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T H E I R G R E AT, G R E AT, G R A N D FAT H E R Having the wisdom and knowledge of a parent to guide you in a business is one thing. But imagine the invaluable advice you’d get from a grandparent, or even a great, great grandparent? Since 1853, we’ve learnt from our forefathers and have constantly built on their successes. Something you can appreciate in every glass of Hardys wine.

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ALL INCLUDED, ALL UNLIMITED, ALL THE TIME Check into a Sandals Resort and you will be treated to our Discovery Dining programme, where anytime dining in up to 16 gourmet restaurants awaits you. We pride ourselves in our European and International cuisines using fresh and local ingredients, each of which comes with its own Head Chef that specialises in their area. Unlimited snacks, white glove service and exclusive Butler Service are also available. We even offer Private Candlelit Dinners on the beach or on your terrace if you prefer. These are just a few of the personal dining touches that come with your next Sandals holiday, the rest we call Luxury Included ÂŽ.

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Holidays don’t get MasterChef Travel is a collection of inspiring, fun, hands-on holidays for food lovers. On our trips you can immerse yourself in sourcing ingredients, learning to cook like a local and, not least, trying out delicious and authentic dishes.

ATOL 2815 ABTA V2999

Destinations include the UK, Italy, India, Malaysia and many more

d try your Explore local markets an nal dishes hand at creating tradit io

Cumbria: A taste of gourmet Cumbria 2 nights from £395

Greece: Hidden gems of Crete 8 days from £1,395

Spend 2 nights in Askham Hall, the Lake District’s newest luxury bolthole – a 13th-century stately home turned restaurant-with-rooms. Sample seasonal delights and feast on fresh Cumbrian produce.

Browse for artisan produce in the markets, visit shady olive groves and taste honey flavoured with fragrant herbs. Sample wines from mountain vineyards and discover secrets of the Cretan kitchen.

020 7873 5005 • mastercheftravel.com


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tastier than this... On our longer trips, there are also plenty of opportunities to discover a destination’s greatest sights. The holidays are accompanied by superb guides and include time with local food experts.

Some trips accompanied by a finalist from the MasterChef TV shows

Holidays for people who love food and travel

Morocco: Boutique Marrakech 4 Nights from £995

Italy: Glories of the Amalfi coast 6 days from £1,245

Delve into the souks and barter for fragrant spices in the ancient medina on this culinary adventure with MasterChef Travel and Keri Moss, joint winner of MasterChef: The Professionals 2012

Visit this renowned coastline and discover the region’s stunning views, gastronomic delights and unrivalled display of Greek and Roman archaeological treasures at Paestum and Pompeii.

020 7873 5005 • mastercheftravel.com


THE STARBUCKS

®

The mark of a masterpiece.

Caramel Macchiato

Hazelnut Macchiato NEW Maple Macchiato

© 2015 Starbucks Coffee Company. All rights reserved.


EDITORIAL

EDITOR

Jon Hawkins CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Aby Dunsby, Hannah Summers

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Mike Gibson SUB EDITOR

Clare Vooght ASIA EDITOR

FRONT COVER: Photography by David Harrison Products provided by John Lewis. Croft Collection wooden rolling Pin, £12; Jersey Pottery Sardine Run bowl, £12.50; Tala mini Cockolly cutters, £7.50; John Lewis Pastry Cutters, £9

CLICK

FOODISM.CO.UK

I’m not a lazy man – whatever my colleagues might say – but some things in life just aren’t worth making yourself. I’ve made enough sloe gin to know the hours spent straining to grab tiny, overripe berries from branches and months waiting for the inky little bastards to permeate the gin would be better spent doing anything else – and just buying some, ready made. I’ve also tried to make my own, artisan ketchup before, and for as long as my tastebuds remember Heinz, it’s a totally pointless exercise. It’s like trying to make Coke – time, care and highquality, locally sourced ingredients can’t help you. However, I’ve never tried to make my own knife totally from scratch, because it looks really bloody hard and, well, why would you? How about, because you’ve already made a hot tub and a meat smoker in your garden and that went well, so why not? That, at least, is how it all started for Blenheim Forge, a company made up of three mates making beautiful, artisan knives under a railway arch in Peckham [p38]. What started out as another weekend project has turned into a brand informed by, and very much part of, a South London food scene that goes from strength to strength. I think I’ll leave them to it, though…

Cathy Adams CONTRIBUTORS

Lucy McGuire, Gary Ogden, Ryan Matthew Smith, Victoria Stewart EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

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ART DIRECTOR

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GRAZE

FEAST

EXCESS

010 EDITOR’S WORD

038 KNIFE MAKING

072 NEW-SCHOOL DENMARK DINING

015 THE FOODIST

048 INSIDE PIZZA PILGRIMS

078 SPIRITS AND BEERS

016 LOCAL HEROES

056 RAISING THE BAR

085 BOOZE NEWS

018 STREET FOOD FIGHT

062 MIXOLOGY

092 THE SELECTOR

020 THE RADAR 022 WEAPONS OF CHOICE 029 RECIPES


011 EDITOR’S WORD | 015 THE FOODIST | 016 LOCAL HEROES 018 STREET FOOD FIGHT | 020 THE RADAR 022 WEAPONS OF CHOICE | 029 RECIPES

— PART 1 —

GRAZE “IF RAMEN IS A COQUETTISH BUNDLE OF FUN, PHO IS ITS RELIABLE BIG BROTHER” STREET FOOD FIGHT, 018


LOCAL HEROES

THE FOODIST

TAST ING M E NUS

1 A WONG

The humble pop-up is no longer a radical concept – far from it. We run the rule over spring’s best

RISE UP Nope, you’re not imagining it. Even in the last three years, the price of food and drink in pubs and restaurants is on the increase. Thankfully the quality is, too, in our opinion...

% CHANGE IN AVERAGE PRICES

The izakaya trend – Japanese drinking dens where small plates accompany sake, beer and cocktails – is the latest in a line of pop-up-ready food concepts. Beer & Buns (beerandbuns.co.uk) is serving up craft beers and hirata buns in a dive bar-themed room above Broadgate sushi joint K10 until April. And the team behind Bone Daddies (bonedaddies.com) are doing it too, with their pop-up grillhouse Shackfuyu having hit Soho streets in mid-February. Ceru, (cerurestaurants.com) a pop-up serving up fiery Levantine fare in Marylebone until the end of April, has also been a huge hit. What does this mean? The best street food traders will be restaurateurs soon enough, and restaurants’ pop-ups will, hopefully, keep them more in touch with what diners want. But apart from that, it simply means the getting’s very, very good. Spring is here, and it’s going to be tasty. Now get me a bib. f

12 10 8

PUBS

6 4 2 0 -2

RESTAURANTS

-4 2011

2012

2013

2014

A Wong is one of the best restaurants in the up-and-coming Victoria/ Vauxhall borderlands, and its tencourse Taste of China menu (£45) is aimed at showcasing all of the distinct flavours that pass through the eponymous head chef’s kitchen. Hint: there are lots, and they’re all bloody delicious. awong.co.uk

2

PICTURE Great Portland Street, W1W

Englishmen, Irishmen and Scotsmen are usually only found hanging around together in old jokes, but at Picture they form a formidable trio in the kitchen. You can try their food for yourself with a £35 tasting menu that includes pork cheek with beetroot and steak with salsify. No laughing. picturerestaurant.co.uk

*source: Christie and Co/M&C Report, Jan 2015

T

O SAY “2015 is all about the pop-up” would be slightly misleading. For a start, it would make out like 2014, 2013 and 2012 weren’t all about the pop-up, too. But although it’s not a new thing, there’s no better time to be an innovator in London’s food scene than 2015 – from tiny burger vans to temporary restaurant residencies, it seems as though London food is increasingly being taken out of the restaurant and straight into the hands of its adoring public. Street Feast’s new pop-up market Hawker House (@StreetFeastLDN) is a great example: independent traders feeding an army of food scenesters out of a converted office block every weekend until April. And, hipster jokes aside, it’s bloody good, with all manner of traders serving up eclectic food. Not only that, but it also gives traders a chance to learn on the job, which, along with fierce competition, means the quality keeps going up.

Wilton Road, SW1V

15


LOCAL HEROES + TAST I NG MENUS

3

4

TAMARIND Queen Street, W1J

Fancy something a little more upmarket than your local curry house? Then strike out to Tamarind, where Northern Indian cuisine is given the Michelinstar treatment, with a tasting menu available for £65, or £115 with a flight of paired wines. Courses include tandoor-grilled baby chicken breast and Elliot farm lamb chops with raw papaya, fennel and star anise. It’s Indian as you’ve never had it before – and not a flat Cobra in sight. tamarindrestaurant.com

HEY, BIG TRENDER Why are you still eating uncool foods like semolina? You need to keep up with the pace and eat what everyone else is getting stuck in their beards. Eating trendy food is now as important as wearing the right trainers, or riding the right vintage unicycle.

16

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FOODISMUK

SUSHISAMBA Bishopsgate, EC2N

Two words: kobe beef. That’s what’s on offer at the Heron Tower’s SushiSamba, which is (ahem) steaking its claim as the capital‘s premier destination for the elusive cut. Executive chef Claudio Cardozo’s superb menu offers everything from £6 sliders to an eye-watering £1,000 robata menu, served on a traditional hot stone. A few restaurants claim to serve authentic kobe, but SushiSamba actually presents its patrons with a certificate from the Japanese government on finishing their meal. Which will presumably replace that degree certificate to take pride of place on your wall. sushisamba.com

5

The kitchen of Adam Byatt’s Trinity, in Clapham’s Old Town, is a site of constant evolution. The chef works on each dish for at least a week before it makes it onto his menu, and he uses seasonal ingredients to keep things fresh throughout the year. Its tasting menu is a microcosm of the creativity that goes into the sourcing and cooking – priced at £55 (or £90 with paired wines), it includes newschool dishes like crispy trotters, with sauce gribiche, cider mayonnaise and crackling, and chocolate cremosa with blood orange and aero. And now we’re drooling. Thanks, Trinity... trinityrestaurant.co.uk

TREND #1: PULLED PORK The effect pulling something has on how great it is REALLY GREAT

TREND #2: KALE Number of people that won’t shut up about kale PEOPLE WHO HADN’T EATEN KALE BEFORE 2014

HAMSTRING PORK

NOT GREAT NOT AT ALL

TRINITY The Polygon, SW4

LOADS

PEOPLE WHO HAD EATEN KALE BEFORE 2014

1980

1990

2000

2010

2020


STREET FOOD FIGHT

Chopsticks out! This month we’re getting our noodles in a twist over which is the best at broth: Japan with its hearty ramen or Vietnam and its tasty pho

RAMEN

Japanese wheat noodle broth Ramen has come of age in London since the heady days of Wagamama, thanks to Bone Daddies et al. The free jazz of the culinary world, you can add pretty much whatever you want to the noodle and broth base (no, not candyfloss, don’t be ridiculous) – beef, pork, chicken, shiitake, kelp, skipjack tuna flakes, a cheeky soft-boiled egg… The possibilities are virtually endless. Don’t be shy with the soy sauce.

◆ Koi Ramen Bar;

Brixton Market. Koi translates to ‘in love’ (the owners are that dedicated to ramen). But they’re taking it slow, with a 12-hour simmered tonkotsu. koiramenbar.co.uk

BALLS OF STEEL

VS

Italian-American street food stall Capish cooks up 20,000 meatballs every year.

31

PHO

Vietnamese rice noodle broth If ramen is a coquettish, unpredictable bundle of fun, pho is its reliable big brother. The list of pho ingredients are a bit more restictive – usually beef or chicken, with beansprouts and herbs – but you always know where you stand, and that’s face down, inhaling delicious, piping hot noodle soup.

Broadway Market. The beef pho at this Hackney mainstay is slow-simmered, with lashings of coriander. banhmi11.com

◆ Mo Pho; 10

Coulgate Street, SE4 2RW. The best pho this side of Hanoi, but it’s worth trekking to Brockley for the name alone. mopho-vietcafe.com

T HE W INNE R IS

RAMEN

Pho is great, but ramen is just that little bit more exciting.

20,000 MEATBALLS PER YEAR

RACKING ’EM UP London rib king the Rib Man once got through a tonne of ribs in a single day – that’s 2,000 racks, which meant he stripped the meat from around 20,000.

1t of ribs. 2,000 racks. 20,000 bones. BITE-SIZED

FOODISM.CO.UK/ NEWSLETTER

Photography courtesy of Koi Ramen Bar and Mo Pho

◆ Banhmi11;

18

Deeney’s, maker of the legendary Macbeth sandwich (hot haggis, cheddar, caramelised onions and rocket), goes through 1.5 to 2 tonnes of haggis a year. There’s a big surge in January for Burns night.

1.5 TO 2 TONNES

◆ Pimp My Ramen;

Greenwich Market. Is making noodle soup into a burger a step too far? The pulled pork ramen burger here may help you decide. greenwichmarket london.com

STOMACH BAKE


DRINKING GRAZING DINING TRENDING

THE RADAR Enigmatic tweeter @NewOpenings gives us the inside track on this Spring’s biggest new restaurants

Trending

Drinking

T H E RI C H MON D

VINOTECA

20 MARCH

16 MARCH

In case Dalston needs another trendy food joint, there’s The Richmond, which will be home to East London’s first raw bar. A concept from Australian chef Brett Redman and fashion stylist Margaret Crow, their menu will feature several types of clams, a selection of carpaccios and tartares, and ethically-sourced fish. Oyster lovers can gorge themselves on their favourite snack to their hearts’ content, thanks to the irritatingly ingenious “oyster happy hour.” E8 3NH; @TheRichmond_

If you’re a Kings Cross local who’s partial to a glass or two of red, you’ll be happy to hear that Vinoteca, the wine bar with sites in Farringdon, Soho, Marylebone and Chiswick, is coming to Pancras Square. The bar will be be packing its latest venue with more than 250 wines from all over the world, while diners can sun themselves in the outdoor terrace. Foodwise, there’s a British-inspired tapas menu that includes English rose veal tonnato and roast lemon Cotswold chicken. N1C 4AG; @Vinoteca

Dining

SHAUN RANKIN AT 12 HAY HILL Grazing

I L C UD EGA

MARCH

Hipsters rejoice: there’s a new Italian wine bar, deli and restaurant coming to the railway arches of London Fields. Dishes at Il Cudega will focus on the Lombardy region, including risotto giallo saltato, aka saffron-fried risotto. The owners have plans for a courtyard containing its own fruit and vegetable garden, seating, bike racks and a food stall which will serve dishes all day. E8 3RL; @ilcudega

20

MARCH

Michelin-starred Jersey chef Shaun Rankin is the man in charge at Mayfair members’ club 12 Hay Hill, producing the menus for the brasserie, deli-style basement bar and al-fresco dining. The exclusive club’s members can look out on to Berkeley Square as they munch on Jerseyinspired culinary treats including lobster, crab and oysters. All for the bargain price of £6,000 a month for a desk space. W1J 8NR; @ShaunRankin


Drinking

Trending

D U CK AN D RICE

J OE’S OR IE NTAL D I N ER

30 MARCH

TBC

Alan Yau, the brains behind Hakkasan is going all Phil Mitchell on us (sort of) as the publican of new Chinese-style gastropub Duck & Rice. It’ll take over the site of the former Endurance pub, next door to his old Soho restaurant Yauatcha. Plans are hush-hush, but it’s rumoured the ground floor bar will serve Chinese cocktails, while upstairs Asian street food will be dished up in private booths and alfresco. W1F 0QB

Restaurateur Scott Hallsworth of Kurobuta fame has kept the original site of his hugely-popular restaurant and is remodelling it as a South-East Asian dive bar and eatery. The diner will serve fiery pan-Asian dishes from firecracker chicken, crunchy sweet and sour fish to barbecued scallops with tamarind ketchup and sambal, while cocktails are served in Chinatown teapots. SW3 5EL; @joeslondon

Drinking

CAHO O TS LO NDO N

5 MARCH

Londoners can get merry on the Tube again with the opening of underground venue Cahoots, a 1940s drinking joint. Go down the wooden escalators and you’ll be greeted at the entry kiosk, if you can tell them correctly which station you want to travel to. Simples. Once inside, you’ll sip on cocktails infused with beetroot or peas, plus ration book staples such as powdered milk. Expect swing dancing, sing-a-longs and a good old-fashioned knees-up. W1B 5PW; @cahootslondon

Drinking

WAH L EEA H MARCH

We love a beer or four, so we’re delighted that chef Dave Ahern shares our enthusiasm to such an extent that he’s including it in almost every dish on the menu of Fulham newbie Wahleeah. Dishes include IPA glazed pork belly, ricotta dumplings with beer butter and beer fondant potatoes. Plus you can wash it all down with one of 40 different ales. SW6 3LQ; @WahleeahSW6

Grazing

STREETXO

MARCH

Photograph (Ceviche) by Paul Winch-Furness

David Munoz, the man behind Madrid’s three Michelin-starred DiverXo, is coming to London. If you’re clever, you’ll have guessed it serves Spanish street food – but the menu will also incorporate influences from Munoz’s travels through Europe and Southeast Asia. The focal point will be the central open kitchen, serving up a fresh, often-changing menu, plus cocktails. W1X 1RL; @StreetXo London

Grazing

OT TOL E NG HI SPITAL F IE L DS

Dining

MARCH

CEVICHE O LD ST

Heading to Artillery Lane in Spitalfields, the latest branch of Yotam Ottolenghi’s colourful, veg-heavy deli-cum-restaurant has City boys and girls in mind. There’ll be “grab and go” fridges, plus a deli counter serving fresh salads and cakes. In the evenings, the restaurant will transform into a more formal, candlelit space with an à la carte menu. E1 7LS; @ottolenghi

30 MARCH

Renowned Peruvian chef Martin Morales is bringing his South Americanstyle cooking to chillier Old Street. Swig a Pisco sour at the bar before heading over to the ceviche bar for fresh fish dishes, or choose from a selection of spiced meats from the Peruvian rotisserie and open charcoal BBQ grill. Lazy diners will be relieved to know that the restaurant will do takeaways, too. That’s Sunday night sorted, then. EC1V 9NU, @cevicheuk

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FOLLOW US @FOODISMUK

Follow @NewOpenings on Twitter or subscribe to the newsletter at newopenings. london for all the latest bar, restaurant and hotel openings and news.

FOODISMUK

21


WEAPONS OF CHOICE Everything you need to soup up your kitchen and eat like a king. Apart from soup PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID HARRISON

22


SAGE BARISTA E X PR E SS £549.95; johnlewis.com

Photograph by ###

Statements such as, ‘Don’t grind my Ecuadorian dark roast too coarsely,’ and ‘Anything above 205 degrees Fahrenheit kills the flavour,’ will sound familiar to coffee snobs. Handily, this machine has an adjustable temperature control and 15 grind settings. Sadly it’s not voice-activated.

23


POLYSC IE NC E SM OK ING G UN £69.99; lakeland.co.uk It may look a lot like a hairdryer, but this is way cooler – as the name suggests, it’s literally a gun made for smoking things. The smoke comes out cold, so it won’t alter the texture of the food. Try apple wood chips – or even add tea, spices or dried flowers to the mix – or be ultraadventurous and smoke your cocktail ingredients. Does a smoky Bloody Mary sound appealing? We thought so.

SODAST REAM SO URCE

CHEF’N VE G G IC HOP

B U GAT T I VITAC IT RU S

£149.99; sodastream.com

£23.95; kitchenbuddies.co.uk

£149; redcandy.co.uk

The SodaStream’s had a bit of a comeback lately, in no small thanks to the fact that you can use it to make great sparkling cocktails.

That notch you reclaimed on your belt this January felt good, didn’t it? If you want to carry on the momentum, this is just the thing.

You may have a juicer, but we’re willing to bet you don’t have one that looks as cool as this. Part kitchen gadget, part high art.

24


N ORDICWA RE BELGI AN WAF F LE R £75; selfridges.com Earn some serious Scandi-cool points with this cast-aluminium Nordicware waffle maker – just in time for Waffle Day on 25 March, (it’s big in Sweden, FYI). Whisk up some batter, add it to the waffler, then heat on the hob. Pockets are deep, so the waffles can hold as much of your chosen topping as possible, and the handle stays cool while cooking (naturally).

ALESS I 9091 K ET TLE

F R E U D T E ABAL L

DUAL IT DUAL-M AX

£173; alessi.com

£72; eclectdesign.com

£99.99; dualit.com

Richard Sapper’s classic kettle design includes a brass whistle that mutes it. Also, if you couldn’t tell, it looks bloody great.

Teapots and teabags are so passé – this retro, submersible-looking teaball from Freud looks sharp and works even better.

This innovative juicer has a foam separator and mesh filter, so you can have smooth juice just the way you like it, every morning.

26


Our pioneering spirit led us to plant a rare varietal in new ground, making our vineyard home to the captivating flavours of Marlborough, New Zealand’s first Sauvignon Gris.

Enjoy Brancott Estate Wines Responsibly


Make

STARTER

CONCEPT RESTAURANTS WE’D LIKE TO SEE IN LONDON

TOTO’S CRAB SALAD

T

HERE’S MORE TO Italian starters than bread, cured meat and olives. Don’t believe us? Fine; we’re more than happy to prove you wrong with this fine recipe from Toto’s. See? We told you so.

CLEAN EATING Want to go out for dinner but didn’t have enough time to shower in the morning? Not a problem at Clean Eating, as you can (well, you have to) eat in your own personal, constantlyrunning shower cubicle. Make sure you stay for dessert – the sponge is already proving popular.

INF O Preparation time

◆ 25 mins

Cooking time

◆ 10 mins

Serves

◆ 4

BITE-SIZED

FOODISM.CO.UK/ NEWSLETTER

Method

1 Boil the crab for around 10 minutes, then take the meat from the shell and season with lemon, oil and salt. 2 Blend the cherry tomatoes with 2 tsp of sherry vinegar, a touch of extra virgin olive oil and salt. 3 Next, blend the avocado with the sweet chilli (without seeds) and the spring onions, as well as a pinch of salt and pepper. 4 Place a serving ring on a plate and fill one with a base of avocado cream, then the crab salad. Pour the cold tomato soup around the ring and garnish with the mixed shoots. By Stefano Stecca, head chef. totosrestaurant.com

INGREDIENTS ◆ 1 medium-sized crab (50g per

person) ◆ 300g cherry tomatoes ◆ 500g avocado ◆ 1 sweet chilli ◆ 100g spring onions ◆ 2 tsp sherry vinegar ◆ Half a lemon ◆ Pinch of salt ◆ 1 tsp extra virgin olive oil ◆ Handful of mixed shoots

HAIR NECESSITIES STEAKHOUSE Head down to Spitalfields for this hidden gem – a new opening that combines the two most essential human needs: eating steak and getting a haircut. Sit in an authentic 1950s barber’s chair and grab a short back and sides with your meat and two veg. How would you like your steak? We’re going for mediumHAIR. (Not even sorry.) KIDS AND GROWN UPS LOVE IT SO Following hot on the heels of the Cereal Killer café, the KAGULIS Bistro offers a menu consisting entirely of Haribo. You can mix as many different varieties as you like, and a dinner for two will set you back an entirely reasonable £345 (or £480 with paired fine colas).

29


Make

VEG COURSE PIZARRO’S WILD MUSHROOM, WATERCRESS AND BLUE CHEESE TART

INGREDIENTS ◆ 300g mixed wild mushrooms ◆ 2 tbsp olive oil ◆ 40g watercress leaves ◆ 100g Picos Blue cheese,

crumbled ◆ 300ml double cream ◆ 4 large free-range eggs ◆ 50g walnut pieces ◆ 225g plain flour, plus extra for

CLICK

FOODISM.CO.UK

dusting ◆ 65g chilled butter, cut into pieces ◆ 65g chilled lard, cut into pieces

MUSIC

Our favourite food lyrics

INF O Preparation time ◆ 60 mins

Cooking time ◆ 45 mins

Serves ◆ 6

W

HETHER IT’S A starter you’re after, or a main event with a couple of side dishes, you won’t find a more impressive-looking and opulent vegetable tart than this one from Pizarro’s pastry masters. The recipe involves wild mushrooms and blue cheese for an appetising, indulgent but simple-to-make spring flan.

Method

1 Preheat the oven to 200°C. Roast the walnuts for 7–8 minutes and leave to cool. 2 Add them with 50g of the flour to a food processor and grind until the nuts are finely chopped. 3 Add the rest of the flour and half a teaspoon of salt, along with the butter and lard, and blend until it resembles breadcrumbs. 4 In a bowl, stir in 2 tsp of water until the mixture comes together into a ball, and knead it on a floured surface until smooth. 5 Roll it out thinly and use to line a lightlygreased 23cm flan tin around 4cm deep. 6 Chill for 20 minutes, then line the pastry case with foil and a thin layer of baking beans, slide it onto a baking tray and cook for 20 minutes. 7 Remove the foil and beans and return to the oven for 5 minutes until the pastry is lightly golden. Lower the oven to 190°C. 8 Clean the wild mushrooms with a pastry brush to remove excess dirt, heat 1 tbsp of the olive oil in a large frying pan over a high heat, add half the mushrooms and some seasoning and fry briskly for 1 minute until soft. Tip onto a plate and repeat. 9 Scatter the mushrooms, watercress leaves and blue cheese evenly over the base of the pastry case. 10 Beat together the cream and eggs with some seasoning, pour the mixture into the tart and return it to the baking sheet. 11 Bake for 30–35 minutes until set and lightly golden. Serve warm, cut into wedges. By José Pizarro, head chef. josepizarro.com

30

Forget cheap fast food and crap beer – it turns out some musicians know how to eat well. Here are some of our favourite food tunes.

I gotcha back, ain’t gotta worry Only thing I ask is for some curry Chicken when we land we eatin’ dinner Mama seen me on TV again lookin’ thinner But I’m lookin’ like a winner, aye JOEY BADA$$ – CHICKEN CURRY Fried chicken on the front seat, she’s sitting in my lap We’re wiping our fingers on a Texaco road map BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN – OPEN ALL NIGHT I’ll have some clam chowder, followed by beef steak on rye Pumpkin pie, whipped cream and coffee I wanna green salad on the side Don’t forget the french fries THE KINKS – MAXIMUM CONSUMPTION And you do dinners at French Laundry in Napa Valley Scallops and glasses of Dolce, that shit’s right up your alley DRAKE – THE RIDE


Make

MEAT COURSE

INFO

Preparation time ◆ 10 mins

Cooking time ◆ 120 mins

Serves

CERU’S KEBAB KARAZ

◆ 4

FOLLOW US @FOODISMUK

FOODISMUK

E

VERYONE’S GOT THEIR own take on the humble baked meatball. This recipe from Ceru is rooted in Turkish cuisine and influenced by Syria, too, using dried cherries and cranberries for a zingy and sour but hearty and rich dish.

Method

VAN HAILIN’ You may be familiar with Pizza Pilgrims’ green Piaggio van, Conchita, but here’s something you might not know. It has a top speed of 35mph, a fuel tank that fills up at 15 litres and a turning circle of 7m. A getaway vehicle it most certainly is not.

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READ MORE IN OUR INTERVIEW WITH PIZZA PILGRIMS ON P.48

INGREDIENTS ◆ 150g dried sour cherries ◆ 150g dried cranberries ◆ 1 tbsp brown sugar ◆ 1 tbsp honey ◆ 1 tbsp pomegranate molasses

(or reduced balsamic vinegar) ◆ 1 lemon, juiced ◆ 500g minced lamb ◆ 2 onions, finely diced ◆ 2 cloves garlic ◆ 2 small dried red chillies ◆ 2 tsp ground coriander ◆ ½ bunch flat-leaf parsley

1 Heat a heavy-bottomed pan and add a little oil. Add one of the chopped onions and cook down for 15 minutes before adding the dried cherries and cranberries. 2 Add the water, sugar, honey and pomegranate molasses or balsamic vinegar. 3 Bring to the boil, then turn down the heat and gently simmer for 30 minutes until the sauce is thickened and syrupy. When reduced, add the lemon juice and taste. 4 Finely dice the onion, cut the garlic in half and remove the central green shoot. 5 Finely chop the dried chilli. 6 With a pinch of salt, crush the garlic with the dried chilli and ground coriander and make a paste. 7 Heat a pan and add a little oil. Fry the paste for 2 minutes, until fragrant and aromatic. 8 Add the chopped onion, fry quickly for 4 minutes and remove from the pan. 9 Place the onion in a bowl with the lamb. 10 Roughly chop the parsley and add to the mixture. Season well with salt and freshly ground black pepper. 11 Mix together with the onion and lamb. 12 Roll the meat into small balls about the size of cherry tomatoes. 13 Heat a clean, heavy-bottomed pan over a medium high heat and add a little oil. 14 Fry the balls in small batches so that they are golden brown all over, but not cooked all the way through. 15 Drain on some absorbent kitchen paper. 16 To finish, place the seared meatballs in a dish with the sour sauce, and bake in the oven until sizzling. 17 Serve with some fresh cucumber yoghurt and flatbread. By Tom Kime, executive chef. cerurestaurants.com


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Make

DESSERT VERDEN’S SALTED CARAMEL CHOCOLATE POT

T

HE PERFECT DINNER party desserts are tasty, pretty, and deceptively easy to make. This one from Verden is just that.

Method

INFO Preparation time

◆ 10 minutes

Cooking time

◆ 60 minutes

Serves

◆ 6-8

1 Heat the sugar in a large pan until melted. Stir in the butter, cream and salt. 2 Pour into the base of the moulds and chill. 3 For the chocolate, heat the cream and sugar until it’s boiling. Take off the heat and whisk in the chocolate and the butter. 4 Add the milk, allow to cool, and pour onto the caramel. Put in fridge to set. 5 Remove from the fridge an hour before serving to allow the chocolate to soften. Top with a spoonful of crème fraîche and serve. By Tom Fraser, head chef. verdene5.com

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INGREDIENTS

For the chocolate

◆ 350ml double cream ◆ 2 tbsp caster sugar ◆ 200g 70% dark chocolate ◆ 50g unsalted butter ◆ 100ml milk

For the caramel ◆ 200g caster sugar ◆ 100g butter ◆ 100g double cream ◆ 1 tsp Maldon sea salt ◆ 1 spoonful crème fraîche

FOOD ON FILM No man, they got the metric system. They wouldn’t know what the fuck a Quarter Pounder is. JOHN TRAVOLTA IN PULP FICTION Annie, there’s a big lobster behind the refrigerator. I can’t get it out. This thing’s heavy. Maybe if I put a little dish of butter sauce here with a nutcracker, it will run out the other side. WOODY ALLEN IN ANNIE HALL I am not drinking any fucking merlot. PAUL GIAMATTI IN SIDEWAYS

LEAVE THE GUN. TAKE THE CANNOLI. RICHARD CASTELLANO IN THE GODFATHER I feel like such a heifer. I had two bowls of Special K, three pieces of turkey bacon, a handful of popcorn, five peanut butter M&Ms and like three pieces of licorice. ALICIA SILVERSTONE IN CLUELESS What’s tiramisu? Some woman is going to ask me to do it to her and I’m not going to know what it is. TOM HANKS IN SLEEPLESS IN SEATTLE

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038 KNIFE MAKING | 048 INSIDE PIZZA PILGRIMS 056 RAISING THE BAR | 062 MIXOLOGY

— PART 2 —

FEAST “CHEFS BY THEIR NATURE ARE PERFORMERS, AND THE BAR IS NOW THEIR STAGE” VICTORIA STEWART ON BAR DINING, 056


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HAMMER TIME: Jon Warshawsky hammers a steel billet, freshly removed from the forge, to draw it out into a rough blade shape. The forge can reach temperatures of 1,300ยบC.

Photography by David Harrison

CUT CUT TO TO THE THE CHASE CHASE 38


The founders of Blenheim Forge made their first kitchen knife in the back garden of their Peckham home. It took two years of trying and failing to make anything as good again, but it was worth the wait, says Jon Hawkins

Photograph by ###

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N TOP OF a cupboard in the Blenheim Forge workshop is a wooden box with two compartments, one marked ‘fucked’, the other ‘not fucked’. The ‘fucked’ half is scattered with half-finished knife blades deemed not good enough to make it to completion – some are bent, others are misshapen and a couple don’t appear to have anything wrong with them at all. The ‘not fucked’ blades are the lucky ones, destined to be turned into highperformance artisan kitchen knives that look more likely to have emerged from the studio of a Japanese maker than under a dingy railway arch in Peckham. Roll back the clock a couple of years and there would have been no need to separate the successes from the failures – in the early days, at least, there weren’t very many of the former. Hand-making a knife from scratch is a lengthy, complicated and brutal process that involves heating metal almost to melting point, hammering, pressing and grinding it, then doing it again and again. The scope for things to go wrong is, understandably, pretty large – and in the early days it usually did.

In the beginning “I wish I could say we were really into our cooking, weren’t happy with all the knives on the market and decided to make something better,” admits Jon Warshawsky, the brand’s friendly, wild-haired co-founder, “but it’s

KNIVES OUT: (from left to right) Richard Warner, Jon Warshawsky and James Ross-Harris run Blenheim Forge from a workshop under a railway arch in Peckham. They started out making things in the garden of their shared house, nearby.

less exciting than that; we were just messing around.” Most people’s messing around, admittedly, doesn’t involve complicated, labour- and resource-intensive industrial processes, but Warshawsky and James RossHarris – two thirds of the current Blenheim Forge team – clearly aren’t most people. The pair made their first knife in 2012, using home-made equipment in the garden of the house they still share in south London. Having already knocked up a meat-smoker and a hot tub in the time between their studies and part-time jobs, they decided to make a chef’s knife with a pattern-welded steel blade. Pattern-welded steel, often called Damascus, is made by fusing layers of different steels together to create a blade with optimum cutting performance and a rippled effect, and it’s often used by Japanese bladesmiths – revered as among the best in the world – to create incredibly sharp and beautiful knives. Making pattern-welded steel was, Warshawsky admits, a bit of a longshot. “It’s something Japanese bladesmiths have done for centuries, but they’ve never written a book explaining exactly what to do,” he says. “If you want to learn it, you either have to go to Japan or buy a lot of steel and try it out yourself – we did the latter.” Remarkably, given their DIY garden setup and complete lack of experience, they got it right first time. “It went so well we thought we’d make a set,” Warshawsky strains to tell me over the screech of the industrial grinder, “but the next time we tried it, it didn’t work.” It didn’t work the time after that, either, and for two months they kept trying and failing, no matter what they did, until they started to have the occasional success in between the failures. “There was a time when I thought there was some element of the process that everyone was keeping a secret, because it just seemed impossible to get right,” says Warshawsky. But the frequent disasters – and odd triumphs – is what drove them to keep trying. They watched knife-making videos on YouTube, swatted up on metallurgy in books and trawled through online forums, but most of all they kept doing it again and again. Warshawsky likens it to learning an instrument: “You could watch videos of someone playing a violin endlessly, but until you get one in your hands it just won’t cut it.” Before long, things were going sufficiently well that knife-making had ceased to be a hobby and become altogether more serious. They moved from their garden to a workshop and built their own forge, and started repeating parts of the process over and over,

noting down their achievements and failures and refining the process. Each of them – now joined by a third member, Richard Warner – focused on perfecting a different step. Warshawsky’s responsibility was for the forge, Ross-Harris had grinding and sharpening, while Warner created the handles and made many of the machines used by the team. After a year and a half of trying, things started to go right more often – in another six months, they were producing highperforming, beautifully finished knives that were far too good to just be consigned to a draw in their own kitchen. “The first knife is still somewhere in the house,” Warshawsky says. “Occasionally we take it out and say ‘this is actually pretty good’. Our current knives are much better, of course, but it took us two years to make a knife as good as the original one we’d just made for fun.” →

“IT TOOK US TWO YEARS TO MAKE ANOTHER KNIFE AS GOOD AS THE ONE WE’D JUST MADE FOR FUN” 41


THE FORGE LOOKS LIKE AN OVERSIZE BIRDHOUSE THAT GLOWS AND PUMPS HEAT OUT INTO THE FREEZING COLD → Keeping it Peckham

STEEL YOURSELF

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Different steels have different properties, which affect the way they behave in the forge and the blade’s performance. “We started off using all kinds of steel. We tried stainless and other typical western steels that people use for knives, and we also tried Japanese steels,” explains Warshawsky. Among those they use today are blue and white paper steel – both made

by Hitachi using traditional smelting techniques. These are low in impurities, easy to sharpen and take on a good edge. Blenheim Forge frequently uses a blue paper steel core in its knives. The name comes from the paper wrapping the steel is supplied in, not the colour of the steel itself – a mistake Warshawksy says people often make. “When you tell people they’re made from Japanese blue paper steel, they often hold it up and say ‘yes, I can see the blueness’.”

Standing on the platform at Peckham Rye station, you can just about see the workshop’s ramshackle, red gate, with its abstract, wrought iron forms and corrugated plastic roof. Behind the gate, you can see the forge they built themselves – smaller and less industrial than you might imagine, like an oversized birdhouse that glows in the half-light and pumps heat out into the freezing London day. There’s also a puddle of water on the floor, under the Japanese-style whetstone grinder that Warner built from an old motor, some wood, part of a beer barrel and a huge, circular whetstone they bought on eBay for 99p. “It’s a bit cowboy how I’ve done it,” says Warner, “but it works.” It’s a remarkable thing, which whirrs round at high speed, grinding down the unfinished surface of the blade while water – hence the puddle – sprays over it to keep the metal from heating up. Standing next to it is a deafening, soaking experience, and one whoever’s tasked with the grinding that day will have to put up with for up to an hour at a time. The grinder also represents a kind of watershed for Blenheim Forge – the first step in a series of improvements implemented by Warner designed to make the whole process more efficient. Before it arrived they worked on a belt-sander, which did the job but was painfully slow and not really suited to such a specialist task. Now relegated to sharpening duties, the belt-sander’s replacement – a custom-made sander (called a linisher) →

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MOST OF THE HARDWOOD USED TO MAKE THE HANDLES COMES FROM CUSTOMERS’ GARDENS OR THE NEARBY CEMETERY → that looks like a giant micro scooter in the half-finished state I see it in – is currently being made, while a bigger forge is also in the pipeline. The dream is to power the new forge with waste oil, probably recycled chip fat. Warner admits there’s a fine balance to be struck between making the processes better and more efficient and retaining an artisan product. “We want to streamline production if the demand comes along, and if you can make knives faster, you can sell them for less” he explains. “They’re still as good and they’re still made here – the knives won’t lose their story. It’s about finding that happy medium between producing enough knives for people who want them and keeping it…” – he searches for the right word – “Peckham.” Friends like these As you enter the workshop itself, it’s surprisingly organised considering the noise and the smoke pumped out by the forge outside. It’s also become home to some friends of the team: at one end there’s an etching studio, next to that a microbrewery, and in against the wall in the middle there’s a huge 1950s Swedish bread oven that a local baker hopes to use – once they’ve figured out how to stop it sucking up all the power in the building and shorting everything, that is. Opposite the oven is a stack of hardwood ready to be made into handles, most of it brought to Blenheim Forge from people’s gardens or nearby Nunhead cemetery, and on the day I visit, Warner is sawing up a branch from a bay tree brought in by one of →

WHET & WILD The shape of the blade is crudely formed by hammering, pressing and angle-grinding – and it’s harder to get right than you might think. “When it comes to the profile of a knife, a really small change makes a big difference aesthetically,” says Ross-Harris. Next, using a grinder made by Warner himself, one of the team refines the profile of the blade. It can take between

20 minutes and an hour of grinding before the blade is thin enough and ready to take on a cutting edge. Water is sprayed over the blade throughout the process to prevent it from overheating. The next stage takes place on a belt-sander, using increasingly fine grades of sandpaper. It’s a painstaking process, explains Ross-Harris: “You’re at risk of overheating the knife so you have to keep dipping it in water to cool it down and go really carefully, especially once it gets a lot thinner.”

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GET SOME EDGE Prior to sharpening, the handle is fitted to the knife. “All the wood we’re using now is locally sourced,” says Ross-Harris, pointing to a stack of branches in the corner of the workshop. “We keep meeting people who say things like ‘oh, I know a tree surgeon’. It’s nice to start with a log rather than a piece of milled timber. It adds a bit of time, and it makes a hell of a mess, but it’s a good thing to do.” Though things are less likely to go wrong in the final stages of the process, when the knife is sharpened on a series of Japanese whetstones, the stakes are at their highest “because you’ve invested so much time”, says Ross-Harris. It’s also a phase that took the team a while to perfect, but he tells me it’s also one of the most satisfying, requiring skill and experience. “You use sight, sound and smell to judge that you’re getting the process right.”

→ their customers, filling the workshop with a pungent, unmistakable aroma. Being able to collaborate with neighbours, customers, local chefs and those bound up in Peckham’s vibrant and growing food scene has been central to the Blenheim Forge story, says Ross-Harris. “We’ve had a huge amount of interest from people in the area,” he explains. “It’s been massively beneficial for us to be based where we are – we’ve been working with Peckham Refreshment Rooms down the road, for example, and it’s just amazing how many interesting people there are around here, all passionate about food.” The plan, of course, is to take Blenheim Forge’s knives well beyond the borders of SE15 – starting with the rest of London and then, who knows? If things continue to head in the right direction, there’ll be more knives for more people, each still made by sootand grime-stained hands under a railway arch in South London. It’s an obsession that got out of hand, and has become a labour of love as much as a homegrown South London success story. Though as Warshawsky drily puts it: “This isn’t going to make us filthy rich. Just filthy.” f

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HOW TO MAKE A KNIFE

In five (not very) easy steps… 1 Making the steel billet

To make a block of pattern-welded (commonly, if not quite correctly, known as Damascus) steel, alternating layers of two types of steel – one harder and another tougher – are stacked up and welded together in a forge at temperatures in excess of 1,100ºC, then flattened and drawn out. This is done first with a heavy fly press (like a giant, freely swinging clamp that’s wound up and smashed into the hot billet) then by hammering on an anvil. The layers of steel fuse just below their melting point, so the temperature has to be judged really closely. Grains of sand-like borax flux are scattered onto the billet each time before it goes into the forge to prevent ‘scale’ (iron oxides) forming on the surface of the steel that stops the layers fusing.

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LAYERS OF STEEL ARE FUSED TOGETHER AT UP TO 1,100ºC IN THE FORGE 2 Building up the layers

The lengthened billet is then cut into smaller pieces which are stacked again, and the process of fusing and pressing is carried out repeatedly until there’s a thin billet of steel made of dozens of alternating layers. In between stages, the billet is left to cool very slowly in a mixture of vermiculite (a mineral often


shape of the knife has been roughly formed already, the shape is refined with an angle grinder. Different requirements, cutting styles and aesthetics all influence the size and shape of the blade – the popular Japanese-style santoku bocho, for example, usually has a long blade with a flat edge, and the point of balance is generally where the blade meets the tang.

3 Hardening the knife

At this point the knife isn’t as hard as it needs to be so it undergoes a hardening treatment. This involves heating the metal to a significantly lower temperature than for the forge-welding phase – around 750ºC – and then cooling it very quickly by quenching it in oil. This is a violent process, and it’s the stage in the process at which things are most likely to go wrong – the blade can snap or warp if there are any weaknesses.

4 Finishing the blade

The process of finishing the blade and creating its edge then begins, first on a rotating stone kept wet with a constant spray of water, then on a linisher (a belt-driven worktop sander). Five different sanding belts are used, each with a finer grit than the last, until the edge is clean and sharp, and the face of the blade has the desired profile – Japanese blades are traditionally very thin, for example – and a smooth finish. used for insulation) and charcoal. Two of the Damascus billets (each containing 120 individual layers in this case) are then placed either side of a piece of Blue Paper steel and the forge welding, pressing and drawing process is repeated. Finally, the shape of the knife and the tang (the part of the steel that extends into the blade) are drawn out by hammering and pressing. Though the

Photograph by ###

SHARP NOTES: The finished knife evolves from a few pieces of imported steel and a log. First, two billets are formed by repeatedly fusing, pressing, cutting and re-layering pieces of steel, which then sandwich a core of blue paper steel (1). These are fused (2) and drawn out into the shape of the blade, then hardened (3), before grinding and sharpening to refine the profile (4). Wood (5) is then cut to fit the tang to create the finished knife (6).

1

5 Making the handle

Though the blade itself is almost finished, it still doesn’t have a handle. There are essentially two types of handle – the Western-style open tang [full tang], where the tang is sandwiched between two pieces of wood or horn, and the Japanese-favoured stick tang (the style Blenheim Forge uses most), in which the tang is inserted into a

2

3

4

HARDENING IS A VIOLENT PROCESS, AND THE POINT AT WHICH THINGS ARE MOST LIKELY TO GO WRONG solid piece of wood. For the latter, the wood is cut down to size and shaped on a purposebuilt jig, along with an insert of horn or bone where the handle meets the blade, and sanded to finish. A hole is drilled into the handle and carefully filed so it fits the tang snugly with the blade at the correct angle, before handle and tang are glued with an epoxy resin and clamped until bonded. The handles are usually treated with oil or a stain, depending on the wood used and the finish desired. Finally, the edge is sharpened on three different Japanese whetstones, each block with a slightly finer grit, and the blade is lightly oiled with camelia oil and wiped clean, ready to use. For more information, or to arrange a visit to the workshop, visit blenheimforge.co.uk

5

6

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James and Thom Elliot set off for Italy two years ago, armed with nothing but a Piaggio van and an idea; today they’ve put their names to a book and two thriving Soho restaurants. Mike Gibson meets the brothers behind Pizza Pilgrims, the unlikely leaders of the capitalwide street food revolution

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Pizza Pilgrims by James and Thom Elliot (HarperCollins, £20); photography by Myles New

THE CRUST OF THE MATTER


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I

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IT’S JUST A FUN PLACE. NONE OF IT’S TAKING ITSELF SERIOUSLY – APART FROM THE PIZZA

reference follows it – the two state they “basically talk in quotes”. As a child of the 1990s myself, they’re not lost on me. “I think we have a kind of weird fascination with nostalgic stuff,” James Elliot, one half of the fraternal duo behind the Pizza Pilgrims, tells me. “Jurassic Park quotes, arcade machines, Super Mario...” “Over there is a games machine with every arcade game since 1970 on it,” his brother Thom proudly declares. “It’s just a fun place,” James explains. “None of it’s taking itself seriously.” Then, a moment’s hesitation before a quick revision: “Apart from the pizza.” That sentence could serve as a microcosm for the Pizza Pilgrims story: the place →

Photograph by Charlie Strand

F YOU’RE LIKE me, you’ll remember rubbing your thumbs raw playing Super Mario on the Game Boy when you were growing up. So, when I step into Pizza Pilgrims’ Kingly Court restaurant, the Mario screensaver on the cash register is the first thing I notice. That, and the enormous illustration of everyone’s favourite pixelated plumber that adorns an entire wall downstairs. It’s like the 1990s in a painting. As I lead the restaurant’s founders outside their Dean Street pizzeria to take photos, the mere mention of the word “shoot” forces them into impressions of the park ranger from Jurassic Park: “Shoot her!” A Simpsons


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PIZZA PILGRIMS’ SOHO FAVOURITES Bone Daddies “We tend to eat a lot in Soho, and we love Bone Daddies. We’ve met a lot of them along the way, so it’s always nice to go down and see them.” Peter Street; bonedaddiesramen.com

Savage Salads “These guys have just got it so right. It’s salad – it’s healthy, and you feel good about it – but it’s delicious and filling. And it’s cheap. They have a queue every single day.” Broadwick Street; savagesalads.co.uk

BAO “Bao are a kind of Taiwanese steamed buns with fillings. We’re really excited about BAO’s restaurant. It’ll be opening in Soho in April.” Lexington Street; baolondon.com

DOUGH IDEA: The brothers love Italian cooking, but say their main focus will always be pizza. “I think that’s the way it’s going in London,“ Thom says. “People know exactly what they want to eat before they go out; the choice is where to eat it.“

→ isn’t serious; the food very much is. Case in point: as soon as what Thom describes as a “four-and-a-half-pinter” conversation in a pub lock-in solidified into an idea for a pizza business, the brothers sourced a Piaggio Ape van in Italy and made plans to drive it back to the UK. The van’s top speed (35mph, if you’re asking) meant they were forced off the A-roads and through the heart of foodie Italy, where they immersed themselves in the food and the culture. Hence the name. “It’s amazing how the food through Italy changes,” James says. “If you start in the south it’s hot and there’s less wealth, so it’s all about fresh produce. It’s cucina povera – frugal food – so it’s all about fresh vegetables, and abundant local produce. Then as you go north, the people get richer and the weather gets worse, so it’s all aged parmigianoreggiano, Parma ham, and truffles.” They certainly talk like chefs now, but it wasn’t always so. Their transition was sometimes gradual, and often lightning-quick. A while before the pilgrimage, James and Thom gave up their jobs – in TV and advertising respectively – and concentrated on nailing down an idea. It was slow going – they both admit to not knowing a huge amount about the industry before they threw themselves head-first into it – and they alternated between ideas of opening a pub, building pizza ovens, or even abandoning the idea altogether before the epiphany occurred: “I think we’d resigned ourselves to the fact that we weren’t going to do it,” James tells me. “Thom was about to do a fast-track course to become a doctor, and then the whole street food thing started happening. Yianni [Papoutsis, co-founder of MEATLiquor] started the Meat Wagon, and we thought ‘Wow, there’s people going down to a car park in Peckham – it’s probably cost him five grand to set up, and it’s rammed.’” That’s when the Pizza Pilgrims idea crystallised, and the brothers realised that the waves breaking in the London food scene meant you didn’t have to have restaurant

PEOPLE IN SOHO LOVE THE IDEA OF WAITING TWENTY MINUTES TO GET A PIZZA AT A STALL NEXT TO A SEX SHOP experience to start a food business. Hell, you didn’t even need a restaurant. “The traditional route for opening a restaurant is to go and learn on someone else’s time and money; I think the street food thing led to people just having a punt at it.” What happened next? A rooftop residency in Peckham was enormously well-received, and Conchita, the brothers’ notorious van, quickly became a familiar sight on London streets. “It’s a horrific term,” Thom says, “but there genuinely was a kind of ‘organic growth’. “We started out with the idea of a van going to weddings, bar mitzvahs, even funerals – anyone who would have us. Then the plans changed and we decided we should try to be at a street market somewhere, and have a permanent presence.” That presence, of course, ended up being in Soho. The two made their previous careers there, but more than that, they were guided by the atmosphere. “I don’t think we could have done it anywhere other than Soho,” James says. “People are so receptive to it here. They love the idea of going and waiting twenty minutes to get a pizza at a stall next to a fruit and veg guy and a sex shop.” “There’s still such an exciting kind of food vibe around Soho,” Thom says. “All the most exciting restaurants, the ones that we wanted to go to, were opening in Soho. But when we got there, there was only one other food stall. It’s grown hugely in the last two years.” “London as a city has got really good at accepting the whole street food culture. It’s something they lack in other European →

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LEFT: The Piaggio Ape van, which they christened Conchita, has been with them since their pilgrimage across Italty. “Obviously you need to have a cool van to be a street food company,” James says. “That’s rule number one.”

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BOOK PEOPLE James and Thom were actually authors before they were restaurateurs. They wrote their first book in the days after their pilgrimage when they were still cooking from their Ape van. As well as recipes for Pizza Pilgrims favourites, it features produce guides and stories from their journey. Pizza Pilgrims: Recipes from the Backstreets of Italy, HarperCollins, £20

For more info: pizzapilgrims.com

Pizza Pilgrims by James and Thom Elliot (HarperCollins, £20); photography by Myles New

I THINK THE BEST WAY OF DESCRIBING IT IS A STUPID IDEA THAT’S GOT OUT OF HAND

→ cities. London is surprisingly open to people setting up shop and going for it.” I think it’s fair to say that only in London could the Pizza Pilgrims story have played itself out like it has; one that in a little over two years has gone from a half-baked idea formed around a pub table to one of the most enduring success stories of the London street food revolution, encompassing a nowfamous food truck, two thriving restaurants and, of course, tentative plans for expansion. Although not without a hint of trepidation: “We’d much prefer to have three restaurants that we’re proud of,” Thom explains, “than 100 with average pizza and staff who don’t want to work there.” Whether it ends up being three or 100, this is only the beginning. It’s James who ends up providing the most apt summary of their journey: “I think the best way of describing it is a stupid idea that’s got out of hand.” He says it off the cuff, but there’s a kind of charming flippancy and an identifiably British sense of self-deprecation to it. That’s what makes the Pizza Pilgrims story such a worthy one to tell, and why it’s such a great paradigm for the 2010s street food insurgency as a whole: they may be being pitched for TV shows and book deals and scouting for their third restaurant opening in two years, but they’re not the food elite. They represent the new breed of London restaurateur; at the heart of it, they’re just two guys who had a great idea and ran with it. They spout Jurassic Park references, they grew up watching The Simpsons and they fill their restaurants with arcade games. They’re sarcastic, self-effacing and nonchalant, and they’re living proof that the MTV Generation can shake off listlessness and replace it with invention. It turns out all they need is a van. f


THE ORIGINAL TASTEMAKER

Rediscover The Rib Room Bar & Restaurant in Knightsbridge. Located on fashionable Sloane Street for more than 50 years, head chef Ian Rudge’s menu is the definitive tastemaker. Lunch available from only £28, Monday to Saturday.

To reserve your table, call 020 7858 7250 or visit theribroom.co.uk


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ARE YOU SITTING COMFORTABLY?

Mark Boardman

Illustrations by

Move over concept restaurants and gimmicky pop-ups: the latest dining trend, says Victoria Stewart, is bar seating around theatrical kitchens

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DINERS EAT THEIR MILKFED LAMB’S BRAIN AT A LONG, CENTRAL MARBLE COUNTER 58

OOR BOOZE, EH? For years our old friend had the monopoly at all London bars. But when a posse of smart bar snacks arrived wanting a piece of the happyhour action, it began to panic. Pork scratchings and peanuts smartened up, vegetables found themselves being pickled by London chefs everywhere from Parsons Green to Dalston, and hunks of charred bread elbowed their way onto plates. And then, recently, the bar war intensified, the panic increased, and booze had to accept equal status to food. Bar snacks aside, these days the only way to eat a full lunch or dinner in London is sitting on high stools at what used to be the drinking area. Introducing the bar diner. Russell Norman, co-founder of the Polpo group and star of BBC 2 series The Restaurateur, likes eating at bars and thinks the rise of this is partly down to a shift in attitudes “but also that there are more bar dining options – as the restaurant property market hots up, operators have to make small places work, and bars are perfect space-savers.” But it isn’t always the small places that champion bar-style seating. If you’re a glitzy-chef’stable-only kind of guest, now is the time to change your approach to dining, because the kitchen-side bar seat is the best around. Let’s take Michelin-starred Barrafina on Adelaide Street as an example. As the more sophisticated sister of the Spanish tapas joint in Soho, diners eat their herb-crusted rabbit shoulder or milk-fed lamb’s brain while sitting at a long, central marble counter.

At celebrity-packed Chiltern Firehouse the middle area may be taken up with seats and tables – so 2014 – but one of the hottest spots in the place is around the kitchen, a shiny bar area from which you can try the famous crab doughnuts. And, since we’re talking stylish, the Sea Containers restaurant at the spanking new Mondrian Hotel on the Southbank offers people the chance to come for the full à la carte menu or simply a kale salad and flatbread while sitting on high stools around a stainless-steel bar; it may double up as a cocktail bar but it also overlooks the expansive open kitchen. “Chefs and diners alike are becoming more aware of the importance of all of the factors that make up the ‘meal experience’. If all of the factors such as ambient noise, visual stimulus – fire, ovens, chopping and things – crockery, staffing, lighting, smell and the food of course are all working in harmony, this can actually elevate the food, making the whole process more experiential,” says Charles Banks, co-founder of food trends company, The Food People. In fact Banks believes this new movement drives down the barriers between the chef and the diner. “Chefs by their nature are performers and this is now a stage for them on which to perform. Add to this mix the fact that consumers have a thirst for knowledge; we know more about food than ever before, we love the transparency of food and feeling like we know who’s been involved.” Barrafina’s new head chef Nieves Barragán Mohacho certainly enjoys the theatrical aspect of her work, but also says that having a bar means she can serve her food to the customer immediately, and exactly how she wants it to be.


IN PLACES THAT OFFER BAR SEATING ONLY, THE SOLO DINER IS KING

Photograph by Carol Sachs, Helen Cathcart, Greg Funnell

“It’s so much fun! They ask you everything, they want to know what you are doing, how you are preparing the ingredients, how you are cooking them... It’s like a theatre,” she agrees. This style of cooking “raises everyone’s game. Being in full view of the customers makes you more focused, you want to make sure their experience is perfect.” For some solo bar diners, such as Zeren Wilson, writer at website Bitten & Written, grabbing the last bar seat becomes a thrill: “In bar seating-only establishments, the solo diner is king, traipsing past groups of three and four. The bar at The Palomar is the only place I want to sit, and the chefs put on a little bit of theatre every time. Smoking Goat in Soho is a fine place to prop up the bar, with their fish sauce wings and a glass of dry German riesling.” His other favourites include Merchants Tavern, The Clove Club, Fino, where he always chooses a bar seat over a table, and A. Wong in Victoria where he can watch the chefs making dumplings. →

SETTING THE BAR HIGH Five great places to dine at the bar in London 1 The Palomar

Expect plush, leather stools at this bar in the heart of Soho, where food is influenced by the cultures of the south of Spain and North Africa. 34 Rupert Street, W1D; thepalomar.co.uk

2 Barrafina Adelaide Street

There are 29 stools to choose from at this Spanish tapas bar, where the vibe rivals any city in Spain. 10 Adelaide Street, WC2N; barrafina.co.uk

3 Ember Yard

Taking inspiration from the Italian and Spanish methods of cooking over charcoal, the leather stools here even come with handy back support. 60 Berwick Street, W1F; emberyard.co.uk

4 A Wong

Bringing together the cuisine from the 14 national borders in China, Andrew Wong’s hugely celebrated restaurant is the liveliest bar-dining experience in SW1. 70 Wilton Road, SW1V; awong.co.uk

5 Polpetto

Enjoy a creamy burrata and Campari cocktail while gawking at the open kitchen of this Soho restaurant. 11 Berwick Street, W1F; polpetto.co.uk

FROM LEFT: Seating at Polpetto on Berwick Street, Soho; chefs preparing food at The Palomar, specialising in modern cuisine from Jerusalem; Café Pistou in Exmouth Market, which serves Provençal small plates and southern French wines to diners on bar seating; the Spanish-Italian art deco-style Ember Yard in Soho; high stools (with decent footrests) at Ember Yard

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THINGS GET POLITICAL – THE FULL FINE-DINING TREATMENT OR EATING WITH YOUR HANDS?

→ But as with every new trend, there are rules. Don’t make friends with the people around you unless you’re alone, advises Wilson, “or after everyone is on their fourth glass of wine. It’s great to ogle what people are eating right next to you, and often this can dictate your own choices, as well as spark up conversation.” Don’t be fussy about your bar stool, either. “A swivelling stool is a luxury and pleasantly diverting, but as long as there is a perch at

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→ the bar, that’s enough for me. Footrests are unnecessary.” Things get political where the food is concerned. While Wilson thinks it’s best suited to “anything you can pick up with your hands – arancini, jamón croquettes, dumplings, fried chicken and sausage rolls,” other establishments are prepared to give the full finedining treatment regardless of the choice of seat. Norman, however, is most annoyed when bars are badly designed. “There’s a brilliant London restaurant where the bar is simply too high. I’m over six foot tall but I feel like a child when I’m sat at it. There’s another good Soho restaurant where the bar doesn’t overhang by nearly enough, so your knees crash and bruise – it’s incredibly uncomfortable. The bars in our restaurants all have the same dimensions and are designed for ideal counter dining.” Norman’s ideal measurements are a bar at 109cm high, a stool at 75cm, and a 30cm overhang “so that your knees have somewhere to go”. Let’s hope the new informal European brasserie Blixen gets it right, then. Co-owned by Riding House Café proprietor Clive Watson, it opened in January in Spitalfields and its new bar seats face the open kitchen – so chefs will be cooking right in front of you. One does wonder if anyone wants to reserve an actual table these days; Banks certainly doesn’t. “Eating at the bar is no longer the poor relation… You can sit and watch your food being prepared, cooked and served, then there’s the anticipation of ‘is that one mine?’ It’s addictive.” So all together now: what do you call a new restaurant opening in London that doesn’t have a decent bar to eat your dinner at? Missing a trick, that’s what. f Follow Victoria on Twitter @vicstewart


A BIT OF A MIX-UP

We’ve scoured London to find our favourite signature serves. Here are six recipes you can use to recreate a bit of mixological magic in your own kitchen

AVOCA-LYPTO SPRITZ For this tasty, fresh spritz-style serve from Heddon Street Kitchen, muddle the avocado in the shaker and add all other ingredients apart from the prosecco. Shake hard, double-strain into a large coupe glass and top with the prosecco. Garnish with a mint leaf. gordonramsay.com/heddon-street

I N GREDI EN TS ◆ 25ml Bombay Sapphire ◆ 15ml St-Germain Elderflower ◆ 20ml lime juice ◆ 10ml sugar ◆ 1/4 fresh avocado ◆ 75ml prosecco

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QUEEN VIC This negroni-style cocktail comes courtesy of Chelsea’s NY-style Italian GOAT. To make it, take a shaker, put in all the ingredients and stir for 20 seconds with ice. Coat the rim of a rocks glass with cocoa powder, then pour in over ice. Garnish with a shard of dark chocolate. goatchelsea.com

I NGREDI EN TS ◆ 40ml Bombay Sapphire ◆ 25ml Campari ◆ 25 Lillet Blanc ◆ 5ml Pimento ◆ 2 dashes chocolate bitters

BITE-SIZED

FOODISM.CO.UK/ NEWSLETTER

RON DE REPLAY You’re always in for a great serve at Bounce (sorry). For this one, stir the ingredients in a cocktail jar to blend and achieve perfect density, before pouring into a rocks glass over cubed ice. Garnish with an orange rind (pinched to release the oils), and finish with the luxury Rococo chocolate ball (if you don’t have one, we’re sure a clean ping pong ball will suffice). bouncepingpong.com

ING R E DIE NTS ◆ 40ml Ron Zacapa 23 ◆ 20ml Aperol ◆ 15ml Grand Marnier ◆ 15ml Liqueur 43 Photograph (top right) by © Ming Tang-Evans

◆ 2 dashes Mozart Chocolate Bitters

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YACON SPRITZ This signature pisco cocktail from contemporary Peruvian Pachamama uses Yacón syrup, used as a sweetener by Peruvians for hundreds of years. To make the Yacón Spritz, mix together the pisco, syrup, lemon juice and aji chili powder and pour into a highball glass. Top up with ginger beer and serve. pachamamalondon.com

ING R E DIE NTS

HAKUSHU SAWA

◆ 50ml Pisco ◆ 1½ tsp Yacón syrup (use honey or

maple syrup instead, if needed)

A distinctly Japanese take on the classic Boston Sour, the Hakushu Sawa is made by simply shaking the ingredients together and straining them into a martini glass. ippudo.co.uk

◆ 20ml fresh lemon juice ◆ ½ tsp aji chili powder ◆ ginger beer

I N GREDI EN TS ◆ 50ml Hakushu whisky ◆ 1 tsp lemon juice ◆ 1 dash of Angostura bitters ◆ 1 egg white

PERFECT HARMONY

INGREDIE NTS ◆ 40ml Suntory Hibiki 12-Year-Old ◆ 20ml Dubonnet ◆ 20ml Cocchi Americano ◆ 2 dashes lavender bitters

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Photograph (top right) by © Ming Tang-Evans

This recipe from Japanese whisky distiller Suntory, served as a special at South Bank restaurant Skylon, is elegant, aromatic and scaled back to showcase the liquid’s flavour. Stir the ingredients in a rocks glass over an ice diamond. Garnish with two lavender sprigs. suntory.com/whisky


simply perfect.

Hand-selected 100% Weber blue agave. The world’s finest ultra-premium tequila. patronspirits.com

The perfect way to enjoy Patrón is responsibly. © 2011 Patrón Spirits International AG, Schaffhausen, Switzerland. 40% Alc./Vol.


A TASTE OF MEXICO

Fancy a taste of authentic Mexican cuisine? We have good news: Selfridges’ new culinary extravaganza – Welcome To Mexico – is in town until mid May. Head to their Foodhall, restaurants and bars for tequila tasting, dining and more

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072 NEW-SCHOOL DENMARK DINING | 085 BOOZE NEWS 078 SPIRITS AND BEERS | 092 THE SELECTOR

— PART 3 —

EXCESS “THE 16 PLUS-COURSE MENU IS UNVEILED LIKE A LONG, BEGUILING MAGIC TRICK” LUCY McGUIRE ON DINING IN DENMARK, 072


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THE NEW CLASS MAIN COURSE

Noma’s René Redzepi has led Copenhagen’s dining scene for years. As the success ripples, Lucy McGuire meets two leading New Nordic chefs outside the capital

Photograph by ###

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IVE ANTS, REINDEER lichen and tree bark. Not exactly things that get your stomach rumbling. But these unlikely ingredients are used by the culinary genius behind the best restaurant in the world. The chef in question is, yep you’ve guessed it, René Redzepi of Noma. He and his co-owner Claus Meyer have used bizarre ingredients and an interactive dining style to earn their restaurant such cult status that diners wait three months to eat here. In fact, Redzepi and his edible ants have caused such a stir, the influence on the cheffing world has been dubbed the ‘Noma effect’. And, bar a few (gasp) defeats, this influential restaurant has remained pretty much top of the Michelin ranks for 10 years. But this Copenhagen-centric food scene could be about to change. The White Guide Nordic 2015 lists 250 of the best restaurants across seven Scandinavian regions. Those who make it to the top 30 are considered the cream of the crop. If you reach the top 250? Well, you’re bloody good. In second place behind Noma is Copenhagen’s coveted Geranium. But for

DANISH FLAVOURS REACH BRITISH SHORES Bubbledogs/Kitchen Table Noma’s former sous chef and waiter James Knappett and sommelier Sandia Chang pioneered Bubbledogs, a highend hotdog and champagne restaurant in Fitzrovia. The adjoining Michelinstarred Kitchen Table champions sustainable cooking with an everchanging menu that adapts to seasonal produce. bubbledogs.co.uk; kitchentablelondon.co.uk

Snaps & Rye Traditional snaps and rye bread are made cool in this boho Notting Hill café. Expect upscale smørrebrød and akvavitbased cocktails. snapsandrye.com

MASH An acronym for Modern American Steak House (rather than a reference to spuds) this is an American steak house with a Danish twist where meat is dryaged for 70 days. mashsteak.co.uk

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the first time in history, restaurants outside of Scandinavia’s capital cities are being hailed by the Michelin lords. One such pioneer is Wassim Hallal – a Danish-Lebanese chef who’s putting Denmark’s second city of Aarhus on the gastronomical map. He’s number 14 on the list. And it’s not just because he appeared on Gordon Ramsay’s Danish Hell’s Kitchen. This man has enough technical flair to give the likes of Heston a run for his money. We wait eagerly at our table in his ultracontemporary restaurant Frederikshøj on the edge of Aarhus – a town that hosts a popular food festival each year. Like Redzepi’s, Hallal’s food can be confusing yet captivating. His 16 plus-course tasting menu is unveiled like a long and beguiling magic trick. Sensory confusion follows with a bowl of ‘sand’, fake quails’ eggs, onion paper and edible chicken shells. In isolation they don’t sound in the least bit appetising. But the quail’s egg and onion paper are served with a melt-in-the-mouth piece of Norwegian lobster and glistening buttery sauce; the edible eggshell has been designed to look like it’s just hatched out a deliciously crunchy chicken nugget. And the sand – topped with a rich fish stock – is fashioned from seaweed and shrimps, melting into flavours of the sea. As the courses keep arriving, Hallal’s technical showboating creeps up a notch, as does his urge to confuse us. “Ooh’s” and “ahh’s” crescendo around the table. Some dishes are so bizarre, we need instructions on how to eat them. Pour this in there. Don’t eat that bit, eat that bit. This is a serious education in interactive dining. Soon, I’m tapping my fork into a skillet of rocks. Well, some are rocks, some are soft blue potatoes. I can’t help but laugh. Then a goldfish bowl of oxtail with King Bolete mushrooms and beetroot arrives. It rests on a bed of hay and we’re hit with a Heston-style whoosh of fog. When the desserts arrive, we’re told to smash the back of our spoons into a sugar lemon that looks like a glass ornament. This reveals a sour, sherbet-like sorbet that’s so moreish, it brings the table to silence. This experimental cooking seems so far removed from the Scandinavian traditions of yesteryear. But as the guys behind Noma insist, this New Nordic Cuisine movement is about embracing traditions in modern ways. So look past the eccentric exterior and you’ll find many chefs stay loyal to this, pioneering the farm-to-table ethos. Traditional Danish snacks such as smørrebrød are undergoing a renaissance. →

THE EDIBLE EGGSHELL HAS BEEN DESIGNED TO LOOK LIKE IT’S JUST HATCHED A DELICIOUSLY CRUNCHY CHICKEN NUGGET


CLOCKWISE FROM THIS IMAGE: Sugar lemon dessert at Frederikshøj; Paul Cunningham; Wassim Hallal’s take on traditional smørrebrød; Wassim Hallal

Photograph by ###

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→ In fact, Hallal has just put his own twist on this rye bread staple with his recently opened deli, F-Høj. And Scandinavian snaps, akvavit (or aquavit as it’s sometimes known over here) – once synonymous with the prohibition period – is now cool among the hipsters and making its mark on British shores. The humble hot dog hasn’t been forgotten either – you don’t have to go far to find a truck selling this Danish street food delicacy. Aarhus hosts the Danish Hotdog Championships each year. And it’s something the next chef I visit, Paul Cunningham, can’t get enough of. The three-time championship winner is a British ex-pat who worked his way up the cheffing ranks in some of Copenhagen’s top establishments. He was awarded a Michelin star just nine months after opening his restaurant, the Paul. After years on the Copenhagen food scene, Cunningham wanted a simpler life – which is why I’m dining at his restaurant in Henne Kirkeby Kro, a luxury inn on the wild, remote West Jutland shores. His number on the White Guide is an impressive 35. This is a guy who famously accompanied his hotdog entry ‘Good Morning Hennedog’ with an army tank filled with Vietnamese men dressed as women. Cunningham’s cooking doesn’t feature puffs of smoke – “There’s none of that hocus pocus crap in

THIS MAN MANAGES TO GET THE MOST OFFALFEARING DINERS EATING PIGS’ EARS AND MALLARD HEARTS 76

CLOCKWISE FROM THIS IMAGE: Frederikshøj in Aarhus; a ‘freshly hatched’ chicken nugget covered in yolk; boutique-style inn Henne Kirkeby Kro

my restaurant,” he says. But as his hotdog entry suggests, he doesn’t blend into the background either. We make our way through a mammoth 22-course menu that begins with tasty bites such as chicken skin crisps and caviar, and potato crisps sprinkled with fungi salt. This is followed by plates of aged duck in a honey carrot salad; plump oysters straight from Denmark’s fjords and spoons of cured pork in a sticky garlic and lime sauce. What makes this food so appealing is that it’s somewhere between hearty Danish cooking and the flashy New Nordic Cuisine I’m beginning to understand. Who else can turn lobster, basil and cognac into a cappuccino? Somehow, this man manages to get the most offal-fearing diners eating pigs’ ears, mallard hearts and veal sweetbreads. But again, look past that shiny exterior and you’ll find that this food actually stays true to the New Nordic ethos: we have pork reared right on the doorstep, fresh root vegetables grown in allotments, and fungi and berries Paul has foraged from the nearby forest. Yes, you might call this new wave of Danish cooking pretentious or gimmicky. But the fact is, those kooky chefs in Copenhagen are encouraging us to open our minds as diners. And they’re setting a precedent across the rest of Denmark for cuisine that’s adventurous, yet sustainable. I might not be ready to snack on ants just yet, but that can’t be a bad thing, can it? f

MORE DANISH CULINARY TALENT Ruth’s Gourmet A hotel restaurant that’s putting Denmark’s northernmost town of Skagen on the culinary map. Run by chef Thorsten Schmidt, foodies are flocking to try his playful Nordic style of cooking. ruths-hotel.dk

Restaurant Koch All eyes are on Aarhus, as the Koch brothers reopen their fine-dining restaurant this year. A health-focused menu promises the ‘best eating experience in Aarhus’. kocherier.dk

Restaurant Tree Top Head chef Rasmus Munk, 23, is the next big thing. Championing an artistic Nordic style with unusual ingredients such as chicken feet, he runs the kitchen at Munkebjerg Hotel by Vejle Fjord. munkebjerg.dk

Svinkløv Badehotel Head chef Kenneth Hansen is up for the highly esteemed Bocuse d’Or. His simple, flavoursome cooking draws crowds to the 1920s beach hotel in the north west. svinkloev-badehotel.dk


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CHEQUE US OUT APERITIF

We’re under starters’ orders, with rum, dark beers and vermouth all vying for honours… PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID HARRISON

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1 FAIR Rum, 40%, 70cl, £39.50; harveynichols.com 2 Smatt’s Gold Rum, 40%, 70cl, £42; 31dover.com 3 Clément Jon One 125th Anniversary, 40%, 70cl, £44.95; amathusdrinks.com 4 Ron Zacapa Reserva Limitada 2014, 45%, 70cl, £81.95; thewhiskyexchange.com 5 Banks 7 Age Golden Rum, 41%, 75cl, £53; harveynichols.com

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1 Two Cocks Brewery Puritan Stout, 4.5%, 50cl, £3.30; twococks brewery.com 2 Fourpure Oatmeal Stout, 5.1%. 33cl, £2.50. fourpure.com 3 Siren Craft Brew Broken Dream, 6.7%, 33cl, £2.85; sirencraftbrew.com 4 Pressure Drop Strictly Roots, 6.5%, 33cl, £2.50; pressuredropbrewing.com 5 Partizan Brewing Porter, 5.5%, 33cl, £2.70; partizanbrewing.co.uk 6 Beavertown Black Betty Black IPA, 7.4%, 33cl, £3.10; beavertownbrewery.co.uk 7 BrewDog & Victory U-Boat, 8.4%, 33cl, £3.50; brewdog.com 8 Siren Craft Brew Barrel Aged Broken Dream, 7.4%, 33cl, £4.50; sirencraftbrew.com 9 Beavertown Smog Rocket, 5.4%, 33cl, £2.80; beavertownbrewery.co.uk


Available On PART OF THE AVALON GROUP'S INTERNATIONALLY ACCLAIMED COLLECTION OF PREMIUM SPIRITS. WINNERS OF 24 INTERNATIONAL PREMIUM SPIRIT AWARDS TO DATE.

IRISHPREMIUMSPIRITS.COM The Wild Geese, The Wild Geese Rare Irish Whiskey, The Wild Geese Irish Soldiers & Heroes, The Wild Geese Soldiers & Heroes, Untamed, The Exiles, Unbroken Unbowed Untamed, The Skull Design, The Vodka Wing and Gin Wing are registered trademarks. The trade dress including The Wild Geese Flying Geese, 1691 and the Honey Bee Seal are trademarks. The products comprised in The Wild Geese Collection of Premium Spirits are sold under The Wild Geese Soldiers & Heroes in North America and Worldwide under The Wild Geese. Manufactured under the authority of the trademark proprietor . Gin: Patent Pending 52014/0188 Ireland. 1317123.6 United Kingdom. Vodka: Patent Pending 1318720.8 United Kingdom. Š Avalon Group Inc. 2002 - 2015


1 Belsazar Dry Vermouth, 19%, 75cl, £34.99; selfridges.com 2 Dolin Chambery Vermouth Rouge, 16%, 75cl, £12.46; amathusdrinks.com 3 Sacred Spiced English Vermouth, 18%, 75cl, £39.99; selfridges.com 4 Mancino Bianco Vermouth, 16%, 75cl, £26.50; harveynichols.com

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BOOZE NEWS APERITIF We’ve scoured London and beyond to bring you the very latest news in the world of alcohol. This one’s on us...

1 Hardy’s Wine Club Australians do a lot of things well, but we won’t list all of them here, because one is cricket and nobody wants any recent wounds being re-opened. However, we will mention wine – they’re very good at wine. Which is exactly why Hardy’s Wine Club has teamed up with Lantana Café in London to create its own tailored menu pairing delicious food with matching wines. Choose from a brunch starring a Nottage Hill Riesling and some classic corn fritters, or for lunch, the Asian-Australian fusion of Thai fishcakes with an Oomoo Sauvignon Blanc. In fact, go wild – there’s a hefty selection on offer. This menu will turn your world upside-down. For more info: hardys1853club.com

2 Celebrity Cruises We’re not sure if you’d clocked on yet, but drinking lager tops isn’t the way to go anymore. It’s craft beer or no beer, we’re afraid. You can even enjoy a tipple of the good stuff in the middle of the ocean nowadays

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– providing you’re on a Celebrity Cruise liner, anyway. That’s because the luxury tour operator has joined the party – it recently updated its beer menus to include more than 40 craft beers from around the world. Its exclusive new Gastrobar even throws in a bunch of brainy beer sommeliers to help you with pairings. Don’t go overboard though…

“Shaken, not stirred.” Most people know that for a man as knowledgable as James Bond, that’s a stupid way to order a martini. If your expertise could use a similar boost, head to the newly renovated OXO Tower Restaurant and try its martini trolley – five classic serves are on offer, each inspired by a different era, and you can customise your own, too. Just don’t ask for it shaken. For more info: harveynichols.com

For more info: celebritycruises.co.uk

3 69 Colebrooke Row’s new vermouth If you haven’t been drinking vermouth cocktails for the last few months, we’ll assume you’ve been living under a rock. Well, if you’re reading this, you’re out now, which means you can get yourself to 69 Colebrooke Row – Tony Conigliaro and the team behind the legendary piano bar have started distilling their own small-batch vermouth, available in cocktails at the bar. Named Senza Nome, it comes in dry and sweet varieties, designed to complement Beefeater Gin. We’ll drink to that…

OAKY DOKE

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Given bourbon’s popularity, it was only a matter of time before specialist expressions found their way into thirsty Londoners’ rocks glasses. Extra oaking is all the rage: first came Jack Daniel’s Sinatra Select, and now Woodford Reserve’s Double Oaked is making a splash. Its Distiller’s Select goes into a toasted barrel for another 12 months, giving it a smoky and smooth finish. For more info: woodfordreserve.com and jackdaniels.com

For more info: 69colebrookerow.com

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STEAKS ARE HIGH

The competition at the grill is hotting up, as top Argentinian wine brand Graffigna launches the London Steak Awards. Here's how to vote for the capital's top beef…

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HERE ARE FEW things in life we like more than a great steak. In fact, there’s just one thing: a great steak paired with a glass of Argentinian Malbec. And we count ourselves lucky, because few cities on earth have been blessed by the steak gods as generously as London. However you like your favourite cut cooked, you’re bound to find it here – paired with a glass of spicy, fruit-packed Malbec. If all that choice is overwhelming, Argentinian winemaker Graffigna is

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making things a whole lot easier. Not only are its rich and complex Malbecs the perfect partner for beef, but the brand has launched a hunt for the best steak in the capital: the London Steak Awards. The nominations are in and now you can vote for the shortlist: head to facebook.com/graffignaUK or tweet @graffignaUK and choose your favourite. Graffigna will then send its panel of judges (see right) to taste the four leading contenders before the winning restaurant is announced in May. The judges will be pairing the steaks

with Graffigna’s stunning Malbecs – and with good reason. Red wine, and particularly Malbec, contains a compound called tannin. Not only are proteins in the steak broken down by tannin to make it more pleasurable to eat, but the fat from the meat softens the flavours, and unleashes even more fruit notes in the wine. Take a sip of Malbec before and after eating your favourite steak and see the results yourself. Then you’ll be ready to cast your vote in the London Steak Awards. May the best meat win! •


PROMOTION

GRAFFIGNA'S RICH AND COMPLEX SIGNATURE MALBEC IS THE PERFECT PARTNER FOR YOUR FAVOURITE CUT OF STEAK THE WINE

THE JUDGES LUIZ HARA Blogging as The London Foodie, Luiz Hara is a man of great taste – not to mention a former investment banker turned Cordon Bleu-trained chef, and a food, wine and travel writer.

MATT WALLS

The Graffigna story begins in 1870, when Italian immigrant Santiago Graffigna set up San Juan's first winery at the foot of the magnificent Argentinian Andes. With minimal rainfall, year-round sunshine and a range of altitudes at which to plant vineyards, San Juan was the perfect setting for winemaking – and it remains so now, enhanced by modern winemaking and a focus on quality. Graffigna Malbec is available in Sainsbury's and on Ocado for £9.99; it's also available at selected London restaurants. graffignawines.com

Matt Walls is a wine expert, writer and editor of the London Wine Guide, and an authority on what to drink (and where to drink it) in London and beyond.

MATTHEW ZORPAS Founder of influential menswear website the Gentleman Blogger, Matthew Zorpas is man with a refined palate – and a keen eye for style and substance.

JON HAWKINS Foodism editor Jon Hawkins is a meat-lover and traveladdict, who has trawled the globe from Japan to Argentina in search of the perfect steak.

GET INVOLVED Vote for your favourite steak on social media… facebook.com/graffignauk @graffignaUK

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BECAUSE IT’S WORTH IT

Fort Worth’s food scene has never been in a better place, and you could win a sensational trip to try it for yourself

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HERE’S SO MUCH more to Texan cuisine than gutbusting steaks and burgers. In fact, as well as ‘cowboy cuisine’, there's a thriving contemporary food scene, with farm-to-table restaurants, authentic smokehouses and great bars. And you could be in with a chance of winning an incredible trip to try it for yourself… With so much culinary heritage and influences from all over, Fort Worth’s food scene has so much to discover, with an authentic craft beer and cocktail tradition that goes back decades, too. Food in Fort Worth is as diverse as its population. You might go there expecting Americana-style BBQ, but you’ll leave having tried great food from some of the most creative homegrown, farm-to-table restaurants in America. Here are five of our favourites:

GRACE Grace, presided over by head chef Blaine Staniford, is a great example of Fort Worth’s gastronomical diversity: it’s a restaurant with the capacity to surprise, serving up contemporary American cuisine, from Wagyu beef pot roast to

YOU’LL LEAVE HAVING TRIED SOME OF THE MOST CREATIVE FARM-TO-TABLE RESTAURANTS IN AMERICA 88

hand-made tortellini. It’s also got an enormous wine list, and a bar menu that includes a host of signature cocktails. gracefortworth.com

Woodshed Smokehouse A traditional meat joint, Woodshed might seem like the kind of restaurant that springs to mind when you think of Texan cuisine. In true Fort Worth fashion, though, it still mixes things up – a true meat-lovers paradise, items on its menu ranges from rattlesnake to elk alongside more traditional meats, and there’s also a choice of woodchips over which your dish can be smoked. woodshedsmokehouse.com


COMPETITION

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Fort Worth Stock Yards; diners at Woodshed Smokehouse; Ellerbe's patio; the bustling Sundance Square Plaza

Reata Restaurant

Firestone & Robertson

Reata is where the old and the new meet. It's Southern soul food, given the contemporary treatment – a medley of Creole and cowboy cuisine – and you’ll find everything from blackened buffalo rib-eye to jalapeño and cilantro-crusted Texas red fish and grilled mahi-mahi with lobster florentine on its eclectic, modern menu. reata.net

As well as its signature blended whiskey, available in bars all around Fort Worth, this whiskey distiller also produces one of the few bourbons not to be made in Kentucky. Texas’s climate, as well as a distinctive mash bill used in the distilling process, means its whiskey pays homage to Texas but also takes in influences from other places – much like the Texas attitude itself. frdistilling.com

Ellerbe Fine Foods A farm-to-table restaurant in the true sense of the term, Ellerbe Fine Foods puts a huge emphasis on using the freshest and most local seasonal ingredients available. Head chef Molly McCook’s menu features produce bought from local farms used artistically and elegantly in dishes like linguine with little neck clams, winter pear and Demases Farm spinach salad and grilled Duroc pork tenderloin.

There’s so much waiting to discover, and one winner will get the chance to see, do and taste it all with a getaway to Fort Worth. Enter for your chance to win. •

HOW TO ENTER

WIN

One lucky reader could be in with a chance of WIN eating their way around Fort Worth, courtesy of Visit Forth Worth. The trip includes flights, six nights' accommodation, meals at five restaurants, tickets to tours and more. To enter, go to fortworth.com/ howdyuk and fill in your details. See the site for exact prize details. To see a full list of T&Cs, go to fortworth.com/howdyuk

Book your tailor made holiday to Fort Worth with Hayes and Jarvis. Visit hayesandjarvis.co.uk or speak to a Destination Specialist on 01293 733773

ellerbefinefoods.com

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WIN


VISIT HRHIBIZA.COM


PROMOTION

ON THE ROCKS The newly opened Hard Rock Ibiza hotel combines classic island luxury with cuttingedge design, music and an array of award-winning, contemporary dining options

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HEN YOU THINK of Ibiza luxury, your mind might jump to worldrenowned DJs in their downtime between club nights, or the rich and famous partying in penthouses with private beaches. But Hard Rock Hotels is on a mission to prove you don't have to be filthy rich to enjoy five-star luxury on the famous party island. In fact, with the recently opened Hard Rock Ibiza, the White Isle lifestyle is closer than you think. The giant, luxurious five-star hotel is a sensory overload from the moment you walk in. It's a hive of breathtaking design, made livelier with soundscapes, lighting and decorated with memorabilia from world-famous musicians. If there's one thing that truly separates Hard Rock Ibiza from other hotels, it's the incredible range of eating and drinking locations within it. The flagship restaurants are presided over by two-Michelin-starred chef Paco Roncero – who brings across the signature brand of contemporary tapas he made famous in his Madrid restaurant to Estado Puro, where he strives to create the perfect tapa, and to Sublimotion, an awardwinning dining concept that uses all five

senses to turn dinner from a simple meal into a mind-blowing experience. For something a bit more casual, Sessions restaurant and Munchies snack bar are also on hand to satisfy your cravings. All that's left is to enjoy your holiday in the utmost luxury, and know that you're being treated to a celebration of gastronomy in one of the most trendsetting hotels in the world. • For more info or to book, visit hrhibiza.com

HARD ROCK IBIZA IS OUT TO PROVE YOU DON'T HAVE TO BE FILTHY RICH TO ENJOY FIVESTAR LUXURY ON THE FAMOUS PARTY ISLAND

FROM TOP: The Ninth skylounge's spectacular views across the ocean; Sublimotion's array of sensory technology makes dinner more than just dinner; Paco Ronsero's signature tapas

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THE SELECTOR

You’re living in the world’s culinary capital but there’s so much choice, it’s almost overwhelming. Well, we’re here to help. Every month, the Foodism team selflessly scours the city for the hottest food and drink options. Tuck in! 92

1 Deeney’s 115 Chancery Lane, WC2A 1PP

The Macbeth toastie from Deeney’s is a killer sandwich (sorry), the kind we daydream about when we’re hungry. Packed between two slices of granary bread is a hearty mound of Scottish flavour: haggis and cheddar (melted together to prevent any ingredient loss out the bottom), a smear of mustard, a layer of rocket and a sweet little treat with every bite in the form of caramelized onions. @deeneys; deeneys.com

1 THE SELECTOR

STREET SARNIE 2

BEST OF THE REST 2 The Ribman

4 Le Swine

91-96 Brick Lane, E1 6HR

Various

The Ribman has graced our TVs and our Twitter feeds these last few years, and who better to be representing the successes of London street food than founder Mark Gevaux himself. His super soft rib meat comes stuffed in doughy white bun, with a dribble of his scotch bonnet injected Holy Fuck sauce. When he’s not tweeting about his beloved West Ham (#COYI) it’s because he’s prepping ribs at 3am.

Can the humble bacon butty ever be beaten? It’s faced a bit of a sprucing thanks to Le Swine, but it’s all good: crispy bacon is encased in a homemade milk and bacon bap, with onion butter, mushroom sauce and fried duck egg.

@theribman; theribman.co.uk

3 Bell & Brisket

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@le_swine; leswine.co.uk

5 Capish Various

Bringing fully loaded bagels to London’s streets since 2010, these hefty excuses for a sandwich are generously heaped with salt beef brisket, tangy pickles and blow-torched cheese. If eating on the street isn’t your game, Bell & Brisket has a few residencies lined up in 2015.

For a taste of Italian5 American cuisine on London’s streets head for a 9” ‘meatball hero’. The semolina sub roll is stuffed with marinara-drenched pork and beef meatballs with a blanket of provolone cheese. Carb-phobic? Ditch the bread for a serving of saucy balls.

@brisketbel; thebrisket.wordpress.com

@capishfood; facebook.com/capishfood

Various


BEST OF THE REST 2 Hawksmoor

241 Kilburn High Road, NW6 7JN

Perhaps surprisingly, Monday nights in all the Hawksmoor restaurants are BYOB. At £5 corkage, it’s an ideal way to save some cash on a dinner out – and more money will get you more meat. Also keep an eye out for themed BYOB nights, with no corkage.

This restaurant, which has a no-charge bring-your-own policy, is not only a Kilburn institution, but a New York one too – Ariana I first served up its slant on Afghan cuisine in Manhattan – but it’s more Middle Eastern marvel than trendy NYC.

020 7426 4850; thehawksmoor.com

020 3490 6709; ariana2restaurant.co.uk

3 Bonnie Gull Seafood Shack

FOLLOW US @FOODISMUK

FOODISMUK

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4 Ariana II

157a Commercial Street, London, E1 6BJ

5 Tayyabs

21A Foley Street, Fitzrovia, W1W 6DS

83-89 Fieldgate Street, Whitechapel, E1 1JU

The best time to visit this seafood restaurant is BYOB Sundays – it’s wine only, but there’s no corkage. The restaurant is all about seaside holiday nostalgia, though it’s definitely a step up from rainy, windswept beaches in August, drinking tinnies on the pebbles and seagulls that steal your chips.

Tayyabs is the don of all bring your own curry houses. With no fee for corkage and reasonably-priced north Indian food, it’s a pretty cheap evening out. Go now, get the fiery lamb chops and leave happy.

020 7436 0921; bonniegull.com

tayyabs.co.uk

020 7247 6400;

THE SELECTOR

B.Y.O.B.

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1 BYOC 28 Bedfordbury, Covent Garden, WC2N 4BJ

Here’s a riddle: you’ll leave this bar drunk, 4 but it doesn’t sell alcohol. OK, the clue is in the title – BYOC stands for Bring Your Own Cocktails – but this speakeasy is a lot less amateur than it 5 sounds: you provide £20 and a bottle of spirit, and for two hours skilled bartenders will prepare tailored cocktails in front of you from the bar’s antique drinks trolley, which contains an assortment of syrups, fruits, spices, herbs, salts and bitters. It’s a novel way to use up any spirits you may have lying around, or the special occasion you were waiting for to drink that small-batch rum you were keeping. And, even better, a few tricks of the trade might brush off in the process. 0203 441 2424; byoc.co.uk

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1 Baranis 115 Chancery Lane, WC2A 1PP

Need a holiday? Baranis can’t guarantee sun, but it can get a stiff pastis into your hand and take you to the South of France. Sort of. The Provence-themed hideaway in the vaulted cellar of an old Chancery Lane auction house is about as close as you can get to a Gallic summer in London – it’s full of little nooks, mismatching chairs and the waitresses wear breton stripes. Once you’ve unwound with some Provençal charcuterie, have a bash at some pétanque (a form of boules) in the bar’s indoor court – the only one in the UK. The aim is to throw the metal balls as close as possible to a wooden ‘cochonnet’ (piglet, or jack). It may sound sedate, but games can get surprisingly competitive after a few drinks. 020 7242 8373; baranis.co.uk

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THE SELECTOR

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BARS WITH GAMES

BEST OF THE REST 2 Mark’s Bar 66-70 Brewer Street, W1F 9UP

The biggest reason to visit Mark’s Bar is the historical British-inspired cocktail menu. But along with expert mixology and generous lashings of old-school charm, there’s a traditional bar billiards table here too. 020 7292 3518; marksbar.co.uk

3 Bounce 121 Holborn, EC1N 2TD

The undisputed home of boozy ping pong games, Bounce is located on the site where

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ping pong was first invented at the beginning of the 20th century. It’s also got the London 2012 Olympic final table, which you can play on at no extra cost. Tasty pizzas are served in the restaurant, but watch out for hazards – aka stray ping pong balls in your pint. 020 3657 6525; bouncepingpong.com

4 The Four Quarters 187 Rye Lane, Peckham, SE15 4TP

Super Mario tournaments, Super Smash Bros Sundays and Pinball competitions are all on the events listings at this hipster-geek pub in

Peckham, which serves craft beers and pub food. It’s a cafe in the daytime, too, so you can hang out all afternoon playing the retro arcade games (yes, they’ve got Pac-Man). 020 3754 7622; fourquartersbar.co.uk

5 The Earl Derby 155 Kilburn High Road, London, NW6 7HU

This is a pub for slow Sundays. Expect real ales and tasty pub food at this spruced-up Victorian boozer, complete with taxidermy – plus board games, crafts and Lego. 0207 625 2618; theearlderbykilburn.co.uk


BEST OF THE REST 2 Carioca 25-27 Market Row, SW9 8LB

Carioca’s new brunch menu brings the best of Brazilian breakfast to London. Expect black bean stews, cake (Brazilians love cake for breakfast), or for something lighter, there’s acai berry granola. The menu’s available until 4pm, allowing for one hell of a lie in. 020 7095 9052; @CariocaBrixton

3 Q Grill 29-33 Chalk Farm Road, NW1 8AJ

Q Grill may be better known for serving up soul food, but its brunch menu, brought in at the end of last year, is already regarded

among the best in London, with BBQ slants on breakfast classics (the sausage and egg buttie is a great way to bust a hangover) and dangerously, unlimited Bloody Marys (which are a great way to usher in the next one).

but the small outdoor space will make this place an even hotter ticket come summer.

020 7267 2678; q-grill.co.uk

55-59 Old Compton Street, W1D 6HW

4 Verden 181 Clarence Road, E5 8EE

Bloody Marys are a brunch essential, but at Verden so is ‘breakfast wine.’ It comes alongside a menu of avocado on toast, and chorizo, poached egg and potatoes, plus there’s a healthy children’s menu for any sprogs. It’s dark and moody-looking inside,

020 8986 4723; verdene5.com

5 House of Ho If you’re the type to hover around the buffet table snaffling sausage rolls, you might like the prospect of Rock ’n’ Roll Brunch at House of Ho. There are two menus to choose from (£29 and £36) including lychee bellinis, endless wine and champagne and Vietnamese-inspired food. Even better your hefty meal is accompanied by a live band. 020 7287 0770; houseofho.co.uk

THE SELECTOR

BRUNCH BUNCH

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1 Bad Egg City Point , 1 Ropemaker Street, EC2Y 9AW

Photograph by ###

Don’t come here expecting a menu of eggs poached, fried and scrambled – despite the name, that’s not what Neil Rankin’s latest venture is about. Located in the heart of the city near Moorgate, you might expect it to be an evening venue (the cocktails help), but the breakfast menu (fried chicken baps, tacos) is epic. After 11am the options switch to hashes with Malaysian and Korean influences, and the Bad Egg burger with a njuda cheese fondu. Who needs granola anyway? 020 3006 6222; badegg.london

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2

BEST OF THE REST 2 69 Colebrooke Row

4 Peg + Patriot

69 Colebrooke Row, N1 8AA

Patriot Square, E2 9NF

The don of experimental cocktail joints (a.k.a. the Bar With No Name), 69 Colebrooke Row is 100-proof class – muddled, shaken up and distilled into a martini glass. Flavour blends include gin, sherry and woodland bitters; and cognac, chamomile syrup and frankincense.

According to the folks here, Death on the Stairs tastes a lot like stripped Aperol, gooseberry, fennel pollen and sparkling wine. If they’re right, then push us off the top step right now. Other serves include the Marmite Martini, and Pho Money Pho Problems, made with Viet spiced vodka and pak choi. Crumbs.

07540 528 593; 69colebrookerow.com

3 The Shrub & Shutter 336 Coldharbour Lane, SW9 8QH

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020 7871 0460; pegandpatriot.com

5 The Cocktail Trading Co.

Local! Seasonal! Thanks, gentrification, for bringing Brixton a jaunty cocktail bar in the shape of the Shrub & Shutter, where cocktails come with a tasty morsel of, say, venison (the Deerhunter) or fennel (the signature Shrub & Shutter cocktail) on the side.

22 Great Marlborough Street, W1F 7HU

0207 326 0643; theshrubandshutter.com

020 7427 6097; thecocktailtradingco.com

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Each cocktail here has a concept, and most of them are madly designed too, with wellington boots, owls and gravestones all featuring. Try the Corpse Reviver, with absinthe, honey wine and Egyptian embalming gin.

5 THE SELECTOR

MAGICAL MIXOLOGY 1 1 Communion Bar 29-33 Camberwell Church Street, SE5 8TR

If it wasn’t made obvious by the bar full of Catholic imagery, the cocktail list at Communion Bar was intended by resident mixologist Robert Krajewski to be divisive. That’s why he’s included Special Brew in the Grass Arena, inspired by the John Healy book about alcoholism and homelessness, along with Buckfast tonic wine, cranberry syrup and fiery chilli whisky. For something less controversial, get baptised with the Sit Down, a pleasantly warming sloe gin, citrus and chestnut honey blend. The Nurse Pinoy is made in honour of Filipino nurses at the nearby King’s College Hospital, with rum, lemon and Calamansi juice. Wash away any booze-related sins with the communion wine and wafer that comes on every table. 020 7703 5984; communionbar.com

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BITE-SIZED

FOODISM.CO.UK/ NEWSLETTER


10.

Things Things to Do on toaDo on Sunday a Sunday

1. Eat anchovies on a Chesterfield 1. Eat anchovies on a Chesterfield 2. Ask an Art Deco mirror your name 2. Ask an Art Deco mirror your name 3. Lounge under a parasol and read Proust 3. Lounge under a parasol and read Proust 4. Make every picture crooked 5. Leave very 4. Make every picture crooked 5. Leave very bad sonnets in random drawers 6. Lie under a bad sonnets in random drawers 6. Lie under a table entirely sober in a turban 7. Fall in love table entirely sober in a turban 7. Fall in love with a swan 8. Go to Lots Road with clothes on with a swan 8. Go to Lots Road with clothes on 9. Bid for something you don’t want 9. Bid for something you don’t want 10. Buy back your grandmother 10. Buy back your grandmother Lots Road Auctions Lots Road to Auctions The Best Thing to Happen Sundays since Church. The Best Thing to Happen to Sundays since Church.

www.lotsroad.com www.lotsroad.com 71–73 Lots Road, Chelsea, London SW10 0RN 71–73 Lots Road, Chelsea, London SW10 0RN T: +44 (0)20 7376 6800 E: info@lotsroad.com T: +44 (0)20 7376 6800 E: info@lotsroad.com


PEACE OUT: Around 570,000 tubes of Smarties are made at Nestle Rowntree in York every day with 420 tubes filled every minute. In a year, more than 50 million tubes of Smarties are sold, meaning over 2.3 billion of the little blighters were eaten by us last year.

SMART MOVE: If you’ve tried the sea-algae spirulina you’ll know it tastes about as good as it looks. But now it’s being used as a dye in Smarties, we’re a lot more interested.

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HARD TIMES: The sturdy shell of chocolate M&Ms was first created in 1941 as a way for US soldiers to enjoy chocolate without it melting in their pockets.

MESSED UP: Heat up one Unreal Candy Gem, throw it on a table and take an ultra close-up. Then, take a blender, pour dye on the blades, turn it upside down, and press pulse. Mix the two photos together and this is the result. That and a large cleaning bill.

Photograph by ###

DE CO NS TR UC T.

It gives us more pleasure than kissing, it contains over 600 flavour compounds, it’s packed with anti-oxidants, and it can even reduce the risk of heart disease. It’s no surprise then that the chocolate industry is worth $110bn a year…


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Foodism - 2 - London, food and drink  

Foodism Magazine - Issue 2 - London, food and drink