Page 1

ISSN 2397-1975

L O N D O N , O N E B I T E AT A T I M E


Let’s do lunch that’s deliciously

ss e l t r o Eff All our soups now come with an easy twist-off cap. So a mouthwatering lunch just got even simpler to prepare. You can even pour just the amount you need and reseal. A tasty little innovation.


Let’s do lunch Better


Editorial EDITOR

Jon Hawkins DEPUTY EDITOR

Mike Gibson

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Jordan Kelly-Linden

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Lydia Winter SUB EDITOR

Victoria Smith CONTRIBUTORS

Amanda Brame, David J Constable, Laura Goodman, David Harrison, Tom Hunt, Lucy Javanshir, Gareth May, Ronan J O’Shea, Victoria Stewart, Richard H Turner

Design ART DIRECTOR

Matthew Hasteley SENIOR DESIGNER

Abigail Rhodes DESIGNER

Emily Black JUNIOR DESIGNERS

Annie Brooks Nicola Poulos PRINTING

alternativeprint.co.uk

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Mark Hedley

BRAND DIRECTOR

Alex Watson

SALES MANAGER

Charlotte Gibbs

PRINT ADVERTISING

Kimberley D’Cruz, Lily Hankin, Carolyn Haworth, Jason Lyon, Will Preston SENIOR COMMUNICATIONS EXECUTIVE

Melissa van der Haak LEAD DEVELOPER

AJ Cerqueti

FINANCIAL DIRECTOR

Steve Cole FINANCE

Caroline Walker Taylor Haynes DIRECTOR

James Rolph MANAGING DIRECTOR

Stephen Laffey CEO

Tim Slee CHAIRMAN

Tom Kelly OBE

foodism uses paper from sustainable sources

CLICK

FOODISM.CO.UK

I recently became one of those people who gets a box of vegetables delivered to my home. Before that, I was one of those people who went to shops or markets and interacted with other humans when I bought things. Then a baby happened and I became a slave to the veg box. Every week I get an email telling me what to expect in my delivery and offering me the opportunity to swap out stuff I don’t want or need (carrots) for stuff I do (not carrots). And every single week I forget to read that email, which has its disadvantages (give me a shout if you need any carrots, yeah?) but also provides some unexpected benefits. For a start, suddenly having a fridge full of mostly British vegetables I’d never thought about whether I wanted has given me an acute sense of what’s in season at any given time; I’ve grown to love the blink-and-you’ve-missed-it appearances of broad beans, wild garlic, and pink fir apple potatoes. It also means I’ve had to get creative with my cooking and dust off some of the cookbooks that had, until the vegbox rocked up on the doorstep of my life, played a largely decorative role, along with those favourites whose pages are speckled and splattered with the memories of dishes past. And, as chef, butcher and author Richard H Turner points out on page 32, there’s another benefit to my increased veg consumption – I’m going to live forever! Ok, so that’s not exactly what he says, but he does present a pretty compelling argument for adopting a plant-based diet. Looks like I might be needing all those carrots after all. f

ABC certified distribution: 109,989 Jan-Jun 2017

FRONT COVER: Photography by Ian Dingle

GRAZE 014 THE FOODIST

016 LONDON LARDER 020 WEAPONS OF CHOICE 025 RECIPES 032 COLUMNS 034 Q&A: CLARE SMYTH 036 THE RADAR 038 FOODISM 100

FEAST 044 HOME COOKING 052 RUTH ROGERS 058 GREAT CHAIN 063 FOOD FIXERS 069 MUSHROOMS 074 MIXOLOGY

EXCESS

The Professional Publishers Association Member

090 TRAVEL

SQUAREUPMEDIA.COM 020 7819 9999

104 BOTTLE SERVICE foodismuk

facebook.com/foodismuk

@FoodismUK

111 THE DIGEST 114 INSIDER: RAMSGATE

© Square Up Media Limited 2017. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. All information contained in this magazine is, as far as we are aware, correct at the time of going to press. Square Up Media cannot accept responsibility for errors or inaccuracies in such information. If you submit unsolicited material to us, you automatically grant Square Up Media a licence to publish your submission in whole or in part in all editions of the magazine. All material is sent at your own risk and although every care is taken, neither Square Up Media nor its employees, agents or subcontractors shall be held liable resulting for loss or damage. Square Up Media endeavours to respect the intellectual property of the owners of copyrighted material reproduced herein. If you identify yourself as the copyright holder of material we have wrongly attributed, please contact the office.

120 THE SELECTOR 130 DECONSTRUCT

11


*

The astonishing story of S op h ie’s BIG k n ic ke r s They don’t get out much these days. Not since Sophie switched to drinking a2 Milk™. The bloated tummy seemed to just disappear. Turns out it didn’t like the A1 protein in most regular cows’ milk. So now she can wear underwear that flatters rather than flattens. And have a cuppa without feeling a bit, well…pants. Sophie shared her story at a2milk.co.uk/ Sophie Why not try it yourself?

*The Great Taste award was awarded to our Fresh Semi-Skimmed (2015) and Fresh Whole (2017) a2 Milk™. a2 Milk™ is not suitable for cows’ milk protein allergy. If you have been medically diagnosed with any milk intolerance, seek advice from your doctor before use. Customer’s name has been changed to protect her modesty.


— PART 1 —

GRAZE “IT’S NOT A TREND THING, THERE’S NO THROWING SOMETHING ON THE MENU BECAUSE IT’S WHAT’S EXPECTED” CLARE SMYTH ON HER NEW RESTAURANT CORE, 034

014 THE FOODIST | 016 LONDON LARDER | 018 THE ESCAPIST | 020 WEAPONS OF CHOICE 025 RECIPES | 032 COLUMNS | 036 THE RADAR | 038 FOODISM 100


THREES UP

Save your artisan cheeses from stale crackers and boring old chutney with these leftfield cheeseboard essentials

1. PET E R’S YAR D C HAR C OAL & RYE C R ISPB R E ADS

THE FOODIST

An ambitious new project in Bethnal Green brings with it debates about wine’s identity, writes Mike Gibson

I

DENTITY IS A curious thing in the world of drinks. A London Dry gin might be made in the Highlands of Scotland from botanicals sourced from all over the world. Craft beers might brand themselves as being as ‘London’ as it gets, but as far as I know, there are no fields of hops or barley within the M25. Wine, at least, is more straightforward. It tends to be, by definition, indelibly tied to its location; the grapes will generally come from one particular region, and the resultant liquid will bear the hallmarks, in flavour terms, of precisely where it comes from. It’s a quality known throughout the wine world as terroir – the specific effect the location, its soil and its climate has on the end product. And whereas in the New World its place of birth might be displayed clearly on the label, in the EU, IGPs (Indications Géographiques Protégées) enforce regulation to ensure the products made in those regions live up to their exacting standards. Even when winemakers buy grapes (known as ‘parcels’), they tend to be from one region. That’s why you drink a

14

glass of bordeaux, or champagne, or gavi. It was straightforward, at least, until now: 2017 saw the opening of Renegade London Wine, an ‘urban winery’ that’s seeking to become London’s biggest and best maison. Warwick Smith and winemaker Josh Hammond buy grapes from the UK and Europe, but the vinifiaction process happens under a Bethnal Green railway arch. The range at present includes, among others, a Lombardian chardonnay, a Herefordshire bacchus and a Bordeaux sauvignon blanc – just as a beer brewer might brew with hops from Germany or the USA. So is what’s in the bottle a reflection – like a London beer – of where it’s made, the winemaking techniques involved, the people behind it and their attitude; or are the above, conventionally speaking, three totally different wines from three different growers? One thing’s for sure: with urban winemaking operations on the rise in Europe and beyond, it’s a debate that’ll continue to flow. f For more information: renegadelondonwine.com

These Swedish-inspired crispbreads are made with organic wholewheat flours, organic fresh milk, honey and naturally fermenting sourdough – plus a bit of charcoal, which gives them their unique, dark colour and real depth of flavour. They taste even better with a generous slab of ripe brie or some soft goat’s cheese. £2.95; petersyard.com

2. PA XTO N & W HIT F IE L D C R E A M ED HONEY W IT H SE A SA LT If you’re already serving honey with your cheeses, well done you. Now take things up a level with this creamed honey with sea salt, made in the French Pyrenees for cheese masters Paxton & Whitfield. With its thick, melt-on-thetongue texture, and salty edge, it’s perfect with a washed-rind goat’s cheese. £5.95; paxtonand whitfield.co.uk

3. PART IZ AN L E M O N AND T HY M E SAIS O N Since you’ve already bought that washed-rind goat’s cheese to pair with your creamed honey, how about something to drink with it? Instead of reaching for that bottle of port you opened last Christmas, try the lemon and thyme saison from Bermondsey brewery Partizan. It’s light, zesty, aromatic, and really versatile. £2.75; thewhisky exchange.com


Lee Kum Kee Europe


FOLLOW US @FOODISMUK

FOODISMUK

TH AT’S WHAT THEY SAID Snippets from our writers and personalities across the industry, all on foodism.co.uk

THE LONDON LARDER

This month: The Cool Chile Co’s tortillas

MEZCALS SHOULD BE ABOVE 45% ABV. I WAS TOLD VERY EARLY ON NOT TO TOUCH IT IF IT’S UNDER 45% ABV BECAUSE THAT STUFF’S FOR TOURISTS MELANIE SYMONDS, co-founder of London Mezcal Week, on the Mexican agave spirit

IF YOU’RE A FAN OF STRETCHY DOUGH PILED HIGH WITH TOPPINGS AND BAKED UNTIL GOLDEN, GET YOUR DIARY OUT AND PUT A CROSS THROUGH 9 FEBRUARY, BECAUSE WE’VE GOT PLANS FOR YOU. FOODISM launches National Pizza Day

With its sparing interiors, vintage Italian posters and bar stools, Marcella feels more like a slice of central Italy than Deptford High Street TOM POWELL checks out the new southeast London joint from the same team behind Peckham institution Artusi

True to the name, the cooking here is all about textural plays. Icelandic lamb – served on a smoking ‘boat’ of hot charcoal and moss, no less – unites a gamey cut of saddle and delicate shoulder over sweet and melty calçots

JORDAN KELLY-LINDEN heads to Texture in Marylebone, where pared-back Nordic cooking meets refined French-style service.

NOW IN THEIR SIXTH YEAR, THE YOUNG BRITISH FOODIE AWARDS RECOGNISE THOSE WHO REPRESENT THE FUTURE OF FOOD. THEY WERE SET UP BY PR AMY THORNE, FOOD JOURNO CHLOE SCOTTMONCRIEFF AND BAKER LILY VANILLI TO FILL A GAP IN THE FOOD AND DRINK AWARDS SPACE, AND BRING ATTENTION TO UP-AND-COMING UK TALENT LYDIA WINTER meets the latest set of YBFs

16

What’s the product? Tortillas, made in Kensal Green from freshly ground white and blue masa harina corn by a machine that goes by the name El Monstruo. They’ll add an authentic Mexican edge to your next taco night. Did we mention they’re naturally gluten-free, too? Oh yes.

Who makes it? Dodie Miller started selling dried Mexican chillies from a little market stall on Portobello Road in 1993. Local interest soon piqued and Miller and her team began to create salsas, sauces and pastes and moved over to big ol’ Borough. But salsa needs a vessel to transport that sweet spice into your mouth; so in 2005, when they realised that fresh corn tortillas were hard to come by in the capital, Miller and her team decided to make their own.

What do they taste like? The foundation of a great taco lies in its base. And with these tortillas, you’re onto a winner. On the toasted side of nutty, with a rich, lingering smell of baked corn, just slap on some chipotle and guac and they’re good to go.

Where can I get them? You can find Cool Chile Co at Borough Market from Thursday to Saturday – or check out coolchile.co.uk. The ‘cook at home’ tortillas come in blue or white and in four different sizes, starting at £1.75 for a pack of ten. f


Lee Kum Kee Europe


LOCAL HEROES TROPICAL SUPPER CLUBS

1

LUTO

Luto, run by Phillippines native and Quality Chop House cook Mary San Pablo, can claim to be one of the few authentic Filipino food experiences in London. Usually held in Dalston café Brunswick East, it serves up the quintessential tropical, garlic- and chilli-laden food of the island nation. lutolondon.com

2

LAHPET

Lahpet is Burmese for fermented tea leaves, and, unsurprisingly, there’s plenty of it on the menu at this Hackney restaurant’s ‘Flavours of Burma’ supper club. Myanmar cuisine is still pretty unexplored in London, and this supper club is a great way to learn more in a setting a little more sociable than a straightforward visit to the restaurant, with a set menu to take you through the evening. lahpet.co.uk

3

ISLAND SOCIAL CLUB

Pop’s Kitchen founder Marie Mitchell aims to build on the success of her restaurants in Dalston and Tottenham with supper clubs that take diners around the Caribbean islands, from Jamaica to Cuba and beyond. Each one aims to get under the bonnet of Caribbean cuisines, and explore the flavours that make each one unique. islandsocialclub.co.uk

THE ESCAPIST Adam Sopher, founder of Joe & Seph’s, on trading consulting for popcorn

B

18

nobody in the UK producing a premium flavoured popcorn. So despite having no prior experience in food at all, my dad, my mum and I agreed we’d trial the popcorn at a food show to see whether there was any demand for a product like ours. It turned out to be a great success and we sold out in just two days. That’s when we realised we had a business opportunity. Four months later we launched in Selfridges and Joe & Seph’s was born. We now have a range of more than 50 flavours of popcorn and ten caramel sauces, and our products are stocked by some of the best retailers, cinemas, airlines and hotels all over the world, which is really exciting. We’re growing quickly and my younger

brother has also recently joined the family business as we continue with our mission to create the best-tasting popcorn in the world. f Find out more, see recipes and shop the range at joeandsephs.co.uk

Photograph by ###

EFORE STARTING JOE & Seph’s I worked at Dixons as a retail consultant, and prior to that I was a consultant at Deloitte. I’m very much from a corporate background, but I was constantly getting itchy feet with my job and was looking to move to something new and exciting. At the time, my dad was always travelling back and forth to America on business, and used to bring back this amazing flavoured popcorn as a gift for friends and family. He’d always fancied himself as a bit of a chef and started experimenting with some flavour combinations in the family kitchen (burning a few pans in the process). They turned out to be pretty tasty. And what’s more, we started to realise there was


Lee Kum Kee Europe


WEAPONS OF CHOICE The food mixer, indoor herb garden and steamer you need in your kitchen right now PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID HARRISON

20


GET IT IN T HE M IX E R Photograph by ###

KITCHENAID ARTISAN STAND MIXER BLACK TIE, £849 KitchenAid’s design classic gets a Batman-like colour upgrade, decked out in stylish matte black. kitchenaid.co.uk

21


G R OW T H B USINE SS SEED PANTRY GROW POD, £35 Seed Pantry’s innovative Grow Pods are built to provide fresh herbs in your kitchen, and even come with an automated system that reminds you when to water. seedpantry.co.uk

22


HOT AND ST E AM Y MORPHY RICHARDS INTELLISTEAM COMPACT, £79.99 An easy-to-use appliance that’ll put the precision into steaming healthy meals, with digital controls and a keep-warm drawer, too. lakeland.co.uk

23


D O L C E

S T I L

N O V O

Dolce Stil Novo by Smeg offers a complete collection of premium cooking appliances featuring exclusive nero vista black glass aesthetics with a choice of copper or steel detailing. Leading technology ranging from touch control pyrolitic ovens through to wine coolers, steam ovens, downdraft extractors and revolutionary new hobs complete the range.

Flagship Store - 14 Regent St. St James’s, London

www.smeglondon.com


Recipes

THE HEART OF THE MATTER PERUVIAN CUISINE GETS A HEARTY UPDATE IN MARTIN MORALES’ NEW COOKBOOK, SHOWING THAT IT CAN COMPETE WITH US ON THAT FRONT, TOO

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID LOFTUS

G

IVEN THE PERCEPTION that exists around the ever-popular Peruvian cuisine – one of light, zingy ceviches, simply barbecued meats and grain salads – it’s notable how many times the word ‘hearty’ crops up in chef Martin Morales’ descriptions of dishes in his new cookbook, Andina: The Heart of Peruvian Food. When you see the recipes we’ve previewed here, you’ll understand why: creamy mashes, a grain and cream pudding, and an Austrianinspired strudel-like dish make for some perfect comfort food as autumn draws in.

What’s more, they’re not an attempt at some kind of Peruvian-European fusion, either; as with pretty much all of the recipes in Morales’ new book, they’re dishes that have existed for decades or centuries in the Andean part of Peru, and the eclectic elements are the results of cultural exchange in the country in that time. As the man behind the Ceviche and Andina restaurants, Morales has been instrumental in getting London engaged with Peruvian cuisine. Here, he shows its aptitude for rich comfort food, too. f

FOLLOW US @FOODISMUK

FOODISMUK

F O O DIS M R E C IPE S, IN ASSOC IAT ION W IT H SM E G

Photograph by ###

Whether you’re searching for a new built-in oven, a fully equipped range cooker, that statement fridge or a stand mixer perfect for some home baking, premium Italian appliance manufacturer Smeg offers the full range and so much more. Now, you can pop in to its stunning new London flagship store at 14 Regent St in

St James’s to explore the range. The beautiful cooking appliances on show, as well as Italian produce available to buy from Smeg’s family Parmiggiano-Reggiano cheese farm and a purpose-built demonstration theatre nestled in the store’s basement, make it a haven for foodies. smeglondon.com

25


CLICK

FOODISM.CO.UK

Martin Morales’

PESQUE DE QUINUA

CREAMY AND INDULGENT, THIS TWIST ON A RISOTTO, MADE WITH QUINOA, QUESO FRESCO AND CHEDDAR, MAKES A PERFECT STARTER OR SIDE

TIME

Preparation ◆◆ 5 mins

Cooking

◆◆ 20 mins

Serves ◆◆ 4

U

BIQUITOUS IN THE Peruvian food we’ve come to know and love, quinoa is put to delicious use in this savoury rice pudding. “I’d heard about this dish, but it was at Huancahuasi Restaurant in Huancayo that I first tried it.” says Morales. “It’s a quinotto-style dish, only creamier and more indulgent.”

Method

ING R E DIE NTS ◆◆ 4 tbsp olive oil

◆◆ 1 large onion, very finely

chopped or grated

◆◆ 4 garlic cloves, crushed ◆◆ ½ tsp cumin

◆◆ 100g white quinoa, cooked ◆◆ 200g single cream or

evaporated milk

◆◆ 200g queso fresco or feta,

cubed

◆◆ 100g cheddar cheese

◆◆ A handful of mint leaves,

finely chopped ◆◆ Salt and freshly ground black

pepper

26

1 Preheat a grill to its highest setting. 2 Heat the olive oil in an ovenproof saucepan on a medium heat. Add the onion and sauté until softened and lightly golden, about 7-8 minutes. 3 Add the garlic and cumin and cook for 2-3 minutes more until the garlic has softened but not browned. 4 Add the quinoa and the cream or evaporated milk to the pan. Stir to combine and season with salt and pepper. Reduce the heat to low and simmer very gently for around 5 minutes, then add the cheese, folding the cubes through the quinoa mixture. Once the cheese has heated through, remove the pan from the heat. 5 Sprinkle the cheddar over the quinoa mixture and put the pan under the preheated grill until the cheese turns golden brown and is bubbling. Top with the mint leaves. f


Martin Morales’

PIE DE ALCACHOFAS

AS WE COME INTO AUTUMN, PIES ARE BACK ON THE AGENDA. HERE’S AN ANDEAN-INSPIRED ONE WITH A FILLING YOU MIGHT NOT HAVE THOUGHT OF ING R E DIE NTS ◆◆ 3 tbsp olive oil

◆◆ ½ red onion, finely chopped

◆◆ 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped ◆◆ 2 tbsp flour ◆◆ 200ml milk

◆◆ 2 tbsp breadcrumbs

◆◆ 3 tbsp parmesan cheese,

grated

◆◆ 2 eggs, beaten

◆◆ 12 artichoke hearts, roughly

chopped

◆◆ 1 egg, beaten, for wash ◆◆ Salt and freshly ground black

pepper

For the pastry ◆◆ 200g plain flour, plus extra

for rolling

◆◆ 90g butter

◆◆ Pinch of salt ◆◆ 1 egg yolk

◆◆ 75ml iced water

P

TIME

Preparation

◆◆ 40 mins

Cooking

◆◆ 60 mins

Serves

◆◆ 6-8

EOPLE IN THE Andes love a good pie as it’s portable and can be eaten cold or hot,” says Morales. “You can find these in bakeries and cafés there, made with artichoke or chard.” While this is inspired by a Peruvian classic, the pastry recipe and the method are very much transferable, so you can try out some of your own variants, too.

Method

1 First, make the pastry. Rub together the flour and butter with the pinch of salt until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs, then work in the egg yolk and cold water. 2 When you have a smooth dough,

wrap it up in cling film and put it in the fridge to chill for 30 minutes. 3 Meanwhile, make the pie filling. Heat the olive oil in a deep-sided pan over a low heat. Add the onion and sauté until soft and translucent, then add the garlic and cook for a further 2-3 minutes to soften. 4 Add the flour and stir until it has combined with the olive oil, then gradually incorporate the milk in the same way as making a béchamel. When all the milk is incorporated, allow the liquid to simmer for 10 minutes to thicken, stirring often. 5 Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the artichokes, breadcrumbs, cheese and eggs. Season well with salt

and pepper and set aside to cool. 6 Preheat the oven to 180°C. Remove the pastry from the fridge and divide it into 2 pieces, one slightly larger than the other. Roll out the larger piece on a lightly floured surface and use it to line a 22-23cm round pie dish. Add the filling, then brush the exposed rim of pastry with the egg wash. 7 Roll out the remaining piece of pastry and use it to cover the pie. Crimp the edges and cut a couple of slashes in the centre of the pie crust, to allow steam to escape. Brush well with the remaining egg wash. 8 Bake in the oven for 40-45 minutes until the crust is a deep golden brown and the filling is piping hot. f

27


Martin Morales’

SANGO CON ADOBO

DUCK LEGS ARE A FOIL FOR THIS RICH, CREAMY FREEKEH MASH AND FIERY ADOBO DE PATO SAUCE

TIME

Preparation

◆◆ 120 mins

Cooking

◆◆ 120 mins

Serves

◆◆ 4

S

ANGO IS AN ancient dish once eaten in the southern Andes – today, it has mostly been replaced by rice,” Morales says of this creamy Peruvian mash. This version is made with freekeh. “It’s sweet and hearty, which makes it suitable as a dessert, but it is also a great accompaniment to any rich, savoury stew. Here, I’ve paired it with traditional stewed duck.”

Method

THE TASTE OF ITALY www.smeguk.com

www.smeglondon.com

1 First, make the marinade. Put all the ingredients in a large bowl, whisk together and season with plenty of salt. Add the duck legs to the marinade bowl. Cover, place in the fridge and leave to marinate for 2 hours. 2 Heat the olive oil in a large, deepsided frying pan or casserole. Remove the duck legs from the marinade and pat dry, reserving the sauce. Sear the duck legs until the skin is a deep golden brown all over and much of the fat has rendered out, about 3-4 minutes on each side. Remove the duck from the pan and set aside. 3 Strain off the fat from the pan and add the onion. Fry for 7-8 minutes

28

GET THE BOOK FRESH

Andina: The Heart of Peruvian Food by Martin Morales out now, published by Quadrille, £27. Buy on amazon.co.uk.

PASTA MADE EASY

www.smeglondon.com


until lightly coloured and softened, then add the chilli paste, oregano, bay leaves, cider and chicken stock. Season, return the duck to the pan, reduce the heat and simmer for 1-1½ hours until the duck is tender. 4 To make the sango, rinse the freekeh thoroughly, then put it in a saucepan and toast on a medium heat until aromatic. Pour in 200ml water, bring to the boil and season with salt. Reduce the heat to very low, cover and simmer until the freekeh is cooked and the water has been absorbed, about 20 minutes. 5 In a separate saucepan, melt the butter over a medium heat, then stir in the flour to create a paste. Continue to cook until the flour has had a chance

to cook out, about 3-4 minutes, then add the sugar and milk. 6 Reduce the heat and whisk until the sugar has dissolved and the sauce is smooth. Tip in the cooked freekeh and the cheese. Season with a little salt and pepper, then cook gently, stirring continuously, until the sauce has thickened and the cheese has melted, about 10 minutes. Remove from the heat. 7 Remove the duck from its cooking liquor and keep warm. Boil the contents of the pan until the liquid has reduced to a syrupy sauce – about 5 minutes. To serve, divide the sango between 4 plates or shallow bowls. Top with the duck and drizzle over sauce. Top with the peanuts and raisins. f

ING R E DIE NTS ◆◆ 4 duck legs, pricked all over ◆◆ 1 tbsp olive oil

◆◆ 2 onions, finely chopped or

grated

◆◆ 50g panca chilli paste ◆◆ 1 tsp dried oregano ◆◆ 6 bay leaves

◆◆ 100ml dry cider

◆◆ 500ml chicken stock ◆◆ Salt and freshly ground black

pepper

For the marinade ◆◆ 100ml orange juice

◆◆ 4 garlic cloves, crushed ◆◆ 1 tsp cumin

For the sango ◆◆ 100g freekeh ◆◆ 50g butter

THE TASTE OF ITALY www.smeguk.com

Photograph by ###

www.smeglondon.com

◆◆ 50g plain flour

FRESH PASTA MADE EASY

◆◆ 50g palm sugar or light soft

brown sugar

◆◆ 250ml milk

◆◆ 50g queso fresco or feta,

crumbled

◆◆ 1 tbsp peanuts, lightly

chopped

◆◆ 1 tbsp raisins, soaked in a

little hot water

www.smeglondon.com 29


Martin Morales’

SHTRUKALA DE OXAPAMPA

A GERMANIC DESSERT DONE THE PERUVIAN WAY, WITH BANANA, PLANTAIN AND A RICH CARAMEL SAUCE MADE WITH SUGARCANE-BASED CHANCACA SYRUP

I N GREDI EN TS For the filling ◆◆ 15g butter

◆◆ 1 small ripe plantain, peeled

and finely diced

◆◆ 1 medium-large banana,

peeled and mashed

◆◆ 75g mascarpone ◆◆ 2 eggs

◆◆ Cream or ice cream, to serve

S

EE A FAMILIAR resemblance in this dish? “‘Andina strudel?’ I hear you cry,” says Morales. “Yes, it’s possible: thanks to migration from Austria and Germany to the Pasco region many decades ago, we have this sticky, mysterious and dramatic dessert. Try it with plantain or any kind of banana.”

For the pastry ◆◆ 35g white quinoa flour ◆◆ 50g gram flour

◆◆ 150g gluten-free flour ◆◆ 125g butter, softened ◆◆ 50g icing sugar

◆◆ 25g muscovado sugar ◆◆ 3 separate egg yolks

For the plaintain

Method

◆◆ 1 small green plantain, peeled ◆◆ 1 cinnamon stick

◆◆ 3 star anise pods

◆◆ ½ tsp bicarbonate of soda

For the butterscotch ◆◆ 150g caster sugar ◆◆ 50g butter

◆◆ 100ml chancaca syrup

TIME

Preparation

◆◆ 30 mins

Cooking

◆◆ 60 mins

Serves

◆◆ 6-8

30

1 Make the pastry. Mix all the flours together in a bowl. In a separate bowl, beat together the butter and sugars until soft and mousse-like. Add one egg yolk to the creamed butter and sugar, then a spoonful of flour mixture and stir to incorporate. Repeat for the remaining egg yolks, alternating with flour each time. Add the remaining flour, stir to combine and form into a

soft ball. Wrap in clingfilm and chill until needed. 2 For the filling, melt the butter in a small frying pan on a low heat. Add the diced plantain and fry, stirring regularly, for 4-5 minutes, until the plantain is lightly golden brown. Remove from the heat and allow to cool. Transfer to a food processor, add the banana and blitz to a purée. Add the mascarpone and eggs and blitz again to a smooth, pourable mixture. 3 Cut the green plantain in half, put the halves in a saucepan and cover with water. Add the cinnamon stick and star anise and bring to the boil. Add the bicarbonate of soda, then reduce the heat and simmer for about 15 minutes, until just al dente. Drain, and slice the plantain into thin rings. 4 To make the butterscotch, melt the sugar in a heavy-based saucepan on a medium heat, shaking so that it covers the base evenly and resisting the urge to stir. Once the melted sugar has turned a light golden brown (about 6-7 minutes), reduce the heat, then add the butter. Whisk into a smooth sauce, and add the chancaca syrup. Whisk again to a caramel. Set aside. 5 Preheat the oven to 170°C. Take a 23cm ovenproof skillet or shallow nonstick tin. Pour in the butterscotch in an even layer, then top with the plantain slices and cover with the banana purée. Roll out the pastry, placing it on top of the filling to completely cover it, tucking the edges down slightly. Cut a couple of slits in the dough. 6 Bake in the oven for 30 minutes, or until the pastry is cooked and golden brown. Turn the tart out onto a large serving plate and serve cut into slices with single cream or ice cream. f


V I C T O R I A

Victoria range cookers from Smeg offer the perfect balance between traditional styling, solid build quality and award winning cooking performance. Choose from a slection of sizes, formats, fuels and colours to bring your kitchen to life. Victoria cookers. Passionate about tradition.

Flagship Store - 14 Regent St. St James’s, London

www.smeglondon.com


CLICK

FOODISM.CO.UK

Richard H Turner

THE POWER OF THE PLANT As a butcher, steakhouse supremo and author of carnivorous cookbooks, Richard H Turner isn’t going to tell you eat more plants and less meat. Is he?

W

HAT WOULD YOU say if I told you I knew an easy way to lower your body mass index, cholesterol and blood pressure; reduce your risk of coronary artery disease, stroke, diabetes and colorectal cancer; help you lose weight; reduce the number of medications you need to treat chronic diseases, and lower ischemic heart disease mortality rates? And what if I – a butcher, a chef, an author of meaty books and the chap

32

behind Meatopia – told you the secret was a plant-based diet? You’d probably think I’d lost the plot. But as it happens, I’m a bit of a closet vegetarian and eat little meat at home. There, I’ve said it. Okay, maybe I’m a bad vegetarian – my diet is more akin to what is becoming known as ‘plant based’. I first came across this idea on a health retreat in Thailand, where my physio would regale me with his eating habits while pulverising my particularly disobedient muscles, (such as they are). He had managed to combine Ironman competitions with a semivegetarian diet, eating mostly vegetables with very occasional chicken and fish. The idea that a man of a similar age to myself could compete at this level, without large amounts of bioavailable (easily accessed) protein, fascinated me. I consequently set out to research plant-based diets and then adjusted my own eating habits accordingly. And it seems I’m not alone. At the turn of the millennium it was estimated that 4 billion people live primarily on a plantbased diet, or roughly two thirds of the planet. As a species, we have evolved as opportunistic eaters, subsisting on this plant-based diet, supplemented with fish and meat when possible. So, what exactly is a plant-based diet? In essence, it’s a diet of foods derived from plants, including vegetables, whole grains, legumes and fruits, but with few animal products. The use of the phrase

‘plant-based diet’ has changed over time, and examples can be found of the phrase being used as a euphemism for vegetarianism or veganism. It was originally adopted to take emphasis off the word vegan; at the time often associated with being too extreme a position, based exclusively in animal rights, rather than a health rationale. Here I prefer to use the phrase ‘plant-based diet’ in its truest sense, to refer to diets including varying degrees of animal products. I’m defining ‘plant-based diets’ as, for example, diets that

I’M SO CONVINCED THIS IS THE WAY FORWARD THAT MY FUTURE PLANS WILL LIKELY LEAN TOWARDS PLANTBASED CONCEPTS


OPEN SEASON SE ASONAL PR ODUC E AND W HE R E TO F IND I T This month, chef, writer and sustainable food hero Tom Hunt gives the low-down on beetroot, which is in season from July until January

include generous amounts of plant foods and limited amounts of animal foods, and as diets rich in a variety of vegetables and fruits, legumes, and minimally processed starchy staple foods and limiting red meat consumption. There’s a clear distinction between ‘plant-based’ and ‘plant-only’. As an ethically minded consumer, I’m alarmed and somewhat embarrassed by our animal protein consumption, and I have more to lose here than anyone, having built a career on it. However, there is more to this than one’s health. As a restaurateur and butcher, I’m all too aware of the prices of properly, ethically reared meat and fish, and they are only going one way. The truth is, we cannot continue to eat meat and fish at the rate we are currently consuming it. The options are clear; either we eat the intensively farmed, unethically reared meat and fish that we know are ultimately unhealthy for us, or we return to valuing protein as a bit part player in our food – an occasional treat – much as our ancestors did. I’m so convinced this is the way forward, albeit perhaps some way off, that my future plans will almost certainly lean towards plantbased concepts. I am, however, only part way in my journey. As a butcher and chef I still taste meat almost daily as part of my work life, but in my own time plant-based is what I want to eat, and every year I travel to Asia where I gorge on ‘healthy’ plants in an attempt to balance out a year’s meat sampling. In fact, while you’re reading this I’ll be back on that physio’s table in Thailand, with aching muscles and a body that’s survived on little but vegetables for a week. And feeling all the better for it. f When he’s not gorging on vegetables and having his muscles pounded by physios, Richard is a butcher, a chef and an author (often about meat). ‘Prime: The Beef Cookbook’ is out now (Octopus)

Beetroot is a stout, rotund hero of the soil. When roasted, it is one of my favorite things. Candy-sweet and sticky, with natural fruit molasses, it’s no wonder that beetroot also works so well in desserts and marries with monstrously dark chocolate. The common deep red and magenta coloured beetroot is gorgeous in its own right, but there are many interesting and beautiful varieties to be discovered, from candy stripes of white and red to golden, yellow, and pink. Buy beetroots with fresh green leaves. The leaves taste good, are nutritious, and should always be eaten. They deteriorate more quickly than the

THE URBAN GARDENER

Petersham Nurseries’ Amanda Brame tells us how to make use of a small city garden. Here’s what you should be doing in late autumn

root, so remove them when you get home, give them a good wash to remove any grit, and store in a bag in the refrigerator. Sauté these greens in the same way as chard or kale, adding spices and lemon for an exotic twist to a vegetable classic. The roots can be stored at room temperature. Beetroots lose more than 25 percent of their folate when cooked; eating them raw will preserve this brain compound, grated into salads with nuts and seeds, or neatly sliced with goat’s cheese or hummus. The Natural Cook by Tom Hunt is available now (Quadrille, £20). For more on Tom and his food projects, see tomsfeast.com

This is a good time for maintenance, too. Head online to see how to get your garden in shape for next year. Amanda Brame is deputy head of horticulture at Petersham Nurseries; petershamnurseries.com. Read the column in full at fdsm.co/columns

With winter on the horizon, there’s not much left to sow or plant. That said, garlic likes a cold spell before it has -a growth spurt in springtime. It’s very easy to grow: use a 35-40cm-deep container, buy specially prepared bulbs and split them into cloves, planting each one at 2.5cm deep and 15-18cm apart. By spring time, when the leaves have started to turn yellow and collapse, take the bulbs out and leave them in the sun to dry out. If you have a sheltered spot you could grow a container of peas. Sow the seeds inside to germinate before hardening off and planting outside. Keep some horticultural fleece handy to throw over in case of cold nights. With luck, this will give you some fresh tips to harvest around Christmas.

33


CLICK

FOODISM.CO.UK

AT THE TABLE...

After heading up the three-Michelin-starred Restaurant Gordon Ramsay, hopes for Clare Smyth’s first solo venture are high. David J Constable gets the lowdown 34


C

LARE SMYTH HAS been, without doubt, one of the most influential chefs in London over the past decade. She has worked in international kitchens under Gordon Ramsay, Alain Ducasse and Thomas Keller, and she also happens to be the first and only woman ever to run a restaurant with three Michelin stars. The opening of her first solo restaurant, Core by Clare Smyth, has been a long journey, but having opened its doors in August, Smyth is now up and running, ready to do things her way; from supporting and working with the best British suppliers to creating her own playlist. For one of the country’s most acclaimed chefs, it’s time to go it alone, and she’s setting her sights extremely high.

Tell us about Core and the new menu It’s actually a very simple menu. It’s 12 courses and everything is produced or grown locally. As a chef I have a responsibility towards sustainability and working with the seasons, but it’s more than that. I want to use the best British suppliers, not just ingredients, but support British craftsmanship too. The furniture, plates, silverware, art, candles, and even the products that we use to clean the floor with, are all British. This is something that’s very important to me. I want Core to be proudly British, but it’s about having fun as well. It’s fine dining but without any of the pretentiousness.

And what about the bar? The bar is great. It’s very much an open-door policy. We have a small snack menu with the likes of jellied eel and smoked duck wing. We also serve an all-British ingredient negroni which we call Blake’s Negroni after Charles Henry Blake (1794-1872) who was a trader and property developer and donated the site for 92 Kensington Park Road (formerly Edwardian town houses) as well as St Peter’s Church, which is next door.

Working with the best of British sounds like good preparation for Brexit…

Photograph by John Carey

No one knows what’s going to happen with Brexit, although I’m sure it’ll greatly affect the hospitality industry. For me, it’s about using the best produce and knowing where it comes from. Our chickens are from a free-range poultry farm (St Bride’s) and we use Colchester crabs. Scallops are from The Ethical Shellfish Company on the Isle of Mull and the grouse is also Scottish. Our potatoes come from Sussex (Hayselden Potatoes). The flour is from Wessex Mill. All of the flowers and floristry is by Lizzie Powell at Early

Hours. And the lamb, skate, oysters, squid, eels, pears, cabbage, carrots are all from within the UK. Jonny (Jonny Bone, Core’s head chef ) and I visited the producers and we know them all personally; they’re part of the Core family. I’m a big believer in looking after your own community and supporting one another. It’s not about being smart or gimmicky. I want to use the best ingredients and know exactly where they come from.

You’re known for Michelin-starred cooking, but the Core website describes the restaurant as “informal dining”. What can guests expect? Core is a relaxed environment. Visiting a restaurant should be a fun experience. A lot of our guests visit for a night out, they want to eat and drink and laugh. There’s no dress code and we don’t have white tablecloths, but there is a small footstool for people to rest their bags on. We’re in Notting Hill after all, and if someone has spent £1,000 on a handbag then they don’t want to put it on the floor. And the music is all my choosing. So it’s Dolly Parton, Dusty Springfield, Michael Jackson, U2 and The Rolling Stones. I guess it’s not to everyone’s taste, but a lot of guests have said how much they like the music.

Are you trying for another three stars? I’d be lying if I said no. I know what it is to have and keep three stars and it’s a lot of work and a huge amount of pressure. What I really want is a clean and celebratory menu, a menu with a message. I want to source and celebrate Britishness. It’s not a trend thing, there’s no fusion cooking or throwing something on the menu because it’s what’s expected. Chicken skin with clams and caviar is probably the most cheffy-thing on the menu, but it remains all locally sourced. I

WHY SO SERIOUS

When she’s not in the kitchen at Core by Clare Smyth, the chef is also an ambassador for appliance brand KitchenAid’s Serious About Food campaign, alongside such luminaries as Grant Pierrus, Edd Kimber, and Denmark’s Henrik Jyrk. The collective is made up of chefs, experts and innovators who sum up KitchenAid’s attitude to food and lifestyle. Find out more and see recipes, trends and articles at kitchenaid.co.uk/ serious-about-food

was influenced by French cooking – everyone working in fine dining is but that doesn’t mean I’m going to import ingredients. The French created fine dining and for them it’s a cultural thing. Food is thought of differently in the UK, but we’re starting to recognise how important it is and celebrate our heritage.

Give us an example of something celebratory and British on the menu My family are potato farmers in Northern Ireland. I grew up eating potatoes and would scavenge for dulse along the coast. I always eat a potato before service, plain with a little salt and pepper. It’s sort of a ritual. The Charlotte potato on the menu is served with dulse beurre blanc, herring and trout roe. It’s a beautiful dish. The humble potato has centre stage. It’s more than a side dish or accompaniment. I don’t think you need to use posh ingredients for the sake of it. I think it’s about perspective. A single potato or carrot is just as valuable as a scallop. The lamb-braised carrot is another example.

What lessons have you learnt from running your own restaurant? I put my own money into this restaurant. It’s not backed by an oligarch or Richard Caring. Everything’s on the line. I employ 35 people. That’s a great feeling, but it’s also constant pressure. My reputation has helped me get to where I am, but that doesn’t mean much now. The planning, the layout, the business plan was all designed by me. I actually didn’t have anyone else working on the project until three months before opening. I have to make it work; for me, for them, for the producers and suppliers I now employ. Core is about the people, all of the people. It stands for new beginnings, with strong ties to nature. f Core by Clare Smyth, 92 Kensington Park Road, W11 2PN; corebyclaresmyth.com

35


BITE-SIZED

FOODISM.CO.UK/ NEWSLETTER

Dining

F OR Z A WI N

NOVEMBER

Trending

PASTAIO

DRINKING

NOVEMBER

GRAZING

Nothing says comfort food quite like freshly made pasta, which is why we can’t wait for Stevie Parle’s new restaurant to land on Ganton Street – a first opening right in central London. Serving up simple, seasonal dishes based around hand-made pasta (and that ’nduja and honey sandwich), it might just be the most anticipated opening of 2017. And that’s not just because of the teaser shots of their delicious-looking dishes we’ve been peeping on Instagram. WIF 9BN; pastaio.london

DINING TRENDING

THE RADAR We take you through the best new bar and restaurant openings from now until the middle of November Grazing

P LAT E

NOW

Marmite: you either love it or hate it. That is, until Arnaud Stevens gets his hands on the stuff, sticks it in his bread and slathers it in beetroot butter. Then, it’s the best thing you’ve ever tasted. Where can you find this combo, you ask? Head to Stevens’ new restaurant and bakery in Shoreditch’s M by Montcalm Hotel to taste it yourself. EC1V 1JH; platecatering.co.uk

Dining

HOVARDA

NOVEMBER

Trending

DAB BAWAL A

NOVEMBER

If the recent news about Jamavar’s first Michelin star wasn’t exciting enough, then get ready, because Samyukta Nair and Rohit Ghai – the co-founder and executive chef behind this regional Indian restaurant on Mount Street – have just announced that they’re about to launch a sister restaurant. Inspired by the food and tiffin culture of modern Mumbai, Dabbawala is due to open its doors this November. W1S 2PA; thedabbawala.uk

Dining

R OC HE L L E CANT E E N OCTOBER

From Shoreditch to St James’s, this month Margot Henderson and Melanie Arnold bring their much loved nose-to-tail eating to the Institute of Contemporary Arts. Inspired by ICA’s exhibitions and the seasons, the menu will feature the likes of braised cuttlefish and fennel, pheasant and trotter pie, and pig’s head to share. SW1Y 5AH; ica.art

36

It’s a metamorphosis of sorts for Peckham’s much-loved supper club Forza Win, which, after closing for October, will re-open as a fully fledged restaurant from November. Win-win. SE15 3SN; forzawin.com

Greece meets Turkey in this Aegean-inspired restaurant from the group behind Yosma. Expect a large open kitchen and a dailychanging seafoodforward menu rounded off with an extensive drinks list. W1D 6DN hovarda.london

Dining

YEN

NOVEMBER

This autumn, Paris comes to London in the from of Yen, a Japanese fine-dining restaurant specialising in buckwheat soba noodles. WC2R 3DX; yen-london.co.uk


C

E

B R ATI E N L

The

P

O

I

SI

T GOES WITHOUT saying that we love good food and drink at foodism. But we especially love good food and drink that has the potential to effect change for the better. It’s not just that eating and drinking sustainably and ethically is good for the planet. It’s that it results in what we’ve been striving for since our first issue: better food and drink, and a better system of venues, businesses and producers making it. That’s the reason why we felt strongly enough about the people doing great things in sustainable food and social enterprising in London and beyond to devote a whole issue of our magazine to telling their stories. So when we were choosing a way to reward those venues and businesses that make London so special, we could think

38

100 G

E

IN ASSOCIATION WITH

G

TIV

E CH

AN

WE LOVE IT WHEN GOOD FOOD AND DRINK EFFECTS POSITIVE CHANGE

of nothing better than to focus on those businesses who do good things in food and drink. From the best restaurants with a sustainable edge to the cafés who are helping coffee farmers earn a fair wage, the social enterprises giving people a much-needed second chance and the street-food traders changing the way fast food impacts the environment, these awards represent the cream of the crop in London’s sustainable and ethical food and drink scene. The foodism 100, in association with Southern Comfort, will be a shortlist of 100, of which ten category winners will be revealed at an event in the new year. If you work in the industry or you think your favourite hangout should be in there, get nominating! f Find out more at fdsm.co/100


THE AWARDS SHOW OFF THE CREAM OF THE CROP

HOW TO ENTER

Think your business – or your favourite local joint – should be considered for the foodism 100? Head to fdsm.co/100 to submit your nomination, or shout about your favourite venue or business on social media using #foodism100 and tell them why they should enter. Nominations close on 10 November, after which our panel will review the entries, and we’ll announce the final 100 online on 27 November. The ten category winners will be announced at an event on 25 January.

CATEGORIES

Photograph by Eugene Mymrin

BES T CA SU A L RE STAUR ANT  »  BE ST FIN E-D I NIN G RE STAUR ANT  »  BES T BAR »  B E S T PUB  »  BE ST CAFÉ  »  BE ST PO P -UP OR RE SID ENCY »  BE ST S T RE E T-F OOD TRA DER  »  BE ST FOOD M A RKE T »  B E S T SO CI AL ENT ER P R I SE »  PO S I T I V E CHA N G E H E R O 39


ecome Enchanted by her Spirit


IN BLACK, EVERYTHING TURNS OUTRAGEOUSLY BOLD.

Black soybeans fettuccini with glazed salmon eggs on lava stone plate.

COME AND

VISIT US

IN STORE

KitchenAid London 98 Wigmore Street, London, W1U 3RN

Tel 020 7935 2575

KITCHENAID INTRODUCES

BLACK STEEL

ITS NEW DARK STAINLESS STEEL COLLECTION. Be bold like your cooking passion. KitchenAid will be there with its new top performing built-in appliances in black stainless steel with PrintShieldâ„¢ system. The unique performance of KitchenAid appliances for a matchless cooking passion. Discover the power of audacity.

www.kitchenaidlondon.co.uk


— PART 2 —

FEAST “THE HORN OF PLENTY LOOKS LIKE A KIND OF MINIATURE SOOTY TRUMPET AND IS FOUND FROM LATE SUMMER TO EARLY WINTER” GARETH MAY GETS TO GRIPS WITH MUSHROOMS, 069

044 CHEFS’ HOME COOKING SECRETS | 052 RUTH ROGERS 058 GREAT CHAINS | 063 FOOD FIXERS | 074 MIXOLOGY: COUPETTE


BY THE BOOK

Even in the age of Instagram, the way we cook at home is both influenced and documented by the authors of cookery books. So who better to turn to for inspiration and speedy kitchen hacks? ILLUSTRATION BY MARIA CORTE

44


Photograph by ###

45


SABRINA GHAYOUR

The spice-loving cookbook author on ramping up flavour with ease

I use herbs and spices in a way that most people don’t tend to in everyday cooking. From breakfast right through to a midnight snack, I raid my cupboards for all manner of spices and exotics, and add them to everything from toast and porridge to pastas, salads and even simple crudités. I absolutely don’t hold back and always season things with the confidence that they will turn out well – the secret is knowing that I like the flavours I am adding. Breakfast can often be a slice of toast with butter or a yogurt and feta spread. With butter, I add honey and spice in the form of chilli flakes or a generous sprinkle of ground cinnamon. With the feta spread and yogurt combo, I turn to dried herbs like oregano, thyme, marjoram, za’atar, and then layer it with olive oil, salt, pepper, nigella seeds and chilli flakes. Pasta is a staple and while I respect the classic Italian recipes, I sometimes crave something a little different. I’ve been known to combine a little feta with dill, coriander or chives and add some chilli flakes and a little lemon zest. I’m all for using what you have at home to avoid buying more than you need and fresh herbs and spices are simple and affordable ways to pack flavours into humble dishes. Herbs also end up in a lot of my drinks and even desserts. It’s about understanding which flavours work well together, like mint and dill in lemonade; rosemary and citrus; thyme and pears, figs and apples; and coriander with mangoes, pineapples and more exotic fruit. Confidence in the kitchen is everything. Follow your instinct and listen to your hunger and it will give you the confidence to be more adventurous in the kitchen. Feasts by Sabrina Ghayour is out now (Mitchell Beazley, £20); octopusbooks.co.uk

46

ANNA JONES

The seasonally minded chef on trading meat for vegetables without losing out on flavour For me, the focus when you are cutting down on anything should be on what you can eat and not what you can’t. The vibrancy and variety of eating without meat inspires me and my cooking with every meal. Without meat, you have to layer flavour and texture in a more thoughtful way, which results in a more exciting way to cook, in my opinion. It doesn’t have to be complicated or timeconsuming – it can be as easy as some lemon zest on a salad or some roasted nuts or seeds to top a soup. Think about the pillars of flavour every time you cook: sweetness; acidity; spice or heat from chilli; earthy flavours from roots of mushrooms. Each dish should have one of those elements as well as some interesting different textures. Eating with veg at the centre of your plate allows you to cook with the seasons, too, making it cheaper and friendlier to the world. The Modern Cook’s Year by Anna Jones is out now (4th Estate, £26); 4thestate.co.uk


ED SMITH

The food writer and blogger, aka Rocket & Squash, on the importance of getting excited about side dishes

Photographs by (Anna Jones) Matt Russell; (Ed Smith) Joe Woodhouse

IT’S ABOUT COOKING IN THE RIGHT WAY, OR IF IN DOUBT, ADDING BACON

It’s too easy to forget about sides and leave them to the last minute – and that’s a mistake, as they have the potential to be the best part of a meal. In fact, when it comes to British ‘meat and two veg’, the sides take up most of the plate, so it seems pretty negligent to only ever (over)cook the same, bland things. With On the Side, I wanted to create a resource that helped people avoid this – both by showing that sides can actually be an inspiring starting point when planning dinner, and by providing an extensive directory showing which sides go with what mains. Favourite autumnal recipes from the book include things like a sweet potato, celeriac and porcini bake, and charred romanesco broccoli (and its leaves) with a piquant dressing. They’re both ridiculously moreish and easily go well with loads of different things. Often it’s a case of adding an additional texture (some garlic and anchovy breadcrumbs or toasted nuts) or increasing depth of flavour (by scattering with fresh herbs, braising tough vegetables in appropriate booze, or finishing with a glug of browned butter). Sometimes it’s just about taking a vegetable that you might not otherwise be drawn to and cooking it the right way. Or, if in doubt, just adding bacon. At the end of the day, the best side dishes are ‘awesome’ because of the context they’re served in; they will ensure the meal is greater than the sum of its parts. On the Side by Ed Smith, is out now (published by Bloomsbury, £20); bloomsbury.com

– Cookery writer Ed Smith on making side dishes sing 47


TIM HAYWARD

The kitchenware king on learning to love your pots and pans

JOHN GREGORY-SMITH

The Middle Eastern food specialist on how to build the perfect bespoke spice collection Having the basics is essential; ground cumin, ground coriander, turmeric and chilli powder. This feisty foursome can be used to flavour almost anything and you can buy them everywhere. For more developed tastes, ingredients like saffron, sumac, smoked paprika, allspice, cinnamon and nutmeg are fantastic. I’m really into Middle Eastern and North African cookery, so I always have an arsenal of spice blends and pastes that I can sprinkle, stir and slather onto anything. Harissa is an incredible Moroccan chilli paste. It’s fantastic rubbed onto chicken or fish, or served at the table to add an extra kick to your dinner. Ras el hanout, a blend of 20-30 spices including cinnamon and rose petals, gives so much depth to tagines. A zesty mix of sumac, thyme or oregano and sesame seeds, za’atar is another great one to have at home. It’s a wonderful rub, or mixed with oil, it’s a great dip for fresh bread. Dukka is a North African blend of spices and toasted hazelnuts that’s delicious sprinkled over roasted vegetables or hummus. And finally, baharat is a woody blend of paprika, cloves, nutmeg and cardamom, great with lamb. Finally, not spices, but perfect for the larder, are tangy barberries that can be used to bejewel rice, dried limes to scent stews, pomegranate molasses to dress salads, and rose water to add perfume to creamy desserts. Orange Blossom & Honey is out now (Kyle Books, £19.99); kylebooks.com. Photography by Martin Poole and Alan Keohane

48

BORING, USELESS KITCHEN TOOLS DON’T SURVIVE FOR LONG

– Tim Hayward on loving kitchen kit

If you want to understand the deep emotional importance of kitchen equipment, try having a clear-out of the cupboards. Sure, you start off with the best intentions of minimising clutter but you soon realise that every dish, bowl, burnt wooden spoon and bent fork is there for a reason. Anyone who’s graduated beyond pot noodles will have grown to love the kit they cook with, and that’s not surprising: our kitchen gadgets and appliances are our most often-used creative tools, and they inspire us to do better. Sometimes it’s a new gadget, a Japanese knife or a particularly gorgeous pan that makes us want to cook beautiful things, but just as often, it’s the pot inherited from mum or grandma’s rolling pin. Good kitchen tools either arrive loaded with emotional resonance and family history or we invest them with those things over time. We develop a relationship with the items that function best. Boring, useless tools don’t survive long in the Darwinian world of the kitchen. That egg coddler that seemed such a good idea when you bought it will become separated into its constituent parts, each of which will quietly migrate to the back of various drawers and then evaporate. The objects that keep our passion for cooking alive are those we love, and cannot bear to throw away. The Modern Kitchen by Tim Hayward is out on 1 November (Quadrille, £20); hardiegrant.com


SAIPHIN MOORE

The Rosa’s Thai Café founder on cooking Asian cuisine with authenticity

MONIKA LINTON

The founder of Brindisa on finding quality continental ingredients When I founded Brindisa on a shoestring 30 years ago, my sole aim was to salute the largely undiscovered artisan food of Spain here in Britain. Back then, most people didn’t have the knowledge of other countries’ native ingredients that they do now. Venturing outside of your comfort zone can be the best way to discover new flavours. I have had many a long drive to meet a supplier who makes just one cheese, but those trips have been some of the most inspiring moments for the business. A well-sourced piece of air-dried ham or a carefully picked bottle of wine can actually remove a lot of the hard work from hosting a dinner party. Good food is universally acknowledged to spark good conversation, and the extra effort you make to seek something out in a far-flung corner of the city won’t go unnoticed. Places like Neal’s Yard will make sure your cheeseboard is head and shoulders above its supermarket counterpart, and Garcia & Sons on Portobello, one of our longstanding customers, will give you a sense of Spain. Sourcing those hard-to-find foods can be time-consuming and expensive, but, by supporting these artisans, we play an important part in helping to preserve the culture, jobs and ecosystems that might otherwise be lost – and for that reason alone, it’s always worth the effort. Brindisa: The True Food of Spain by Monika Linton is out now (4th Estate, £29.95); 4thestate.co.uk

50

I always make my own curry pastes in a large batch. It’s easier than you think and will keep in the freezer for up to six months. That’s why I always include paste recipes in my books. Ready-made pastes and sauces never taste the same; preservatives can change the flavours and colours quite dramatically. Invest in ingredients like lemongrass, galangal, kaffir lime leaves, shrimp paste, palm sugar and fish sauce. All of these ingredients can be found in Chinese supermarkets and online, and most of them last for a while or can be kept in the freezer without losing flavour. You can substitute ingredients when you need to – like Thai basil for Italian basil; green Thai eggplants for purple Italian aubergine, bird’s eye chillies for finger chillies; Asian pumpkin for butternut squash; or galangal for young ginger. Sometimes that’s not possible, so you can leave out lesser galangal and kaffir lime leaves. If you can’t find lemongrass, though, the recipe doesn’t work, so I’d cook a different dish! I always think about whether my readers can find the ingredients in the UK, as well as how to adapt the recipes to their preference. For example, in Thailand, we often use very fishy ingredients like fermented fish paste. It’s definitely an acquired taste, so I mark these ingredients as optional. For a vegetarian/vegan audience, I offer alternative ingredients such as salt instead of fish sauce or mushroom sauce instead of oyster sauce. I make it informative by explaining different types of substitute proteins such as tofu and mushrooms. Rosa’s Thai Café: The Cookbook is out now (Mitchell Beazley, £20); octopusbooks.co.uk f


THE ORIGINAL EXPERTLY CRAFTED ----------------------------

PEANUT BUTTER

-------------------------------------------------------

OUR NUTS ARE FRESH

ROASTED HI-OLEIC PREMIUM PEANUTS no A OILS

Legey Außie Nuts Ma  NZ

----------------------------


52


CAFÉ SOCIETY

As the River Café celebrates 30 years at the forefront of London’s food scene, Lydia Winter talks to owner Ruth Rogers about running one of the city’s most important ever restaurants PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID HARRISON

Photograph by ###

53


W

E GREW WITH the restaurant,” says Ruth Rogers in delightfully soft, Americanaccented English. “We started out determined to serve a certain kind of food with a certain ethos, in a beautiful space off the river.” The ‘we’ Rogers is referring to is herself and her late friend Rose Gray, the co-founders of Hammersmith’s River Café – arguably one of the most influential restaurants of our time. A ‘certain kind of food’ is a style that ended up inspiring a wave of chefs to cook seasonally, led by their ingredients, while a ‘certain ethos’ went on to become the formula for most modern restaurants: high-quality cooking in casual, comfortable surrounds. Rogers makes for an interesting presence – calm, warm, personable and engaging when she’s talking, but alternately frenetic, getting up mid-interview to have huddled discussions with her chefs and other staff members. Even now, it seems she finds it hard to leave the restaurant alone, and it’s a safe bet that this attention to detail and restless enthusiasm has a lot to do with the River Café’s enduring success. Rogers and Gray’s ideas may feel commonplace now, but in 1987, when the restaurant made its debut, they were anything but. London’s food scene had a reputation for being lacklustre; these two women, in a small cafeteria out of the centre of the city, were quietly starting a revolution. With credentials like these, it’s no surprise that the River Café has been at the forefront of London’s food scene for 30 years, an anniversary it celebrates this month with the launch of a

new cookbook, River Café 30, which was cowritten by Rogers and the restaurant’s head chefs, Sian Wyn Owen and Joseph Trivelli. For any restaurant, ten years of business is a milestone, let alone 30 – it’s an achievement not to be scoffed at. “It’s amazing for us that we’ve achieved this birthday,” says Rogers, with a clear note of pride. “[The book shows how] we started out as this very small restaurant and grew from nine tables to 30 or 40 covers in 1987, we grew again and put in the kitchen in 1994, then we added a bar in 1999 and today we have the private dining room and a bigger kitchen.” With such humble beginnings, did Rogers and Gray ever think they’d have such an effect on the way people eat and cook? “No,” she says. “We weren’t just small in size but in ambition, and in what we could do and what we could cook.” And that turned out to be Italian food, albeit different to the type of Italian cooking that diners in London were used to. “A lot of the food that we had in Italian restaurants was brought over by waiters and managers who had a vision of what they could do in London without really being food-focused,” recalls Rogers. “Instead, we thought, let’s have the food that we ate with Italians at home,” home being Lucca for Gray, and Tuscany for Rogers, whose husband is the Italian-born architect Sir Richard Rogers. This love of authentic Italian cooking cemented the two women as friends. “We both started talking about the food that we wanted to cook,” Rogers says, “and we knew that it would be Italian. We did have other things on the menu in the first days of the restaurant – there was pappa al pomodoro and artichokes, but there was also a

IT’S AMAZING WHAT WE’VE ACHIEVED… WE STARTED OUT AS A VERY SMALL RESTAURANT hamburger and chicken spago.” The pair set out to educate their customers, using the proper Italian words for ingredients, and sourcing seasonal produce from Milan. This was a revelation: diners learned about everything from borlotti beans to polenta, and it’s safe to say that increased demand for artisanal produce in shops owes much to this exposure to ingredients that we’d had limited experience of before. And this in itself is a big part of the River Café’s legacy: the influence that it’s had not only on food in restaurants, but also in the way that people cook at home, and their attitude towards authentic ingredients. Rogers agrees. “Things have changed with the availability of ingredients, with the internet and supply and demand. You can go into Marks & Spencer’s and ask for cavolo nero or a Sorrento tomato, and they

Photographs (food) by Matthew Donaldson

54


Photograph by ###

understand what you’re talking about.” A passion for fresh ingredients threads itself through the River Café’s food, and the book’s introduction recounts a well-loved and much-recounted story where, while on a research trip in Italy, Gray fell in love with a beautiful pumpkin she saw in a market. The pumpkin ended up flying back to London safely ensconced in business class, while Rogers and Gray sat in economy. This is how the pair – who weren’t professionally trained as chefs – developed “as we became more and more involved with the winemakers and the olive oil producers, as brilliant chefs came to work here, and the whole London food scene changed, with diversity and people coming here from other cultures and other restaurants.” ‘Brilliant chefs’ include the likes of Jamie Oliver, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall and Theo Randall, all alums of the River Café kitchens. Allegra McEvedy, who co-founded Leon and now runs her own restaurant, Albertine, in Shepherd’s Bush, says “the chef that I single-handedly learned the most from was Rose Gray at the River Café. She was a phenomenal cook. Every detail was crucial – she had such an incredible palate, everything mattered. She taught me simplicity, quality of ingredients, that less-is-more thing.” While it’s clear that Rogers is proud of how she’s helped shape some of our most well-known chefs and their cooking, she’s more concerned with the influence she’s had beyond their food: “Those chefs now all run their own kitchens. I hope that when they leave they’re leaving with the knowledge not just of how to cook well but also the values that we have – values of giving people days off and food to eat that is high quality.” She recounts how the other week, Wyn Owen had to send a chef home that she thought wasn’t well enough to work. “The chef wanted to stay and couldn’t understand why. And Sian said, ‘One day you’ll be a head chef and I want you to send someone home.’” At a time when restaurant kitchens were known to be very tough environments, Rogers and Gray made sure to create an atmosphere that encouraged collaboration and positivity. “I think that changed when we opened,” says Rogers. “There were chefs saying, let’s have restaurants where there’s more transparency, where there are open kitchens, where the food is seasonal, where →

CAFÉ CULTURE: (from left) A new recipe, crab and artichoke salad; a classic one, spinach and ricotta gnocchi; Ruth Rogers at the restaurant

55


GET THE BOOK

With more than 100 new recipes and updated classics from the River Café’s history, the book is essential reading for those who want to know a little more about Rogers and her staff’s unique approach to cooking. River Cafe 30 by Ruth Rogers, Rose Gray, Sian Wyn Owen and Joseph Trivelli is published by Ebury Press and priced at £28 (hardback).

ALL HANDS ON DECK: Rogers with River Café head chefs Sian Wyn Owen and Joseph Trivelli

→ customers can wear whatever they want but still have a very high quality of food.” And that’s another key part of the River Café’s legacy: Rogers and Gray were among the first to create a restaurant that served high-quality food in a space that wasn’t formal and intimidating. “[At the time] you only had two choices: you could go into a really relaxed place and not eat very well, or spend a lot of money, dress up and eat well,” she says. “We thought, why can’t we do that?” Listening to Rogers speak, there’s a striking sense of a shared vision, one that they

56

YOU CAN GET CAVOLO NERO OR A SORRENTO TOMATO IN M&S NOW

managed to execute as two people, and now as a wider team of chefs. Rogers and Gray were so attuned to one another – clearly a reason behind the River Café’s magic. Despite the loss of Gray after a tragic battle with cancer in 2010, this fluidity and cohesion continues between Ruth and her team today. “It’s very connected,” says Rogers. “I know every single waiter and chef, and all of the chefs know each other.” This, in part, is due to having one team working together on one restaurant. “We’re all so focused on this restaurant that we’re not distracted by running across London to see how they’re doing in the kitchen over there, or what’s happening in that restaurant.” Head chefs Wyn Owen and Trivelli, who between them have racked up 16 years at the River Café, are testament to this connection, and it’s one of the reasons that Rogers gives for the River Café’s success. Trivelli analyses this approach: “I suspect that Ruth and Rose ran a restaurant like this so that when they weren’t here together, which was often, they would be able to run it alone. With such an organic way of working – we write the menu for every meal – if you’re not here, then you’re not here. We’re always talking with each other.” This attitude spills over into the new cookbook, the first that Rogers has written without Gray. Trivelli and Wyn Owen are now co-authors, as is Gray, and their influence will be apparent to the reader, whether that’s in new recipes or newly adapted old favourites. The cookbook is a distilled version of the restaurant, from its ‘certain kind of food’ to the aforementioned ‘certain ethos’ – the River Café‘s enduring magic. f


FEATURING 100’S OF SPIRITS THAT YOU WON’T FIND ON THE HIGH STREET GET IN THE FESTIVE SPIRIT!

QUOTE FOODISM10 TO SAVE 10% ON TICKETS FOR FRIDAY 1ST DECEMBER Why not treat yourself to one of our Premium Packages?

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON OUR TICKET PACKAGES AND TO BOOK VISIT WWW.THESPIRITSHOW.CO.UK DRINK RESPONSIBLY


GROWING CHAINS

58


Not all chain restaurants are bad news, it’s just that only a few of them actually get it right. Laura Goodman asks those who’ve managed it to reveal the secrets of their success

Photograph by Chris Coulson

FOWL PLAY: Chick ’n’ Sours founders Carl Clarke and David Wolanski have ambitious plans for the future

59


O

NCE, IN MY early twenties, I won some money at a friend’s birthday bingo. I got a line and a full house. The next day, we woke up and drove to Brighton and spent the winnings on lunch at a café-grocer we were into at the time. We had lavish cooked breakfasts and extra coffees and passionfruit pavlova milkshakes, and it was the future, guys, it really was. Well, we called it, because there are now 80 iterations of that particular café-grocer. Only now there’s nothing grocer-y about them; they just do rubbish burgers and grissini. They’re the same in the name I’ve carefully not mentioned and nothing else. There are bad chain restaurants and that’s nothing new. But to see them go bad before your eyes makes you think: how do the good ones do it? The ones you’re relieved to see when you run out of steam at the shops. The beloved restaurants that morph into small, subtle chains so seamlessly you barely notice it happening. So I spoke to some of the best.

The beginning Some begin with world domination in mind and some don’t. Most restaurateurs I spoke to for this feature said they didn’t, but then

60

accidental success makes for a better story. Shamil Thakrar, one of the founders of Dishoom (which now has four locations in London and one in Edinburgh) told me that he thinks “proper chains” start completely differently to how Dishoom did. “When you’re in the headspace of chains, you’re creating a thing and then trying to get the most bang for your buck with that thing – which is very sensible”, he says. “But we did the reverse. We created a thing, and now every time we look at a new location, we do more work, not less. Our mantra is ‘deepen, don’t dilute’. So, it’s a philosophical difference”. On the other hand, Thomasina Miers and Mark Selby of Wahaca (now at 25 locations) always intended to go big. Even back in 2007, when Wahaca was just one Covent Garden hotspot, they had plans. Selby says, “We always intended there to be more than one Wahaca, but we wanted a business with a sustainable soul that would still be going in 30 years. So, Tommi and I agreed we wouldn’t open a second Wahaca unless we knew we’d be able to maintain the quality and passion. Ultimately, we believed in the magic of Mexican food, and wanted the whole country to eat it. That’s still the business vision.” This makes sense – if your gameplan

is to shake things up across the country, you’re creating a chain. If your business vision is to create a special restaurant, maybe you’re not. David Wolanski from Chick ’n’ Sours says of his burgeoning empire (two Chick ’n’ Sours, one Chick’N), “We want to change fried chicken for good, and you don't do that with just one store.” Stay tuned to see if he’ll go Wahaca-sized.

THERE ARE BAD CHAINS AND THAT’S NOTHING NEW. BUT HOW DO THE GOOD ONES DO IT?


CHAIN REACTION: [clockwise from left] Breakfast at Dishoom; Shake Shack’s frozen custard; Thomasina Miers of Wahaca; Mark Rosati

The place Making the next move is a big deal for businesses trying to expand “consciously” (to coin a Gwyneth). When choosing a new location, there are all sorts of things to consider, but in London there is also only one: budget. Beyond that, people speak of something a little vaguer: “a feeling of community”, or a ready-made pool of food lovers open to the idea of a new place to hang out. Mark Rosati is culinary director of Shake Shack. He told me that when Shake Shack looks for new locations, they have a brief in two parts: “People want the same experience that they might’ve had back when we just had one Shake Shack in Madison Park, but they also want something local. “When it comes to opening in a new place, our goal is to create a community gathering spot that feels comfortable, with the right vibe, and good food.”

NYC. And the more fun-sounding part of his job involves the menu’s frozen custard section. He designs location-specific ‘concretes’ (frozen custard blended with mix-ins, on the off-chance you’re not au fait), like Seoul’s Gangnam (vanilla custard, marshmallow sauce, strawberry, shortbread, soy bean powder) and Istanbul’s Pistachios in the Park (chocolate custard, pistachios, fudge sauce). He describes arriving in Tokyo and not having a clue where to begin: “Google ‘Tokyo desserts’ and you get loads of green tea, but is it really popular or is it just a tourist’s impression?” So, he did what any one of us would do. And after five or six days eating in Michelin-starred restaurants, fusion joints, and joining queues at the fish market at 3am, he started to form a real impression. “I fell in love with black sesame purée. It’s got this tahini, peanut butter-ish flavour but it’s naturally sweet. I tried it in a couple of concretes, but I wanted it pure, so I put it into a milkshake. It’s a bestseller!”

Dishoom King’s Cross is based around the idea of a ‘godown’ (warehouse) in which working people and commuters feel comfortable meeting, eating, drinking and lingering. Its food specials reflect that – the nihari is a generously spiced lamb stew traditionally served to labourers “for strength and protection against faintness of heart”.

The people Restaurants are nothing without their people, and if a chain is going to live by an ethos, they need everyone to be on board. At Wahaca, they talk about a “mission” to show people how amazing Mexican food is – they take every new general manager and head chef out to the markets of Mexico so they can see what it’s all about. They run one or two of these inspiration trips a year. Selby says, “If people aren’t full of passion and excitement after that trip, we know they aren’t right for us”. The answer, then? More tacos, less grissini. But that’s obvious. f

The mood

Photograph by [Shake Shack] Evan Sung ; [Thomasina Miers] Tara Fisher

We’re getting vaguer still, but let’s think about that idea of ‘vibe’ for a second. Thakrar says: “When you walk into a new Dishoom, you’ll experience a very different mood. In King’s Cross, you get old-school industrial glamour, while the Shoreditch veranda suggests summer even when it’s not, and in Carnaby (which is set in the 1960s), you’ll feel like Don Draper. Therein lies the secret to new Dishooms – creating different emotions”. Everyone I spoke to for this piece spoke about architecture. Unlike the chains that came before them, these ones seem intent on celebrating the subtle differences in their outposts, rather than creating an easy-toreplicate template they can roll out in any building. Selby and Miers wanted every restaurant to “have a Wahaca feel” but also to “look different and have its own character, dictated by architecture and locality”. He says that at the time they did this (ten years ago), they were setting “an industry first”. Look at us now; we’re writing trend pieces about it!

The food For most restaurants, keeping the food consistent is the central goal and biggest challenge. Shake Shack likes to go one better; it’s Mark Rosati’s job to ‘localise’ the menus. So, when they first came to London, that meant sourcing cattle from Scotland and getting it delivered every day, like they do in

61


WHERE

FOOD

LOVERS FEAST 16-19 NOVEMBER TOBACCO DOCK

Tickets on sale now tasteoflondon.co.uk Special offer for Foodism readers Tickets from £12* Use code FOODISM transaction fees apply

Photo courtesy of Kricket. Photography: Hugh Johnson

The UK’s Top Chefs | London’s Best Restaurants Food & Drink Masterclasses | Artisan Producer Markets


WE CAN FIX IT You’re an entrepreneur looking to launch a new product in the food and drink industry. So where do you even begin? Victoria Stewart meets the consultants giving startups a leg up on the London food scene

Photograph by ###

FOLLOW US @FOODISMUK

FOODISMUK

63


H

ERE’S A DREAM you might have had: you love tomato relish. No, wait, you’re obsessed with tomato relish. You make your own, and you eat it with everything. You’d probably put it on your porridge, given half a chance. You often hear about people who quit their jobs to start up food businesses, and you wonder if one day that could be you – the next Levi Roots. Now there’s no denying that’s a great dream. After all, many have been there and done it. But I’ll bet you a few pennies that each one completely underestimated the difficulties of setting up in one of the city’s most competitive industries, and had never worked harder in their life. This is where London’s food fixers come in. As people who really know the business of food and want to make it easier for new start-ups to stay afloat, none of them will tell budding food entrepreneurs what to do, but some of them help budding food entrepreneurs sell their pot of relish to a delicatassen or introduce them to other people in the community who’ve been there before and made mistakes. Sound useful? Meet three of them…

The Realist PRITESH MODY, WORLD OF ZING

What he does: Works with small food brands

to enable them to sell products on his platform, then connects them with shops such as Whole Foods Markets and 50-orso independent retailers. “I sell people the nightmare, not the dream. This is not an easy business; we live in a country where for six months of the year it’s cold and you’re going to be standing outside in a market [selling your stuff ] – if you can take that reality then

IT’S ALL ABOUT HELPING PRODUCERS TO BRING THEIR PRODUCTS TO LIFE you’ve got something to go on.” Why he does it: Having worked in drinks marketing, launching Pink Pigeon rum and Crystal Head Vodka, Mody set up World of Zing in 2014, to give a selling platform to producers. Now he works with independent shops, because: “It’s a nicer experience [than working with supermarkets]. When you hand over a product, you know they’re going to love it and want to know about it and tell their customers. And now those small stores are filling up with more of these products, and that’s a good place to be.” How he does it: By eating out a lot and storing up ideas for what’s on trend. If Mody tries something “exceptional” he’ll offer to help bring it onto retail. After that “it’s all about helping the producer bring their product to life, from understanding branding, to legal requirements, label compliance, bottle styles, marketing strategy… “A lot of people have a bit of money, come up with an idea, and think they’ll create this amazing brand with an agency and that’s it. But so many people have dropped by the wayside because they’re not fully committed.” Worked with: Tonkotsu’s Eat The Bits chilli sauce, Dalston Chillies hot sauces, Slow Richies sauces and Bermondsey Tonic Water. worldofzing.com

The Community Builder TARA SUNDRAMOORTHI, KITCHEN TABLE PROJECTS

What she does: Heads up a team of 40,

introducing new food entrepreneurs to

IT’S A FIX: [left] Kitchen Table Projects has helped over 500 start-ups; [above] Pritesh Mody started World of Zing to support small producers

64

retailers, running workshops and seminars on a range of different subjects, from managing finances or marketing to gaining investment. Kitchen Table Projects has supported over 500 food and drink start-ups since it started in June 2015. Why she does it: “I had a restaurant before. It was a long and lonely journey and I didn’t really have a network or anybody helping me, and so I just really wanted to do something that supported other food and drink entrepreneurs, showing them how to manage a successful business. That’s why I set up


Photograph (Kitchen Table) by Carl Stanley

Kitchen Table Projects.” How she does it: While there’s occasional oneon-one consultancy, Sundramoorthi actually prefers to run events, as she suggests “the best way to learn is to go and meet lots of other people like you.” Last year, for example, Kitchen Table Projects hosted an event with Marks & Spencer that enabled start-ups to ask questions to the supermarket’s product developers and buyers, something she considers would still be “very murky grey territory” for most who are starting out. At another conference, 700 businesses all “had

WE GIVE PEOPLE ACCESS TO A CRUCIAL NETWORK

the opportunity to pitch to retailers, to meet other food founders who are just like them but maybe a few years ahead in the industry, who have been there and succeeded – which is the most important thing. It gives people access to that crucial network.” In future, they are looking at the export market, and will continue to “respond to the evolving needs of food start-ups.” Worked with: Mindful Bites (snacks now available in Whole Foods Markets), CocoNuts ice cream, and TG Teas. kitchentableprojects.com →

65


HELPING HAND: Artisan Food Club has supported small businesses such as Lewis of London {above] and From Dorset With Love [below]

→ The Nurturer MARCUS CARTER, ARTISAN FOOD CLUB

What he does: Overall he aims to work with

artisan food businesses [he has 40-50 ongoing clients, and around 250 on the books] to “empower them in order to help them grow.” He gives them visibility via his website, helps them get into shops, and has a central invoicing system allowing producers and shops “to work together – we manage all the invoices and paperwork, and send out all the orders. The shop then receives one monthly invoice.” Why he does it: Because he is fascinated by sales, having studied it for 20-30 years and having worked in various different parts of the industry, including farming and wholesale. Having “always started with the consumer and worked backwards,” one of things Carter has found is that shops “want small suppliers but don’t want the invoices that come with that, so then they use a wholesaler and don’t have a point of difference.”

66

How he does it: When working with producers,

Carter’s rule is that people “have got to know what the product is, first and foremost… then their product has got to be on shelves and people have got to be eating it. I want to empower producers to go out and sell because what can often happen is that because if they’re not very good at that, or at understanding what the shops need, they have a few bad experiences, which knocks

WE AIM TO WORK WITH ARTISAN FOOD BUSINESSES TO HELP THEM GROW

them.” He likes to work with shops such as Sourced Markets, Dugard & Daughters in Herne Hill, and Eat17 shops, which are looking for innovation and to give their customers “a real treat”, because this is what he believes unites the successful ones. Worked with: Aphrodite Pomegranate Ketchup; Raw Cocoa Bites; Dorset Love Master chutneys; Abernethy smoky butter; Lucocoa chocolate. artisanfood.club f


PROMOTION

THE 25TH HOUR Freedom Brewery has discovered that Brits are time-poor and do not have enough hours in the day, so the brand is inspiring adults across the UK to reclaim their time to pursue their passions and goals, follow their dreams and experience new things. Try it, and share your experiences by posting them on social media using the hashtags #The25thHour and #WhatWouldYouDo?.

FREE AND CLEAR Freedom Brewery’s beers are made for passionate, independent drinkers, and the brewer is launching a campaign to help you put that passion to use

F

Photograph by Jade Nina Sarkhel

REEDOM BREWERY, THE original independent lager brewer, has been crafting a wide range of distinctive lagers and ales since 1995, standing apart from the mainstream since its conception. Every decision is made for the benefit of the brew, made evident through the quality and taste of its products, which use the highest-quality British and global ingredients. Freedom Brewery has created a wide variety of flavours to match differing discerning taste profiles, from light and crisp lagers to more aromatic and bitter ales. The brilliantly balanced beers from Freedom Brewery include a floral Freedom Organic Helles Lager; a light and crisp Freedom Four British Lager; an aromatic and dry Freedom Pale Ale; a citrus and bittersweet Freedom Pils – Pilsner Lager, and, last but by no means

least, Freedom’s Amber Rye Lager – arguably the most distinctive of the batch, with a hint of spice. What sets Freedom Brewery apart is also its maturation period, lasting as long as four weeks to ensure the quality of the final product. More than anything, Freedom Brewery is known for its allnatural credentials. No ingredients are added at the end of the brewing process – compared to the majority of beers, which add fish finings – therefore all beers are certified vegan. Originally London-based, Freedom Brewery moved to Staffordshire in a quest for better water and more sustainable brewing practices. The brewery is now set on a private estate of rolling countryside with access to a private spring water source, which gives the beers their distinct profile.

The brewery continues to innovate with flavour and manufacturing processes to prove that lager is more than just lager. This move reflects the brand’s approach to life: travel, experience, live, be dynamic, be vibrant and above all else, be free. Freedom Brewery wants to inspire people to have the freedom to pursue their passions, follow their dreams and be totally free. Freedom Brewery is also one of the most sustainable brewers in the UK, using a process that begins at the water well with local spring water. The waste water is then processed through a natural reed system. The result is a great-tasting beer that is naturally carbonated, filtered and unpasteurised, which gives it its clean and balanced flavour. ● Shop the range at freedombrewery.com/shop or follow the brand @FreedomBrewery

67


SAVE THE DATE 9 FEBRUARY 2018

NATIONAL

PIZZA

DAY


Photograph by Naki Photograph Kouyioumtzis/Getty by ###

’SHROOM SERVICE As mushroom season gets well underway, Gareth May speaks to chefs and foragers to find out the key to successful – and safe – hunting

69


I

F THERE’S A less appetising nickname for a food I’ve never heard it: the ‘lungs of the forest’. Seriously, who wants to eat lung? But that’s the thing about mushrooms: they’re full of surprises. In the case of Amanita phalloides the rude awakening is a liver transplant; known widely as death caps, they finished off Roman Emperor Claudius, the poor chap. As well as doing in iconic world leaders (oh to dream) ’shrooms teem with folklore – and we’re not talking about legs-turned-intotree-trunks-on-the-lav mushie trips either, as glorious as they are to hear around the camp fire. We’re talking about how King Alfred’s Cakes make brilliant firelighters and take their name from when Wise Elf (now that’s a nickname) hid from the pillaging Danes burning the coal-like funghi for heat. How in medieval times the beef steak was believed to be a symbol of Jesus because when it’s fresh it eerily resembles bloody flesh. And how the stinkhorn has no folklore attached to it whatsoever but looks exactly like a penis (and that’s good enough for a mention from me). Fancy yourself as a hunter? Getting a grip on fungi, phallic or otherwise, is no mean feat. Commendatore Antonio Carluccio OBE, who’s holding mushroom markets all over the UK throughout autumn, says the UK mushroom season is a mercurial beast. “In good weather conditions, the season could start in mid-August with the first flush of porcini and the majority of fungi waking up in September and November,” he says. This all depends on the atmospheric conditions and types of woods though, he adds, as

AUTUMN HARVEST: A large variety of mushrooms can be found growing in the UK from September to November, but don’t forage without guidance.

70

Photograph by Matilda Delves/Getty

FANCY YOURSELF AS A HUNTER? GETTING A GRIP ON FUNGI IS NO MEAN FEAT

mushrooms are a picky bunch and grow in symbiosis with certain types of trees and soil, each preferring its own environment. The best advice, Carluccio says, is to get in touch with the local mycological society to learn more about location and timings. “It is quite dangerous for an amateur forager to try to correctly identify the edible ones from the poisonous ones. It is always better to follow teachings and experience of mycologists. I personally have safely collected around 100 types, because I know them well and I am not interested in collecting any mushrooms that I don’t know. I never experiment, I always trust my long-time knowledge that I have gathered since I was five years old (and always with grown-ups).” Our long, wet autumns, ideal for mushrooms, are a bit of a tease, then. Public Health England advises that people should not eat mushrooms collected in the wild unless they are very familiar with the various types that grow in the UK and are sure the mushrooms they have collected are safe to eat. But it’s not just the fear of kidney damage that should be at the forefront of pickers’ minds – there’s also the matter of ethics. The UK has lost much of its ancient woods compared to other countries, and foraging bans are being introduced to protect the fungi we do have. Take Epping Forest for instance, one of the few surviving ancient woodlands, which has over 1,600 varieties (with about 50 that are edible) including national rarities such as the pink wax cap, sandy stilted puffball, oak polyphore and a number of tooth fungi. They’re an important factor in Epping Forest and help conserve the unique habitat that’s a designated Site of Special Scientific Interest and Special Area of Conservation. They’re also a meal ticket for commercial foragers, chancers that literally fill bin bags with as many as they can find and sell them on the black market. As a result, wardens called Forest Keepers patrol the forest, protecting →


Pic credit (all): Matilda Delves/Getty

Photograph by ###

71


MUSHROOMS WORK AS A BEAUTIFUL UMAMI SEASONING IN DISHES → the ancient woods 365 days a year.

72

STAY AT HOME ’SHROOMS

FUNGI TO BE WITH: A selection of freshly foraged mushrooms including porcini, which are among the most prized fungi you can find

“Mushrooms are one of those superb British ingredients where every part can be used from the trim to the meaty flesh,” he says. “All mushrooms work as a beautiful umami seasoning for root vegetables and robust meats but the most prized mushroom of all is the elusive cep, from its meat-like texture in the stem to the sweet delicate flavour of the cap, you can dry both and enjoy the beautiful earthy flavour all year round by using it to finish and season dishes.” Umami flavour or not, I think I’ll still pass on the stinkhorn. f

Foraging is a tricky and potentially deadly business and one which Raymond Blanc, OBE, side swiped with the creation of a ‘mushroom valley’ at his boutique hotel and restaurant Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons in Oxfordshire. The purpose-built patch of land cultivates home-grown fungi and the Raymond Blanc Gardening School also has a Grow your own Mushrooms course, showing patrons how to create a substrate for ‘breeding’, inoculation, and incubation. Sure, it might sound like the life cycle of a marine in an Alien movie but as head gardener, Anne Marie Owens, says – safety is paramount (if you haven’t got the message yet, mushrooms can kill you, people) and the argument for cultivating at home, from oyster mushrooms to morels, is a pretty easy one to make.

Photograph by Anna Ivanova/Getty

Dodging the warden would be the least of your worries if you’re bent over with cramps and the like, and to prevent, you know, like, death and stuff, many foragers promote a passive sort of mushroom hunting. George Fredenham and Richard Osmond – jointly known as The Foragers, who hold walks from their St Albans pub The Verulam Arms – agree that knowledge and experience is the key to foraging mushrooms, and attending courses and joining associations is the way to go.  They also say in the early excursions that resisting the temptation to eat and even pick is key to developing a true taste for hunting. Foraging, they explain, can be similar to gambling with the compulsive need to always find the edible. But it doesn’t have to be this way: the key to becoming a safe, competent hunter is to reward yourself with knowledge, documenting the mushrooms you find (even poisonous ones) with photographs and notes in order to build your knowledge. For those keen to master the art of safe ’shroom hunting, nature’s larder will reward homework, respect, and keen eyes with many safe-to-eat varieties fist-pumping through the wet canvas of fallen leaves and boot prints, from the horn of plenty – which looks like a kind of miniature sooty trumpet and can be found from late summer to early winter and is best dried and used rehydrated for stocks and soups – to the wax-coloured frilly-tipped chanterelle, the ideal ’shroom to give a good sauté with butter and a little salt and parsley. Richard Bainbridge, proprietor and chef of Benedicts restaurant in Norwich, uses wild British mus, both dried and fresh, in many of his dishes and reels off his favourites as though he’s a kid boasting about his Pokémon collection: ceps, chicken of the woods, girolles, St George’s, and ink caps. All have individual flavours and textures that make a chef’s life super exciting from midAugust onwards, he adds.


FRENCH TWIST Mike Gibson pays a visit to new Bethnal Green bar Coupette, where he discovers a distinctively Gallic take on cocktail culture

74


I

THE VINE

One of Coupette’s flagship cocktails – grapes expressed in nine (count ’em) finely balanced spirits and liqueurs.

INGREDIENTS ◆◆ 40ml Noilly Prat

◆◆ 10ml Alsace riesling

T’S TEMPTING TO think that the landscape of London’s world-leading bar scene is influenced mainly by the historic bars of London, old and contemporary US cocktail culture, and, increasingly, the aperitivo tradition of Italy. But, when it comes to food and drink, Chris Moore tells me, “the French are good at everything. Especially when it involves grapes.” Moore’s statement is both self-evident and curious: it goes without saying that the French are “good at” wine. But at a bar, it can be easy to forget the virtues of French cidre, or cognac, or calvados; or that classic cocktails like the sazerac would be nothing if not for the French’s ingenuity in alcoholic drinks. And it’s emphasised by one particular cocktail at Coupette, the Bethnal Green venue Moore founded recently after a long stint at the Savoy hotel’s Beaufort Bar. It’s aptly named ‘The Vine’, and is made up of nine grape-based drinks, including Noilly Prat dry vermouth, Alsatian riesling, Jurançon, Vin de Liqueur and Aerated XO cognac, served straight up. It’s a formidable balancing act, and one that tastes a little like dry vermouth, but simultaneously more intensely flavoured, more rounded, and more subtle. This is what you’ll find at Coupette. A heavy emphasis on French ingredients, but drinks that are accessible – made to drink, not to study, but whose complexities make themselves known just after the first sip. The Champagne Piña Colada, for example, is exactly that: it’s a velvety cocktail, made with rum, coconut milk, champagne and finely crushed ice, which starts off appealingly smutty and finishes refined and elegant. Or the Apples, simply a monthly-changing calvados and a carbonated juice of similarly rotating apple varieties, which has immediate apple not unlike a bottle of Appletiser and then lingers deliciously on the palate in a manner unlike any soft drink. Coupette, with its loungey feel and similarly beautifully put-together food menu, is full of charms like these. Vive la France, and allez les cocktails. f 423 Bethnal Green Rd, E2 0AN; coupette.co.uk

◆◆ 5ml Jurançon

◆◆ 5ml Vin de Liqueur ◆◆ 5ml Jade le Coeur ◆◆ 5ml armagnac

◆◆ 5ml golden raisin syrup

◆◆ 3 dashes black grape bitters ◆◆ Hennessy XO, to garnish

Photograph by ###

Stir ingredients and strain into a coupette. Garnish with half a black grape, then spray with Hennessy XO.

75


RAMON/GIN/ FIGUE

You guessed it: fig is the star of the show here, with loads of ingredients infused from fig leaves foraged just around the corner.

I N G REDIENTS ◆◆ 40ml Bombay Sapphire ◆◆ 10ml Esprit des Figues ◆◆ 20ml lemon juice

◆◆ 20ml fig leaf cream ◆◆ 20ml fig leaf syrup ◆◆ 20ml egg white

◆◆ 1 drop rose water ◆◆ Fig leaf soda

Use a hand blender to emulsify for 20 seconds, then shake for 20 seconds. Fine strain into a fizz glass, allow a few seconds to settle, then top with fig leaf soda.

Photograph by ###

76


AVAILABLE NATIONWIDE IN WAITROSE, MAJESTIC AND 31DOVER.COM


TRUFFLED WHITE NEGRONI

A white negroni – one that uses a white vermouth and amaro combination rather than sweet vermouth and something like Campari – is one thing, but Moore and his team take it a step further here with the addition of truffle, left to infuse with the liquid in a jar and strained. Moore suggests making this in a two-litre batch if you try it…

INGREDIEN TS ◆◆ 20ml Star of Bombay gin ◆◆ 30ml Lillet Blanc

◆◆ 10ml Suze d’Autrefois ◆◆ 5ml Escubac ◆◆ 10ml water

◆◆ 1g fresh seasonal truffle

Add all ingredients to a kilner jar and allow to infuse for 24 hours. Strain through a coffee filter and bottle. To serve, take a frozen glass with a large block of ice, and pour.

Photograph by ###

78


PROMOTION

THE SPIRIT OF NEW ORLEANS In the city where they say 'let the good times roll', one drink rules. For more than 140 years, Southern Comfort has given us a taste of New Orleans. Here are a few reasons Southern Comfort is the bartenders' best friend

DRINKS FOR A VERY SOUTHERN WINTER Keep warm this winter, stay comfortable and try out these New Orleans-inspired winter cocktails Mississippi Mulled Wine Ingredients: ◆◆ 50ml Southern

Comfort ◆◆ 75ml red wine ◆◆ 75ml pineapple juice

Method: Add all ingredients to pan and heat to 75oC, pour into a glass and garnish with a pineapple wedge.

Southern Cobbler Ingredients: ◆◆ 50ml Southern

Comfort ◆◆ 75ml apple juice ◆◆ 75ml cranberry juice ◆◆ 1 lime wedge,

squeezed

Method: Add ice, squeeze limes and place in drink. Add further ingredients, stir gently. Garnish with an apple slice and a light dusting of cinnamon. Serve in a Collins glass.

Spiced Apple Pie* Ingredients: ◆◆ 25ml Southern

Comfort ◆◆ 25ml Fireball liqueur ◆◆ 150ml apple juice

Method:

1. Its creator was an early pioneer in the art of blending

and spices – form the basis of Southern Comfort, although the recipe is a secret.

Mix ingredients in a pan and heat to 75oC. Pour into a mug and garnish.

Martin Wilkes Heron may have been born in St Louis, but it was in New Orleans, in 1874, that he created the whiskey liqueur that would make his name.

3. It hails from the birthplace of the immortal Sazerac, the spiritual home of Jazz & the cocktail

*Find me at Winter Wonderland

2. The unique blend of whiskey, fruit and spice works in perfect harmony with cocktail ingredients and mixers As a port city, New Orleans in the late 1800s was awash with produce from all over the US and overseas. Three of the most delicious imports – whiskey, fruit

Not only was New Orleans responsible for the birth of jazz, but it's also the spiritual home of the cocktail. The city whose energy and creativity inspired MW Heron to create Southern Comfort – New Orleans – is the same city responsible for one of the great classic cocktails: the Sazerac, made with Sazerac rye, Peychaud's bitters, sugar and absinthe. ●

Southern Comfort Original is available from all good bars and retailers nationwide and on amazon. co.uk. Follow @SouthernComfortUK on Facebook and Instagram to keep up to date with the latest news, events and competitions.

79


CLICK

FOODISM.CO.UK

CHAMPAGNE PIÑA COLADA

One of the bar’s signature serves, this drink is so popular that people also order it to take away.

I N G REDIENTS ◆◆ 25ml Bacardi Superior Heritage rum ◆◆ 25ml Trois Rivières rum ◆◆ 35ml pineapple cordial ◆◆ 40ml pineapple juice

◆◆ 2 scoops of coconut sorbet

◆◆ 40ml Moet & Chandon Brut

Blend together, place in a chilled glass and sprinkle fresh coconut on top.

Photograph by ###

80


C

NOMINATIONS ARE NOW B R ATI N LE G E

The

P

O

SI

100 G

E

In association with

TIV

N E CHA

IT GOES WITHOUT saying that we love good food and drink but we especially love good food and drink that has the potential to effect change. So, we’re rounding up London’s top 100 venues which are creating positive changes within their businesses. The Foodism 100, in association with Southern Comfort, will recognise and champion venues across the nation’s capital which employ sustainable, ethical and social initiatives - from the bars and cafés with a sustainable edge to the the social enterprises giving people a much-needed second chance, to the street-food traders changing the way fast food impacts the environment. The awards are split across ten categories and the winners will be announced at an awards ceremony at Borough Market on 25 January. So if you’re a business or know of a business doing good things to make the planet more sustainable nominate at www.foodism.co.uk/foodism100

Nominations close 10 November

OPEN BEST CASUAL RESTAURANT » BEST FINE-DINING RESTAURANT » BEST BAR » BEST PUB » BEST CAFE » BEST POP-UP OR RESIDENCY » BEST STREET FOOD TRADER » BEST FOOD MARKET » BEST SOCIAL ENTERPRISE » POSITIVE CHANGE HERO

Are you a business in the food and drinks industry doing your bit to make the world more sustainable?

YES? THEN WE WANT YOU!

BUSINESSES WINNERS NIGHT


— LANDSEC —

INSIDE VICTORIA’S NOVA FOOD A FOODISM GUIDE

Everything you need to know about the venues and the stories of the brand-new Nova Food

82

CONTENTS ◆◆ Nova Food: an overview of the new

destination ◆◆ The map: a visual guide to where to find

Nova Food’s bars and restaurants

◆◆ The competition: get a taste of

everything on offer at Nova Food


PROMOTION

IN TROD U C TI O N

SUPER NOVA A new addition to a classic London neighbourhood, Nova Food is revitalising Victoria’s going-out scene with 17 restaurants, bars, cafés and retail spaces

J

UST IMAGINE FOR a minute that when you got off a train or Tube at Victoria station, some of the most talented chefs in the city were waiting to welcome you into their dining rooms. And imagine, too, if these restaurants and cafés and shops were places you could get to in a matter of minutes. You’ve just pictured Nova Food, and the image in your mind is very much a reality. Victoria has long been a place full of activity, with transit hubs, worldrenowned theatrical productions and more right on the doorstep. And it’s one of reinvention, too, with new buildings and a reimagined station springing up before our eyes. But, with the arrival of the gleaming Nova, Victoria destination, the area finally has the full complement of restaurants you’d expect from one of

the beating hearts of central London. 17 restaurants, cafés and retail stores, either open now or opening soon, will handle everything from your morning coffee to a quick lunch, dinner or a night out. And there are more exciting projects arriving in the coming months, too.

Turn over to see a handy map of the destination’s venues, and again to read about an amazing competition on offer that’ll give six lucky readers a taste of all there is to do and see at Nova Food. ● For more information, go to createvictoria.com or search #novafood on social media

17 VENUES WILL HANDLE EVERYTHING FROM COFFEE TO DINNER AND A NIGHT OUT 83


E AT

17

GHA KIN BUC

16 8

4

1

3 11

15 7

13

WA LK

10

VICTORIA

TO N ING

SIR SIMON MILTON SQUARE

INS

14

9

12

2M

5

6

2

STREET

US

PL

ACE

VICTORIA STATION (CIRCLE AND DISTRICT LINE)

TERM

84

EET

MP ALA

CE

17 city-leading venues, one destination – check out where you can find them and plan your next visit to Nova Food

ST R

ROA

D

MAP IT OUT

ARL

W H ER E TO

IN


PROMOTION

1. Ahi Poké One of the most exciting exponents of the fastgrowing poké trend, Ahi Poké serves up traditional Hawaiian cured fish salad bowls using sustainably sourced seafood.

contemporary Italian food that can be found in New York, and an upmarket cocktail bar The Drunken Oyster.

8. Notes A shrine to both coffee and wine, which also serves up small plates of cheese and cured meats, and pastries and tarts, too.

2. Aster

9. Ole and Steen

New Nordic is all the rage in the capital, and chef Helena Puolakka treats diners to her unique cuisine, which mixes in contemporary French influences. There’s also a café, bar, deli and more.

Now open, this is a bakery in the true spirit of Scandinavia, with great coffee and sweet and savoury treats on offer.

3. Bone Daddies Coming soon, the ramen masters bring their brand of Japanese noodle soup to Nova Food.

4. Crosstown Doughnuts The delicious, much Instagrammed doughnuts, available to buy at the Nova kiosk.

2 MINS WALK

E BRESSENDON PLAC

VICTORIA STATION (VICTORIA LINE)

5. Franco Manca The Nova Food outpost of everyone’s favourite sourdough pizza place, Franco Manca serves delicious, authentic Neopolitan fare.

6. Greenwood

10. Pure Feel-good juices and smoothies made with all-natural ingredients, alongside a range of salads and snacks.

11. Rail House Cafe Adam White's follow-up to the Riding House Café is a lunch, dinner and brunch spot with a bar, private dining room and patio and upstairs bar Puffing Devil.

12. Shake Shack The US burger joint’s sixth London site, offering burgers, fries and ’shakes.

13. Sourced Market

Somewhere between a classic pub and a restaurant, Greenwood also houses bar games like pool and ping pong.

Less a traditional store, more an eclectic, vibrant collection of products from artisanal food and drink producers from London and beyond.

7. Hai Cenato

14. Sticks ’N’ Sushi

One of the most high-profile chefs to come to Nova was Jason Atherton. Hai Cenato specialises in the

The restaurant specialises in highquality sushi and Japanese barbecue, set to open soon.

15. Stoke House A carvery in the contemporary American mould, this unique diner from restaurateur Will Ricker specialises in wood-fired cooking and smoked meats.

16. Timmy Green A new all-day restaurant, Timmy Green does a great line in afternoon tea and a good old Aussie brunch. Photograph by ###

17. Vagabond Load up a card and try measures or full glasses of some truly exciting wines and beers, alongside a compact but delicious food menu. ●

85


WIN WIN

A TASTE OF NOVA If you haven’t discovered the cafés, bars and restaurants at Nova Food yet, enter to win the chance to find out exactly what’s on offer at London’s newest gourmet destination

A

S ONE OF London’s newest food and drink hubs, Nova Food is a mustvisit for those with an appetite for discovering some brilliant bars, restaurants and retailers in a part of town where there’s tonnes going on. The decade-long transformation has culminated in the arrival of Nova, Victoria, which has already become a local landmark, as well as an essential spot for those who want to discover some

86

NOVA IS A ‘DAWN TILL DUSK’ PLACE WHERE YOU’LL FIND WHATEVER YOU’RE AFTER

of the capital’s newest places to eat out. There are loads of exciting venues open already, and some exciting restaurants are still to come. As a ‘dawn till dusk’ destination, whether you’re looking for breakfast, lunch, dinner, or a snack, afternoon tea or pre-theatre meal, you’ll find just what you’re after, and a handy location just a few minutes’ away from Victoria station, opposite the District Line exit, makes it easily accessible.


COMPETITION

HOW TO ENTER

WIN

If a taste of what Nova, Victoria has to offer sounds like your kind of thing, listen up: we’ve partnered with Nova Food to offer six lucky winners prizes including coffee every day for a month, a Christmas feast for four, craft beers, afternoon tea, a three-course dinner and more. For a chance of winning one of these six prizes, just answer a question. For T&Cs, more information and to enter, go to fdsm.co/nova

Photographs by (roast) Elena Shamis; (fish) JeanCazals; (afternoon tea) Leyla Kazim

Pop in for coffee, pick up artisanal produce from small UKbased producers, settle in for a lazy brunch, or grab a sushi dinner, and that’s just for starters. To get a real taste of what’s available, foodism has teamed up with Nova to offer six prizes across its venues. The prizes on offer are: 1 A Christmas feast for four at modern British carvery Stoke House (worth £300), complete with glass of bubbly on arrival, white or red wine or beer 2 A Pop Art Afternoon Tea for two (worth £90) with bottomless prosecco at Australian-inspired Timmy Green 3 A three-course dinner for two at one of Aster’s Thursday night Live Music Nights (worth £125), including a bottle of sommelier-selected wine and a glass of bubbles on arrival 4 A three-course dinner for four and a bottle of wine at Franco Manca (worth £100) 5 A hand-picked selection of six craft beers from Brixton Brewery (worth £25) from Sourced Market, which works with some of the UK’s best small, artisan producers to offer everything from coffee and craft beer to charcuterie and croissants. 6 A free coffee every day for the month of December (worth £120) from Notes, a coffee house and wine bar serving up brews and wines with a side line in stellar snacks and small-plates. ●

WIN

WIN

Find out more about Nova Food at createvictoria.com/nova-food

87


— PART 3 —

EXCESS “I’M GIVEN A GLUG-BY-GLUG EDUCATION IN THE PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE OF WINE IN THE ADELAIDE HILLS” RONAN J O’SHEA GETS A CRASH COURSE IN SOUTH AUSTRALIAN WINE, 090

096 ORIGINS: RON ABUELO | 104 BOTTLE SERVICE | 110 AWARDS ROUND-UP 111 THE DIGEST | 114 INSIDER | 120 THE SELECTOR | 130 DECONSTRUCT


AUSTRALIA

FIELDS OF GOLD

There’s a new wave of winemakers making full use of South Australia’s rich and varied terroirs, and the results are pretty impressive, says Ronan J O’Shea

90


Photograph by ###

91


A

LTHOUGH WE’VE ONLY been driving away from the city for 15 minutes, the skyscrapers of Adelaide are a distant memory as we head out into the countryside. Hills snake and bend, trees grow larger and more verdant, criss-crossing above us into a canopy. The fields stretch for miles and, scorched yellow, are ready for a few months’ rest after a long summer, while the occasional “kangaroos crossing” sign is a dead giveaway that I’m a very long way from home. My guide, David – an Adelaide native and wine journalist – pulls up outside the Summertown Aristologist, a whitewashed building with a couple of tables and chairs outside that looks more like a saloon than a restaurant and wine cellar. Half expecting a snaggle-toothed old-timer to ward me off the porch with a thousand-yard stare and gentle tap of his shotgun, I’m pleased to discover those inside this former grocery store are welcoming. Owner Aaron Fenwick isn’t your typical wine connoisseur. Fully bearded, with a rake of tattoos down each arm, he looks more Dalston hipster than wine guy, which makes him exactly the right person to tell us about the bunch of creative young winemakers shaking things up in South Australia’s Adelaide Hills region. As we chat, Fenwick opens a bottle from Commune of Buttons, a winery from the Basket Range area. Eschewing a corkscrew, he opts instead for a huge bowie knife, which he then duly tosses to the floor before doling out healthy measures of a fantastic natural white wine. It’s a far cry from any stuffy elitism you might find in certain London restaurants, but don’t mistake that for ignorance. Over the next hour, I’m given a glug-by-glug education in the past, present and future of wine in the Adelaide Hills and beyond – and it’s eye-opening. Grapes have been grown and wine produced in South Australia since it was settled in the 19th century, but only in relatively recent times has its reputation begun to filter further afield. As a state, “SA”, as they call it here, was a planned settlement rather than a colony – this, combined with an arid climate, goes a long way to explaining its development.

92

The state benefits from hugely diverse terroirs, often in one valley, sometimes even within the same vineyard. McLaren Vale, for example, is believed to have been as mountainous as the Himalayas twice throughout the aeons, a tumultuous change in landscape which has left the now-relatively flat region enormously varied in terms of soil types. This gives modern, more knowledgeable (and adventurous) grape growers the ability to both experiment with varietals and maximise the land available to them by planting higheryielding vines. In previous years, growers stuck with whatever worked first, not necessarily what worked best. These days, modern technology and research are allowing them to

SOUTH AUSTRALIA BENEFITS FROM HUGELY DIVERSE TERROIRS, SOMETIMES WITHIN ONE VINEYARD


Photographs by [small vineyard] William Robinson/Alamy; [main vineyard] Ray

Warren Creative/Alamy; (sign) Iain Masterton/Alamy; (barells) Boris Karpinski/Alamy

A VINE LINE: South Australia’s wine regions include McLaren Vale [main] and Barossa Valley, both of which benefit from the varied terroirs that are so covetable when growing grapes for wine

pinpoint the most efficient way of using their soil, and young winemakers like those in the Adelaide Hills are reaping the rewards. Historically, as a settled state, people came here by choice, though the word must be considered in relative terms; the grape escape is an apt way of describing a necessity rather than adventure. Irish Catholics came to Clare (naming it after the Irish county) to escape famine; Lutheran Germans to flee a king displeased with their desire for religious freedom. While others were forced to the antipodes through the legal system (of sorts), here politics, religion, opportunity or just plain hunger were the driving force. Those who came here found what David describes as “magic soil”. Fruit and vegetables grew in abundance, but the money was in the vines, and it wasn’t long before wineries across the state began to export their wines

back to the old world. In time, winemaking – along with subsistence farming – became the lifeblood of the region. While survival may have been the goal back then, many people continue to find purpose through the soil to this day. Taking the highway south from Adelaide to McLaren Vale, I’m met at the door of winery Brash Higgins by its owner, Brad Hickey. A gentle giant of a man, the Chicagoan spent a summer picking grapes here around a decade ago, during which time he earned the nickname that now adorns his wines. “Everyone gets a nickname in Australia,” he tells me as we take a drive over the rolling hills of McLaren Vale, looking out over rugged coastline. “But to be American and get a nice one from the Aussies you have to be lucky.” The reason behind it was circumspect but not unusual; wineries would historically

write down their employees’ ‘names’ on the off-chance immigration officials turned up, ensuring they had something to show. Staying under the radar just long enough to fall in love with the place (and a local woman to boot), he decided to stick around, and has since made a name for himself as a winemaker of high-quality organic wines. As we sit enjoying one of them (a lively, spicy blend of grenache and mataro) that afternoon, it becomes clear he’s as eager as anyone to extol the quality of South Australian wine and that ‘magic soil’. Indeed, the interior of his house is home to a wallsized map showing the terroir of the valley, and the vast diversity of soil. Throughout my time in the state, toil and luck seem to be the key elements that drive people. The following day, while walking around Coomunga Wines in Port Lincoln →

93


GRAPE EXPECTATIONS: [main] the grape harvest at Peter Lehmann Wines in Barossa Valley; [left] Peter Lehmann is often cited as the modern godfather of winemaking in South Australia

IT’S WHAT LIES BENEATH THE GROUND THAT BREATHES LIFE INTO SOUTH AUSTRALIA

94

Saltram winery, he was charged with telling them their crop wouldn’t be bought that year. Refusing to renege on his word, he promised the growers he’d purchase their grapes and did, at great personal risk. The rest is history: Lehmann became one of the biggest producers of wine in South Australia. Though the company was sold to wine giant Casella in 2014, developments since have raised hopes the soul of the vineyard won’t be ripped out. Before leaving, I inspect the Queen of Hearts paintings on the walls (Lehmann was a firm believer in luck, but perhaps more importantly, a lover of 52-deck high-stake card games). I also look at the ironstone wall above the cellar door counter. Made from the very same soil used to grow his grapes, it’s a reminder that with each passing season and trend, every drought and golden harvest, that it’s what’s beneath the ground that breathes life into South Australia. And boy, do they know how to live it. f

NEED TO KNOW

To find out more about travelling to South Australia and discovering its winemakers, go to southaustralia.com. Return flights to Adelaide from £723 with Qantas. qantas.com

Photographs by (both) Eric Nathan/Alamy

→ (not traditionally a key wine area but one that’s starting to make noises), winemaker Peter Clutterbuck shows me his method of deciding when to harvest. Using a small device called a refractometer, he can measure the acidity of his grapes. It’s not rocket science, but like everything in the business, it requires patience, strong attention to detail and more of that good fortune. “When I was planting these,” he says, pointing to a small cluster of vines on his

farm, “I wasn’t sure they’d do well. But that’s when we discovered the soil underneath was clay.” Clay, he explains, is ideal for certain grape varietals, its high moisture content saving him a great deal on irrigation costs. Sampling a glass later on, the fruits of both labour and luck prove impressive. “What does Coomunga mean?” I ask, sipping from a glass as we sit in his shed. He smiles, and replies “World’s best wine.” There are 27 Australian Aboriginal languages, and I’m pretty sure he’s lying in every last one of them. But as I look at a flavour profile chart on his wall and try to make sense of it, I can tell one thing for sure; the man’s doing something right with his grapes. His small farm is a far cry from the winery I visit a few days later in the famous Barossa Valley, but the similarities in the approach to growing remain clear. Standing in the foyer of Peter Lehmann Wines, the scale is grander, the decor pricier, the cellar door existent, but the principles remain the same: good grapes; hard work; fine wine. Often cited as the modern godfather of winemaking in the state, Lehmann (prior to his death in 2013) was a larger-than-life sort of guy who famously saved the livelihoods of numerous grape-growing families working for him. In 1977, while working for the


PROMOTION

SPIRIT OF FRANCE Sauvelle Vodka is a unique spirit born in Cognac, raised in Bordeaux, whose quality makes it a favourite among bartenders and casual drinkers alike

N

AMES ARE VERY important. Names, they say, have power. Sauvelle Vodka agrees. It took many, many hours to select the brand’s name, knowing the importance of how it needed to sound, how it needed to look, and how it needed to ‘fit’ with what the distiller hoped its vodka would be. When they came up with the name Sauvelle, a combination of the wild – (sauvage) and the beautiful (belle), they instinctively knew they were on the right track. And once you try Sauvelle Vodka, we suspect you’ll understand why they felt that way.

SAUVELLE VODKA APPEALS TO THE DRINKER AND TO THE MIXOLOGIST

However, some names need no introduction; they simply engender an emotional response, and instantly evoke a sense of class and quality. It’s what Sauvelle, ultimately, strive for: a name that strikes a mood. Many have already achieved such status. Take Bordeaux, for example. This French city may be famous for its port, its architecture, its river, its museums but they’re not the first things that spring to mind. It’s the wine, because Bordeaux is not just famous for its wine, it’s synonymous with wines of class, quality, a certain pedigree. You don’t have to move far from Bordeaux to find another town that serves as an example. Cognac’s name carries so much weight, such a stellar reputation, as this town lends its name to one of the world’s finest spirits. When Sauvelle was looking for a home for its small-batch vodka, it took inspiration from the name, and the spirit behind it, and thus combined the two.

Bordeaux is the brand’s base, but the liquid is created in a microdistillery in the heart of Cognac, using local wheat and the clear waters of Gensac. It is then smoothened with Chene du Limousin oak. This process results in a vodka of rare purity – but they tend not to focus on that. Purity is boring; it’s flavour that’s interesting, and Sauvelle’s recipe results in a luxuriant liquid with notes of vanilla, caramel and cherry blossom, a hint of oak, a hint of pepper... It’s a spirit that appeals to the drinker and the mixologist; to the free-spirited, the bon-vivant, the welltravelled, the stylish; a vodka that shines in cocktails but is nuanced and smooth enough to be savoured on its own. Sauvelle may echo the exceptional quality of those drinks from its adopted home(s), but it also remains timeless, and free-roaming, a drink that’s as much at home in an autumnal cocktail as it is over ice by the Mediterranean… ● sauvellevodka.com

95


ORIGINS

SWEET SPIRIT Panama’s Ron Abuelo is making modern rum in an old-fashioned way, says Lydia Winter

96


Photograph by ###

HALL OF FAME: Inside one of Ron Abuelo’s bodegas, where the rum rests in barrels until it’s matured

97


R

UMBLING ALONG A dirt path in a brightly painted cart pulled along by two oxen, I feel like I’ve been put in a time machine and pitched up in a time before cars, air conditioning and other modern conveniences. The sun is beating down on the back of my neck and, aside from the buzz and crackle of insects, it’s almost completely silent. We overtake another cart, this time not carrying a sweaty journalist but a towering pile of woody stems: freshly harvested sugar cane, which is destined to become Ron Abuelo, Panama’s oldest and best-known rum. It’s distilled here at Hacienda San Isidro in the Las Cabras area, a three-and-a-half-hour drive from Panama City, Panama. We pass underneath a picturesque arch, the path becomes a paved road, and my old-world reverie begins to fade as we come to rest outside a modern building overlooking the fields. I pause to absorb the romance of the scene: fuchsia-coloured bougainvillea peeks out from every corner; palm trees gently fan the blue sky; and several of the brightly painted carts dot the landscape, manned by men wearing the now-familiar panama hat. Behind me are 11 wood-fronted bodegas; silent, reverential

THEY CONTROL 100% OF THE PRODUCTION PROCESS, HANDHARVESTING THE CANE BEFORE DISTILLATION 98

halls filled with wooden barrels of rum that are quietly and purposefully lying in wait until they reach perfect maturity. This is what makes Ron Abuelo so special: its cache of oak-aged rums, ranging from the seven-year-old to the centurian, which is made up of rums aged for a total of 100 years altogether. Abuelo means ‘grandfather’ in Spanish: a nod to the brand’s history as Panama’s oldest rum producer. The story began in 1908, when Spanish immigrant Don José Varela Blanco arrived in Pesé – a small town in Las Cabras, near to where the distillery is located. There he established the country’s first sugar mill, and

by 1936, he and his three sons began distilling alcohol from freshly pressed sugarcane juice. Today, the Varela family – third-generation descendants of Don José – continues to distil spirits from nearly 3,000 acres of estate-owned crops, one of the few rum brands in the world to do so. They control 100% of the production process, hand-harvesting the cane before distilling and ageing the liquid on the estate. The company’s development goes in hand in hand with Panama’s, so much so that Juan Carlos Varela became president in 2014. Politics aside, it’s the distilling process that I’m here to see. It’s February, right in the middle of the sugarcane harvest, which


THINGS HAVE BEEN DONE THIS WAY FOR ALMOST A CENTURY, SO WHY CHANGE?

ON THE RUM: (above left) The Centuria is the jewel in the estate’s crown; (below left) workers harvesting sugar cane; (below right) an oak cask

means the processing plant and its employees are working 24 hours a day bringing the cane to be crushed. The fibrous stems are mashed, a machine extracts the sugar cane juice, and the crushed pulp waste is burned to generate power to crush the cane. Aside from obvious technological developments, things have been this way for almost a century, since Don José first embarked on his mission. The thinking is clear: why change the very things that made it so special in the first place? While Caribbean countries tend to have the monopoly on rum in the UK, there’s a reason why Panamanian rums deserve to be recognised. Panama, long and narrow in shape, has distinct weather patterns, particularly around Pesé, which is located in a fertile valley in the Azuero peninsula, giving the rum a unique terroir. What’s really significant is that the area lacks summer rain (a phenomenon called arco seco, or dry arch), and it boasts both Caribbean heat and air from the Pacific Ocean, so it has a unique microclimate of temperature and humidity. This is obviously important because it results in an abundance of sugar cane, but also because it has a distinctive effect on the aging process. Ron Abuelo ages its rums in American white oak barrels, starting with the Anejo, a delicately spiced spirit that’s ideal for cocktails. Next up is the deeper, more caramel-flavoured 7 Anos, aged for seven years in oak barrels. The Anejo 12 years is where things start to get interesting. It’s Abuelo’s flagship rum, designed to truly reflect the brand’s precise production process and love of tradition. And it shows: the liquid is smooth and complex – ideal for sipping, like a whisky or cognac. Finally, there’s the Centuria, a limitededition spirit that was initially produced to →

99


SWEET LIKE SUGAR: (from top) Harvesting the sugar cane at the Varela estate; some of the sugar cane is still transported by ox and cart

→ celebrate 100 years of rum production, and the Varela family opened up their private stock – featuring rums that have been aged for more than 30 years – in order to make it. A unique solera system is used to preserve the liquid’s character over such a lengthy period, especially given that it’s being produced in such small quantities.

100

The taste is phenomenal: buttery and rich, with notes of vanilla and honey – it’s my favourite from the Ron Abuelo stable. With such a complex range of flavours, it’s unsurprising that Ron Abuelo has a loyal following in London bars. Chris Tanner, bar manager at The Vaults, Soho, particularly likes the seven-year-old rum. “I use it in classic cocktails like an old fashioned or a manhatttan. The sweetness and age of Ron Abuelo’s rum mean you can swap it for whiskey and make these robust drinks more approachable.” This versatility and finishing process is Ron Abuelo’s hallmark, which it has recently applied to a new collection of three rums finished in a different casks: oloroso sherry, tawny port or cognac. Each of these serves is delicious, imbued with a unique flavour. As you can probably imagine, I become very well acquainted with the Ron Abuelo portfolio during my stay in the country. Each of the rums is sophisticated and refined; a perfect match for the elegant

THE TASTE IS BUTTERY AND RICH, WITH NOTES OF VANILLA AND HONEY surrounds of Panama City’s crumbling Casco Viejo quarter, where cool tapas restaurants occupy vine-covered ruins and young people flock to buzzy rooftop bars in search of a breeze. It’s a melting pot of old-world colonial charm and modern sensibilities, with an irresistibly unique character – much like its favourite rum. f ronabuelopanama.com


E T S A T T N I FRESH M R A G U S O ZER m the Swiss mountains

fro Long lasting refreshment

Peppermint / Mentha x piperita

With our unique blend of 13 Swiss herbs

ricola.com


COMPETITION

WIN

EYES ON THE PRIZE To make this festive season extra special, Silent Pool Distillers has put together a hamper to reinvent one lucky reader’s home cocktail-making ahead of Christmas

C

HRISTMAS IS FAST approaching, and to help you get into the spirit of the season, Silent Pool Distillers has a fantastic prize on offer for one lucky reader this winter. Given that Christmas is the time to be merry, Silent Pool want you to be merry with friends (and with plenty of alcohol, of course).

By entering, you’ll be in with a chance of winning a ‘Silent Pool Bartender Kit’, including a bottle of the distiller's award winning Silent Pool Gin, created using 24 of the finest botanicals, as well as a beautiful set of glasses and three of the brand’s innovative Silent Pool Mists; a liquid garnish designed to enhance the botanicals in your drink.

SILENT POOL MISTS ARE DESIGNED TO ENHANCE THE GIN’S BOTANICALS

The perfect serve For the perfect G&T, load your Silent Pool Copa glass with ice, add a shot of Silent Pool Gin, mix with your tonic of choice, and finish with two sprays of Silent Pool’s liquid mist garnish. With three flavours to choose from – Bergamot Orange, Kaffir Lime and seasonal favourite Christmas Spirit – this fabulous kit will raise your homemade cocktail game to grand new heights. ●

HOW TO WIN

WIN

We’re giving one lucky reader the chance to win a 70cl bottle of delicious Silent Pool Gin, six signature Copa glasses plus three 3cl botanical Mists – one each of Kaffir Lime, Bergamot Orange and Christmas Spirit. Fancy it? Head to fdsm.co/silent-night and you might just be in luck.

103

WIN

WIN


COLD AS RICE: Sake is a wine made from rice polished and buffed to different sizes, which affects the roundness and flavour of the finished product after fermentation and ageing. Usually, better-quality sake is served cold, as nuances of flavour can get lost when the temperature gets too high. It’s usually served in a ceramic or wooden cup called an o-choko.

DRINK

BOTTLE ROCKETS This month, we run the rule over some serious sake, as well as our favourite wheat- and ryebased vodkas and old- and new-school ciders PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID HARRISON

104


2

3 4

1 5

Got a hankering for some Japanese rice wine? Check out these five great sakes: 1 GEKKEIKAN IWAIMAI DAIGINJO SAKE, Kyoto, Japan. Brewed from Iwai rice and Kyoto mineral water, this has light, fruity overtones. Serve it chilled. 72cl, 14%; £34.78 2 GEKKEIKAN GENSEN SOZAI JUNMAI, Kyoto, Japan. Junmai-grade sake, dry and full-bodied, made from rice polished down to 70% of its original size. 300ml, 14%; £9.30 3 KASUMITSURU KINGYO SPARKLING NIGORI, Hyogo, Japan. A lightly carbonated sake made without the addition of

brewers’ alcohol (common in the sake industry) and unpasteurised. Light and crisp. 14%, 280ml; £7.20 4 OZEKI DRY SAKE, Hollister, California. A light and well-rounded sake, this sake from Japanese-Californian sake brewer Ozeki is a great one for sake novices. It’s refreshing and fruity, and pairs well with seafood. 375ml, 14.5%; £7.98 5 OZEKI NIGORI, Hollister, California. This sake, much like wine aged on the lees, benefits from the subtle flavours of the moromi, or fermenting mixture. A great all-rounder. 375ml, 14.5%; £9.98 All sakes available from japancentre.com

105


OFFICIAL SPONSOR

MEDIA PARTNER

4 MARCH Enjoy the magic of OVO with a premium hospitality experience at the Royal Albert Hall

Call: 020 3036 9062 royalalberthall.com


CIDER HOUSES RULE: Cider, or cyder, has dominated the South West’s brewing scene for centuries. But as much as some of the great old cider houses are still going, newschool brewers are popping up, too.

1

2

3

4

1 URBAN ORCHARD, London, UK. The flagship cider by Hawkes Cidery, which makes use of an apple donation scheme by small-scale growers. 330ml, 4.5%; £2.10, beermerchants.com 2 SHEPPY’S 2016 VINTAGE RESERVE CIDER, Taunton, UK. A classic cider from the more-than 200-year-old brewer, made from only 2016 apples. 500ml, 7.4%; £2.09, waitrose.com 3 ORCHARD PIG HOGFATHER, West Bradley, UK. A gently sparkling cider from the Somerset producer, a new addition to the range. 330ml, 7.4%; £2.09, waitrose.com

Photograph by ###

4 ASPALL ORGANIC CYDER, Stowmarket, UK. Aspall founder Perronelle Chevallier was a pioneer of organic farming. The brand’s organic cyder is a modern relic. 500ml, 7%; £2, ocado.com

107


GRAIN FEEDER: Vodka can be distilled from pretty much anything that has natural sugars that can be converted to alcohol. Often it’s made with grapes or potatoes, but these four are made with wheat or rye grain, which usually give creamier and spicier notes.

1 2

4

3

1 WRY VODKA, Guildford, UK. Made by the distilling team behind Silent Pool Gin, Wry Vodka is a, er, rye vodka that’s charcoalfiltered and distilled with extra rye grain. It’s creamy and refined, with a hint of spice. 70cl, 40%; £20, silentpooldistillers.com 2 ABSOLUT RAINBOW COLOURS, Åhus, Sweden. A limited-edition bottle design for the brand’s ‘Kiss With Pride’ LGBTQ awareness campaign with Stonewall. 1l, 40%; £27.50, amazon.co.uk 3 TOM OF FINLAND, Kuopio, Finland. A wheat vodka produced in Finland and inspired by legendary Finnish gay icon Touko Laaksonen. 50cl, 40%; £24.95, masterofmalt.com

108

Photograph by ###

4 BELVEDERE SINGLE ESTATE LAKE BARTĘŻEK, Polmos Zyrardów, Poland. Part of Belvedere’s new single-estate series, this vodka is made from a crop of diamond rye from the village of Lake Bartężek. 75cl, 40%; £49, Clos19.com


VINTAGE BAR On the move

around the UK

For those who like a touch of elegance, socialising and anything Vintage‌‌ Our classic Horse Boxes are perfect for any event. Corporate functions, festivals, weddings, parties and even afternoon teas. We specialise in premium spirits, Fizz, cocktails, Craft Ales, lagers and ciders

info@oscarsbarhire.co.uk

www.oscarsbarhire.co.uk


t h e w h i s k y e xc h a n g e | h a rv e y n i c h o l s | h e d o n i s m | s e l f r i d g e s

t h e w h i s k y e xc h a n g e

s p i r i t o f t he y e a r 2 017 garden tiger dry gin

b r e at h ta k i n g ly c o m p l e x g i n a n d e au x d e v i e

www.c apreolusdistillery.co.uk


BITE-SIZED

FOODISM.CO.UK/ NEWSLETTER

THE DIGEST This month’s food and drink news, including two big birthdays and some good, good food

FEELING GOOD

Awards season is upon us, and a total of four London restaurants and one street food stall came out on top at the Sustainable Restaurant Association’s Food Made Good Awards in October. Brunch spot The Breakfast Club picked up the Support Global Farmers award for its sourcing policy on avocados, which ensures farmers in Latin America get a fair deal for their produce, and Quaker House won the Support the Community for its bakery, which employs men with personality disorders. Elsewhere,

Borough Market trader Gourmet Goat was recognised for its resourceful use of kid goat and rose veal; Petersham Nurseries triumphed in the Serve More Veg and Better Meat category, thanks to executive chef Damian Clisby’s outstanding commitment to sourcing and campaigning for quality produce; and The OXO Tower Restaurant took home the Food Made Good Champion award for its involvement in the SRA’s monthly campaigns to make food good over the last year. How good does that feel? See the list of winners in full at fdsm.co/food-made-good

HISTORY LESSON

SMART THINKING This year is the twentieth anniversary of Streetsmart, which raises money for the homeless and vulnerable through UK restaurants each November and December. The charity has raised more than £8.2m since it was founded by Mary-Lou Sturridge and William Sieghart, and more than 500 restaurants have signed up for this year’s campaign. For more info, and a list of participating restaurants, go to streetsmart.org.uk

There are long-standing London dining institutions, and then there’s Wiltons on Jermyn Street, which was founded in 1742 – before the US Declaration of Independence, before the industrial revolution, and even before the first use of #foodporn on Insta. Famed for its oysters (Queen Victoria was a fan), Wiltons’ enduring success will be commemorated by a green plaque, but we’d recommend toasting the restaurant’s longevity by tucking into its celebrated game, fish or, best of all, those oysters. wiltons.co.uk

111


PARTY POLITICS

Remember that time when you and your mates bought all the food in the world, stuck it on a table and invited dancers round to serve champagne? Should have taken a picture, because if you had you could have entered it into the Food for Celebration category of the Pink Lady Food Photographer of the Year awards. You have until 6 February to get the perfect shot… pinkladyfoodphotographeroftheyear.com

Photographs by 9Street Smart) Justine Trickett; (Wiltons) Michael Paul

LIBERTY: BELLE Iconic Soho department store Liberty London now has its own mini British food hall, stocked with products from small producers all over the British Isles, including Pump Street chocolate, Jensen’s Old Tom gin and a wine from London Cru. Each of the 50-plus items – some created specifically for the store – gets a Liberty twist, with packaging designed by 15 different illustrators. Available now libertylondon.com

SMALL WONDERS

WOOD IF I COULD

Japanese mizunara oak is prized for the incense-like spiciness it imparts to whisky, but its permeability and hardness means it’s rarely used for long-term ageing. Suntory, though, has cracked it, and the Yamazaki Mizunara 2017 is the stunning result – a blend of single malts, each aged more than 18 years in mizunara, with a price tag to match its rarity. £1,000, selected retailers. suntory.com

112

You know autumn’s here when the temperature falls, the leaves drop, and the annual ETM Slider Decider competition rolls around again. The 2017 edition was held at The Botanist on Broadgate Circle, and gathered together a serious roster of tiny-burger-making talent from some of the capital’s most exciting restaurants. The winner was Tuyo’s Ricardo Pimental with his Bellota slider with homemade piquillo ketchup, agri-dolce shallots, tzatziki and manchego, while runner-up was Mark Morrans of Señor Ceviche. His Peruvian Vurger was entirely vegan, with a shiitake, miso and quinoa patty with dairy free ‘American’ cheese. For more info: etmgroup.co.uk/events


1

UK TRAVEL

INSIDER

Fancy scoffing fish and chips in front of a lively autumn sea? Head to Ramsgate, says Hannah Summers Albion House, Ramsgate Here’s a good pub fact for you: Ramsgate is home to the only Royal Harbour in the UK. Yep, that’s Ramsgate, Kent, that southern seaside town that probably won’t feature on your holiday radar all that much. Except it should. This isn’t a Blackpool, a Brighton or a Hastings. No neon lights, no tattooed hipsters (yet) and no shiny new pier. Instead, there are Georgian terraces, a crazy network of wartime tunnels and the best fish and chips with the worst service you could ever hope to encounter (at Peter’s Fish Factory). At the centre of all this fun is Albion House, a clifftop, 14-bedroom boutique hotel which was built in 1791 and even hosted Princess Victoria before she was crowned queen.

Keen to explore more of the UK's tastiest destinations? Go to foodism.co.uk for food and drink guides around the country, and further afield, too.

114

Sea-view rooms come with muted tones, high ceilings, marble bathrooms and big, long windows overlooking the pretty harbour – throw them open for some seagull sounds. Beds are big and plump, but don’t linger too long as breakfast is a huge feast in a pretty, sunlit room perfect for spreading out with the papers and a couple of bloody marys. Come evening, the restaurant is a calm, candlelit space serving roast sirloin with carrot mash, and generous cheese boards showcasing the best of Kent and East Sussex. If you need a drink afterwards, head to The Ravensgate Arms for local beers, beaten up armchairs and a real fire. f

WYATT & JONES Three miles along the coast from Ramsgate is the town of Broadstairs, which is a must for a pretty beach chock-full of gallivanting dogs, excellent micro pubs and one of the best restaurants in the South – Wyatt & Jones. Start with some oysters and check out the specials – our pick was a sharing platter of chateaubriand with the crispiest roast potatoes, a rich and punchy garlicky gravy and soft, buttered carrots. Unforgettable. 23-27 Harbour Street, Broadstairs; wyattandjones.co.uk

2

From £100 a night B&B. Albion Place, Ramsgate, CT11 8HQ. albionhouseramsgate.co.uk

RAMSGATE ◆◆ Population: 40,408 ◆◆ Area: Thanet,

East Kent

Forget about Margate: if you want a seaside Kentish ’gate that’s yet to be gatecrashed by hipsters and artists, get yourself to Ramsgate and its Isle of Thanet sister town Broadstairs.


GETTING THERE

Trains go between Charing Cross, London Victoria and St Pancras to Margate, Broadstairs and Ramsgate. Journey times range from 1 hour 15 to 2 hours. Get trip tips at foodism.co.uk

BARNSOLE VINEYARD

It’s no secret that South East England’s packed with excellent vineyards, and east Kent has one all of its own – boutique winery Barnsole, with a lineup that includes (of course) an English sparkling wine, plus singlevarietal and blended whites and reds. The vineyards were originally planted in the early nineties, but a second planting of chardonnay and pinot noir in 2013 means good things for the winery’s sparkling wine game in the future. For a taste of what they’re up to, take a one-hour tour with Barnsole’s winemaker – £11 gets you a lesson on local winemaking history, insight into what the team are up to and a guided tasting of their still and sparkling wines. Fleming Road, Staple; barnsole.co.uk

3

4

Photograph by [Gadd's brewery] James Bryan; ]fruits de mer] Cultura Creative (RF) / Alamy Stock Photo

FRUITS DE MER Given Ramsgate’s location overlooking the Channel, you might expect it (and neighbouring Broadstairs and Margate) to be bursting with fishmongers. In fact, you’ll find a relative dearth – though Fruits de Mer in Broadstairs, run by Jason Llewellyn for the last three decades, does a good job of representing the local waters’ bounty. Not only does he supply many of east Kent’s restaurants, but his Broadstairs shop means locals (and visitors like us) can enjoy fresh local crab, lobster, turbot, gurnard, sole and more. 10 The Broadway, Broadstairs

GADDS’ BREWERY

The green, highly aromatic flowers of the hop plant impart loads of the flavour in beer – from bitterness and zesty citrus notes to that ‘dank’, resinous weediness beer-hipsters are currently loving. The UK has a long history of hop growing, but you’ll only find them cultivated on any scale in the West Midlands and SouthEast England; which is where it all began. Gadd's Ramsgate brewery (it’s actually nearer Broadstairs) makes the most of east Kent golding hops (mixed in with others from further afield), with some of them grown just down the road. Keep an eye out for seasonal specials that often use other, less traditionally beery, produce from the garden of England, including cherries and apricots. Pyson's Road Ind Est, Broadstairs; ramsgatebrewery.co.uk

5

115


IN HIGH SPIRITS The Spirit Show on 1-2 December will take you on a world tour of the finest spirits around, with some unusual ones available to taste, as well as pop-up bars and events

C

ELEBRATE OPENING THE first (and second) doors on your Advent Calendar with a visit to the Spirit Show, taking place in London on 1 and 2 December 2017. The show is the perfect place to stock up your drinks cabinet and tick off your Christmas shopping list. Bringing together some of the world’s finest and most unusual spirits, the Spirit Show will take you on a tasting tour like never before. Featuring dozens of brands you

116

won’t find in your local supermarket, the Spirit Show brings together an eclectic selection of spirits that you have probably never heard of and won’t get the opportunity to sample anywhere else. From Land’s End to John O’Groats, via Mexico, the USA and Siberia; the Spirit Show will showcase tantilising tipples for your tastebuds. There’ll be a superb range of the usual suspects – gin, vodka, rum, whisky, tequila and more – but the show will also feature...

The Unusual Suspects SIKERA

An ancient spirit created by the people of Grand Tartaria from Siberia, Sikera means “shine like the sun”. Because of the severe climate, Sikera became a strong drink with a unique character, and a delicate flavour and aroma of sweet berries and fruits. It’s the result of centuries of Grand Tartarian expertise from the creators of the drink. Historically, the taste and character


PROMOTION

WHAT ELSE IS THERE TO DO AT THE SHOW? WSET Tasting Stage The expert tasting tutors from the Wine & Spirit Education Trust will be running a series of sessions to teach visitors how to taste spirits like a pro and what to look for when choosing spirits.

Fentimans Cocktail Experience Master mixers Fentimans will be hosting a series of hands-on demos, teaching visitors a repertoire of cocktail skills that they can take away and show off at home.

Rumming and Relaxing with The Floating Rum Shack Rum expert extraordinaire Peter Holland from the Floating Rum Shack will be hosting a series of rum tastings. His enthusiasm for this cane sugar spirit will transport you away from wintry London to the far-flung shores of the Caribbean and beyond.

Ice Carving with PSD Ice Art The marvellous ice sculptors from PSD Ice Art will be wowing visitors with their skills and creating some very ‘cool’ creations.

of Sikera depended on master’s skills. The master was supposed to know all the secrets of Sikera-making and to be good at picking herbs, berries, nuts and honey. Today, it contains a wide range of natural ingredients and each type has a unique taste and bouquet, and complements meat and fruit desserts. tartaria.us TOBACCO LIQUEUR

Another ancient product, this time from France: Jade Liqueurs developed Perique Tobacco Liqueur to captivate the senses with the aroma of ancient, natively grown tobacco, in a form that effectively negates health concerns. The product is enjoyed in the same way you’d drink a fine liqueur or brandy. bestabsinthe.com/perique MOONSHINE

Taking inspiration from Cornish rebels of the past, The Cornish Moonshine Company has used Cornish barley to create a smooth, five-times-distilled and unaged whiskey. It tastes amazing in cocktails, with the Cornish Moonshine Mojitos being a particular favourite. The team have also just launched 55% Cornish Moonshine Devil Water. cornishmoonshine.com COLLAGIN

There’s no escaping the gin trend at the moment, and while there are hundreds of standout gins at the show, a particularly interesting one is Collagin – the world’s first gin distilled with pure collagen. Young in Spirits, the team behind it, have a vision to merge spirits and beauty into one beautiful union. ● collagin.co.uk

TICKETS Standard tickets start from just £20, and premium tickets from £35. foodism readers can save 10% on all tickets and packages – simply quote FOODISM10 when booking your tickets. And with special offers from all Spirit Show exhibitors, you’re sure to save even more money. For more information and to book visit TheSpiritShow.co.uk. Don’t forget to sign up to the e-newsletter to receive all the latest information about the show.

117


PROMOTION

SAUCE OF ITS OWN Lee Kum Kee’s signature oyster sauce has become the sauce of choice in Chinese cooking, but its umami flavours make it a great choice for Western cooks, too

G

IVEN THE COMPLEX and distinctive taste of oyster sauce, and its rich history in Chinese cooking, you’d be forgiven for thinking its use is largely confined to East Asian dishes. But its unique flavours are also what make it such a versatile cooking

OYSTER SAUCE ADDS A MEATY UNDERTONE WHILE NOT INTRUDING ON DELICATE FLAVOURS 118

ingredient, and one that can add just as much to a classic British dish as it can to a stir-fry. It might be the most widely used sauce in Chinese food – equally adept at marinating meat and seafood as a dipping sauce or dressing cooked food – but there are many Western dishes it can improve when cooking with it. The sauce, which has rightly become a staple of Chinese kitchens all over the world since it was invented by Lee Kum Kee’s founder, provides pure umami flavour when used as a marinade, adding a savoury, meaty undertone while not intruding on the more delicate flavours of a dish. It can also be used to thicken sauces and gravies, bring out umami notes in other ingredients, and even have an enriching effect on the colour and appearance of a dish. From something as simple as a barbecue or a burger to a more complex

dish like a classic British cottage pie, the possibilites for using oyster sauce to make the dishes you know and love are endless. Why not try using it to marinate a joint of lamb before roasting, alongside garlic, lemon juice, ginger and vegetable oil, as well as using it in the gravy you serve on the side? Or, you could use it for a rich onion gravy to accompany sausages and mash, adding it to flour, stock and balsamic vinegar. So next time you see a bottle of Lee Kum Kee’s oyster sauce on the supermarket shelf, think beyond the stir-fry... ● Lee Kum Kee’s range of sauces are available at Tesco, Morrison’s, Waitrose, Sainsbury’s, Amazon, Ocado and all good oriental supermarkets. For more information, go to LKK.com


WHERE BETTER TO GET IN THE FESTIVE SPIRIT? QUOTE FOODISM10

TO SAVE 10% ON TICKETS FOR FRIDAY 1ST DECEMBER

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON OUR TICKET PACKAGES AND TO BOOK VISIT WWW.THESPIRITSHOW.CO.UK DRINK RESPONSIBLY


THE SELECTOR

Like whisky? Here, have all the whisky – and gin, and rum, and sherry. This issue, we track down the bars going all in on one type of booze; restaurants that like to showcase their suppliers; our favourite food masterclasses; and great fast food

In association with

Quote FOODISM10 when booking to save 10% on Friday tickets. For more info: thespiritshow.co.uk

120

THE SELECTOR

THE SPECIAL ONES Going big on one kind of drink doesn’t make a bar a one-trick pony. Here’s where to jump on the trend for specialist bars

 1  Sack 9 Christopher Street, EC2A 2BS

Sherry managed to shed its rep in the UK as an overly sweet spirit for grandmas and trifles a few years ago, and as a result a series of bars dedicated to Spain’s fine fortified wine have cropped up all over town. If you’re yet to jump on the bandwagon, head to Sack, where you’ll find a comprehensive selection covering all aspects of the sherry spectrum, and knowledgeable staff to guide you through the list. 020 3246 0045; sack.bar

1


2

BEST OF THE REST

Photograph by [Sack/Black Rock] Addie Chinn; [Burlock] Photograph Greg by Moss ###

 2  Black Rock

 4  Burlock

9 Christopher Street, EC2A 2BS

31 Duke Street, W1U 1LG

There are more than 250 whiskies on offer at this subterranean Shoreditch bar. Yep, that’s correct. So even if you think you think you know your single malts and blends, it’s likely there’ll be a tipple or two that will challenge your tastebuds. If you’re a novice when it comes to the golden spirit, Black Rock’s a pretty good place to start, with advice and tutored tastings on offer, as well as a selection of whisky-based cocktails.

Hawaiian shirt-clad bartenders and more than 100 varieties of rum bring a touch of Caribbean spirit to the heart of Mayfair at this fun-filled bar that serves up the spirit neat, mixed or in daiquiri form. Can’t decide? The helpful staff will gladly pick out a specific variety suited to your tastes, leaving you free to soak up the convivial atmosphere. And don’t forget to order a round of ‘snaquiris’ mini daiquiris that you can sip... or shot.

020 7247 4580; blackrock.bar

020 7935 3303; burlocklondon.co.uk

 3  Merchant House

 5  Sakagura

13 Well Court, EC4M 9DN

8 Heddon Street, W1B 4BS

This cosy basement bar in the heart of the City doesn’t mess about when it comes to gin - it has one of the largest collections of the botanical spirit in the world. That means more than 300 different varieties to choose from, served classic with tonic or blended into one of the bar’s inventive cocktails. And just in case you’re thinking they’ve put all their chips on Team Gin, they also have more than 300 rums, too. Better bring your A game…

This Japanese restaurant has a secret – a sake cellar that’s stocked with some of the best examples of the Japanese rice wine you could hope to find outside of the Land of the Rising Sun. You can sample them mixed into cocktails such as the Sakagura Sour – where two sakes are blended with vodka and lemon juice – or go for a sake flight, where you can try a variety of different styles neat, including cloudy, sparkling, aged and sweet.

020 7332 0044; merchanthouselondon.com

020 3405 7230; sakaguralondon.com

3

4

5

121


1

 1  Voodoo Ray’s Various locations

THE SELECTOR

THE FAST SHOW When you just need instant satisfaction, enter fast food. Here’s where to get London’s very best

You know that friend from New York who’s always on about “not being able to get a decent slice in this town”? Take them to Voodoo Ray’s, where you can grab quality pizza by the (gigantic) slice – or a whole 26” pie if you’re really, really hungry. Toppings go from classic pepperoni or american hot to stuff like spinach, broccoli and ricotta and even fully vegan slices, all backed up by great craft beers and cocktails. voodoorays.com

2

BEST OF THE REST  2  BIRD

 4  Bubbledogs

81 Holloway Road, N1 8LT

70 Charlotte Street, W1T 4QG

Fried chicken’s hard to beat when it’s done properly. That’s why we like BIRD, which serves free-range fried chicken ‘the way it’s meant to be’. That means in a variety of sandwiches (Buffalo Blue, we’re coming for you), or straight-up on the bone, with loads of sauces to dip it in. It’s finger-lick… oh, wait. That one’s taken.

It’s not just the fact that the hot dogs here are paired with an extensive selection of champagnes that makes them fancy (although, clearly, it helps) – it’s the array of toppings that really get people swooning. Choose from the likes of the Mac Daddy –slathered with macaroni and cheese – or the BLT, a pimpedout version of the classic with truffle mayo.

020 3195 8788; birdrestaurants.com

020 7637 7770; bubbledogs.co.uk

 3  Yard Sale Pizza

 5  Bleecker Burger

15 Hoe Street, E17 4SD

Various locations

What started as a supper club is now a threebranch-strong collection of pizza joints that serve everything from a simple margherita, to leftfield pizzas like the Benedict Cumberland, with semi-dried tomatoes, kale, chilli and cumberland sausage. Ingredients are carefully sourced, super fresh and top quality, so you can eat your pizza guilt-free. Kind of.

Countless joints have helped redefine the burger over the last few years, but Bleecker – one of the first wave – is still among the best, with its aged-beef patties the stuff of legend. Bleeker’s now grown into a burgeoning restaurant empire, with the latest in the brandnew Bloomberg HQ in the City – but don’t panic, you can still get Angry Fries. Phew.

020 8509 0888; yardsalepizza.com

bleeckerburger.co.uk

122

3

4

 5


BEST OF THE REST  2  Pied à Terre

 4  Macellaio RC

34 Charlotte Street, W1T 2NH

Arch 24, 229 Union Street, SE1 0LR

It’s not often you get a truly behind-the-scenes experience at a Michelin-starred restaurant, but that’s exactly what Pied à Terre’s Kitchen Masterclass Experience is. Spend the morning with head chef Asimakis Chaniotis, who’ll demonstrate how to prepare three dishes as well as explaining how to use different ingredients and flavour combinations.

This Italian steakhouse offers interactive butchery classes at the Union Street branch, where the head butcher will explain different cuts of meat, and you’ll learn about the distinctive fassone beef that the restaurant uses, as well as cooking some dishes yourself. The three-hour class includes a three-course meal at the restaurant.

£195; 020 7636 1178; pied-a-terre.co.uk

£90; 020 3848 0529; macellaiorc.com

 3  Bellavita Academy

 5  Restaurant Gordon Ramsay

11c Dock Street, E1 8JN

68 Royal Hospital Road, SW3 4HP

Simone Remoli’s eponymous pasta restaurants serve up some pretty fine plates of Italian food, and now the chef is sharing his pasta-making experience in a series of new courses at the Bellavita Academy. The courses take place one evening a week over a period of four weeks, and take in everything from plain and filled pastas to gnocchi and baked dishes.

Restaurant Gordon Ramsay is a serious place, and its bespoke masterclasses are a serious experience. You’ll be guided through the creation of a three-course lunch for two, before joining your guest in the restaurant to eat the fruits of your labour. The experience costs £600 per couple including one attendee to the masterclass, lunch for two and paired wines.

£320; pastaremoli.co.uk/masterclasses

020 7592 1226; gordonramsayrestaurants.com

2

3

4

 5

THE SELECTOR

BACK 2 SCHOOL

If you want to learn how to cook like a boss, it’s time you got a lesson from those at the top  1  Bread Ahead 249 Pavilion Road, SW1X 0BP Photograph by [Bread Ahead] Jason Bailey

Not satisfied with supplying Londoners with some of the best baked goods around, the team behind Borough Market-based Bread Ahead decided to set up a school running bread-making classes. So phenomenally popular was the concept, they’ve now expanded to several sites, and the newest, in Chelsea, combines a school upstairs with a bakery downstairs. So you can pick up a loaf if things don’t quite go according to plan…

1

020 7403 5444; breadahead.com

123


FOLLOW US @FOODISMUK

FOODISMUK

 1  Wright Brothers Various locations

As well as sourcing from Billingsgate Market, the Wright Brothers five seafoodfocused restaurants also benefit from close relationships with suppliers in Scotland and the West Country, too. This results in the occasional evening events, with menu takeovers devoted showcasing produce. Look out for an upcoming event with The Ethical Shellfish Company’s Guy Grieve, featuring fresh, hand-dived Isle of Mull scallops. thewrightbrothers.co.uk

1

THE SELECTOR

MEET THE MAKERS

2

Great produce matters, and these restaurants get diners up-close and personal with their suppliers BEST OF THE REST 3

5

124

 4  Humble Grape

Various locations

Various locations

This high-end public house and hotel company is so proud of the suppliers it uses that it hosts ‘happenings’ at its four venues, where diners can meet those responsible for the first-rate produce they’re chowing down on. Past events include a Beef Banquet and Nose to Tail dinner, both paying homage to local producers and seasonal ingredients.

With three sites in Battersea, Islington and the City, Humble Grape is everything a great wine bar should be: a great list of genuinely exciting but still eminently drinkable wines, friendly service, a loungey atmosphere and small but simple food menu. Keep an eye out for regular tastings with some of its favourite winemakers from around the world.

cubitthouse.co.uk

humblegrape.co.uk

 3  Stoke House

 5  Spring

81 Buckingham Palace Road, SW1W 0AJ

Somerset House, Lancaster Place, WC2R 1LA

This champion of UK-reared meat had us at ‘modern British carvery’, but a new series of meet-the-maker events appeals to us even more. Coming up is Butchery, BBQ and Beer – featuring the likes of Oxford Charcoal, Cornish butchers Phillip Warren and beer from Kicking Horse Brewery – and a cheesethemed night with Paxton & Whitfield.

Skye Gyngell’s beautiful Spring restaurant has long made a big deal – and rightly so – about its relationship with Herefordshire biodynamic farm Fern Verrow. And now you can find out more about their philosophy and produce, at one of Spring’s occasional Salons – morning discussions (with food, of course) that give a taste of this unique partnership.

From £35; 020 7324 7744; thestokehouse.com

020 3011 0115; springrestaurant.co.uk

Photograph by [Wright Brothers/Stoke House] Paul Winch-Furness

4

 2  Cubitt House


FEATURING PREMIUM WHISKY, GIN, VODKA, RUM

TEQUILA, COCKTAILS, MIXERS AND MUCH MORE… GET IN THE FESTIVE SPIRIT!

QUOTE FOODISM10 TO SAVE 10% ON TICKETS FOR FRIDAY 1ST DECEMBER Why not treat yourself to one of our Premium Packages?

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON OUR TICKET PACKAGES AND TO BOOK VISIT WWW.THESPIRITSHOW.CO.UK DRINK RESPONSIBLY


COMPETITION

WIN

SKY-HIGH DINING Babylon at The Roof Gardens offers great food with regularly changing seasonal menus, jazz nights, and unrivalled views across London’s skyline

W

ITH AN EVER-INCREASING lineup of eclectic towers that pierce the sky above them, the panorama of London’s skyline is without doubt among the most beautiful and impressive of the world’s leading cities. With that in mind, if you could eat at a restaurant or drink at a bar that overlooks it, why wouldn’t you? And when the venue in question offers modern British food, spectacular service and regular events to match, it probably sounds like your new favourite spot. That’s what you’ll find at The Roof Gardens, and its award-winning restaurant Babylon. It’s unquestionably one of the highlights of West London’s vibrant dining scene, and whether you’re dropping in for a business lunch, enjoying drinks and seafood on its heated al fresco terrace, a Sunday roast

126

or a night out that runs from a glass of champagne, through to a memorable dinner and a nightcap, Babylon has all this and more to offer. The food is prepared with care and attention, sourcing from the best suppliers possible and regularly refreshed according to what’s in season. As well as its regular menu and two- or three-course offerings, you can enjoy sharing plates on Mondays and Wednesdays, and watch live jazz musicians every Tuesday. It’s mouthwatering food and drinks, sumptuous views and your evening’s entertainment, all in one spectacular setting. ● Babylon Restaurant and The Roof Gardens are part of Virgin Limited Edition. For more information, call Babylon on 020 7368 3993, email babylon@roofgardens.virgin.com or visit roofgardens.virgin.com

WIN A THREECOURSE MEAL FOR TWO AT BABYLON

WIN WIN

We’ve partnered with The Roof Gardens to give one lucky reader and a guest an evening to remember. You’ll start your evening in style, high up on the seventh floor of The Roof Gardens at the award-winning Babylon restaurant. Take in the amazing views of London’s skyline WIN with a cocktail on arrival, before tucking into a seasonal British threecourse dinner for two with a bottle of wine included. For full T&Cs and to enter, go to fdsm.co/babylon


PROMOTION

IT’S FIT FOR A KING Bourbon, top-notch food and the filming location for autumn blockbuster Kingsman: The Golden Circle – here’s everything you need to know about the state of Kentucky

I

F YOU THINK the beautiful US state of Kentucky is all about bourbon, amazing heritage and an incredible culinary scene, you’d be right. But there’s far more to see in the state than just that. And with the launch of one of this autumn’s most anticipated movies, Kingsman: The Golden Circle, there’s yet another reason to head over and visit – to see the sights of one of the biggest blockbusters of 2017. In the film, two elite secret organisations – the UK-based Kingsman and the US-based Statesman – combine forces against a common enemy to save the world. Their base? Louisville, Kentucky, naturally – which just happens to be the perfect place to visit if you want to immerse yourself in a topnotch food scene as well as one of the world’s most exciting distilling regions. What’s more, to celebrate the film’s launch in UK cinemas, one of Kentucky’s

finest distillers – Old Forester – has specially created a new whiskey to be released alongside the new movie. Old Forester Statesman is named after the master distillers of old Kentucky, as well as the crack team of special agents in the new Kingsman film. The whiskey is sourced from handselected barrels matured in the warmest spots in the Old Forester warehouse, and apart from heading over to the state yourself, it’s the best way to get a flavour of the Bluegrass State. ● For more information and to book, head to kentuckytourism.com or americaasyoulikeit.com/Kentucky.aspx.

For more on the state’s incredible food and drink scene visit kentuckycuisine.com. Discover more about Old Forester Statesman at oldforester.com/bourbons/statesman. Follow Kentucky Tourism at @TravelKentucky on Facebook, @KentuckyTourism on Twitter, or @KYtourism on Instagram.

WIN AN AMAZING HOLIDAY FOR TWO If all this talk of Kentucky has you desperate to head over to the US and experience it all for yourself, you could be in luck. Kentucky Tourism and America As You Like It have teamed up to give one lucky reader the chance to win an unforgettable trip to Kentucky for two. To be in with a chance of winning, enter the competition at kentuckytourism.co.uk/kingsman

127


ESSENTIALS

THE JAPAN CENTRE PICKS ITS TOP SAKES. FIND THEM AT ITS FLAGSHIP PANTON STREET STORE OR JAPANCENTRE.COM

SHOTOKU SHUZO NATSU NO TAWAMURE JUNMAI GINJO SAKE

SHOCHIKUBAI SHIRAKABEGURA MIO SPARKLING SAKE

A versatile, pure rice wine with a dry, mellow flavour, all presented in an adorable fishpatterned bottle. Made with 100% Japangrown rice (polished down to 60% for a purer flavour) and without the addition of brewed alcohol, it can be enjoyed at any temperature.

As pleasant on the tastebuds as it is easy on the eyes, the sake in this one-of-a-kind blue bottle has been crafted in the traditional brewing style, using nothing but Japanese rice, rice koji for fermentation, fresh water and a little carbonation. Enjoy chilled.

GEKKEIKAN GENSEN SOZAI JUNMAI SAKE

GEKKEIKAN IWAIMAI DAIGINJO SAKE

This 300ml clear bottle of junmai-grade sake is a product of Gekkeikan, the chosen sake brand of the Japanese Imperial Household. Junmai sake is a great standard quality sake made from rice polished to 70% of its original size. A truly natural, crystal clear junmai sake with a full bodied texture and dry taste. Can be drunk warm or cold.

For a rare and exclusive sake experience, Gekkeikan's Iwaimai Daiginjo is where you need to go. Brewed from 100% Iwai rice (a rare kind of sake rice grown exclusively in Kyoto) and mineral water from Kyoto's Fushimi district, this sake has a light and fruity aroma and refreshing flavour, ideal for enjoying chilled on its own or with delicate, aromatic foods.

GEKKEIKAN NAMA SAKE

GEKKEIKAN PONSHU DRY HONJOZO SAKE WITH OCHOKO CUP

Unlike other types of sake, this bottle of standard-grade namasake by Gekkeikan, choice sake brand of the Japanese Imperial Household, is unpasteurised for a stronger taste and aroma.It is from this that namasake gets its name, literally meaning ‘natural sake’. This crystal clear namazake comes in a clear glass bottle and has a dry and balanced taste making it a truly refreshing drink .Namasake is best served chilled.

Dry and full-bodied. All of the Ponshu sakes come topped with a coloured cap that doubles as a small ochoko serving cup. This variant, decorated with a black and purple chrysanthemum theme, is a dry Honjozo sake. Made from rice, rice koji, and a little distilled alcohol, this sake has a very dry, sharp flavour

HANANOMAI SPARKLING MELON SAKE

KASUMITSURU KINGYO SPARKLING NIGORI SAKE

Light and refreshing sparkling Melon sake from a long-established sake brewery in the Shizuoka prefecture, Hananomai takes its name from the phrase meaning "flower dance", a fitting name for this fruity and sweet liqueur. All the ingredients are grown in Western Shizuoka, an area with the perfect climate for growing sake rice.

Enjoy the delicious contrast between the full-bodied thickness of a cloudy nigori sake and the refreshing fizz of mild carbonation. A pure rice wine (made without the addition of brewer's alcohol), this sake derives its mellow flavour by retaining of some of the sake kasu (the lees left over from sake production). Enjoy this sake chilled.

OZEKI DRY SAKE

OZEKI NIGORI SAKE

Ozeki Dry sake is a dry sake with a refreshing fruity flavour and tastes best when served either chilled, or gently warmed to around 40-450C. With its lower than average alcohol content, smooth taste, and versatility of ideal serving temperature, this sake is ideal for firsttime sake drinkers to experiment with. It pairs well with chicken, light Asian dishes, sashimi, sushi, and it can be also poured over fresh or grilled oysters to add depth of flavour.

An unfiltered sake that preserves the fresh flavor of the moromi (the fermenting mixture of rice, water, koji, and yeast), for a crisp, vibrant presence. This Ozeki brand sake is a great all-round sake that works well with chicken dishes, sushi and sashimi.

129


GOURD ENOUGH TO EAT: There are a number of edible and non-edible species and subspecies in the gourd family, ranging from pumpkins to cucumbers and melons. They’re probably one of the oldest domesticated types of plants.

130

IN GOURD TIME: We’ve been fans of gourds for millenia – they’ve been found on ancient archaeological sites dating as far back as 13,000 BC.

THE GOURD LIFE: Gourds have uses beyond filling our bellies. Their dried and hollowed-out shells can be used to transport water, but they’ve also been turned into tools, musical instruments, toys, storage boxes and decorations.

Photograph by Radius Images / Alamy Stock Photo

It’s time to fall in love with colourful gourds and squashes at the farmers’ market – then out of love when you still haven’t used them weeks later. But give them a chance and you’ll reap the rewards


Let’s do lunch that’s whole-heartedly

e m o s e l o h W By the time you’ve counted all the sources of protein & fibre in our new health range, you could have probably heated yourself a delicious bowlful for lunch. Who said healthy had to be boring and high effort?

Let’s do lunch Better


Let’s do lunch that’s delightfully

l u f r u o v a l F When your kitchen is filled with the delicious aromas of our soup, you know you’re in for a really tasty lunch. In just 5 minutes, you can enjoy a steaming bowl of sweet, fragrant Broccoli, Pea & Pesto, rounded-off with luxurious cream and cheese. Lunch doesn’t get more mouthwatering.

Let’s do lunch Better

Foodism - 22 - London, food and drink  

Foodism Magazine - Issue 22 - The Home Cooking Issue

Foodism - 22 - London, food and drink  

Foodism Magazine - Issue 22 - The Home Cooking Issue