

PINE NUTS 8,000 people took a pineapple with them to last year’s Mysteryland festival. (Go to festivalbaby. com/report/2014 for the full 2014 Festival Baby report.)

DO YOU KNOW YOUR NEIGHBOURS’ NAMES? A SURVEY BY WEBER FOUND THAT ONLY 5% OF THE UK DOES. NOW EXCUSE US – WE’RE OFF TO BORROW A CUP OF SUGAR. (Source: Weber; weberbbq.co.uk)

FOOD NATION Cooking and baking tops the list of skills the UK would love to learn, coming in at 39%. Playing a musical instrument was second, with 23% of the vote. (Source: NIACE; niace.org.uk)

39%

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036 THE GREAT BRITISH SUMMER 046 PIEMAKING IN MELTON MOWBRAY | 050 TALES OF THE RIVERBANK 056 THE PINK LADY FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY AWARDS | 062 MIXOLOGY

— PART 2 —

FEAST “WE PRAY THAT AS PASTRY AND FILLING CO-MINGLE, OUR SALIVA WILL DRIBBLE AND TASTE BUDS WILL TINGLE” SERMONISING ON THE ART OF THE PIE, 046


CLICK

FOODISM.CO.UK

BRITISH SUMMER BITES You could use the longer days and warmer weather to do useful things like DIY or exercise. Or, you could spend the time in a park or on a roof terrace, drinking and eating. We think we know which way your summer might be going already‌

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O MISUSE A piece of rhetoric from a ubiquitous TV show: brace yourselves – summer is coming. Or, to be more accurate seeing as it’s late June, summer is here. And, despite the fact you’re now in the world of work, and the time when ‘summer’ meant anywhere between six and 12 weeks of time spent doing absolutely nothing is now long-gone, we still pine for the long days of this special season just the same. There’s also something about being in London that feels amazing in summer. The weekends and weeknights feel longer; there’s even more weird and wonderful stuff to do; and we remember that those massive green things near our flats and places of work aren’t just for suffering through a rainy Sunday morning dog-walk or jog. They’re for lounging, roving, eating, frisbee-ing, footballing, drinking, festival-ing, sunbathing, ice-cream-ing, barbecuing – you get the idea. Crazy as it may sound, the only negative about summertime in London – sweat-box tube travel apart – is there’s almost too much to do. In a city of more than 8 million – a hell of a lot of whom are trying to ensure you have as much delicious food-and-drink-based fun as humanly possible – it can be disorientating. That’s why we’ve made it our mission to guide you through making the most of the season, whether it’s barbecue tips from the guys in the know, a to-do list each for a park in all four corners of the city (as well as one in the middle), essential summer pop-ups, the best festival food and drink, and even which vegetables you should be planting and which ice creams you should be cooling off with. We hope it helps you make this summer one of your best ever…

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Sound Bites

LONDON IS A FANTASTIC PLACE TO BE IN THE SUMMER. I LOVE ANYWHERE WITH A TERRACE – IT’S EUROPEAN CULTURE FINALLY COMING TO LONDON, ONLY BETTER AND MORE DIVERSE Pascal Aussignac, marketing manager, Duck n’ Roll;

THE LOWDOWN: GREENWICH PARK 1 COFFEE: Morgans Greenwich market favourite Morgans is hard to beat for your caffeine hit, using a Monmouth espresso blend. Greenwich market; morganscoffeeexperience.com 2 BAR: Grown Ups A collab between London’s favourite spice/cocktail trader World of Zing and gelateria Black Vanilla includes a cocktail and sorbetto pairing menu. 5 College Approach; black-vanilla.com 3 RESTAURANT: CRAFT London It’s a bit of a walk to Stevie Parle’s newest restaurant, but it’s worth it for the food, almost all of the ingredients of which are all made in-house. Peninsula Square; craft-london.co.uk 4 WINE SHOP: Theatre of Wine What more can we say about this wine shop that the name doesn’t say already? Also great for craft beer. 75 Trafalgar Road; theatreofwine.com 5 PICNIC: Chapters The Blackheath brasserie has introduced a picnic hamper, including charcuterie, pork belly and more. 43-45 Montpelier Vale; chaptersblackheath.com

@ducknroll_cg

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Pop Ups

LON DON’S BEST RO O F TO PS

Roofnic

OXFORD STREET, W1C, UNTIL SEPTEMBER

We’re always happy about a new rooftop, not least when it’s in prime real estate and accessible by a hidden door. Roofnic is open 10am-10pm daily, offering small plates, createyour-own-picnics and summertime cocktails. For info: roofnic.com

Carom

ONE NEW CHANGE, EC4M, TILL END OF JUNE

Carom took a bit of damage in a recent fire on Wardour Street, but that hasn’t stopped it: the restaurant may be closed for refurbishment, but head chef Vishnu Natarajan is keeping things cooking with a takeover of the terrace at One New Change, in partnership with City bar Madison. Amazing views of St Paul’s and Carom’s signature biryani – catch it quick. For info: caromsoho.com; madisonlondon.net

Nantucket Beach Club

PEPYS STREET, EC3N, UNTIL 30 SEPTEMBER

Praying for a summer holiday? Nantucket Beach Club will make you feel like you’re on one, with New England beach delicacies on offer as well as classic East Coast island cocktails. For info: doubletree3.hilton.com

ADAM LAYTON’S TOP LONDON MARKETS Model Market

Sound Bites

THERE’S JUST A SPECIAL VIBE WHEN SUMMER HITS LONDON – EVEN WHEN NOTHING’S HAPPENING, THERE’S STILL SOMETHING TO DO! IT’S THE TIME TO MAKE NEW MEMORIES

‘Big J Jemal’, Big J’s Kitchen bigjskitchen.com

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“It’s in a 1950s abandoned marketplace, reinvented as a street food hub. There are more people in Lewisham than in Newcastle, but only a handful of restaurants worth eating at, so we quadrupled the number of places to eat in Lewisham overnight. What we’ve done there is created these micro-diner stations – we’ve given some of the traders the space to host 20 covers or so. They’re a stepping stone between a street food shack and a restaurant. My favourite trader there at the moment is Up in My Grill – flame-grilled Argentinian with chimichurri, with an emphasis on proper British sourcing and quality meat.” streetfeastlondon.com

Dinerama

“Dinerama is our brand new night market, which has just launched in Shoreditch, near Great Eastern Street. What we’ve got there is building on what we did at at Model Market. We’ve got six micro-diners – 20- or 30-cover mini micro-restaurants – inside an old former bullion truck yard in Shoreditch. Breddos has got a taqueria there; there’s a ‘barbecue lab’; Fundi Pizza – brilliant wood-fired pizzas, and they’re building an oven for it – and a baja grill, too.” streetfeastlondon.com

Maltby Street Market

“One of my favourites is Maltby Street market, which is on Ropewalk, in between Borough and London Bridge. It’s all about Monty’s Deli and Bartozino – Bartozino is a tapas, sherry and jamón ‘cave’ under an archway in Maltby Street, and Monty’s Deli does my favourite salt beef sandwiches. Proper, US-style – Russian dressing, sauerkraut, the works – I think they’re the best at what they do.” maltby.st

Dalston Yard

“Dalston Yard is our spiritual home. It’s our third summer there: 24,000 square feet; 20 traders; eight bars. It’s the all-singing, all-dancing festival street food experience. The big guys there are Smokestak who do this next-level US barbecue. We’ve got fourand-a-half tonne smoker there!” streetfeastlondon.com

Brockley Market

Brockley’s my local one, down in SE4 – a Saturday day-market in the car park of Lewisham College. It’s got some of our favourite guys there: Spit and Roast, who do buttermilk-fried chicken with Korean hot sauce, and Luardos – one of our favourite Mexican traders, and one of the first on the scene. It’s all about the breakfast burrito at Brockley Market – they do this hangover-busting burrito, really beautiful, with fresh ingredients. It’s something everyone should make the pilgrimage to Brockley for.” By Adam Layton, street food guru & head of marketing at Street Feast. @NoshableAdam


Love Summer

Sound Bites

GROW YOUR OWN

We’ve rounded up the best vegetables to plant now and harvest down the line, courtesy of Riverford founder and farmer Guy Watson Getting the right planting date combined with the best variety for your situation is critical. Too early and you will be buried in greens in November. Too late and you will go hungry all winter and then have a glut in the spring.

Leeks Two plantings, one in early- and one in midJuly, will keep you in leeks from October to mid-April. Use the more hardy, traditional, shorter varieties like Musselburgh for later picking.

Cabbages It’s already too late for white and red cabbage. Plant the slower-growing Savoy in early July and the faster January King smooth green cabbage at the end of the month.

Kales and PSB Plant in late July or early August. The super trendy Cavalo Nero grows more slowly and should be planted-out first.

Beetroot It will still make it from an early July sowing; quick-growing turnips, like the wonderful purple-topped Milan, can be sown at the end of the month. For more info: riverford.co.uk

IN SUMMER, THE PACE OF LONDON SLOWS DOWN, PEOPLE FORGET ABOUT THEIR BUSY LIVES ENOUGH TO RELAX IN THE VAST PARKS AND WALK ALONG THE MANY CANALS AND BEAUTY SPOTS DOTTED AROUND THE CITY. IT’S NOW THAT LONDON REALLY FEELS PART OF EUROPE, PEOPLE DRINK COFFEE ON TERRACES, EAT OUT LATE AND MINGLE, ENJOYING THE CITY’S MULTI-CULTURAL GASTRONOMY

THE LOWDOWN: VICTORIA PARK 1 COFFEE: Climpson and Sons One of the best coffee destinations in London. Head to its vaunted café on Broadway Market, or check out its (fully-functional) archway HQ. 67 Broadway Market; climpsonandsons.com 2 BAR: Peg + Patriot Experimental cocktail bar featuring all kinds of weird and wonderful infusions, housed in the striking Town Hall Hotel in Bethnal Green, Town Hall Hotel; pegandpatriot.com 3 RESTAURANT: Lardo Closer to London Fields than Victoria Park, but worth the short walk for acclaimed chef Rachel O’Sullivan’s charcuterie and fusion pizza. 197-201 Richmond Road; lardo.co.uk 4 WINE SHOP: Bottle Apostle Emporium for all kinds of beers, wines and spirits, with tasting machines and friendly staff. 95 Lauriston Road; bottleapostle.com 5 PICNIC: Ginger Pig Better known for its butchery, the Ginger Pig also does a beautiful line in deli food and cold cuts. 99 Lauriston Road; thegingerpig.co.uk

TOM HUNT, author of The Natural Cook, executive chef of Poco, ambassador of the Soil Association’s #BetterBBQ campaign

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THE LOWDOWN: HAMPSTEAD HEATH 1 COFFEE: Coffee Cup Get your weekend coffee and pastry fix with this 1960s-style bistro on the high street. It also turns into a restaurant later in the day. 76 Hampstead High Street; villabiancagroup.co.uk 2 BAR: The Spaniards Inn Pub fact: the Spaniards is reputedly the oldest pub in London, having been open since the 1500s. Today, it’s a Hampstead staple, with proper British pub grub and great beer. Spaniards Road; thespaniardshampstead.co.uk 3 RESTAURANT: Mimmo la Bufala Speaking of Hampstead stalwarts, Mimmo la Bufala has been serving locals their favourite pizza and pasta for the last eight years. It’s super fresh, with pizza cooked the right way, in a proper wood-fired oven. 45A South End Road; mimmolabufala.co.uk 4 WINE SHOP: Jeroboams This wine merchant has a cracking selection of Old and New World (Lebanese Musar, anyone?) wines, as well as a not insignificant selection of cheeses, too. 29 Heath Street; jeroboams.co.uk 5 PICNIC: Le Pain Quotidien You might think you know LPQ, but we’re betting you haven’t tried its picnic hamper, which includes, among other things, beetroot houmous, gruyère and, for an extra £8, wine. We’d pay it if we were you. 1 South End Road; lepainquotidien.co.uk

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RICHARD TURNER’S PERFECT BARBECUE

The Hawksmoor and Pitt Cue Co maestro lets you in on his secrets for grilling this summer Buy quality meat The quality of the meat is the most important factor in a good barbecue, for me. Fresh meat should have a sweet, meaty smell, never stale or off-smelling. Some butchers hang meat for excessive amounts of time in the belief that hanging can make up for watery, inferior meat. It can’t. Buy your meat thick-cut – this allows a crust to build on the grill without overcooking and drying out. It’s often difficult to tell what meat will taste like from appearance alone, and for this reason it’s important to use a butcher you can ask questions of, like which breed, feed and conditions the animal was reared in. If they can’t answer these, try another butcher.

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Use charcoal Gas grills are not barbecues; charcoal and wood fueled grills are. Stay away from the easy lighting charcoal. Just open the bag and smell – they are soaked in fuel so petroleum products are in the smoke right to the end, and you can taste it in the food. For the same reason do not use starter fluid, mineral spirits, gasoline or kerosene. If possible, buy a quality charcoal brand made slowly using ethically resourced wood. Fruit tree wood is particularly good. Wait until the heavy smoke subsides a bit and the coals are covered in white ash before you start cooking. This is when they are burning at their highest temperature and are giving off only a small amount of clean smoke. For longer cooks you might need to add more charcoal. If you can, it is best to light the charcoal first and then add hot coals. Another approach is to just feed the fire half a dozen new, unlit coals every half an hour or so. This will produce some white smoke, but it works.


salt falls off, and what’s left is, in theory, the correct amount of seasoning. As with everything, there are variables to watch out for: thicker meat requires more seasoning than thinner meat due to the lower surface area to meat ratio.

Rest the meat before you serve Undercook and over-rest your meat and you can’t go far wrong. Be wary of poultry, which should be cooked through. I tend to rest grilled meat at around 60°C for at least ten minutes before serving or eating.

Season your meat, don’t marinate it

Photograph (barbeque) by David Harrison

I never marinate – marinating is used to mask and enhance inadequate meat. Good, well-sourced meat needs no marinade if cooked correctly – just simple sea salt and black pepper. That said, seasoning is not quite as simple a skill as you might think. Not all salt is created equal, in fact some salt is ‘saltier’ than other salts and different meats require different amounts of seasoning. I use pure Maldon sea salt and roughground black pepper to season. Table salt tastes saltier and contains anti-caking agents, which I’m not a fan of. Season aggressively by throwing small handfuls of sea salt and a little pepper at the meat. During this process much of the

Hog: Proper Pork Recipes from the Snout to the Squeak by Richard H. Turner, out now (Mitchell Beazley, £25); octopusbooks.co.uk

FESTIVAL BABY’S TOP FIVE FESTIVALS FOR FOODIES 1 SECRET GARDEN PARTY (LEFT)

Huntington, 23-26 July

“‘If more of us valued food and cheer above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world.’ Strong stuff from Tolkien, and a fitting intro to SGP’s Soul Fire – an oasis of fine Italian dining and alfresco seating overlooking the lake – a perfect spot to watch the fireworks. With acts like Beans on Toast, Chris Tofu and Kiko Bun, it’s perfect for food-obsessed festival fans and journalists in need of culinary parallels.”

Sound Bites

SUMMER IN LONDON IS SHORT, UNRELIABLE AND NOT THAT HOT, BUT IT STILL GIVES YOU LICENCE TO DRESS FOR THE BEACH AND DRINK IN THE DAYTIME. I LOVE RENTING BORIS BIKES WITH FRIENDS AND DOING A PUB CRAWL DOWN THE RIVER. NOT THE SAFEST ACTIVITY, BUT A GREAT WAY TO SEE THE CITY! James Elliot, co-founder, Pizza Pilgrims, pizzapilgrims.com

3 WILDERNESS

Oxfordshire, 6-9 Aug

“45-minute queue, £6 burger? Not at Wilderness, where food is a matter of pride. Guest chefs this year include Raymond Blanc and Angela Hartnett. The line up includes Roisin Murphy and journalist-punching Bjork.” 4 FESTIVAL NO.6

Portmeiron, 3-6 September

“A festival which packs a punch, with long-table banquets and street food both on the menu. On top of that, Portmeirion itself is positively teeming with topquality restaurants and a Welsh produce market to complement the likes of Belle & Sebastian, British Sea Power and Gaz Coombes. Lovely.” 5 BESTIVAL

2 GRILLSTOCK (RIGHT)

London, 5-6 September

“Food and music share equal billing at Grillstock; perfect if you’re craving more than a bacon sandwich and a Carling. Borne out of a love of American BBQ, it’s all Southern-style hospitality, letting you kick back to slow-cooked meat and highoctane music, with the Fun Lovin’ Criminals, DJ Yoda and the Cuban Brothers all cooking in the capital.”

Isle of Wight, 10-13 September

“Bestival has delicious food year on year; and some pretty damned good music, too. An eclectic bill of vendors includes trendy street food and luxuriant banquets – more than enough to to keep you fed and happy for three days. In 2010, we came down (emotionally) after seeing the Prodigy with an artisan burger, and with a line-up boasting the Chemical Brothers and Jurassic 5, we’ll need something even stronger this year. Maybe a lamb shank.” Visit festivalbaby.com for more.

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Kebabs are so much ® better with Peppadew Piquanté Peppers. Pop a few Peppadew® Piquanté Peppers on your kebabs and discover how much better they can be thanks to our unique, sweet heat taste. Chicken and Peppadew® Piquanté Pepper thigh kebabs with spice rub Serves 4 / Prep 10 minutes / Cook 10 minutes • 500g chicken thighs • 2 small red onions peeled and quartered • 1 large yellow pepper cored and cut into 2 inch pieces • 20 whole Peppadew® Piquanté Peppers drained • 12 large mushrooms trimmed and halved • 1 tbsp olive oil Smoky spice rub: • 2 tsps smoked paprika • 2 tsps ground cumin • 1 tsp garlic granules • 1 tsp crushed coriander seeds • 1 tbsp soft brown sugar 1. Slice the chicken into 16 pieces. Place in a bowl with the peppers, onions and mushrooms. Mix the spice rub ingredients together. Toss the chicken and vegetables with the oil and then sprinkle over the spices. Mix well so they are coated. 2. Thread the chicken, Peppadew® Piquanté Peppers and vegetables onto 4 large metal skewers or 8 smaller ones. Heat an outdoor bbq or gas grill. Grill on direct low heat for 4-5 minutes each side. Serve with hot sauce or bbq sauce and salad.

Pick up some Peppadew® Piquanté Peppers in store today.

Try more tantalisingly, tempting, totally tasty recipes at www.peppadew.com Mild and Hot available at Tesco, Waitrose, Sainsbury’s, Asda, Morrisons, Co-op, Ocado, Wholefoods and Booths. Cheese Stuffed available at Tesco, Waitrose, Sainsbury’s, Ocado, Wholefoods and Booths. Roasted Red Peppers available at Co-op and Waitrose.


WHAT’S COOLER THAN BEING COOL?

THE LOWDOWN: GREEN PARK

Three new ice cream products to chill out with this summer

Adam Richman photograph courtesy of Travel Channel

1 COFFEE: Cook Book Cafe This food spot, serving everything from teas and coffees to weekend brunches and lunch, champions sustainable British ingredients. 1 Hamilton Place; cookbookcafe.co.uk 2 BAR: American Bar, the Stafford London’s hotel bars are among the best in the world; this one is the cream of the crop. Say no more. 16 St James’s Place; thestaffordlondon.com 3 RESTAURANT: Kitty Fisher’s One of the ‘it’ restaurants of the year, Kitty’s is hidden down in the historic, recently-renovated Shepherd Market. 10 Shepherd Market; kittyfishers.com 4 WINE SHOP: Berry Bros & Rudd With more than 5,000 fine wines from all over the world, not to mention its vaunted cellars, BBR is one of the must-visit wine destinations in London. 3 St James’s Street; bbr.com 5 PICNIC: Fortnum & Mason Fortnum’s picnic hampers are the stuff of London legend, and come stuffed with great food, fine wine and even glassware and crockery. 181 Piccadilly; fortnumandmason.com

Snowflake Luxury Gelato What’s better than a sandwich? An ice cream sandwich. That’s right – this summer, New York-style gelateria Snowflake is bringing its brand of gourmet sandwiches to Selfridges, as well as vegan flavours of its signature gelato. Yes, we know you like the nostalgia of a 99 with a flake from the ice cream man, but soft, creamy gelato served in a warm brioche bun? What are you still doing here? Go! For info: snowflakegelato.co.uk; selfridges.com

At first glance, chocolate truffles; look closer and you’ll see these little chocolate balls hide a frozen mochi centre. Your front teeth can thank us later. For the uninitiated, mochi is a Japanese dessert a bit like ice cream, but chewier (we’re informed it’s got what’s known in Asia as the ‘Q texture’). They’ll be available in Whole Foods in a range of flavours. For more info: littlemoons.co.uk

POPS How do you make a cocktail last longer? You freeze it, of course. Not only are POPS ice lollies capable of getting you drunk (which we like), they come in champagne and bellini, as well as other flavours (which we like even more). Find them in shops including Selfridges and limited-edition versions in Battersea pizzeria Bunga Bunga. For more info: wearepops.com

ADAM RICHMAN’S GRILLING TIPS The dude-food don gives us his techniques for the ideal summer BBQ Use restraint

“A great cut of meat can be killed by adding too much in the way of sauces or spices. Kosher salt and black pepper can be more than enough to bring out great flavour in a good steak.”

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Know your grill

“Make sure you are aware of the temperature differences throughout each part of the grilling and cooking area. Know where the hotspots are and where the temperature is a little lower. This will allow you to cook things thoroughly without burning them.”

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Think outside the box

“Everybody does hamburgers and hotdogs. Try grilling something you have never grilled before: squid, corn on the cob, halved peaches brushed with honey, slices of watermelon with lime juice and chili powder, even polenta!” Keep up with Adam on Twitter at @AdamRichman, or visit theadamrichman.com

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Pop Ups

O UR P I C K OF TH I S SUMMER’S S HORT-T ERM E AT I N G S POTS

Jimmy’s Secret Garden CLAPHAM ROAD, SW9, UNTIL 31 AUGUST

Leafy Clapham gets even leafier this summer, with pop-up maestro Jimmy Garcia’s latest – a vibrant garden behind a secret door at 409 Clapham Road. He’ll be serving up seasonal, foraged food (tasting menus available, naturally) with paired cocktails and wine. For more info: jimmyspopup.com

Swallows & Amazons

ROPEWALK, SE1, UNTIL 11 JULY

Disappearing Dining Club has the wrap on cool supper club pop-ups, and it’s following up the recent Woodford Reserve Supper Club with this, a historical-themed collaboration with Background Bars (reponsible for Night Tales and Summer Tales). It’s four weekends of prime BBQ and cocktails in the basement of LASSCO Ropewalk. Where else can you sup on summer cocktails in the Eisenhower Lounge and gorge on ox heart skewers and Lousiana pork necks? Nowhere, that’s where. For info: disappearingdiningclub.co.uk

Cocktails in the City: Summer Edition

BEDFORD SQUARE GARDENS, WC1B, 18-19 JULY

You know that old joke, ‘a guy walks into a bar...’ Well what if we told you that this summer, you could walk into 20 bars. At once. In a big garden. Confused? Don’t be – Cocktails in the City’s summer pop-up (pictured), taking place in Bedford Square, features an all-star mixological line-up from the likes of the Rivoli Bar at the Ritz, Harvey Nichols, Hawksmoor Spitalfields, London Cocktail Club and plenty more. Just don’t blame us if can’t you avoid trying everything and leave three sheets to the wind... cocktailsinthecity.co.uk/london

Red’s True BBQ

THE OLD BLUE LAST, EC2A, UNTIL 4 JULY

Red’s is run by people so committed to authenticity of flavour that they actually travel

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to the Deep South for inspiration – we think that pretty much speaks for itself. But if you need further convincing, here it is: its big, sexy Shoreditch restaurant opens in July, but until then, its pop-up at Shoreditch pub the Old Blue Last will let you experience the best of the vaunted menu before the hungry hordes arrive. Bonus hipster points for you. For more info: truebarbecue.com

POP-Down

BOROUGH BARISTA, UNTIL 31 JULY

Feel like a private chef is just too decadent? No worries – new pop-up POP-Down, from private chef company Cuisson, will bring you the cream of its cooking talent at a price that won’t put you off. Choose from regularly changing food offerings from its open kitchen, including a four-course, French-influenced menu, or get your sugar high on with no fewer than three dessert courses. For more info: cuisson.co.uk

Grain Store Unleashed

CLERKENWELL ROAD, EC1M, UNTIL AUGUST

If you’ve not made it to King’s Cross’s Grain Store, now may be your chance. Well, not Grain Store, but Clerkenwell’s Zetter Hotel, for chef Bruno Loubet’s Grain Store Unleashed – a pop-up that thrusts vegetables into the limelight (although it’s not a vegetarian menu) and celebrates all that’s fresh and wonderful about the English garden in summer. Check the menu online – some of the dishes sound so good they had us actually chuckling to ourselves in anticipation. For more info: grainstoreunleashed.com

THE LOWDOWN: CLAPHAM COMMON 1 COFFEE: Brickwood London Tucked away just opposite Clapham Common Tube station is this coffee and brunch spot, which serves great hot drinks and killer sandwiches. 16 Clapham Common South Side; brickwoodlondon.com 2 BAR: Rise 46 A speakeasy-style hideaway on Battersea Rise (hence the name) – come for the beer and cocktail lists; stay for the relaxed vibe. 46 Battersea Rise; rise46.com 3 RESTAURANT: Comensal A relaxed, social Mexican restaurant on up-and-coming Abbeville Road that’s more authentic than most. 32 Abbeville Road; comensal.co.uk 4 BEER/WINE SHOP: DVIne Cellars More than just a wine shop, this store (with tasting cellar) specialises in organic and biodynamic wines. Find its stall every second weekend at Clapham’s farmers’ market, too. 74 Landor Road; dvinecellars.com 5 PICNIC: Tart London Style out your day on the Common by borrowing one of Tart’s picnic hampers and filling it to order with its eponymous tarts and fresh salads. 25 The Pavement; tart-london.com


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Just how seriously does the town of Melton Mowbray take its world-famous pork pies? Very, it turns out. We send Neil Davey to try his hand at baking one and judging some at the annual British Pie Awards 46


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OU CAN TELL Melton Mowbray is a food-obsessed town from the moment you arrive. “Welcome to Melton Mowbray,” proclaims a sign at the station, “Rural Capital of Food Home of Stilton Cheese Melton Mowbray Pork Pies.” Although not, clearly, home of punctuation. There’s plenty more evidence, too – of the food thing, not the punctuation – in the centre of town. I’ve arrived early, so I slip into the Half Moon for a pint of (impeccable) Bass, where I overhear four blokes – proper pub regular types – discussing the merits of a new restaurant. One shrugs that it was alright. One dissects his dishes with Gregg Wallace-esque terminology, while another nods his agreement. The fourth rolls his eyes at them. “Well, I’m not going back,” he announces. “I mean, fooking ciabatta?” Quite which establishment they’re discussing is hard to fathom. About every third shop in Melton Mowbray seems to be a pub, bar, café, restaurant or other food outlet. Sure, some are the ubiquitous ones – and it’s slightly depressing to see a Greggs in this, the ‘home of pork pies’ – but, happily, most are independent, and the busiest of all of them appears to be the Dickinson & Morris shop – which is where I’m heading for a lesson in the fine art of making pork pies. It’s a good place to start, agrees assistant bakery and shop manager Andy Sharpe, as he deftly assembles the ingredients and kit for the lesson. Founded in 1851, D&M is the oldest remaining baker of the authentic Melton Mowbray Pork Pie (which I’m going to call an MMPP from now on), the recipe for which was finally granted a Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) in 2009. Andy explains the basics. “The first thing,” he tells me, “is that an MMPP is made with uncured pork. The second: it must be bakedoff unsupported, so no tin or tray. And finally, it can only come from this area.” The making of an MMPP is a three-day process. Happily, Sharpe has started before I get there, but he explains the process starting with the ‘hot water pastry’. “You boil water and lard,” says Andy, “and then mix in strong flour. Then you chill it for 24 hours.” It needs the rest so that it can be worked properly, but in the meantime you can prepare the filling. “We use pork shoulder,” Sharpe says. “It’s →

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→ uncured; it’s chopped, not minced; and the only thing we add is white pepper.” For the classic pie, you take an 8oz ball of pastry and push a dolly into it – a wooden device, like a short, squat rolling pin with a longer, thinner handle. The initial pressure pushes the pastry upwards, and it’s then “hand-raised” – exactly how it sounds – to create a perfect looking ‘cup’ of pastry, into which Andy then places the pork. He puts a disc of pastry on top, expertly crimps it shut, before squeezing it into Dickinson & Morris’s eight-point design, and then it’s chilled for another 24 hours. The following day it will be baked for 90 minutes. “Then we poke two holes in the lid,” says Andy, “and pour the bone stock jelly into one hole. The steam escapes from the other and once there’s some seepage, we know it’s sealed.” After all that, they chill it again. The results, though, make the whole laborious process worthwhile, and, possibly with a pie or two in my bag for later (for, er, research), I stroll through the town to prepare for day two and the main reason I’m here: judging at the British Pie Awards. Yeah, I know – I get all the rubbish assignments… Somewhat fittingly for a town where pies and food are part of the fabric of life, the judging takes place in the spectacular St Mary’s Church. Frankly, they had to find a big venue because there are a staggering 830 pies to be judged, across 20 categories including Melton Mowbray Pork Pie, Chicken Pie (Hot), Brides Pie and Football Pie. It is a “cathedral of pies”, as chairman of the British Pie Awards Matthew O’Callaghan describes it from the pulpit, before handing

PIE ME A RIVER We’re sure Neil Davey would wholeheartedly recommend a pilgrimage (or should that be pie-grimage?) to Melton Mowbray to try its world-famous pork pies for yourself, but if you’re looking for something a little closer to home, try out Mrs King’s. Its main shop – which has been serving pies with the Melton Mowbray stamp of authenticity since 1853 – is up in Cotgrave, Nottinghamshire, but from Wednesday to Sunday you can find its stall at Borough Market. It sells the whole range, from the MMPP to pork and stilton, game, and pork, chicken and apricot. Excuse our drooling... For info, go to mrskingsporkpies.co.uk

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Photographs by mepics (Neil Davey and judging) and Paul Brown Imaging (pies)

THE VICAR’S BLESSING OF THE PIES IS AN AMUSING, RHYMING ADDRESS, BUT THE MOOD SOON TURNS VERY SERIOUS over to the Reverend Kevin Ashby for the blessing of the pies. It’s an amusing, rhyming address – “We pray that as pastry and filling co-mingle, our saliva will dribble and taste buds will tingle” – but the mood soon turns serious. Very serious indeed. Following an earlier briefing from head judge Ian Nelson, we – that’s me and more than 100 fellow judges from as far afield as California – get to review the (somewhat) complex scoring system as a group with a ‘control pie’, an expression that makes me giggle more than it probably should. Again, before we’re let loose on our designated class – which, for me, is Class 2, Pork Pies to give it its full title (i.e. not the Melton Mowbray Pork Pie) – the head judge for each class runs each smaller team of

judges through the first couple of entries, explaining our responsibilities as they go. Judging is anonymous, with each plate having an ID number rather than a producer’s name. Each pie starts with a perfect score of 100 but will lose points based on six criteria: appearance (15 points); baking (15 points); pastry thickness (10 points); pastry texture and taste (20 points); filling (including jelly, gravy and sauce) (10 points); and filling texture and taste (30 points). We’re also encouraged to give some constructive feedback, if we can, on each entry. The repetition is useful as it takes a while to get used to the system, but as we’re split into pairs and head to our table, my fellow judge and I are feeling pretty confident. The class has an impressive 72 entrants but, thankfully, we’re only judging 26 of them. Even so, it takes us three hours to get through all of the pies and, sadly, we don’t score anything particularly highly, hitting a run of great pastry with terrible fillings, or great fillings with terrible pastry – so much so that we wonder if we can give feedback like “entrant 1234 should make the pastry for 5678”. But apparently, we can’t... Still, it’s a fascinating experience – although you have to wonder what the lunch caterers were thinking when they decided to serve two massive platters of pies. Perhaps they’ll realise for the 2016 competition, given that the fruit plates were the first thing to go (no, I’ve never seen that happen at a buffet before, either). The following day, we discover that the Outdoor Pig Company has won the class, and that there’s also excellent news for Dickinson & Morris, which has picked up the Class Champion award in the MMPP category. And, when I can finally face a bite a couple of days later, I’m not at all surprised… f

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: A (genuine) pork pie wedding cake; judging at the awards; a master baker works with the sacred pastry; an MMPP baked to perfection; Neil Davey enjoying his pie

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TALES OF THE RIVERBANK 150 years ago, the Thames was a polluted cesspool. Clare Finney meets the fishermen, foragers and brewers who make a living from it today Photography by Joseph Fox

CRAYFISH BOB, ABINGDON: With crayfish abundant in the Thames since the 1980s, Bob is making hay feeding the crustacean to the masses, Louisiana-style.

SIPSMITH, CHISWICK: At the time of its founding in 2009, Sipsmith was the first licensed copper pot distillery to open in London in nearly 200 years.

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BILLINGSGATE MARKET, CANARY WHARF: The UK’s largest inland seafood market has been providing the restaurants of central London with fresh fish since the 16th century.

GARY HILLIER, ERITH: Hillier is one of just six eel fishermen making a living on the Thames – just over three decades ago, that number stood at more than 30.

BLUEY WALPOLE, HOLLOWSHORE: Walpole laid the first wild oyster beds in the country in the 1980s. Now, his oysters are rated among the best in the world.

Original photograph by NASA/GSFC/METI / Japan Space Systems, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

MEANTIME, GREENWICH: Greenwhich’s Meantime Brewery, once a tiny smallbatch brewer, has become one of the enduring success stories of London’s craft revolution.

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FOODISM.CO.UK

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CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: A bottle of Meantime’s London Porter; elderflower, destined for Sipsmith gin; inside the distillery; Crayfish Bob heads out on the Thames; fish for sale at Billingsgate Market; the invasive North American signal crayfish, as caught by Crayfish Bob

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T’S MY BELIEF you hate the sight of the very river… As if it wasn’t your living! As if it wasn’t meat and drink to you!” Gaffer, in the opening scene of Charles Dickens’ Our Mutual Friend, rages across the Thames at his daughter Lizzie, who whimpers in reply: “I – I do not like it, father.” In her defence, the meat and drink her father is referring to here is drowned people; the coat pockets of which he’ll raid before handing their body into the police, claiming he just happened upon it. The fact he could make a good living out of this tells you everything you need to know about the state of the River Thames in the Victorian age. It stank. It was an open sewer. The only life it sustained was pathological. The introduction of the flushing water closet, hailed as a sanitary revolution, had been its undoing. It’s thriving fishing industry died, along with the thousands of Londoners whose sole water supply was the Thames. In the Great Stink of 1858 MPs finally had enough. The problem was in their own back yard – they couldn’t sit parliament the stench was so awful – and Queen Victoria and Prince Albert had to cancel a river cruise. “By a perverse ingenuity, one of the noblest of rivers has been changed into a cesspool,” the MPs shouted angrily. What did his honourable friend mean to do? The answer, played out very intermittently over the course of two centuries, would prove to be one of our biggest clean-up operations. Even in the past 50 years the river has improved dramatically, from being declared biologically dead in 1957 to sustaining over 120 species of fish today. “Still,” I hear you mutter, “you wouldn’t actually feed off it. I’ve seen what washes up on the muddy flats at Putney.” The reality may surprise or even alarm you, according to how much you know of fishing, foraging and where water comes from. Thames Water plc is not a historic title: when we turn on the tap we are drinking the Thames. Of course, it goes through various treatments and purification processes beforehand, but “if you’re living within the M25, most of your water will be sourced from the River,” says media relations manager Stuart White. This leads me to a far more interesting


Original photograph (bottom) by NASA

beverage: beer, and the dependence of London’s breweries on the Thames. “The chances are we’re one of their biggest customers: after all, it’s not like we’re just filling our baths with it.” I’m standing with Jethro Holman in the noisy, musky bowels of Meantime Brewery in Greenwich on the banks of the Thames. Behind us, three huge tanks are filling with up with what Holman describes as simple Thames water tap water. “It will go through this reverse osmosis machine,” he says, pointing to a strange, scuba-like contraption, “and be forced through a layers of fine membranes to get all the minerals out of it. What we brew at Meantime is essentially a blank canvas, to which we can add the minerals we need.” Gypsum, a mineral common in Staffordshire, makes fine pale ales. Soft water, the result of low calcium levels, is good for lager. “Over in the Czech republic, the water is very, very soft. That’s where Pilsner comes from – but London has hard water, and it’s the calcium that aids the roasted coffee flavours of the London Porter,” Holman explains. It’s no coincidence that, up until the late 1870s, the majority of Londoners were drinking dark ales or gin, because “the water was undrinkable, and alcohol and hops were antiseptic.” Yet even today when the population is drinking, if not less beer, then far more water than they used to, there’s no getting round the fact 95% of a pint from Meantime originally flowed through Old Father Thames. This, plus processes and routine cleaning means 88,000 pints of water a day are used by that brewery. Now look at how many breweries there are in London today. As Thames Water’s White says, if you turn on a tap in the London region, you are using water from the Thames. Down the river at Fuller’s, they have to fill up their water tanks at night, they demand so much.

Investment Banking Sarah Cruz stands on a stepladder, wielding a pair of formidable-looking secateurs. She needs to work quickly: elderflower wilts from the moment it’s been cut, and Sipsmith is waiting. The distillery has teamed up with Cruz via her group, Abundance London,

whose raison d’être is to harvest the seasonal glut of local produce you find in the city. Sipsmith is after elderflower for its gin, and where better to source it than from Chiswick’s riverbanks, a mere minutes walk from the brand’s distillery? Cruz delivers it that very morning. Thereafter, head distiller Ollie Kitson says he’ll try two different methods of making gin: distilling it (that is, using the flowers as one of the botanicals) or infusing the flowers whole in the original spirit. He’s thrilled with Sarah’s offering, which, warmed by the early morning sun, is beautifully aromatic. We leave him happily roasting flowers in a slow cooker, ready for the glass still, and head upstream to a man who also loves foragers – albeit of a quite different nature to Cruz and her team. His name is Bob Ring, better known as Crayfish Bob, and his game is the catching of crayfish from the Thames near Abingdon, where they are most prolific. Ring hopes to wipe out the plague-carrying American signal crayfish, which, having been introduced to the Thames forty years ago, has all but wiped out the river’s native white-claw species. “The logical thing to do, it seems to me, is to trap the Americans and sell them on. We’ve loads of them, and they’re causing trouble,” he says. Yet the practice is currently under threat from government advisors, who wish to introduce a ban on crayfish trapping, to protect white claws. “Their argument is that making crayfish commercial might encourage the problem, because we’ll put the unsalable ones back, or stock them in other waters where the natives still are. They don’t want to acknowledge the fact they introduced the American in the first place,” Ring fumes. In reality, he argues, he and his merry band of trappers pull out hundreds of tonnes of American crayfish each year. They’re sold at street-food stalls and at events like the one Ring himself organises, the Louisiana Crawfish Boil. Come summer, he’ll be in the Doodle Bar in Battersea, selling authentic (“one of my staff is from Louisiana, the other from Texas”) all-you-can eat boils to the sound of live bands and ‘Nascraw racing’, all in aid of creating a market for the invasive species, so we can eat our waters clear.

VISIT A PIE & MASH SHOP AND THE JELLIED EELS WILL BE FROM HOLLAND, NOT LONDON The Eel Thing In Erith, just outside London, Gary Hillier plies his trade as one of the last commercial eel fisherman on the Thames. He’s fished on and off for 30 years: long enough to have witnessed the shift in demand here from the wild eels he catches to cheaper, farmed eels from Europe. Visit an old pie and mash shop, and the jellied eels will be not from the Thames, as has been the case for centuries, but from Holland. “They taste bland, they’ve had gelatine added, and the skin is far tougher than wild.” Hillier makes his own jellied eels. “I don’t need to add gelatine, because they have tasty natural juices.” His wife likes them smoked, which he does himself in an old filing cabinet he converted a few years ago. The irony is that the rest of the eels in his catch he now sends to Holland; the Dutch know better than to eat their own farmed eels, preferring them wild and fresh. Thus when Gary lands a catch, he puts those eels he and his friends are not eating into aerated tanks until they can be sold. Historically, eels (typically served atop heaps of creamy mash) were considered poor people’s food because they were so abundant, and for centuries they were many East Londoners’ only regular source of protein. These days, the Environment Agency →

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→ claims eel populations are plummeting – a claim Hillier disputes vehemently: “There are plenty of eels here; they’ve never been more prolific.” The reason there are so few eel fisherman today, he claims, is because of “the EA and Europe interfering with licenses. There are no young people coming into it. We have one eel fisherman who is 89.” When I speak to Mike Boughton of A. Cooke’s in Shepherds Bush, one of London’s few remaining pie and mash shops, he confirms that while his grandfather probably sourced from the Thames, he would not think of it. “I’m not sure about that,” he says. “We need to be able to trust our suppliers.” The perception of the Thames as dirty is one held by many, both in and outside the fishing industry – yet it is cleaner than you think. The threats to the eel’s survival come, not from pollution, but from the various tidal and hydropower barriers that obstruct and even destroy young eels as they swim upstream. “I don’t catch baby eels. I put them back in the water and say, see you in a few years,” says Hillier – who may dispute the EA’s stance on fishing, but is entirely with them where sustainability of eels is concerned. Estuary English Moving down to the Estuary – the choppy, windblown mouth of the Thames where it

BLUEY WALPOLE HAS BEEN AN INSHORE FISHERMAN HIS ENTIRE LIFE, LIKE HIS FATHER

ABOVE: Though Billingsgate’s origins were as a market for all sorts of goods, an act was passed in 1699 that recognised it as a fish market. In 1982 the market relocated to its current Docklands site

meets the east coast – we find another fisherman for whom Europe is persona non grata: Bluey Walpole. He’s been an inshore fisherman his entire life, like his father before him. Where once skate alone would have made up 50% of his summer income, EU quotas means he throws away hundreds of tonnes each month. “We can catch that quota in a single day,” he says bitterly. “Now in order to avoid the skate, which are so abundant in the estuary, we have to go further and further out to sea.” He sells his haul in his local shop and in Billingsgate Market, where it’s bought by London chefs. His income is supplemented – barely – by harvesting oysters in the estuary and sending those up to town too. “They’re hardly a food you eat every day though,” he points out. “We’re in limbo here. All inshore fishermen are. Even the sole, bass and plaice which you find in the Thames have EU quotas, though they’re also abundant.” If you want to support Bluey, look for his Hollowshore Oysters or visit Bobbys or CJ Newnes in Billingsgate, both of whom stock their fish. Other Estuary treasures include the strong, salty Thames herring, which hails from a longstanding fishery in Blackwater, Essex. It’s the first fishery in the world to be certified as meeting the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) standard for a second

time – so it is super sustainable, as well as locally sourced. You’ll find this fish even in supermarkets like Waitrose and Sainsbury’s from November – just look for blue ‘MSC certified’ sign on the packet, and make a meal of them by shallowfrying in a handful of oats and orange zest, à la London-loving chef Oliver Rowe. Rowe’s restaurant Konstam in Kings Cross, recently closed, was an exercise in sourcing fish from the Thames. Herring, sprats and crayfish hailed from its waters, with even lobsters and crabs sourced from within the Estuary’s bounds. He still does the odd pop-up – follow him on Twitter for dates – and champions local food in each recipe he writes. Fans of Hollowshore Oysters include Marco Pierre-White and Garry Hollihead. Finding food sourced from Old Father Thames is not – yet – easy: even 2013’s Thames-dedicated #Riverfood event was forced to supplement its menu. Fishermen like Gary, Bluey and Bob survive, but do not thrive upon its waves. The future’s… cloudy; no longer dirty and diseased, but still not quite bright enough to quell their fears of going under should things not improve. Nevertheless, if what I have tasted of its depth is anything to go by, there is much hope for a river that is, increasingly, Londoners’ mutual friend. f

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FISHY BUSINESS: Drina Cabral's 'The Hunter and the Hunted' came first in the competition's Politics of Food category. The sardine, however, definitely lost

(INCR )EDIBLE

MOMENTS

Food photography doesn't always have to look delicious – sometimes it's about making a statement, too. Case in point: the Pink Lady Food Photography Awards – a celebration of some of the most remarkable food photography in the world 56


SNAP HAPPY

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If you have an eye for capturing food on film, registration for the 2016 competition is now open, and it couldn't be easier to enter. Just visit the website and upload your best shots. pinkladyfoodphotographer oftheyear.com

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GOOD GRILLING: 'Food Stall, Medieval Festival' by Mark Benham is pretty much self-explanatory. The smoky scent of the scene almost wafts from the page, which is perhaps why this picture came first in the Food for Celebration category

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Photograph by ###

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SUCKER UP: A stunning example of one ingredient manipulated into the shape of another, this image of a perfectly-coiled octopus tentacle was captured by Colin Campbell, and highly commended in the Cream of the Crop category

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Insider knowledge straight from the source. Learn the secrets of Borough Market’s experts at Miele’s Insider Knowledge Events. They supply some of the best restaurants in the world. And now it’s your chance to learn from them. At seven unique events, you’ll spend time with one of Borough’s best as they pass on their wisdom and demonstrate their skill. Events run from May to December 2015. For full details visit miele.co.uk/events using the code EVET2 to claim your 20% discount or call 0330 160 6610.


TIPPLE MIX Eyebrow-raising mixology doesn’t have to be reserved for bartenders. Shake up your next date night with some of our favourite London serves

LADY MARMALADE “The idea of Lady Marmalade came from the breakfast martini; homemade pink grapefruit marmalade with house dehydrated oranges and hand-prepared Campari dust. Also, an added splash of champagne turns this original cocktail into a boutique interpretation. The Lady Marmalade is a great addition to your evening meal, or as an aperitif drunk at any preferred time of day.” – Denis Siniak, deputy bar manager, Tonic & Remedy

ING R E DIE NTS ◆◆ 25ml vodka ◆◆ 15ml Cointreau ◆◆ 3 dashes orange bitters (or 1 dash

Angostura bitters) ◆◆ 1 bar spoon of grapefruit

marmalade (or orange marmalade) ◆◆ 10ml Campari ◆◆ Your favourite champagne or

prosecco to top Shake all ingredients except the champagne and Campari over ice and strain into a champagne flute. Top up with champagne. Pour the Campari gently into the glass so it ‘floats’ in the centre. Garnish with an orange twist. tonicandremedy.co.uk

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AIRMAIL “This is a delicious and innovative champagne cocktail based on a classic which first appeared in 1949. It’s very similar to a daiquiri, but with the addition of champagne. Nightjar has created a rim of green tea and powerful Moroccan mint to set off the flavours. The overall effect is a unique, refreshing cocktail.” – Marian Beke, head bartender, Nightjar

I NGREDI EN TS ◆◆ 50ml Havana Club 7YO ◆◆ ½ lime, juiced ◆◆ 15ml bee pollen syrup (or honey) ◆◆ Fresh Moroccan (or other) mint ◆◆ Green tea leaves ◆◆ Icing sugar ◆◆ A splash of champagne

Shake the ingredients together and serve in a champagne flute, then top up with champagne. Garnish with the tea leaves and mint leaves and dust with the icing sugar. barnightjar.com

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ING R E DIE NTS The Bloody Mary mix

◆◆ Chopped coriander leaves ◆◆ ½ lemon, juiced ◆◆ ¾ tsp Maldon sea salt ◆◆ 5 grinds of cracked black pepper ◆◆ ½ tsp wasabi paste ◆◆ 1 tsp Tabasco ◆◆ 4 tsp Worcester sauce ◆◆ ½l tomato juice ◆◆ 35ml vodka

The chocolate syrup ◆◆ 250ml water

CHOCOLATE BLOODY MARY

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“Paul A Young and I have created a menu of chocolate-inspired dishes to be served throughout July, and as we’re probably most well-known for our brunches, the Bloody Mary seemed the perfect choice to play with. The bitter Original Beans chocolate syrup works really well. I could drink this at any time of day.” – Peter Gordon, executive chef, The Providores and Tapa Room

◆◆ 200ml agave syrup ◆◆ 10g cocoa powder ◆◆ 5g Maldon sea salt ◆◆ 75g Original Bean dark chocolate

Mix all the Bloody Mary mix ingredients (except the vodka) in a large jug. Simmer the chocolate sauce ingredients for 2 minutes and leave to cool. Fill a highball glass with ice and a lemon wedge, add 35ml vodka, top with the Bloody Mary mix and the chocolate mix and garnish with a celery stick. theprovidores.co.uk

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THE LAVENDER CLOUD “If you’re looking for an aromatic and exciting cocktail, the Lavender Cloud is the one. Inspired by the floral notes of BLOOM gin, this is a subtle and delicate creation designed to take you above the clouds.” – Tiago Mira, head bartender, the Lobby Bar, One Aldwych

I N GREDI EN TS ◆◆ 50ml BLOOM gin ◆◆ 20ml rhubarb liqueur ◆◆ 10ml black raspberry liqueur ◆◆ 7ml honey, infused with lavender ◆◆ 20ml fresh lime juice. ◆◆ Bergamot foam to top

Shake ingredients well, and serve in a chilled martini glass. Garnish with a sprig of lavender. onealdwych.com

THE SHRUB & SHUTTER

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◆◆ 10ml maraschino ◆◆ 10ml green chartreuse ◆◆ 20ml lemon juice ◆◆ 15ml toasted fennel sugar (or

infuse simple sugar syrup with fennel seeds) ◆◆ 5ml Shrub and Shutter chlorophyll bitters (or Bitter Truth celery bitters) ◆◆ 10ml cucumber shrub (chopped cucumber infused in a heated mix of 200ml white wine vinegar, 100ml water and 100g sugar) Shake well and serve with a blowtorched fennel shutter. theshrubandshutter.com

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“We created our ‘salad cocktails’ as an antidote to a heavy Christmas, but they’re equally great as a lighter cocktail to drink in the sun. They’re inspired by classic salads – for example, the ‘Sorry, We’re All Out of Waldorfs’ includes ingredients that go into the classic Waldorf salad created in the 19th century. It’s a good illustration of how we like to use culinary techniques, and things you’d think of more as cooking ingredients, in our cocktail selection.” – Dave Tregenza, co-founder, the Shrub & Shutter

ING R E DIE NTS ◆◆ 40ml Whitley Neill gin


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PROMOTION

MIXING THINGS UP

Luc Belaire is renowned for world-class French wine. Now, it's embracing London's mixology scene, with signature serves available in top bars across the capital

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ONDON’S BARTENDING SCENE is a harmonious combination of old and new – old buildings repurposed to house trendy bars; classic cocktails given 20th-century makeovers by clever and creative mixologists – o it seems only right that Luc Belaire, whose maison has been crafting unique wines since 1898, would be a great fit for the London cocktail scene today. Even as French wine brands go, Luc Belaire has a pedigree many would covet. The two cuvées it produces are its Provence-Alpes-Cote d’Azur Rosé – a rich, fruity rosé with notes of summer fruit, made with Grenache, Cinsault and Syrah grapes, aged and then mixed with 100% Syrah for a beautiful pink colour – and its Burgundy Brut Gold – a crisp, refreshing, classic sparkling wine with floral elements, made with 100% Chardonnay grapes.

What’s more, its fifth- and sixthgeneration winemakers oversee the production process of every bottle, ensuring there’s a personal touch to every drop of Luc Belaire. The brand’s heritage and undeniable quality are reflected in the bars that stock and serve the wine – Mayfair’s Hush Brasserie, the City’s Coq d’Argent and Fitzrovia’s London Edition Hotel, to name just a few. Further afield, the Belaire stamp is spread as far as the highest bar in the world At.mosphere, in Dubai’s Burj Khalifa hotel; selected Four Seasons hotels; Hollywood’s Mondrian hotel; and selected Mandarin Oriental hotels, too. It may be a brand that’s steeped in history and tradition, but there’s no denying that Belaire has one foot in the future. See right for three of its signature London serves. •

THE COCKTAILS Mayfair Mojito Served at Mayfair brasserie Hush, this refreshing cocktail is made with rum, lime and syrup, topped up with Luc Belaire Rosé.

Rose Me Created by the bartending team at Coq d'Argent, this serve is flavoured with ginger, rose, lychee and Luc Belaire Rosé.

Rum n’ Roses The London Edition has come up with a herbal, floral cocktail based around Luc Belaire Rosé, with rum, elderflower and absinthe. See foodism.co.uk/make-thisluc-belaire for the full recipes

For more information, go to lucbelaire.com

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070 PALERMO STREET FOOD | 076 BOTTLE SERVICE 083 IN THE DRINK | 090 THE SELECTOR | 098 DECONSTRUCT

— PART 3 —

EXCESS “HEAD DOWN THE BACK STAIRS OF THE STORE AND ENTER INTO A CANDLE-LIT CULINARY WONDERLAND” THE SELECTOR, 090


DIRTY PRETTY THINGS MAIN COURSE Hannah Summers learns to love what she finds on the gritty streets of Palermo. Yes, even the deep-fried veal spleen in a bap

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H

E HOVERS AT my side, eyeing up my picnic with lusty envy. In front of me is a mound of glistening olives, plump sun-dried tomatoes, bread and cheese: my lunch. Or is it breakfast? I’ve lost track already. It’s 11am in Taverna Azzurra, a local bar where soft rock blares from the speakers, and wine pours from repurposed water coolers. Behind me a greying, rotund man lunges in to nab a lump of cheese. Stealthy? No. Sozzled? Oh yes. Anywhere else in the world, having your food pinched by a drunk loiterer would be a sign to get the hell out. In the Sicilian capital, Palermo, it just slots into the city’s gritty, convivial street food scene – and is hardly surprising in a place where the local saying is ‘bonu vinu fa bonu sangu’: ‘good wine makes good blood.’ And bad habits, perhaps. If eating out in Italy conjures up images of lingering al fresco pasta marathons or

MEN HERE SUPPORT THE LOCAL SAYING ‘GOOD WINE MAKES GOOD BLOOD’

Photograph by imageBROKER / Alamy

THIS IMAGE: Explore Palermo’s winding streets and you’ll come across the bustling Mercato della Vucciria, where going hungry really isn’t an option

afternoons snoozing off pizza, forget it – Sicily’s port city does things its own way. Table and chairs? Grow up. Knife and fork? It’s fingers only for you, my friend. Here in the island’s capital, food is devoured standing up and on the streets, and according to one of the great Palermo proverbs, ‘a person eating must make crumbs’. Clearly, I’ll fit right in. What will become something of a foodie epic had started two hours earlier, at 9am in the morning. Accompanied by my boyfriend, Adam, I meet Marco Romeo – the owner of Streat Palermo food tours and the Godfather (excuse the label, but it is apt) of Palermo’s pavement stalls. I’m hankering after the silky hit of an espresso, a habit I’ve become accustomed to on Italian breaks. “Never!” Marco stops in his tracks. “Mix it with all this food and you’ll have a dodgy stomach.” That’s the least of my worries. I smell it before I see it – the pungent waft of boiled →

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FORGET CHEERIOS, VEAL IS THE STANDARD BREAKFAST HERE IN PALERMO, A CITY MARKED BY THE CULINARY STEPS OF CONQUERERS 72

→ meat. A man called Mr Toni greets us with a nod before submerging his grubby hands beneath the floral cloth ‘lid’ of his wicker basket. He rummages around before pulling out soft, slippery folds of squidgy yellow... something. “Leftover veal!” Marco smiles triumphantly, sprinkling our paper cone of frittola – that’s fat and cartilage infused with bay leaf – with lemon juice. “Boiled, then fried in lard, then boiled again. This is typical Palermitan street food.” Dear God. Forget Cheerios – this is the standard breakfast in Il Capo, the 1,200-year-old main fish market in central Palermo, a place marked by the culinary footsteps of former Sicilian conquerors including the Arabs, Spanish and Normans. Take pasta chi sardi – the city’s long-standing signature dish. It’s a prime example of how Palermo’s food is a mash-up of historical influences – sardines bought from the market are tossed with wild fennel from the Sicilian mountains, along with saffron, pine nuts and sultanas (traditional flavours from the Middle Eastern conquerors), and of course, spaghetti. Arabian influence is everywhere. It’s infused in the local dialect, the design of the

alleys and the ingredients at our next pit-stop, a hole in the wall called Da Arianna, the home of the arancina. Brought to Sicily by the Arabs in the ninth century, the minced veal and saffron arancina (a regional tomato-free version, hence the spelling with an ‘a’) was originally served like risotto, before locals realised a rounded shape would make it an easier snack to carry whilst hunting. Today,

HOTEL PRINCIPE DI VILLAFRANCA Away from the crumbling streets of the old city, but still brilliantly located for central access, this cosy boutique hotel is the perfect spot to spread out after your food fest. Around the corner you’ll find Palermo’s best bakery: Savoca is a local favourite, where counters are lined with doughy, tomatoey and cheesy treats. You can even bring a takeaway box back to your room. But who in their right mind would do that?! Erm... Three nights with flights from £572pp. classic-collection.co.uk


CLOCKWISE FROM THIS IMAGE: Graffiti depicting the ‘Genius of Palermo’; Mr Mario and his famed sfincione cart; frittola: street food for the brave

Photograph (main) by Getty

the family who run Da Arianna churn out hundreds of the orange-shaped balls a day. Mamma expertly caresses grains of rice in the back kitchen, while Jesus looks on from a pink, plastic cross – typical of a hugely Catholic city boasting 220 churches. The most beautiful but rarely visited of these is the baroque Immacolata Concezione. While our next dish bubbles away, we nip inside to see the gleaming statue of Saint Rosalia, the patron saint of Palermo. It’s a temporary break. “All this food is fried,” Marco informs us as our next dish arrives. He’s nervous we might dismiss it as unhealthy. Deep-fried? Pah! It’s our favourite vice! Adam and I bat his worries away, before burning our mouths on fresh-out-thefryer morsels: salty, crisp chickpea fritters known as panelle, and stubby, phallic potato croquettes called cazzilli – deriving from the Italian for penis, of course… Following Marco, we negotiate the labyrinth of Palermo’s backstreets, where signs of destruction are still as evident as if the 1943 allied invasion had happened yesterday. Walls crumble around us, and rotting beams support precarious buildings,

where you hurry past in case they collapse (which they frequently do, Marco reveals). Out in the open, danger comes from speeding mopeds, so we seek sanctuary on the kerb with Mr Mario (so well known he doesn’t need a surname), who is famed for his sfincione cart. The word is derived from the Latin spongiam, or sponge. And that’s what it is, sort of. A hunk of pillowy bread, it’s soaked in lashings of oil, tomato and pepper. Surprisingly delicate, it turns out to be the most unlikely Italian pizza I’ve ever tasted; in one epic bite it sticks two fingers up at the pink-hued-piazza and smoochingcouples stereotypes of most Italian cities. We amble to Vucciria, where deteriorating houses are broken up by occasional streaks of colour. Piazza Garrafello reveals a typical Palermo scene – a building that’s remained largely untouched since the 1943 bombings, held upright by rows of scaffolding. Painted on the crumbling walls behind is some floralinspired graffiti, a tribute from the Austrian artist Uwe Jäntsch who fell in love with the piazza when he moved to the city. The locals couldn’t care less; in one corner of the empty square, two men slump against plastic chairs, peeling potatoes with a backdrop of long-abandoned balconies and half-arsed graffiti scrawls of PREGO PREGO PREGO, the ubiquitous Italian saying. Mr Giuseppe (I’m not making up names) is our next port of call. He’s responsible for the city’s most famous fast food dish, pani ca meusa: spleen sandwich. A staple for Palermo’s Jewish community in the early 1900s, the veal spleen, lung and throat cartilage is boiled and fried, stuffed into a bun that’s been gently soaked in fat, then topped with ricotta cheese. “It’s just like a burger,” Marco nods, tucking in. Except, it’s really not. Still, it’s definitely got something. After recovering from the initial apprehensive bite, I happily scoff the rest. On every corner you see that street food is a source of local pride – granddads stand at buckets mixing batter for hours, or fan kerbside barbeques. Their passion, it seems, is only rivalled by one other thing. “Welcome to Palermo’s second most important cathedral,”

FOOD STOPS OSTERIA LO BIANCO Join the Palermitans at this bustling osteria for some of the best pasta and fish in the city. Book ahead.

ALTRI TEMPI Tuck into huge bowls of the local speciality pasta chi sardi while the Italian version of X-Factor blares in the corner.

SAVOCA ROSTICCERIA Stop at this locals’ favourite bakery for a selection of high-end Sicilian bites including mini-calzone.

ROSCIGLIONE The best place in Sicily to get cannolli with ricotta cream. The factory makes thousands of the sweet pastries every month.

Marco announces, waving towards an eclectic jumble of architecture. The first – Stadio Renzo Barbera – is down the road, still ringing from the din of the previous week’s 3-1 win over Napoli. But it’s nothing compared to the real cathedral. Its dazzling facade sports Moorish and Baroque flourishes, dust-coloured →

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LOCAL FLAVOUR

Sample Sicilian cuisine – as well as food from some of Italy’s other top culinary regions – closer to home at the Moretti Gran Tour, which will be transforming Space Studios into a street food market from 16-18 July. moretti-gran-tour.designmynight.com

ICE CREAM BULGES OUT THE SIDE OF BRIOCHE BUNS → Gothic-Catalan arcades and 12th-century Norman towers spiking into the sky. Inside is surprisingly neoclassical and understated; the biggest embellishment is the tomb and a shiny, gargantuan poster of Giuseppe Pino Puglisi, the priest who openly criticised the Mafia, and paid for it with his life in 1993. Nowadays, however, the only danger for tourists is high cholesterol. “I’m adding you to my spreadsheet of tourists I like,” Marco tells us, and suggests we meet later, after a pause from the onslaught of food. We set about exploring the city’s Greek columns, Roman arches and Norman churches, but Sicilian food proves strangely addictive. We only manage five minutes before we’re distracted by the sherbet-hued ice

creams in a side-street gelateria called Gelato. Pistachio ice cream bulges from the side of our brioche buns, a challenge to eat while negotiating cramped alleys. Massive knickers dangle from washing lines, abandoned mattresses lean defeated against walls and bin bags erupt like nearby Mount Etna. One lane is blocked by a clapped-out Fiat 500 – a photographer’s dream. Palermo’s gruff streets won’t be winning any beauty pageants, but the dishevelled vibe is no less alluring. It proves even more so in the market area of La Vucciria, which is transformed by the time we return that night. Makeshift barbecues line the perimeter of the small square, and billows of smoke wafting from the coals mingle with that from the cigarettes and spliffs of the city’s youth, who seem all too ready to abandon mamma’s home cooking. Remarkably, we’ve still got some stomach space to spare. But once again the dish in my hands is unrecognisable – curly fried knots of something grey and bobbly. “Veal intestine!” Marco cries for the third time that day. I’m unfazed now. With any reservation dulled by numerous bottles of cheap Forst beer, the smoke-infused meat squirted with lemon tastes good. Really good. I could get used to this. Grabbing a helping of fried bacon wrapped around

shallots for the road, Marco leads us back to Piazza Garrafello. Although deserted earlier that day, it’s now packed with tables, pop-up beer carts, decks and flashing lights, the scaffolding threatening to topple with every beat and footstep. The surrounding cobbles throng with lively beer-chugging locals and men enthusiastically playing table football underneath a centuries-old statue of the Genius, the emblem of a city whose Latin inscription warns: ‘Palermo devours its children, and feeds its foreigners.’ No surprise, then, that the evening climaxes, as always, with some late-night indulgence. Standing at the counter of Fratelli Ganci, we share doughy snack-size calzones and arancina before a final spiedino – a deep-fried (of course) brick – sorry, pastry – of minced meat. It’s so substantial and dense that the paper plate strains from the weight of it. As, unfortunately, do my jeans. Cue an emergency digestif. We squeeze back into our earlier hangout, Taverna Azzurra, which is now packed with a nimble, younger crowd in Converse high tops. After 10pm, the bar owner’s sons run the show. My food-nabbing mate and his paunchy pals are long gone following a hard day guzzling sweet, locally-produced Marsala, Zibibbo and Sangue de Sicilia wine. It would be rude not to follow suit, wouldn’t it? We order a round. Hey, it’s good for the blood. f Food tours are available with Streat Palermo, streatpalermo.it; arrange flights and accommodation with classic-collection.co.uk

Photograph (main) by directphoto.bz / Alamy

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THIS IMAGE: below the rooftops of Palermo lies a world of foodie opportunity BELOW: the city’s veal and saffron arancina are eaten in their hundreds


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Order this week and get :

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BOTTLE SERVICE DRINK

This summer, we’ve got all the gin, British wine and summer ales you can handle. Chin, chin PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID HARRISON

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From London to Africa via Japan, here are the gins we’re looking forward to sipping on this summer: 1 Jinzu, 41.3%, 70cl. £33.45; 31dover.com 2 Highwayman Gin, 40%, 70cl. £39; ladiesandgents.co 3 Star of Bombay, 47.5%, 70cl. £34.50; waitrose.com 4 Opihr, 40%, 70cl. £30; harveynichols.com 5 Eccentric 18th Century, 44.4%, 70cl. £39.99; eccentric gin.com 6 Half Hitch, 40%, 70cl. £39.95; halfhitch.london 7 Portobello Road No. 171, 42%, 70cl. £25; portobelloroadgin.com 8 Whitley Neill, 42%, 70cl. £23.23; masterofmalt.com

Photograph by ###

BITE-SIZED

FOODISM.CO.UK/ NEWSLETTER

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The British wine scene just keeps on growing. Here are four of our favourites flying the flag for English viniculture:

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1 Nutbourne Vineyards Blush, 11.5%, 75cl. £12.50; nutbourne vineyards.com 2 The Bolney Estate Pinot Noir 2013, 12.5%, 75cl. £16.99; bolneywineestate.com 3 Chapel Down Bacchus 2009, 12%, 75cl. £13.99; selfridges.com 4 Gusbourne Estate Sparkling Rosé, 12%, 75cl. £29.95; bbr.com

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Lighten up, ales. Now’s the time for fresh, hoppy summertime beer. Here are seven of our favourites:

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1 Beavertown Quelle, 4.1%, 330ml. £2.40, beermerchants.com, alesbymail.com 2 Einstök Icelandic White Ale, 5.2%, 330ml. £13.99 for 6; majestic.co.uk 3 Celt Goddess of the Spring, 6%, 330ml. £2.35; winerack.com 4 Cerveza Artesanal Tyris Au Yeah, 4.5%, 330ml. £22.63 for 6; amazon.co.uk 5 Fourpure Brewing Roux Brew 15, 5.6%, 330ml. £22.50 for 6; eebria.com 6 Meantime Yakima Red, 4.1%, 330ml. £20.49 for 12; meantimebrewing.com 7 Big Hug The Bears, 4.2%, 330ml. £2.60; bottleapostle.com

Photograph by ###

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THE ORIGINAL PILSNER BREWED THE O R I G I N A L WAY

BREWED IN

PLZEN, CZECH

THE ORIGINAL PILSNER


Y R E H C T U B L A N O I T I D TRA FOR S E L Y T S E F I L N R E D O M For three generations, our family have been supplying traditional meat to the people of Lancashire. Raised at the foot of Pendle Hill, our animals are sustainably farmed meaning that they live outdoors, are raised over a long period of time, and are well cared for. Every step in the farming of our animals is important to produce the very best meat for our customers, Lancashire is a great place to produce the tastiest of meat by raising animals over a longer period of time, in the beautiful outdoors.

You too can enjoy what Roaming Roosters has to offer, delivered direct to your door. It’s traditional butchery for modern lifestyles, and if you use the code FOODISM20 at roamingroosters.co.uk, you can try it with 20% OFF too.

Gone are the days when there was a butcher on the corner of every street. Here at Roaming Roosters we believe that using a Butcher will mean your meat is properly reared, traceable and tasty. We’ve been serving the people of Pendle for three generations, but we’re now delighted to be able to serve the people of London too, thanks to our online shop. Simon and Nick Me llin Owners of Roaming Roo

sters

roamingroosters.co.uk @roamingroosters /roamingroosters

Roaming Roosters, Barrowford Rd., Higham, Lancashire BB12 9ER

FOOD THAT MAKES YOU FEEL GOOD!


CLICK

FOODISM.CO.UK

IN THE DRINK APERITIF The big news on this month's booze radar 1 Booze Traveller There's a wealth of grog to be discovered all over the world, and aiming to find the best (and weirdest), is Jack Maxwell, in new show Booze Traveller. The former Beverly Hills, 90210 actor finds everything from drinks made of moss to drinking and fighting with Vikings – in countries including Japan, Peru and Mongolia. On the Travel Channel UK from 2 July.

FEAST FOR THE EYES: Dinerama, is the newest day/ night street food arena from the Street Feast team, in Shoreditch Yard. We were there (in force) to usher it in. Visit streetfeastlondon.com for more details.

travelchanneltv.com

2 Lidl's craft beer Yeah, yeah, yeah, craft beer this, craft beer that. But there's no denying there's a reason the trend has become so popular – which is why Lidl is launching a new craft beer initiative. The chain is championing a bunch of breweries by stocking 48 different locallysourced and premium craft ales in its stores across the UK. lidl.co.uk

3 STEAK EXPECTATIONS If anyone should know their way around a steak it's an Argentinian winemaker – which is why malbec master Graffigna set out to find the best steak in the city earlier this year. And the winner of the London Steak Awards, announced in May? (Drumroll please.) Hawksmoor. A worthy champion. Fancy winning dinner for four at Hawksmoor? To enter, go to foodism.co.uk/ competition/ hawksmoor

DINERAMA We teamed up with Street Feast for a preview of its new, five-days-a-week Shoreditch Yard site

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PILSNER AT ITS BEST

The original pilsner, Pilsner Urquell, is now proudly serving its tank beer to Soho’s new Chinese gastropub Duck + Rice. Now you can get a taste of Tankovna for yourself – unpasteurised beer brought straight from copper tanks at the bar to your glass

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HAT WOULD YOU think if we said you could drink the original pilsner, fresh and unpasteurised – delivered direct from its brewery in Plze , Czech Republic – in a Chinese gastropub in London? If you’re a beer aficionado, we’re guessing you’d be particularly excited. And if you’re not, you will be after you

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try the legendary pilsner like you’ve never tasted it before.

The process The trick is the pasteurisation. Or rather, the lack thereof. Unlike drinking from a bottle, can or a regular tap behind the bar, Pilsner Urquell tank beer remains unpasteurised, so it’s the freshest pint of beer possible.

Pilsner Urquell’s brewmaster Vaclav Berka believes that attitudes to how beer is consumed, and how it tastes, are changing: “In 1842, the way of brewing changed forever; a beer revolution which created the world’s first golden beer. Our beer is always in perfect condition when it passes through our gate, and tank beer ensures we keep the very best taste and quality.” Unpasteurised Pilsner Urquell tank


PROMOTION

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Pilsner Urquell's characteristic golden hue; a barmaid pours a pint; the tanks in all their glory; friends enjoy a pint at Soho restaurant Duck + Rice

beer is now delivered straight from its brewery, in Plze , Czech Republic, direct to Duck + Rice. Delivered fresh from the brewery and piped into each of its authentic Czech tanks, each tank is opened in turn, offering the freshest pint of Pilsner Urquell to its customers. It means customers at Duck + Rice are able to enjoy Pilsner Urquell at its best and, if the evidence of the first few weeks is anything to go by, the locals love it!

“Pilsner Urquell is the archetypal pilsner, yet distinctive, with sufficient character to take on spicy food,” says Alan Yau, esteemed restaurateur and the owner of Duck + Rice. “It’s very refreshing for the palate, with a clean finish that prepares one to properly appreciate different flavours. To enjoy the tank beer alongside the newfashioned Chinese food from the Duck + Rice kitchen is an exciting new pairing.” But don’t take his, or our, word for it. The only way to truly decide is to go to Duck + Rice and try Pilsner Urquell’s Tankovna for yourself. One sip and you’ll be wishing every beer you’re served came straight from a copper tank. •

The taste

BEER YOU'RE USED TO DRINKING HAS TO BE PASTEURISED TO ALLOW FOR THE TIME FROM STORING TO POURING. NOT WITH PILSNER URQUELL’S TANKOVNA

Unpasteurised Pilsner Urquell tank beer amplifies the beer’s perfect balance of fuller flavours and a stunning, clean finish – fitting for a brewer that has done things its own way ever since its inception in 1842. Duck + Rice’s housing of the Tankovna tanks follows the lead of many pubs and bars in the Czech Republic, and when you take the first sip from your tankard, you’ll wonder why there aren’t more of these stunning copper tanks adorning bars all over the capital. Václav Berka says “Tank beer is unique in its taste and quality. It offers beer-lovers the freshest beer possible. The tanks ensure that the beer is kept at the right temperature and in perfect condition until the time it is poured into the glass, ensuring the very best taste, quality and a fuller, rounder malt body.”

The venue Chinese gastropub Duck + Rice has already turned heads since its recent arrival in Soho, and the arrival of Pilsner Urquell’s Tankovna ensures it will continue to do so. The beer itself was chosen for its unique flavour profile – not many lagers can compete with the spice and sweetness of modern Chinese food like that served at Duck + Rice, but Pilsner Urquell is more than a match for it.

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PROMOTION

THE SPICE OF LIFE

Do things a little differently at your barbecue party this summer – after you light the coals, you can really spice things up with an Eastern-style sauce from Lee Kum Kee

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OR THE CHEF who tires of humdrum hot dogs, boring burgers, uninspiring salads and overcooked chicken wings, salvation has arrived in the form of Lee Kum Kee’s sauces. The family–owned company from Guangdong has been in the food game a while now (since 1888, to be precise), so it knows a thing or two about bringing genuine, authentic flavour to a party. When the sun starts shining and the coals are calling, bring out a real party atmosphere with one of Lee Kum Kee’s signature sauces. The brand of choice for Michelin-starred chefs from around the world has teamed up with experts from East and West to help you cook up a storm at your barbecue this year. Grilling just got a whole lot hotter. Chicken burger with oyster sauce marinade and teriyaki mayonnaise, anyone? How about scallops in a white wine and plum sauce? Whether you’re a trendsetter or a traditionalist, there’s a recipe to whet your appetite. Chefs Arthur Potts Dawson of

London and Calvin Tsoi of Hong Kong have teamed up to create these mouthwatering recipes using Lee Kum Kee sauces, which are certain to wow your guests in the summer sunshine. Ditch the herbs, lower the salt and forget the pepper – the boys are here to teach you a trick or two. Premium Oyster, they says, works well as a marinade to accentuate flavour and bring out a delicious umami in your ingredients; while Oriental Sesame Dressing can be drizzled onto salad. Char Siu Sauce, meanwhile, has a savoury and sweet flavour, sure to spice up the party. Arthur and Calvin have made a list of essential tips for the budding barbecuer looking to impress in front of the grill this year (right). For the full list use the QR code, and see more recipes at foodism.co.uk. • To win a Hong Kong trip for two, go to lkkcarnival.com to enjoy a real taste of China.

GRILLING TIPS Lee Kum Kee’s chefs have come up with some key tips for the perfect barbecue. Follow these tips and you’re bound to impress: ◆◆ Keep it clean, keep ‘em keen: a

clean grill is a happy grill. ◆◆ Don’t blacken thy name: boil (just a

bit), marinade, grill. ◆◆ Keep your hands to yourself:

let the charcoal do the talking; interfere sparingly. ◆◆ Keep a lid on it: use a lid for an earthy, smoky aroma. ◆◆ Spread the love: evenly-spread charcoal grills meat more quickly.

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snowdoniacheese.co.uk

RED DEVIL

With Pride in Our Heart and Fire in Your Belly

Fiery chilli and pepper red leicester


PROMOTION

MARKET LIKE IT'S HOT

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: A example of the dishy food on offer; Camden Market in all its glory; the guys behind Cereal Killer Cafe

Summer's looking tasty at Camden Market, with new culinary delights, boutique festivals and an outdoor cinema

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AMDEN MARKET JUST might surprise you this summer. Proper, authentic street food with influences from a host of countries? Check. Add to that a combination of vintage clothes shops, a great independent scene and live music, and you've got yourself a London street party like no other. With a raft of new openings set to cement the market as an essential street food destination, it's undeniably on the up, and a welcome alternative to east

A RAFT OF NEW OPENINGS ARE SET TO CEMENT THE MARKET AS AN ESSENTIAL STREET FOOD DESTINATION

London for the in-crowd. Needing no introduction is Cereal Killer Cafe, following the success of its Brick Lane site with a new Stables Market location. It dominated the column inches last year, so it should already be on your radar, and its quirky cereal-based offerings are a perfect fit for Camden's love of all things unusual. If that tickles your fancy, you'll love that someone's finally opened up a fish-finger sandwich shop. Originating as an idea at Bestival a few years back, a couple of enterprising women spotted a gap in the market, and The Fabulous Fishfinger Company has now blossomed into a full-blown fish fixture in Camden. This ain't your usual 3am rustle-up, though – fresh fish, quality bread and proper chips make this one for the sarnie connoisseur. But that's not it – with stalls like Ghetto Grillz, Mr Piadina and Mama's Jerk Station all setting up permanent shops, and a packed season of exciting events, Camden Market is just begging to be experienced this summer. •

NIGHT-TIME TALES Aside from the food, you've also got Backyard Cinema, showing 36 films over six weeks, from 29 July. Or Lock Live – a boutique festival on 10 July showcasing all the best that the market has to offer. If you're into after-dark fun, then check out the Summer Night Markets, which start on 30 July every Thursday, so you can take in the market against a backdrop of live music and cocktails...

For more info visit camdenmarket.com

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THE SELECTOR

In a place that spoils you for choice when it comes to eating and drinking, deciding where to dine in London can often prove tricky. That’s where we come in - the Foodism team present some of the city’s hottest options 90

 1  1  Back in 5 Minutes Ante Clothes Shop, 224 Brick Lane, E1 6SA

Situated at the rear of a clothes shop on Brick Lane, Back in 5 Minutes couldn’t be more achingly hip if it tried. But that’s no bad thing – what’s not to love about shopping and dining in the same place? Head down the back stairs of the Ante store, and enter into a candle-lit culinary wonderland, where you can expect the likes of chargrilled scallops, salmon with chorizo and the perennially-trendy BBQ pulled beef. disappearingdiningclub.co.uk

THE SELECTOR

HIDEAWAYS 2

BEST OF THE REST  2  Gremio de Brixton

 4  Oslo Court

St. Matthew’s Church, Effra Road, SW2 1JF

Charlbert Street, NW8 7EN

A biblical experience. The holy grail of tapas. The puns are almost too many to mention when it comes to this Spanish restaurant located in the crypt under St Matthew’s Church in Brixton. While some pledge their allegiance to the good lord upstairs, you can worship at an altar comprising jamon, manchego and croquetas. Amen to that. 020 7924 0660; gremiodebrixton.com

A 1930s flat doesn’t seem an obvious place for a restaurant, but with 35 years notched up on its culinary clock, Oslo Court’s concept is clearly a winner. Expect retro decor and dishes, and a crowd very much in the present.

 3  Call Me Mr Lucky

 5  Four O Nine

11 Southwark Street, SE1 1RQ

409 Clapham Road, SW9 9BT

You’re more than likely to have heard of the Breakfast Club, but you may not be so familiar with its elusive younger sibling, Call Me Mr Lucky. Accessed through a password-protected secret door in the kitchen, this speakeasy-style bar and restaurant serves up a late-night plate of pancakes, bacon and maple syrup, which does nothing for our body-clocks, but plenty for the soul... 020 7078 9635; callmemrlucky.com

Clapham High Street may be best-known for pubs overflowing with shot 5 guzzling party people, but buzz on the bell of Four O Nine’s hidden door and you’ll be lead to the antithesis of the chaos unfurling around it. This discreet dining room has a distinctly grown-up feel, with dishes featuring an array of seasonal British produce. 020 7737 0722; fouronine.co.uk

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oslocourtrestaurant.co.uk

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BEST OF THE REST  2  Asia de Cuba

 4  Bibendum

45 Saint Martin’s Lane, WC2N 4HX

Michelin House, 81 Fulham Road, SW3 6RD

With successful openings in Abu Dhabi and Dubai logged, Asia de Cuba’s attention has turned to taking care of business back in London. Specifically, that means a thorough revamp of its Soho restaurant, with corporate chef Luis Pous’s signature ‘Chino Latino’ cuisine still very much at the heart of things.

Bibendum has been a Chelsea staple since it opened in 1987, and a recent renovation, along with a new head chef, have seen it given a shake-up. Peter Robinson has worked with founding chef Simon Hopkinson to create a new, pared-down menu.

020 7300 5588; asiadecuba.com

 3  Quaglino’s 16 Bury Street, SW1Y 6AJ

This genuine 1920s relic, with its enormous room, lush furnishings and Great Gatsbyesque atmosphere, harks back to the days of proper glamour dining. A refurb last year saw it brought up to date, without sacrificing the things that make it such a London institution. 020 7930 6767; quaglinos-restaurant.co.uk

020 7581 5817; bibendum.co.uk

 5  Pied à Terre 34 Charlotte Street, W1T 2NH

Pied à Terre has a history as colourful as the artful plates it serves. It’s no stranger to a renovation, having suffered fire damage in 2004 – luckily the latest touch-ups are just tweaks; the focus is still very much on the food. 020 7636 1178; pied-a-terre.co.uk

THE SELECTOR

NEW OLD SCHOOL  1

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3  1  The Ivy 1-5 West Street, WC2H 9NQ

Photograph by Paul Winch-Furness

The Ivy has been the hangout of choice for the rich and famous 4 – and occasionally for us normals too – for generations, and it’s back after a massive refurb and renovation. (Don’t worry – the characteristic stainedglass windows are still  5 intact.) Executive chef Gary Lee’s new menu includes Ivy classics – Cornish crab, shepherd’s pie and Bang Bang Chicken all still feature, as you’d hope – alongside new additions such as barbecued squid and chorizo salad, and an Asian-influenced grazing menu featuring tea-smoked short ribs and tempura shrimp and squid. There’s a revamped cocktail menu, too, with a ‘roaring twenties’ section – a gentle reminder of just how long this Soho institution has been in the game. 020 7836 4751; the-ivy.co.uk

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BEST OF THE REST  2  Melt Room 26 Noel Street, W1F 8GY

Lactose intolerant? We’d suggest skipping this one. If you’re not, however, it’ll be music to your ears that New York-style grilled cheese emporium Melt Room has hit Soho, serving up everything from simple bites to pimpedout dishes like pastrami with porcini, red Leicester and horseradish to eat in or take out. 020 7096 2002; meltroom.com

 3  Berber & Q Arch 338 Acton Mews, E8 4EA

Josh Katz has been a busy boy since leaving Ottolenghi. Not only did he preside over

Finchley Road café Zest, but he’s gone on to set up Berber & Q, a modern Moroccanthemed grillhouse in a converted railway arch in Haggerston. It offers up unfussy, delicious grilled and smoked meats, picked veg and characteristically Maghrebi sides, all served on a huge tray in the middle of the table.

at lunchtime, early evening or post-theatre, it’s perfect for when you want to save on time without scrimping on taste.

020 7923 0829; berberandq.com

There are innumerable great burger joints in London, but not many provide as fuss-free a service while still keeping the quality high as Honest. Burgers come with seasoned fries as standard (as well they should), and the selection is simple: four regular burgers and one monthly-changing guest special.

 4  Tredwell’s 4A Upper St Martin’s Lane, WC2H 9NY

Marcus Wareing’s new restaurant may not be the first name to come to mind when you’re after a swift bite in central London, but its Express Menu might change all that. Available

020 3764 0840; tredwells.com

 5  Honest Burgers Various locations

020 3693 9690; honestburgers.co.uk

THE SELECTOR

OUT IN AN HOUR

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 1  The Salon at Spring Somerset House, Lancaster Place, WC2R 1LA

Photograph by ###

Skye Gyngell’s Spring at Somerset House has been heralded as one of the Strand’s best restaurants since it opened last year, but if you wanted to nip in and out within an hour or so you’d probably be leaving with an armful of doggy bags and more than a few dirty looks. Thankfully, it’s expanded its offering to a sister restaurant, the Salon at Spring, which offers a swifter service and a no-reservation policy – perfect for when you need to nip out for a working lunch or a quick early dinner. 020 3011 0115; springrestaurant.co.uk/salon

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1

 1  The Duck and Rice 90 Berwick Street, W1 0QB

What do you get when you cross Alan Yau with a traditional British boozer? Something pretty bloody fantastic, that’s what. A menu of Asian-inspired dishes – char sui buns, jasmine-smoked pork ribs, five spice fried chicken, dim sum – goes hand-in-hand with a beer list that’s 47-bottles strong, with a host of draught options too. Choose from pilsners and pale lagers, Belgian-style, wheat and fruit, ales, stouts, porters and the ominouslynamed ‘bombers’. We can only hope they’re considering implementing that age-old tradition of the lock-in too… 020 3327 7888; theduckandrice.com

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THE SELECTOR

FOOD AND BREWS


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BEST OF THE REST  2  The Italian Job 13 Devonshire Road, W4 2EU

Photograph [3] by Hannah Summers

The UK’s first Italian craft beer pub has arrived. Beyond the pedestrian choices of Peroni and Birra Moretti, there’s a whole new world of brews to be discovered, alongside a short-but-sweet menu of Italian tapas. 020 8994 2852; theitalianjobpub.co.uk

 3  The Joker of Penton Street 58 Penton Street, N1 9PZ

For a range of pale ales and some of the most lovingly-prepped burgers in the city, head

north to the Joker near Angel, a pub that combines beers with hunky, messy piles of beef and buns made by the legendary Burger Bear. Decent live music adds to the fun.

the journey home seem a lot easier, trust us.

020 7837 3891; joker.pub

389 Brockley Rd, SE4 2PH

 4  The Dysart 135 Petersham Road, TW10 7AA the

Your efforts to reach The Dysart (not-sohandily located in Petersham) will be rewarded – their tasting menu of ‘classicBritish-meets-Japanese’ dishes comes with a flight of ales, should you so desire. It’ll make

The only one of its kind

THE NEW PLACE TO EAT IN MAJORCA

It’s hip and it’s chic. It’s in front of the sea. An avant garde beach bar and restaurant. Eat something truly fresh before leaving the island.

Non-typical paellas, fish from the area and real Spanish meat.

020 8940 8005; thedysartpetersham.co.uk

 5  London Beer Dispensary This friendly local hangout is run by the Late Knights Brewery, a tiny operation based in Penge that supplies just five local bars with their lovingly-crafted brews. There are eight to choose from at the LBD, and they also serve what they claim to be the ‘best burger in town’. Sounds like a challenge to us. 020 7977 0486; lateknightsbrewery.co.uk

Photograph by ###


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FOODISMUK

BEST OF THE REST

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 2  Sticks ’n’ Sushi

 4  Modern Pantry

1 Crossrail Place, E14 5AR

47-48 Saint John’s Square, EC1V 4JJ

The Danish restaurant group’s expansion into the impending Crossrail’s territory will mark its fourth London restaurant, so you’d better start getting used to it. As the name suggests, it serves up yakitori skewers (the sticks) with hand-crafted sushi (the, er, sushi). Delicious.

That chef Anna Hansen has worked with Peter Gordon is evident in this restaurant’s modern, global influence on everyday dishes. Cornish monkfish is roasted with garam masala lentils, and pumpkin pie gets a squeeze of Iranian lime and a chilli wafer.

020 3141 8230; sticksnsushi.com

020 7553 9210; themodernpantry.co.uk

 3  Amaru

 5  Flat Three

Ivory House, St Katharine Docks, E1W 1AT

120-122 Holland Park Avenue, W11 4UA

Now that Peruvian’s here to stay, its close cousin Nikkei (a Japanese/Peruvian fusion cuisine that’s been well-represented in Peru for decades) is flying, too. One of its best exponents is Amaru, serving creative food from its home on St Katharine Docks.

Japanese-Korean fusion has been done, but throw a bit of Scandinavian into the mix and we’ll pay more attention. Dishes at Flat Three are artfully complex: sencha ice cream, sweet fermented ama koji porridge, cherry beer sorbet and buckwheat make one epic dessert.

020 7702 4765; @Amaru_SKD

020 7792 8987; flatthree.london

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5 THE SELECTOR

FUSION FOOD  1  1  The Providores 109 Marylebone High Street, W1U 4RX

020 7935 6175; theprovidores.co.uk

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Photograph by ###

Fusion cuisine is no longer the property of gimmicky 1970s restaurants. It’s bigger than ever in the 2010s, and New Zealander Peter Gordon is one of the chefs spearheading it, having already set up successful restaurants in Auckland and London. His Marylebone restaurant is Antipodean given a shake-up, with dishes like Wye Valley asparagus with smoked tofu and crispy curry leaves, and smoked Dutch eel with orange freekeh, capers, babaganoush, sesame miso dressing and crispy buckwheat adorning a menu that’s eye-wateringly complex in its creation. Tapa Room, its little sister, serves smaller and more easygoing plates in the same vein, and both play host to one of the most extensive New Zealand wine lists in the capital.


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Open Evening Wednesday 8 July 18.00 – 21.30 Spaces are limited so please register to attend.

Leiths Diploma is an internationally renowned full time cookery course designed for those with professional culinary ambitions.


ALL IN HAND: The general consensus is that the ice cream cone was officially ‘born’ in 1904 at the St Louis World’s Fair, when an ice cream vendor and a waffle maker were pitched next to one another, and the former ran out of bowls...

LOAD OF WAFFLE: The world’s largest ice cream cone measured 2.81m in height, and was created in Italy in 2012, using 700g of white chocolate and 2,000 wafers. One to share, then.

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Photograph by ###

DE CO NS TR UC T.

The ultimate summer accessory, as iconic as it is practical (an EDIBLE vessel, what’s not to love?) and a design that’s remained the same since we first got our grubby toddler mitts on one. Yep, when it comes to keeping cool, the ice cream cone wins

CONE LOVE: The brilliant news is, ice cream cones are low in saturated fat, sodium and cholesterol. What you choose to put in them, however, could cancel out their diet-friendly credentials... Hold the flake.


with Yoghurt blended beverage

Red Berry

Š 2015 Starbucks Coffee Company. All rights reserved.

NEW Mango Passion Fruit

Foodism, 4, London food and drink  

Foodism Magazine, Issue 4, London food and drink

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