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I love being surprised by food. I don’t mean coming home to find the leftover tagine I shoved in the freezer last week has made me a slap-up meal with flowers, a bottle of franciacorta and a hand-written placecard on the table. Though it wouldn’t hurt. For once. I guess what I actually mean is that, when it comes to eating, I like it when what I’m tasting defies what I was expecting from it. I’m not (necessarily) talking about great food I thought would be bad, and definitely not about bad food I thought would be great – just food that gives my palate a brow-furrowing jolt, then makes me grin inanely. I’m pretty sure I’m not the only one who feels like that. This issue, among other things, we asked Zoe Adjonyoh of hit supper club-turned-restaurant Zoe’s Ghana Kitchen about her favourite ingredient to cook with [p62]. She instantly came up with kpakpo shito, a little green Ghanaian pepper with a twist in the tail. “It’s very deceptive,” she told us. “It looks really cute but it’s intensely fiery.” In fact, that element of surprise is something of a mission statement for Adjonyoh, and not least because you’ll find her restaurant in a building made from old shipping containers in Brixton. “The point is to take people on a food journey,” she said, “where they can try ingredients and flavours they’ve never tasted before. There’s a sense of adventure.” Sounds like it’s high time we all went and checked out the kpakpo shito. And you know what they (never) say: if you can’t stand the heat, get out of the Ghana Kitchen… f

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GRAZE 012 THE FOODIST

014 LONDON LARDER 016 LOCAL HEROES 016 THE ESCAPIST 018 WEAPONS OF CHOICE 025 RECIPES 032 COLUMNS 038 THE RADAR

FEAST 046 COFFEE

057 FUTURE FOOD 062 ZOE’S GHANA KITCHEN 070 BRITISH ROSE VEAL 076 NORWAY’S SKREI COD 082 MIXOLOGY

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114 INSIDER: THE COTSWOLDS 118 THE SELECTOR 130 DECONSTRUCT

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— PART 1 —

GRAZE “GOOD FOOD AND DRINK IS RESTORATIVE, AND SUMMER FESTIVAL FOOD IS SOME OF THE BEST THERE IS” MIKE GIBSON ON WILDERNESS FESTIVAL, 012

012 THE FOODIST | 014 LONDON LARDER | 016 THE ESCAPIST 018 WEAPONS OF CHOICE | 025 RECIPES | 032 COLUMNS | 038 THE RADAR


TOP THREE

The first of the two annual ‘chocolate holidays’ is coming up – celebrate with these tasty posh Easter eggs

1. PR E STAT

THE FOODIST

If you need further confirmation that chefs are the new rock stars, check out Wilderness, says Mike Gibson

I

REMEMBER IT CLEARLY. It was 11 in the morning, the Oxfordshire sun was beating down, heatwaves shimmering just above the turf around Cornbury Park. To put it lightly, I did not feel good. A night of partying in a massive, magical, neon-drenched forest had left me hazy and a little drained. But salvation was waiting: I stumbled to a cabin whose awning was emblazoned with the Lavazza logo and ordered a flat white from three guys who looked like they shared my pain. I felt its healing power as I stood in the queue at the side of a big yellow campervan and ordered a grilled cheese. And, a couple of minutes later, I bit into The Cheese Truck’s bacon, stilton and pear toastie, and I felt human again. Wilderness returns again this year with a roster of chefs and food traders the festival is so proud of that, on the line-up, they share pretty much equal billing with the artists. In fact, if you didn’t know the names, Angela Hartnett’s Cafe Murano could be a washedout dream pop band; Patty & Bun a male-

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female folk duo from Arkansas; Bubbledogs a revitalised indie band who never quite followed up the promise of their 2005 debut. Food is so high up on Wilderness’s priority list that if you look at the line-up of chefs and traders, you wonder if there’ll be anyone in London left to cook for you in early August. But that’s because it’s one of those festivals that’s not just about the music. Last year, I had a farm-to-table banquet from Skye Gyngell that started with ‘cosmic’ purple carrots; I had weekend-long access to great coffee; I drank great (and cold) beers and superb cocktails. Before seeing Derrick Carter play The Valley, I lined my stomach with three tacos from Breddos. Good food and drink is restorative. Summer festival food is now some of the best you’ll find anywhere. And when you’re walking around Cornbury Park at a low ebb and you find salvation in a sandwich? Well, you’ll thank the Lord for that line-up. f Wilderness runs from 3-6 August. For the full lineup and to buy tickets, go to wildernessfestival.com

How do you go about making an Easter egg more, er, Easter-y? Luxury chocolatier Prestat has an idea: lace it with hot cross bun spices. We’re serious. Prestat’s Hot Cross Bun Infused Easter egg is a thick shell of milk chocolate that’s plied with orange zest and warming Easter spices (the usual suspects: clove, allspice, cinnamon). Inside? Tiny, solid eggs of the same. Of course. £16.99; ocado.com

2. B OOJ A B OOJ A Alternatively, you could go the other way and choose a bit of an out-there flavour combination. OK, so salted caramel isn’t exactly the least trendy flavour on the market, but add in some almonds and you’ve got a delicious, moreish Easter egg with a granular texture and a hint of delicate nut. It’s also dairy, gluten and soya free, if that helps you get onboard the, er, Booja Booja train. £24.95; harveynichols.com

3. OM NOM And if that doesn’t float your boat, why not ditch your arbitrary allegiances to anything ovoid and simply use Easter as an excuse to make your way through a massive, solid halfkilo block of chocolate in one long weekend? Icelandic producer Omnom has produced this huge bar, in both milk and dark chocolate varieties. Grab it from single-estate specialist Cocoa Runners. 500g, £39.95; cocoarunners.com


LONGER WEEKENDS CALL FOR SLOWER ROASTS

EASTER DESERVES LURPAK

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TH AT’S WHAT THEY SAID Words of wisdom from industry acolytes and Foodism’s staff. Go to foodism.co.uk for more

THE LONDON LARDER

This month: P. Honey

YOU WALK IN, THERE’S NO MENU, THE GUY GOES “OK, HERE’S WHAT I HAVE. DO YOU LIKE THAT?” YOU GO “YEAH,” AND HE DISAPPEARS

STANLEY TUCCI, A-list actor, on his favourite Italian restaurant Al Boccon Di’ Vino in Richmond

IF YOU GO TO PALATINO AND DON’T START WITH THE FRIED SAGE LEAVES, WE’RE NOT TALKING TO YOU ANYMORE. DIPPED IN TEMPURA, THEY’RE FRIED UNTIL CRISP AND LIGHT JON HAWKINS, on Stevie Parle’s Palatino

Perilla joins the likes of Rök Smokehouse as a neighbourhood restaurant that feels like it’d be at home in the backstreets of Copenhagen or Mälmo MIKE GIBSON, on Perilla restaurant

Great flavour and good ecology are the same thing. That’s an important thing for the urban populations to recognise and celebrate – that we have a power through our food choices to affect the way the world is used outside of the cityscape

DAN BARBER, farm-to-table chef and wastED London host, on eco eating

THINK ABOUT YOUR FAVOURITE MEAL. YOU CAN PROBABLY IMMEDIATELY RECALL THE SMELLS AND TASTES OF THOSE DISHES. REMEMBER THE LAST TIME YOU WENT FOR A HIKE, PADDLE, SURF OR CLIMB AND HOW GOOD THAT SANDWICH TASTED AFTERWARDS? NOW, COMBINE THE BEST OF BOTH THESE WORLDS! PROPER FOOD IN THE OUTDOORS KIERAN CREEVY, private chef and international mountain leader, on cooking outdoors

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What’s the product? Pure, raw honey made from hives around Wandsworth and Wimbledon. Unlike most commercial honey, it’s only been filtered once – which means you’re pretty much eating the same stuff the bees eat themselves. It hasn’t been heated, so all of the honey’s medicinal qualities have been preserved and you’re getting a product rich in natural vitamins and enzymes.

Who makes it? Brixton-based, largely self-taught beekeeper Percy Neville-Johnson, who launched P. Honey officially as a company around a year ago, after what originally started as a passion project to showcase bees. Their work left him with plenty of honey to sell…

What does it taste like? We sampled the Set Pure Honey, which has a heathery flavour with notes of lime and eucalyptus. It’s reassuringly thick, and has a faintly farmy, yeasty taste thanks to its rawness – the yeast is largely killed off during the production process of cheaper, commercially produced varieties.

Where can I get it? It’s currently only available on the P. Honey website (from £7 for 350g), where you can also buy it in a clear, runny version that’s made predominantly with nectar from chestnut trees. f p-honey.com


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06-09 APRIL

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LOCAL HEROES C H E F C OLLABORATIO NS

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TONKOTSU

Food writer and chef Gizzi Erskine is a big fan of Korean food, and she’ll be lending her expertise to ramen shop Tonkotsu this March and April. For £22.50, you can get a bowl of her twisted, Korean-inspired ramen, with a helping of her signature Korean wings and a pale ale from Huddersfield brewer Magic Rock, too. tonkotsu.co.uk

2

SUSHI SHOP

It’s not often you can sample the dishes of a Michelin-starred, Paris-based Japanese chef without even leaving your sofa. Enter Sushi Shop and its partnership with Kei Kobayashi, the Alain Ducasse-trained chef-patron of Kei. The collaboration plays into Sushi Shop’s JapaneseFrench heritage, and is inspired by some of Koyabashi’s most memorable signature dishes. mysushishop.co.uk

3

MARK HIX

If you had a kitchen library (don’t we all?), what would you do with it? Mark Hix MBE has the right idea: he’s lending his to a series of unique dinner parties, which will see the 12-seater kitchen bar given over to a series of events with his chef friends. The first, taking place 27 March, will see Mitch Tonks step up to the plate; followed by Vivek Singh, Tim Hayward, José Pizarro and more. hixrestaurants.co.uk

Photograph (Mark Hix) by Jason Lowe

THE ESCAPIST

Borough Wines’ head honchos on finally finding their niche in the wine world Corinna Pyke (right)

I grew up in Bordeaux, so you might think working in wine was something of an inevitability, but it was only when I moved to London, after a stint in interior design, that I ended up back in the bordeaux business. I started the stall on Borough Market in 2002, in order to make the bottles from my French family and friends available to wine drinkers here. I soon expanded the range and began to sell wine from the barrel, too. At that time there was this exciting emerging food scene and yet, if you wanted to buy wine, you were stuck with the same selection from a handful of stuffy merchants. I wanted to make Borough Wines different – accessible, but with that sense of excitement and innovation.

My background is in music and arts marketing, shaping successful campaigns for artists such as Soul 2 Soul and Gabrielle. I met Muriel when I was working in regeneration, connecting empty spaces with creative businesses. I came on board as Borough Wines took that step from market to bricks-andmortar shop, to guide the branding and communications side of things, which were increasingly important as the company grew. There are a lot of parallels between what I was doing before and my role at Borough Wines; working closely with the local community, sensitively rejuvenating spaces and striving for sustainability – in terms

16

of the business, the community and the environment. I’m not working with bands anymore, but everyone knows food and drink is the new rock and roll… f boroughwines.co.uk

Photograph by ###

Muriel Chatel (left)


WEAPONS OF CHOICE Pasta, coffee, tortillas and an app-enabled smart cooker. Make it yourself – or don’t PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID HARRISON

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HIGH R OL L E R IMPERIA PASTA MAKER, £64.95 Want to experiment with making pasta from scratch? This pasta roller will create uniform sheets, and will cut up tagliatelle, too. souschef.co.uk

Photograph by ###

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DR IP, DR IP, B OOM 1. ANDREW JAMES PURIFY 4L, £88.99 This hot and cold water dispenser will also filter your tap water – perfect for coffee geeks. andrewjamesworldwide.com

2. HARIO V60 CERAMIC COFFEE DRIPPER 02 WHITE, £25 Hario’s fabled V60 dripper lets you brew your coffee slowly and precisely, for maximum flavour. hario.co.uk

1

2

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PRESSING MAT TE R SOUS CHEF TORTILLA PRESS, £24.50 Give tortilla making at home a crack with this weighty press. souschef.co.uk

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S MART AT TA CK 1. TEFAL COOK4ME CONNECT, £319.99 Plug this in, connect it via Bluetooth to your phone, and it’ll cook you an almost limitless number of recipes. amazon.co.uk

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pressed FRUIT

SPARKLE


Recipes

SUPER TUSCANS

TRAVEL AROUND TUSCANY’S SECRET SILVER COAST WITH A NEW COLLECTION OF RECIPES AND STORIES FROM ITALIAN COOKERY WRITER EMIKO DAVIES

PHOTOGRAPHY BY LAUREN BAMFORD

T

HE WONDERS OF Italian cooking are no secret to Londoners – yet there are still pockets of the country’s rural cuisine we have yet to explore. In her second book, Acquacotta, Emiko Davies seeks to introduce us to the flavours of the Silver Coast, a stunningly beautiful slice of the Tuscan Maremma region. Named for the its shimmering sand, the area boasts a natural larder full to bursting with fresh seafood, from sole to mackerel, as well as game, and herbs and vegetables foraged further inland. One-pot dishes are the region’s speciality,

and much of the food is born out of poverty, which means the cookbook is packed with sharing meals that are hearty and don’t cost the earth. Like much of Italian cooking, everything is best served with plenty of wine and good converstation. Here, Davies shares her recipes for a tart packed with peppery wild asparagus; a seafood stew that’s a fisherman’s stapleturned-local delicacy; a lamb soup perfect for feeding a crowd; and a light, sophisticated – and surprisingly simple – tiramisù-style dessert that’ll round off any meal. f

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F O O DISM RE CIPE S, IN ASSOC IAT ION W IT H L AVAZ Z A

Photograph by ###

Luigi Lavazza first created the concept of blending coffees in 1895. More than 121 years later, Lavazza is recognised throughout the world as the symbol of Italian espresso, and has mastered the choice of coffee for any occasion. Lavazza started as a family business in a small shop in Turin, and has now grown to become a well-known brand around the world. However, the focus hasn’t changed: the company remains in the hands of the fourth generation of the family, who continue

to dedicate their expertise to bringing the real Italian coffee experience to your home. Prontissimo! is the first premium Italianstyle instant coffee from the real Italian coffee brand. The Intenso blend contains 10% micro-ground roasted coffee, for the authentic Italian taste. Locked inside the micro-granules are vital coffee oils, which give a full-bodied and rich cup of premium coffee, proving you can enjoy the real Italian coffee experience any time of the day. lavazza.co.uk

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Emiko Davies’

ASPARAGUS TART

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PUNCHY WILD ASPARAGUS AND FRESH HERBS TAKE PRIDE OF PLACE IN A LIGHT AND SIMPLE SHORTCRUST-PASTRY TART

I N GREDI EN TS For the shortcrust pastry ◆◆ 70g chilled butter, chopped ◆◆ 250g plain flour ◆◆ ¼ tsp salt ◆◆ 80ml chilled milk (or water)

TIME

Serves

◆◆ 4

Preparation

◆◆ 30 mins

For the filling ◆◆ 1 handful wild herbs (see

variations) ◆◆ 350g wild asparagus

sliced ◆◆ 3-4 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil ◆◆ 60ml dry white wine (or

water) ◆◆ 6 eggs ◆◆ 30g finely grated parmesan or pecorino cheese

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A

NY SORT OF savoury tart can be made with this recipe,” says Davies, “but if you’re lucky enough to have some peppery wild asparagus and herbs, this is possibly one of the nicest ways to use them.” You can use any herbs here – Tuscan favourites include wild fennel, calamint and wild garlic. Short on time? Use shop-bought pastry.

Method

1 To make the pastry, rub the chopped cold butter into the flour until there are no more large pieces of butter left. Add the salt and the milk (or water) a bit at a time until the dough just comes together, or use a

Photograph by Lauren Bamford

◆◆ 1 small yellow onion, thinly

Cooking

◆◆ 50 mins

food processor. Don’t overwork it – stop as soon as it looks smooth. Wrap in plastic wrap and chill in the fridge for 30 minutes. 2 On a work surface dusted with flour, roll the pastry out to 3-4mm thickness. Carefully transfer it to a pie dish approximately 24-26cm in diameter, and gently press it down into the grooves of the dish, trim, and prick the base all over with a fork. If making this ahead of time, you can keep the raw pastry crust in the fridge wrapped in plastic wrap, or keep in the freezer. 3 Blind bake the pastry crust (this goes for store-bought pastry too) 180°C by setting baking paper over the top of the crust and filling the entire pastry case with baking beads. 4 Bake for 10-15 minutes, or until the edges of the pastry begin to turn golden. Remove from the oven and remove the baking beads and baking paper. Return the crust back to the oven to ‘dry’ out the base for no more than 5 minutes. Set aside to cool. 5 Meanwhile, wash the herbs and asparagus, cutting off any tough parts of the stalk and chopping roughly. 6 Cook the onion over a low heat with half the olive oil and a pinch of salt for 5-10 minutes, so the onions sweat and soften without browning. 7 Add the asparagus and the wine, and season. Cook, stirring, over lowmedium heat for approximately 7-10 minutes, or until tender. Set aside. 8 Beat and season the eggs. Add the cooled asparagus, along with the chopped herbs and cheese, to the eggs. Pour the mixture over the pastry and bake in the oven for approximately 20-25 minutes, until the top is puffed and golden. f


Emiko Davies’

FISHERMAN’S ACQUACOTTA THE CLASSIC TUSCAN DISH GETS A REVAMP, ELEVATING IT FAR BEYOND ITS HUMBLE BEGINNINGS AS A FISHERMAN’S STAPLE

I NGREDI EN TS ◆◆ 500g purged clams and

mussels ◆◆ 4 large mazzancolle prawns ◆◆ 60ml extra-virgin olive oil ◆◆ 2 yellow onions, finely sliced ◆◆ 1 celery stalk, finely sliced ◆◆ 2 garlic cloves, whole ◆◆ 1 small red chilli, chopped

(optional) ◆◆ 700g tomato passata ◆◆ 4 thick slices of stale Tuscan

bread (or crusty white loaf) ◆◆ 1 handful flat-leaf parsley,

chopped

TIME

Serves

◆◆ 4

Preparation

◆◆ 30 mins

Cooking

◆◆ 60 mins

T

HE NAMESAKE OF this book, acquacotta, is a true peasant dish. Traditionally made with the bits of fish that don’t make it to market, this is a modern take using clams, mussels and prawns.

Method

1 Scrub the mussels and pull out the beards. You can either keep the prawns whole or chop. 2 Pour the olive oil in a large casserole pot and warm over gentle heat. Cook the onion and celery, along with a pinch of salt, until very soft. 3 Add one garlic clove and the chilli, cook for 1 minute, then add the

tomato and 500ml of water. Season with salt and bring to a simmer. Cook gently for about 40 minutes, topping up with water if it’s too thick. 4 Prepare the bread – stale bread is best as it doesn’t become soggy. Rub the bread with the remaining garlic. 5 Add the prawns, mussels and clams to the simmering liquid. Cover and cook for about 2 minutes, or until the shells have opened and the prawns are just cooked. 6 Remove from the heat and stir through the parsley. Place the stale bread in the bottom of the serving bowls and spoon the acquacotta evenly over the top. f

simple This dish is thanks ng yi sf ti sa and afood se of to plenty ead br and crusty

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Emiko Davies’

LAMB STEW

USING THREE HERBS AND A DASH OF CHILLI, THIS STEW IS A NOURISHING CROWD-PLEASER

INGRE DIE NTS ◆◆ 1kg lamb leg or shoulder,

chopped into large chunks ◆◆ Extra-virgin olive oil ◆◆ 3 whole garlic cloves, plus 1

extra garlic clove for rubbing bread (optional) ◆◆ Chilli flakes or sliced fresh red chilli (optional) ◆◆ 2 fresh bay leaves ◆◆ 2 rosemary sprigs ◆◆ 250ml dry red wine ◆◆ 400g tinned whole tomatoes ◆◆ Thick slices Tuscan bread (or other crusty white loaf), grilled, to serve

T

HIS DISH IS called buglione, which, Davies believes, is derived from the Italian word for a confusing mixture or muddle. “This makes me wonder if the name came about because the dish was a mixture of whatever was at hand,” she says. “This could be about the herbs and spices added.” In any case, the recipe makes for a hearty, flavoursome stew.

Method

1 In a deep casserole dish, brown the lamb in batches in the olive oil over high heat until evenly coloured. Don’t overcrowd the pan. Brown for approximately 5-10 minutes. 2 Add the garlic, chilli and herbs to the meat, and turn the heat up to medium. Continue cooking for 1-2 minutes, then add the wine. 3 Let it simmer for about 5-7 minutes, stirring occasionally, then

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es plenty This soup us d chilli, an s rb he of ns it’s ea m which flavour packed with


TIME

Serves

◆◆ 4

Preparation

◆◆ 15 mins

Cooking

◆◆ 90 mins

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add the tomato. 4 Season with salt and pour over enough water to cover. Bring to a simmer, then turn the heat down to low. Cook, covered, for 1 hour. 5 Uncover and cook for a further 30 minutes, or until the meat is tender and falling off the bone and the liquid has reduced slightly – it is traditionally meant to be quite soupy. 6 Serve with grilled bread (rubbed with garlic, if you wish) to mop up the lovely, flavour-packed sauce. f

Photograph by Lauren Bamford Photograph by ###

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Emiko Davies’

COFFEE-LACED RICOTTA TIME

THE FLAVOURS OF COFFEE, RUM AND DARK CHOCOLATE GIVE THIS QUICK DESSERT A TOUCH OF SOPHISTICATION

Serves ◆◆ 4

Preparation ◆◆ 10 mins

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ING R E DIE NTS ◆◆ 250g fresh ricotta

T

OGETHER WITH THE booziness from the rum and the uplifting hit of caffeine, this is rather like a lazy idea for a tiramisu,” says Davies, of this simple dessert recipe. Served well chilled in little glasses, it’s a refreshing, elegant and surprisingly light way to end a meal.

Method

1 Whip the ricotta with a whisk. Add the sugar, espresso and rum (if using) and whisk until smooth and well combined. 2 Crumble the biscuits and divide half of the crumble among the glasses. 3 Distribute half of the ricotta mixture over the top. Add a layer of the remaining crumbled biscuits, then a layer of the rest of the ricotta mixture. 4 Allow to chill for 1 hour before serving, then dollop whipped cream on the top and sprinkle with the dark chocolate. f

GET THE BOOK

Acquacotta: Recipes and stories from Tuscany’s secret silver coast by Emiko Davies (Hardie Grant, £25.00). Photography by Lauren Bamford

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◆◆ 2 tbsp strong espresso

ts are quick These desser and are a to whip up, in for a dan st great coffee r post-dinne

◆◆ Splash of rum (optional) ◆◆ 100g soft, plain biscuits

(about 8), such as lady fingers or cat’s tongue ◆◆ 100ml pouring (single/light) cream, whipped to soft peaks ◆◆ 20g dark chocolate, shaved or grated for serving

Photograph by Lauren Bamford

◆◆ 80g caster (superfine) sugar


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Richard H Turner

NEWS IN BEEF In an extract from his epic new cookbook, Prime, Richard H Turner explains (almost) everything you need to know about buying beef grass-fed beef is intramuscular fat and is invisible to the naked eye; just because we can’t see it doesn’t make it any less tasty.

Smell This is the most important characteristic for me. Your nose has evolved to divine information – if meat smells pleasant, it’s good; unpleasant, it’s bad. It really is that simple. Freshly cut steak should have a sweet, slightly meaty smell; meat cut too long ago will have an unpleasant, sour smell, as will anything wet aged in a bag.

B UT T E R-F R IE D ST E A K W IT H G OL DE N GARL I C Serves 4 Ingredients ◆◆ 2 x 500g bone-in steaks such as

T-bone or prime rib, cut 3- 4mm thick ◆◆ 50g beef dripping ◆◆ 125g unsalted butter ◆◆ 4 thyme sprigs ◆◆ 2 garlic bulbs, cloves peeled ◆◆ 1 rosemary sprig ◆◆ Maldon sea salt flakes and freshly

ground black pepper

Colour

Buying Beef Much of what we think we know about checking meat for quality is wrong. Some of it is based on what supermarkets have led us to believe good meat should look like, through years of marketing and advertising. Some is based on what the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) tells US citizens in an attempt to promote corn- and grain-fed beef, and the European public has subsequently picked up this information. Take a good look at your beef. It should be dry, not wet, with a good layer of creamy yellow fat. The meat should be an appetizing deep red colour – muscle that has worked and is therefore tasty is darker than muscle that hasn’t.

Marbling Most experts will tell you that marbling is where the great steak flavour comes from. This idea originated with the USDA, which grades beef by the amount of white and creamy marbling on grain-fed beef. Marbling on grass-fed beef, however, is a pale yellow, if it’s visible at all. Much of the marbling in

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Grass-fed beef is a darker red colour than a well-marbled, grain-finished steak. When a freshly cut surface is exposed to oxygen, the myoglobin in the meat makes it turn a bright red hue, known as a “bloom”. If the meat is not freshly cut, bright red indicates it has been kept in an oxygen-free environment such as a vacuum pack. Supermarkets vacuum-pack steaks to keep them freshlooking, as steak will naturally oxidize and turn from bright red to brownish red as the day goes on. This doesn’t make it bad – those steaks are just as good as the bright red ones – but it’s harder to sell steaks at the end of the day if they’ve turned brownish red.

What to look for Great beef comes from animals that are grass-fed as nature intended, of a pure breed, free-range, at least two years old (preferably three), hormone-free, growth-promoter-free, and happy: they should have had a short journey to slaughter and have been killed quickly and humanely. It is possible to buy meat online now, but do some research first, asking questions such as where and how the meat was farmed and how old it was at slaughter. Ask what breed it is – I wouldn’t buy cross-breeds as they grow too quickly at the expense of flavour. Look out for ‘pure breeds’ or ‘native breeds’. Personal favourites are Dexter, Highland, Angus, Longhorn and

This is old-school French cookery at its best. If you can find grassfed butter, then use it – evidence is mounting that grass-fed butter is healthier than intensively farmed butter, and it’s certainly better for you than margarine or oil. Season the steaks all over with salt and pepper. Heat the dripping in a large cast-iron skillet or frying pan. When it has melted and is foaming, add the steaks and cook over a high heat until crusty on the bottom, about 3–4 minutes. Turn the steaks and add half the butter, the thyme, garlic cloves and rosemary to the skillet. Cook over a high heat, basting the steaks with the foaming butter, garlic and herbs, turning once more and adding the remaining butter. Cook until the steaks are medium rare, 3–4 minutes longer. Transfer to a chopping board or plate and allow to rest for at least 10 minutes, preferably longer. Remove the herbs and keep frying the garlic until golden and soft. Cut the steaks off the bone, then slice the meat across the grain and serve with the meat resting juices poured over and the garlic cloves.


OPEN SEASON

Galloway. If a company can answer these questions to your satisfaction, then place an order. Of course, the best way of all is to buy from a butcher. If he/she can answer those same questions, you have found someone with whom to build a relationship, to love and cherish.

A question of priorities Most of us could afford to spend a little more on our meat but buy less of it – when food is nutrient-dense, we don’t require as much. We could buy meat, eggs and milk produced from animals that have lived their lives on pasture, rather than in cramped, dirty stalls or cages. We could refuse to participate in the brutality that is characteristic of factory farms. It costs more to raise animals properly, the way we used to before farming became industrialised, so we should be willing to pay more to know that the animals we eat were treated well and with respect. If wealthy societies were willing to pay a little more for food, we could help ensure that farmers get paid what their produce is worth. We should also pay more for our food because good, tasty food takes time to grow and rear, and time costs money. Historically, people were happy to eat almost any cut from an animal, but these days we have eyes and stomachs mostly for the prime cuts, the easy bits, the luxury foods – fillets, loins, legs, roasts, chops – and we eschew bits that have built up a bit of muscle texture, connective tissue and, as a result, fat and flavour. These cuts are cheap and good value. They do take a little extra cooking skill, but it pays dividends. There is absolutely no doubt in my mind that slow-grown meat, though a little more expensive, tastes better than cheap, intensively farmed meat. In a perfect world, we might buy organic where possible, not only for our own health but also to ensure that the land remains healthy for future generations. We should be willing to pay more for food that is safely and sustainably grown. Produce grown domestically often costs more than food shipped in from the other side of the world. Nevertheless, we should expect to pay extra for the food that didn’t deplete the world’s fossil fuels to get to us. This is just one small way we can help to reduce pollution. It’s actually more economical to invest in high-quality (whole, local, organic) food, because it results in improved health for us all. Less will need to be spent on drugs, dentistry, vitamin supplements and medical care. f ‘Prime: The Beef Cookbook’ by Richard H. Turner is published by Mitchell Beazley, £25 (hardback)

SE ASONAL PR ODUC E AND W HE R E TO F IND I T This month, eco-chef and restaurateur Tom Hunt waxes lyrical on radishes, just coming into season from April until September Radishes grow fast – in fact, three weeks is enough to produce a root big enough to warrant a chop. I love the spicy, peppery varieties that burn your mouth like a hot mustard leaf. But there are many: long French ones, or bulbous purple, red and white. Grow them in pots about your house or on your windowsill. Eat them like crisps fresh from the soil. It’s all about the crunch. Just don’t waste the leaves. They are nutritious, they add a peppery twist to salads and they can be used to replace spinach or watercress in soups and stews.

THE URBAN GARDEN

In a new monthly column, Petersham Nurseries’ Amanda Brame tells us how best to make use of a small city garden. Here’s what’s best to sow or plant in March and April Days get a little lighter in late March, so now it’s time to sow the seeds you prepped so carefully last month. Herbs such as coriander, dill, fennel, oregano and parsley, can go straight into containers outside. For an endless supply of fresh salad, you will need to continue to sow spring onions, mixed salad leaves, radish and even beetroot every three to four weeks until midSeptember, which will ensure plenty of fresh pickings all the way through the summer. It’s also a good time to plant up a herb container with any other herbs you can buy in pots, such as rosemary, thyme, mint and sage. For those of you with a bit more space you might like to plant some shallot or onion sets. If you love garlic, now is the last chance to get that planted for a harvest this year. I love using the young shoots – they’re

The root can be eaten raw with honey and vinegar, on toast with butter and salt or pickled and served with fish. The leaves deteriorate quickly, so they’re a good indicator of how fresh your radish is when buying. Look for crisp, perky leaves and a firm root. Store them in the fridge, remove the leaves and keep in a tub or bag. And soak them in cold water before serving, to make sure they’re ultra crisp. f The Natural Cook by Tom Hunt is available now (Quadrille, £20). For more on Tom and his restaurants, see tomsfeast.com

delicious pan-fried with prawns. Next time, I’ll be giving more info on the ‘cut and come again’ harvesting techniques, how to grow French beans, plus all the other veg best to sow until the end of April. Amanda Brame is deputy head of horticulture at Petersham Nurseries; petershamnurseries.com. Read the column in full at fdsm.co/columns

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COFFEE

MAGIC BEANS Coffee geek? Check out these great single-origin beans

COFFEE HOP

Photograph by David Harrison

1 Square Mile Genesis, Costa Rica. Beans. Citrus and dried fruit notes. 350g, £15; squaremilecoffee.com 2 Union Hand-Roasted Liberación, Guatemala. Cafetière grind. Notes of cocoa and red grapes. 200g, £5.35; unionroasted.com 3 Workshop El Teruel Decaffeinated, Colombia. Espresso grounds. Dark chocolate and ripe red fruits. 200g, £9.50; workshopcoffee.com 4 Lavazza Cereja Passita, Brazil. Grounds. Hints of honey. Part of the forthcoming single-origin collection. 200g, lavazza.co.uk 5 Notes Tegu PB, Kenya. Beans. Fruitily acidic. 250g, £12.50, notescoffee.com

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D E E P E S T. D A R K E S T. D O R S E T.


H EAVY MACHINE RY

DAILY GRIND

In a new series, we shed a light on the machines, big and small, that power London’s bars and restaurants. This month, it’s El Pastor’s bespoke flour mill

CORN GRINDER, EL PASTOR

Photograph by David Harrison

A proper Mexican tortilla consists of way more than just flour and water: the corn is nixtamalised – cooked and ground into flour, before then being turned into dough. It’s a lengthy, painstaking process, and one that the team at Borough Market’s El Pastor undertakes every day using this volcanic stone corn grinder, following the traditional, centuries-old method of making authentic masa flour. f El Pastor, 6-7A Stoney Street, SE1 9AA; tacoselpastor.co.uk

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BITE-SIZED

FOODISM.CO.UK/ NEWSLETTER

Grazing

PIZ Z A PIL G R I M S

OPEN NOW

Dining

RAIL HOUSE CAF E

DRINKING

MID MARCH

GRAZING

You’re probably hearing a lot about Victoria now that there’s more to do there than watch endless Wicked matinées. Now that Nova Food has opened and brought a bucketload of restaurants with it, it’s turning into a proper food destination – no doubt the reason why the Riding House Café/ Village East team chose it to house their third venue. It’ll be big – 330 covers – and serve up dishes like the Eggs Burgerdict (no prizes for guessing that one) and wild bass with truffle. SW1E 5DJ; railhouse.cafe

DINING TRENDING

THE RADAR We take you through our favourite new bar and restaurant openings from now until the end of April Dining

BA LAN S S OHO SO CIETY

OPEN NOW

Drinking Dining

TAM AR IND K ITC HE N

LATE MARCH

While the original Tamarind in Mayfair channelled traditional Moghul cuisine into a fine-dining concept (hence the Michelin star it’s held since 2001), the new Soho iteration is, as you might expect, a little less formal. Although, given that the menu will be designed by the group’s head chef Peter Joseph, and that the room’s design will be inspired by the palaces of northern India, we can’t imagine it’ll be a dive. W1F 8WR; tamarindcollection .com

Drinking

DIC K IE’S BAR APRIL

The influence of the world’s best bar, The Dead Rabbit in New York, is starting to ramp up. After a collaborative pop-up and the recent opening of Swift (two of whose founders made their name there) comes Dickie’s. A team-up between drinks mavens Richard Ryan and Gregory Buda, and chef Richard Corrigan, it’ll serve creative drinks downstairs at Corrigan’s in Mayfair. W1K 7EH; @CorriganMayfair

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PAT T Y & B UN

10 APRIL

Notting Hill’s about to get a Patty & Bun all of its own, which will feature huge sharing tables as well as seats at the bar and a private room for larger bookings, too. W11 3BU; @pattyandbunjoe

Dining

HONI P O KÉ

OPEN

You can find raw fish salad designed by Coya development chef Richard De La Cruz at Honi Poké, a new restaurant on Dean Street. W1D 3SP; honipoke.com

Photograph (Honi Poké) by Charlie McKay; (Pizza Pilgrims) Paul Winch-Furness

The team at Balans have been busy. They must have been, because each outpost outside of the venue’s original home in Soho is either recently revamped or newly open. Its Clapham site will bring a bit of much-needed late-night eating to the Old Town. Brunch, lunch and dinner will be on its eclectic food menus, with killer cocktails, too. SW4 7AB; balans.co.uk

Pizza Pilgrims’ first East London restaurant will also be their first BOYB place. As well as classic Pilgrims’ pizzas, you can bring in chocolate bars for the team to ‘calzonify’, too. E1 6JE; @pizzapilgrims


UNBOTTLED WATER STILL, MEDIUM OR SPARKLING

REFRESH WITH GROHE BLUE HOME A beautiful and intelligent system that transforms simple water into pure thirst-quenching pleasure. How do you like your water? Still, medium or sparkling, it’s all a matter of taste. GROHE Blue Home has a simple and intuitive mechanism that lets you carbonate your drinking water at the touch of a button. Deliciously cool filtered water. www.grohe.co.uk


THE GOOD STUFF If you're serious about your coffee, it's time you got serious about the milk you put in it, too. Here's what you need to know…

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PROMOTION

I

F YOUR’E ANYTHING like us, coffee’s importance goes way beyond simply being something you drink. Maybe you dream of sweet, floral roasts from the mountains of Ethiopia; or drift off at your desk thinking about the rich and nutty aroma of that macchiato that perked you up at breakfast. But when was the last time you thought – really thought – about the milk that went into your coffee? Given the white stuff accounts for about a third of a latte, for example, it’s high time coffee lovers woke up to the starring role milk plays in their favourite drink. After all, add milk – hot or cold; full-fat or semi-skimmed; flat or frothed – and you’ll totally change the texture, body and sweetness, not to mention the nutritional value. The team at Yeo Valley aren’t coffee experts, but more than 50 years in the dairy business means they know a thing or two about what makes great milk. Produced on their Somerset farms, along with those of the Organic Milk Suppliers Cooperative (OMSCo), Yeo Valley milk is proudly British and organic – and all the better for it. It’s better tasting, because the cows eat a natural, forage-based diet of mostly grass and clover, and it’s also better for the cows, who roam outside for most of the year. When they have to be inside, during cold and rainy winter weather, they’re fed silage – preserved

THIS SOUTH WEST-BASED COOPERATIVE OF FARMERS GET A FAIR PRICE BY WORKING TOGETHER, AND PRODUCE WHAT YEO VALLEY THINKS IS THE BEST MILK AROUND

MILKING IT: (clockwise from top) Yeo Valley's rolling green pastures; a barista at work; adding milk changes coffee's flavour, texture and body

grass taken from the farms where they live (think of it as cow sauerkraut). Finally – and just as importantly – it’s better for the South West-based cooperative of farmers – who get a fair price by working together, and produce what Yeo Valley believes is the best milk around. You may not be thinking about cows or farmers when you fill up your cafetière or pour-over – or when you watch the barista create that muchneeded flat white – but it helps to know your milk’s made in the right way by

good people, on organic British farms. Because when you care so much about where your coffee comes from, and how it’s produced, why wouldn’t you pay the same attention to the milk you choose to partner it with? Get it right and it’s a match made in rich, creamy, aromatic coffee heaven – topped up with the knowledge that you’re using milk made in the right way, with care and attention by British farmers. We’ll drink to that. ●

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HOLY COW Free-range is just the start – Yeo Valley wants everyone to tout the virtues of drinking not just ethical, but organic milk

I

T’S NOT JUST their taste in coffee that means more consumers are choosing to buy organic milk. More and more, consumers are buying with their hearts as well as their heads, choosing products that they know they can trace back to farms that treat their livestock fairly. The success of free-range milk has laid down a marker, but Yeo Valley wants the public to do even more.

Free-range milk As a proudly organic company, and one that’s fully in tune with an ethical and traceable supply chain, Yeo Valley is rightly delighted to see that Asda are giving consumers a choice to make, offering free-range milk in their stores. And, given that Yeo Valley as a company is run with environmental health front of mind, the team place huge importance on the welfare of their animals. As such, moves to produce food for our country from well-caredfor and healthy animals, reared on a

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grass-based diet, are always likely to be well received not just by the likes of Yeo Valley, but across the organic community as a whole. What’s more, a grass-based diet is better not only for the health of our animals, but for us and our environment, too.

Organic growth But it doesn’t stop there. For all the

ORGANIC MILK STANDARDS REQUIRE COWS TO BE OUTSIDE FOR AS MUCH OF THE YEAR AS POSSIBLE

headway that’s been made with freerange and grass-fed milk (not to mention the huge leaps taken getting customers on a large scale to really consider their food’s supply chain), Yeo Valley believes that going organic is a brilliant way to take that mentality even further. A forage-based diet is just one part of the criteria that companies like Yeo Valley subscribe to as organic farmers.


PROMOTION

LEFT: Mary Mead, founder of Yeo Valley, with Lakemead Debora XXXIV. BOTTOM: Free-range cows at the brand’s farm in Blagden, Somerset

ORGANIC FARMS SUPPORT ON AVERAGE MORE THAN 50% MORE WILDLIFE ACROSS 30% MORE SPECIES

Yeo Valley milk is available in most major retailers for £1.10 per litre. For more information: yeovalley.co.uk

AGRICULTURE HAS ALWAYS HAD TO TAKE A LONG-TERM VIEW, AND ORGANIC METHODS ARE WELL PLACED FOR BOTH ENVIRONMENTAL AND FINANCIAL SUSTAINABILITY –SIMON CRICHTON, FOOD, FARMING AND TRADE TEAM MANAGER, TRIODOS BANK

MILK

Through its 20-year partnership with OMSCo (the Organic Milk Suppliers Cooperative), the brand has been championing high-welfare and grassbased farming since its inception. Organic farming also means you’re drinking milk free from pesticides and GMOs, and organic farming means animals are free from the routine use of antibiotics. It also encourages biodiversity: organic farms support on average more than 50% more wildlife, across more than 30% more different species by supporting their soil. All Soil Association-accredited organic farms are inspected annually, and all adhere to legally defined production standards. Put simply, it means organic milk standards require cows to be outside for as much for the year as pasture conditions allow, and states that they must also be fed on a forage-based diet. The Mead family, the owners of Yeo Valley, have recently been in talks with Graham Harvey, the author of Grass Fed Nation. This is because of an unerring belief that there is always more to learn about how we can farm in a sustainable and productive way, respecting both the animals we care for and the world we live in. Look out for more information about this special partnership, coming soon... ●

29%: DAIRY HAS THE LARGEST SHARE OF THE ORGANIC MARKET AT ALMOST A THIRD

SALES OF ORGANIC DAIRY IN THE UK INCREASED BY 3.2% LAST YEAR ORGANIC DAIRY IS ON THE UP – CHECK OUT THESE FACTS AND FIGURES FROM THE SOIL ASSOCIATION'S ORGANIC MARKET REPORT 43


keep it & use it again.


— PART 2 —

FEAST “AS MUCH AS YOU KNOW ABOUT HOW TO ENJOY COFFEE, HOW MUCH DO YOU KNOW ABOUT HOW IT GETS HERE?” COFFEE’S JOURNEY FROM BEAN TO CUP, 046

046 COFFEE | 057 FUTURE FOOD | 062 ZOE’S GHANA KITCHEN 070 BRITISH ROSE VEAL | 076 SKREI COD | 082 MIXOLOGY


BITE-SIZED

FOODISM.CO.UK/ NEWSLETTER

MAGIC BEANS Speciality coffee’s rise shows no sign of stopping. But how much do you know about its origins? Mike Gibson helps fill in the gaps 46


R Photograph Photograph by Steve McCurry by ###

OOT-TO-FRUIT. FARM-TO-TABLE. BEAN-TO-CUP. Chances are, you’ve come across at least one of these terms on your travels around London’s cafés and restaurants. The reason is simple: in the age of information, the more we learn about our food and drink, the hungrier we seem to be for knowledge. A happy knock-on effect of this hunt for expertise is that – in general terms – the more we care about our food and drink having a traceable, ethical supply chain, the better it ends up tasting, and the more we’re likely to care about it. It’s the reason why, in 2017’s London, you might go into a café and order a flat white with espresso from Nicaragua, because you think the “almond, chocolate and orange zest” tasting notes sound more up your street than the beans from Ethiopia or Indonesia. It’s the reason why you might →

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→ be happy to pay £8 or £10 for a bag of coffee beans you know have been imported from a farmer at a fair price. It’s the reason you might own an Aeropress or a V60 filter, and why you consider the act of making a coffee as a tenminute job, at least. And it’s catching on. But, as much as you know about how best to enjoy what happens when ground beans meet hot water, steam or hot milk, how much do you really know about how it gets here in the first place? We’ve enlisted the help of some coffee brands, big and small, who are building their business models in search of not only better coffee, but better ethics, too. It involves working directly with farmers not only to treat them fairly, but to make sure their products are the best they can be, and are a genuine reflection of the environment they’re grown in. Because the more we understand about the coffee we’re drinking, the more we enjoy it. So sit down, grab a cup of tea (just kidding) and read on… Coffee’s beginnings in London It might surprise you to know quite how far back London’s history as a city of coffee lovers goes. One man who’s in a particularly good place to tell its story is Geordie Willis, creative director of wine merchant Berry Bros & Rudd. While this may seem like a total non sequitur, there’s a reason he’s in the know: as a direct descendent of the Berry family, it was

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his ancestors who set up not only one of the first coffee retailers in London, but one of the first shops, full stop. While most trading was done at market stalls in 1698, the Berry family set up a bricks-and-mortar site on St James’s Street – the same one that’s there today. “The thing that a lot of people don’t know about us is that actually a third of our existence has been coffee, tea and spices,” Willis says. “We were what was referred to as an ‘Italian grocer’. We were never a coffee house in the traditional coffee-house form – we weren’t serving coffee in the shop – but we were selling it, along with spices, tea and other provisions to the coffee houses,

THE MORE WE UNDERSTAND ABOUT COFFEE, THE MORE WE ENJOY IT


THEY STARTED ADDING CLOVES, SPEARMINT AND WINE TO COFFEE

predominantly the coffee houses of St James’s and the surrounding areas.” Coffee was already popular with the hoi polloi of London at the time, but it would be a while before the coffee houses of Mayfair became the cafés we know today. “The coffee houses would have been spaces with large cauldrons of eight- to ten-gallon cauldrons bubbling away,” Willis says. “Coffee was very bitter at the time – they started adding things into it: cloves, spearmint, wine sometimes, to make it a bit more palatable.” Coffee was still a relatively new and untested drink, although it was looked on favourably by the those in charge. “Any hot drink that involved boiling water was safer; the government were behind coffee because it was certainly less damaging than alcohol at the time,” Willis says. But coffee wouldn’t be a drink someone could easily make at home for a while yet. “It was harder to make it at home even after the coffee mill came through,” he says. “Making coffee was something that was predominantly in the coffee houses; tea was easier to do at home. “Around London, the various different coffee houses were being frequented by different types of people – it might have been the wigs in one place, it might have been lawyers, politicians and so on. They were these convivial places where people would meet and talk. They were less rowdy than the

taverns; plus they were warm, which was quite important at the time – people would come in and shelter. They were quite expensive – they were a penny to gain entry at the time, so they weren’t necessarily for everyone – but people would congregate and talk about ideas. The ballot system – that came out of the coffee houses. The newspaper – that was from the pamphleting that surrounded them.” It’s a hell of a legacy for a hot drink. But places that serve coffee have stood as meeting places and cultural centres ever since the product first started being brought to the West from Yemen and Turkey in the 1500s. While from the height of the British Empire until fairly recently we traded in volume and tried to keep costs down at all times, consumers are waking up to the importance of seeking out better trading standards. That early history shows how London came to love coffee, but it’s only recently that we’ve come to truly appreciate how complex it is. “The roastery scene when we first started in →

HISTORY BOYS: (from top) The historic Berry Bros & Rudd shop in St James’s street references its coffee history; the coffee scales in the shop

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THE MOVE TOWARDS DIRECT TRADE IS NOTICEABLE → 2002 was a different world,” says Nicole Ferris, managing director of Climpson & Sons, a coffee roaster, retailer and café in Hackney. “There wasn’t much of a ‘scene’ back then, but Monmouth, Tea and Coffee Plant, Square Mile and a few others were on our radar.” Since then, though, it’s a different story. “The coffee market is becoming more defined by discerning individuals who place high values on taste and distinction,” she continues. “Just like the increase in popularity of craft beer, natural wines and fine foods, people are turning to independent, specialty coffee shops. People want to know where their coffee is coming from; they’re asking more questions and are more demanding on cafés and roasters to be transparent and share their knowledge. According to Allegra, the total UK coffee shop market is now valued at £7.9 billion,” says Ferris. “It’s on track to exceed 30,000 outlets by 2025, and to break £15 billion in sales over the next decade.” Even now, 300 years after the West fell in love with coffee, it’s still on the up. Trading

Photography by Deniz Rouvre

Coffee, as with much of what’s grown and traded in the tropics, has had something of a chequered history in ethical terms. It’s traded on enormous scales, and farmed largely in developing communities. But in recent years, there’s been a shift. “Coffee, like corn or sugar cane, existed in a world where the people were largely irrelevant to the end consumer,” says Origin Coffee’s Joshua Tarlo. “The farmto-table movement has really opened people up to de-commodifying their food.” Tarlo is on an annual sourcing trip to Kenya as he speaks – as Origin’s head of coffee, he ensures the brand has as much direct with the farmers the company works with as time and logistics allow. “In Nicaragua, we work with one family to get thousands of kilos of coffee,” he says. “Here in Kenya, we need to work with almost a thousand producers – the farms here are incredibly small so it takes a village to make

a latte. The size means that it gets almost impossible to visit all the farms, so what we do is visit the mill where the coffee from all the farmers is processed. We meet with the president of the cooperative they belong to, talk to a few of the farmers if we can, chat with the agronomists who work with the farmers and get a sense of the community.” Climpson & Sons runs along the same lines. “Ian [Burgess, Climpson’s founder] started roasting in a shed for the market stalls in 2003,” says Ferris, “and he began roasting for wholesale in 2005. Back then organic and Fairtrade were still prevalent, but the move towards direct trade and paying a higher price for quality coffees has been more noticeable.” “We work with trusted partners at origin to ensure producers receive fair prices,” Ferris says, “and we seek to develop ongoing relationships in buying from many of the same farms each year.” Origin and Climpson are both rooted in the new school. They’re the kind of smallscale (initially, at least) independent roasters and retailers that have created the thirst for quality, and often single-origin, coffee in London. But, while they can leave their stamp on coffee culture, it takes big players to join in to effect change on a huge scale. Lavazza, one of the world’s biggest coffee retailers, is in a position to do just that: “We feel it is essential for coffee roasters to maintain a strong ethical stance when sourcing beans,” says Mario Cerruti, the brand’s chief sustainability officer. “It’s up to us to be leaders and help elevate the industry to higher standards.” While Lavazza’s scale of trading makes facetime with all of the brand’s partners somewhat unrealistic, the company nonetheless keeps close tabs on its trading:

“We work very closely with our coffee farmers, ensuring high quality and ethical standards are met for each one of our producers,” says Cerruti. In 2001, Lavazza was a founding partner of an organisation called The International Coffee Partners. “The aim of ICP is to make small coffeegrowers more competitive,” says Cerruti, “to develop their entrepreneurial skills, and improve their living conditions and their work by promoting more sustainable farming practices, protecting natural resources, as well as boosting the building of growers’ coordination networks.” It’s exactly the kind of change that was desperately needed. While in London we have enough choice that we can seek out the kind of small-batch coffee that’s made according to our own exacting principles, it doesn’t make up the majority of the coffee traded around the world. Put simply, every coffee company big or small, is responsible for making sure its way of working benefits its farmers as much as itself.

Single-origin and coffee geography The arabica strain of coffee bean is said to have been discovered in Ethiopia in the 11th century. Since then, it’s been transported around the world, and centuries of growing have created coffees with entirely different flavours based on where in the world they’re grown. “Coffee needs very specific conditions in order for it to grow,” says Climpson’s Nicole Ferris. “Because of this, coffee only grows close to the equator, between the Tropic of →

PEOPLE POWER: (left and below) Denis Rouvre shot this year’s calendar for Lavazza, which shines a light on coffee-growing communities

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SOIL QUALITY, CLIMATE AND ALTITUDE ALL HAVE AN IMPACT ON FLAVOUR

BEST BEANS: (from top) One of Origin’s partner farms; the brand’s Limoncello tasting series; the machine-based ‘washed’ process in action

→ Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn. This is known as the coffee belt. The regions in between this belt provide ideal soil quality, temperature, climate and topography. Coffees tend to have characteristic tendencies based on where they are grown: the provenance of the coffee, including seasonality, altitude and other growing conditions will affect the outcome of flavour.” While it’s far from simple, the flavour of a coffee bean after it’s processed, roasted, ground and made into a hot drink has a lot to do with where it hails from. “The unique customs of the people who grow the coffee, the soil it’s grown in and the unique climate of each farm offers massive diversity, but there are trends from one country to the next,” says Origin’s Joshua Tarlo. “Kenyan coffee tends to be winey, fruity and sweet,

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while Colombian coffee can be citrusy and floral.” Ferris expands: “Coffees from South America are known for their sweetness, big body and medium-to-low acidity. Molasses, hazelnut and chocolate are common tasting notes from this part of the world. From Asia, you might find earthy, spicy, full-bodied characteristics – savoury and tobacco notes mixed with a cinnamon and nutmeg character. East African coffees are regarded as some of the most complex in the world. They are grown at high altitude, which results high acidity. Here you might find bright citrus, blueberries, tropical fruits, black tea, berry-like floral notes, dried strawberries, blackcurrant, stone fruits and bergamot.” While to some, coffee might just taste like coffee, an increasing number of people are looking to speciality coffees for their complexity, and single-origin – coffee that can be traced back to a single region, or even a single farm – is hugely popular. It’s not only for speciality roasters but also for brands like Lavazza, which is releasing a new range of single-origin coffees this August. When you consider that the company’s founder, Luigi Lavazza, is credited with inventing blended coffee, that’s a big move. “There are other elements that have a great impact on the quality of a cup of coffee,” Ferris says, “such as soil quality, climate and, most importantly, altitude. This is referred to as ‘terroir’ and encompasses all the growing conditions that have had an impact on its unique characteristics.”

Washing, processing and roasting Like chocolate, coffee’s raw material doesn’t bear a particular semblance to the finished product you’re used to. “Coffee ‘beans’ begin their incredible journey as the seed of a coffee cherry, found on coffee trees. The unripe →


BERRY GOOD: The team at Climpson love seeing the farms they work with in person, taking the time to make regular sourcing trips

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IT’S PRETTY WILD HOW DIFFERENT PROCESSING MAKES SUCH DIFFERENT CUPS

light florals with the booming sweetness. The series is a pretty great way of not just seeing how different coffee can be but also getting to know what you like.” It’s clear that we’ve still got a lot to learn about the intricacies of coffee. But we as a generation are, clearly, the best-equipped to take it further. “Although the industry has learned so much over the thousand-odd years it’s been around, we still don’t fully understand what makes the unique flavours that some people and places produce.” But that diversity is what keeps us hungry – or should that be thirsty? – for better, more specialised coffee. As Origin’s Tarlo puts it, “it’s what keeps folks like me living out of bags months out of the year to find those unique places, where the people and land make something really special.” f

Photograph by Adam Weatherley

→ cherries are green and ripen to a deep red, orange or bright yellow colour depending on the variety,” says Ferris. “Before roasting, processing is the most important stage when determining flavour in the final cup.” “The farmer grows the coffee and hopefully picks it when it’s nice and ripelooking – like a dark red cherry,” says Tarlo. “Getting the fruit off the little seed inside – which becomes the bean we grind and brew – can massively change the flavour.” This is where it gets complex. It’s not as simple as just roasting the beans, nor is it only a coffee bean’s geography that determines the flavour of the resultant cup of coffee. “Processing is essentially the chosen method of removing the seed from the cherry,” says Ferris, “and there are three ways you can do this – the washed method, the natural method, and the pulped-natural method – each of which imparts different characteristics on flavour.” So how does it differ? “There’s the oldest way, called the natural process, which just means leaving the cherry in the sun for the fruit to turn into a raisin, where it separates really easily,” Tarlo continues. “Or you can use machines to force the bean out, which we call the washed process. That old way tends to make a vibrant fruity cup and the machines tends to make something more round and

balanced in flavour.” Pulped-natural fills in the blanks, removing the outer skin from the cherry but leaving on the pulpy ‘mucilage’ around the bean. Origin is so confident that its customers can keep up with these technicalities that it’s just begun to release sets of singleorigin coffees, from the same farm, whose beans differ in terms of their processing, so that consumers can see the differences for themselves. “It’s pretty wild how different processing makes such different cups,” Tarlo says. “The washed variety is really round, balanced and floral. The natural is vibrant and sweet, knocking that delicate floral business out and just tasting like the ripest berries around. The pulped natural is the ‘Goldilocks’ coffee for a lot of people, balanced between the two and keeping the


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Recurring and gift subscriptions available at origincoffee.co.uk


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OUR FUTURE FOOD

Animal-free dairy products, beef without cows, insects as a vital ingredient – these concepts may seem far-fetched, but they’re closer than you think and coming to a table near you, says Gareth May

Photograph by ###

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UR BEDROOMS ARE chocka-block with scantily clad sex robots, capsuled hover cars carry us to work, and all our clothes are 3D-printed at home. Welcome to the future. But what’s on the menu? Meet the entrepreneurs of tomorrow’s kitchen to find out…

High Steaks CREATING MEAT WITHOUT ANIMALS

Abi Aspen Glencross is a London-based cellular agriculturalist. So what’s that when it’s at home? Cellular agriculture is the creation of animal products from cell cultures rather than the slaughter of animals. Funded by New Harvest, the world's leading authority on cultured meat, Glencross is at the forefront of slaughter-free steak; a butcher of the future, with bloodless mitts. Differing from the headline-grabbing lab-grown burger, which is made from stem cells, Glencross is attempting to create whole cuts of beef – utilising a cultured skeletal muscle in order to provide a system to supply tissue with nutrients and oxygen – with an endgame of creating a T-bone steak without using any part of a cow. “Essentially, I grow skeletal muscle – or what we predominantly relate to as meat – in the lab,” she tells us. “I work on the fundamental building blocks of this technology and am currently drawing parallels with skeletal muscle tissue

DO YOUR EASTER CROWD PROUD.

THE FUTURE’S BRIGHT: [clockwise from right] The team from Future Farm Lab; cows may not be needed for beef in future; cultured meat, close-up

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Photographs (main and cow) by Joe Sarah

WE ARE SEEKING TO CREATE A SYSTEM THAT LEAVES INDUSTRIAL FARMING REDUNDANT

engineering used in regenerative medicine.” In her spare time she also co-runs Future Farm Lab with Phoebe Tickell and Sophie Perry, a collective seeking to make industrial farming redundant. “How? We decentivise its drivers by offering a more attractive, less risky alternative with cellular agriculture, and rebuild a better food system,” she says.

THERE’S NOTHING BETTER THAN LAMB AT EASTER. BUT FOR A DELICIOUS CHANGE WHY NOT TRY OUR SPICY HARISSA LAMB? SERVE WITH CHICKPEAS AND POMEGRANATE SEEDS.

new-harvest.org; futurefarmlab.com

Super Cereal ACCELERATING CROP GROWTH WITH BACTERIA

Teenage years are supposed to be about rebelling, not saving the world. Ciara Judge and Emer Hickey obviously didn’t get the memo. Just as they turned 17, the students from Kinsale Community School in Ireland were taking on the global food crisis, →

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For this recipe and more inspiration, visit cookaholics.co.uk


→ winning an award at the 2014 Google Science Fair – along with fellow student Sophie HealyThow – for their work with rhizobium bacteria. “Emer was gardening with her mum and observed wart-like nodules on the roots of pea plants,” Judge explains. “After we asked our science teacher about them, we knew we wanted to work with rhizobium. She basically described a superhero bacteria that helped legume plants magically grow faster – and at the age of 14 we were pretty intrigued.” Three years and 10,000 test seeds later the trio revealed that the bacteria, which is naturally found in soil, forms a symbiotic relationship with cereals, organising nitrogen into more useful compounds to be used by the plant and potentially accelerating crop productivity by up to 50%. Today, the girls are still kicking science’s ass, working with Intellectual Ventures – an initiative founded by Bill Gates – to continue tests and design and commercialise a natural treatment for crop-growth acceleration. They’ve also co-founded Germinaid

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CRAFTED WITH REAL MILK PROTEINS, PERFECT DAY IS MADE USING A PROCESS SIMILAR TO CRAFT BREWING

Innovations – a research company fighting the global food crisis. ciarajudge.com; germinaid.com

Magic Milk MAKING BETTER ANIMAL-FREE MILK

Named after the Lou Reed song, Californiabased enterprise Perfect Day produces sustainable, animal-free dairy products that taste like the real thing. That’s right: they don’t come from a teat. Crafted with real milk proteins, Perfect Day is made using a process similar to craft brewing, combining yeast and age-old fermentation techniques to make casein and whey. Chuck in a mix of plant-based sugars, fats, and minerals and you’ve got dairy milk sans the chemicals, hormones, lactose and, as they put it, “other nonsense”. “As the global population approaches ten billion by the year 2050, sustainable food production solutions are critical,” comms chief Nicki Briggs told us. “We believe that animal product alternatives that deliver the


WILD AND FREE: [clockwise from left] Sheep graze on Village Farm’s unfarmed grassland; Critter Bitters; the minds behind Perfect Day milk

WE STRIVE TO PRODUCE DELICIOUS ORGANIC MEAT THAT’S GRAZED IN HARMONY WITH NATURE

same taste and eating experience as the real thing are a way to temper the growing global demand for animal protein, without asking consumers to give up the foods they love.” Perfect Day certainly puts its milk where its mouth is. A study conducted by conservation biologists found that the company’s produce could reduce land usage by 91%, energy consumption by 65%, and gas emissions by 84%, compared with factoryfarmed dairy milk.

Rebecca Hosking and Tim Green put wildlife diversity, sustainability and land regeneration above mere profit. Part of their work involves putting the sheep into paddocks and moving them on every day, allowing the herd to naturally fertilise the soil and graze on young pastures and diverse herbs. As a result, the soil remains healthy, wildlife is attracted to the burgeoning habitat – currently including nestings for the critically listed skylark – all in the name of 100% traceable meat. “We strive to produce the most delicious organic lamb and mutton that has been

carefully nurtured on wild coastal pastures and grazed in complete harmony with nature,” says co-founder Hosking. “We measure our business success in biological wealth and in the amount of wildlife we can create habitat for. Eat Village Farm lamb and you’re not just eating beautiful food, you are directly helping nature. It’s food you can feel good about in every single way.” thevillagefarm.co.uk

Creepy Crawly Cocktails SPARKING DEBATE ABOUT INSECT EATING

Mexico: the birthplace of entomophagy. (That’s eating insects for those beyond the reach of Wikipedia.) According to a 2013 UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) report there are more than 500 species of edible creepy crawlies on this Earth – and the UN wants us to start looking under bricks for an alternative to traditional livestock. That document was the inspiration for Critter Bitters, cocktail bitters made with roasted crickets. New Yorkers Julia Plevin and Lucy Knops came up with the concept while studying at The School of Visual Arts. “We were given the FAO report which cites entomaphogy as the first viable solution to the world food shortage. But the problem is that there’s an ‘ick’ factor, so our design challenge was to help people overcome that,” Plevin says. Plevin and Knops source the organic, non-GMO crickets from a supplier called Aspire; they add a nutty flavour to cocktails and they also spark debate. “Critter Bitters are a conversation starter to get people talking and thinking about the situation of food in the world as the population grows and our resources dwindle.” f critter-bitters.com

perfectdayfoods.com Photograph (Critter Bitters) by Lucy Knops

Village People FARMING THAT MIMICS NATURE

Village Farm, on the outskirts of East Portlemouth in Devon, uses a system called Holistic Planned Grazing, a farming approach developed by ecologist Allan Redin Savory that extols innovative and ethical techniques. Imitating the natural ecosystem of unfarmed grassland – where herds of herbivores graze, dump, and then move on – co-founders and best mates

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THE POINT OF ZOE’S GHANA KITCHEN IS TO TAKE PEOPLE ON A FOOD JOURNEY African food has too long been ignored by modern London restaurants. Lydia Winter meets Zoe Adjonyoh, the chef who is opening up eyes – and stomachs – to a whole continent PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID HARRISON

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Y FAVOURITE GHANAIAN ingredient is kpakpo shito, a little green, round pepper. It’s very deceptive – it looks really cute, but it’s intensely fiery,” says Zoe Adjonyoh, founder of Zoe’s Ghana Kitchen, where you’ll find this pepper – and other traditional Ghanaian ingredients – on the menu. The restaurant occupies one of the units in Pop Brixton, the community project and event space made out of shipping containers. Now in its third year, the business grew out of a pop-up and supper club (that both still run) that Adjonyoh started in 2011, having used cooking as a way of learning more about her heritage. She took the dishes that had been introduced to her by her Ghanaian father and began to modernise them, making them lighter and healthier. And this, Adjonyoh says, is what was needed: “Until recently, African food wasn’t really being made for people who weren’t African… It needed to be given a more contemporary feel.” And this is what she does, serving up dishes like her hugely popular groundnut stew, a peanut butter soup, and the paella-like jollof, made with rice, scotch bonnets and dried ground seafood powder. Adjonyoh has a point: in a city where the dining scene’s appetite for new cuisines is limitless, African cooking hasn’t had the most exciting reputation. Until now, with a raft of other chefs and restaurants presenting us

JUMP-UP: [right] Zoe Adjonyoh is introducing Ghanaian cuisine to the mainstream; [below] traditional dishes at Zoe’s Ghana Kitchen

How did you start to learn about Ghanaian cuisine? My dad’s Ghanaian and when I was a child he would bring home interesting and strange ingredients that I didn’t see very often. I was curious to see what they were, and I also wanted to build a relationship with my dad and my Ghanaian heritage. We didn’t have much family from Ghana here – I grew up in south-east London after a period as a toddler in Accra, the Ghanaian capital – so I was aware that there was a side of my heritage that I wasn’t getting access to. The entry point was always going to be food because that was what I knew. I got my first education beyond my father from going to markets in Ridley Road – I live in Hackney – so when I started doing supper clubs I had quite a small menu that recreated my childhood dishes. When I wanted to expand the menu, I’d have conversations with the stallholders on Ridley Road and ask about the ingredients, what they did with them and what their names were. A bit later on, I did a research trip to Ghana. I went back for two reasons – one was because I was writing my MA about my dad – and I treated it as a recipe-hunting mission,

AFRICAN FOOD WASN’T BEING MADE FOR PEOPLE WHO WEREN’T AFRICAN and was able to travel around the country. I spent time in the kitchens of various people I met on the way, and I learned a lot in a very short amount of time.

Why is there now a new-found interest in African cuisine? Africa has a new place in the conversation when it comes to fashion, music and other cultural things; it has a new voice behind it. People in the diaspora are proud of their culture and their heritage – they want to highlight what they think is great about Africa and they’re doing that through food, and the easiest way to do that is celebrating food from the particular region they’re from.

Why has it taken so long for African food to become more prominent? I found that my experiences of eating African food were in places that Africans ate in. There wasn’t really a notion of extending it to a wider community, or space for people who weren’t used to eating it. That was the first problem. Next came getting the exposure so people knew that it was available. Part of that is reimagining the dishes so that they feel more contemporary.

Does your cooking adapt traditional Ghanaian cuisine? I haven’t had to adapt anything because I don’t put ‘traditional’ before Ghana; I’ve always been cooking the way I like to cook. I haven’t modified recipes to suit Londoners’ palates – what I’ve done is reimagine traditional dishes, sometimes using slightly healthier ingredients or methods. I can put a bowl of jollof rice down in front of a Ghanaian, or a non-Ghanaian, and →

Photograph by Camille Mack

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with new ingredients like the shito pepper, or the fermented corn dough known as kenkey. Yet, as Adjonyoh points out, none of these things are really new to London at all: “When I first learned about Ghanaian food, I was asking store owners at east Dalston’s Ridley Road Market about their ingredients and how to cook with them.” Proof, then, that African food has always been here, but it was just waiting to be discovered. Aside from her Ridley Road Market education, Adjonyoh also went on a research trip around Ghana, a journey which introduced her to the country’s flourishing culture and led to her becoming a passionate ambassador for not only Ghanaian food, but African food in general. “What I find so interesting about it is that there’s a whole continent to unlock,” she says. The result is a restaurant that evokes the roadside chop bars of Ghana, and that’s about more than just the food: it’s an insight into modern Africa. “Along the way I’ve learned so much about African fashion, music and art, and I wanted to share that with people through the environment that you build around food,” says Adjonyoh. Here, Adjonyoh fills us in on the all the flavours of Ghanaian food, why its time is now, and where to find it – and other examples of African cooking – near you.


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LEADING THE WAY: [here] Zoe started with supper clubs and now runs a restaurant in Pop Brixton; [right] lamb cutlets with peanut sauce at Zoe’s Ghana Kitchen

peppers, which are more aromatic than hot. There are also interesting chillies like paprika chillies, and staples like yams, fufu [a dish made by pounding together cassava and unripe plantain with water], kenkey and banku [a paste made using fermented maize and cassava]. Rather than highlighting the differences between Ghanaian food and all the other food categories, there are actually a lot of similarities in terms of the ingredients, it’s more how they process them. These ingredients are actually very similar to a lot of other cuisines from around the world. I’ve had some customers who have come in and said the shito is similar to Malaysian sambal, or the kenkey is like a Mexican ground maize dish… What I find interesting is how there are the same ingredients around the world, but people are eating them in different ways.

What is it that makes Ghanaian cuisine so distinctive?

→ sometimes the Ghanaian will say it’s not hot enough, or that it’s too hot, and then the same will happen the other way round. The point of Ghana Kitchen is to take people on a food journey where they can try ingredients and flavours they’ve never tasted before. There’s that sense of adventure and I’m trying to guide people with that – I’m not trying to represent anything that I cook as traditional Ghanaian food as there are plenty of people doing that already. What are the key ingredients in Ghanaian cooking? The spices, like guinea peppers and alligator

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I LEARNED ABOUT GHANAIAN INGREDIENTS ON EAST LONDON’S RIDLEY ROAD

Each country has its own particular relationship with its food culture. For example, while Nigeria and Ghana are relatively close and share a lot of the same ingredients, how they treat the food is very different. That’s to do with basics like the way things grow, or the tools you have to cook with, or the climate. If you’re talking about the flavours, Ghanaian food has a real wholesomeness to it. It’s largely unprocessed, and it’s all fresh and dried pulses and herbs and peppers – flavours that are indigenous to Ghana that you don’t find elsewhere. Then comes the personality. There’s a lot of symbolism in Ghanaian culture – eggs are very important as they’re very symbolic of fertility and growth, and are used for so many things, like the coming of age ceremony. The Ashanti people have a whole set of proverbs around fufu, it’s a very important food to them. Other groups might care more about the kenkey. I’m not trying to teach lessons →


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The Groundnut – Africa

The Groundnut is a south London-based partnership exploring the African and European heritage of founders Folayemi Brown, Duval Timothy and Jacob Fodio Todd. They’ve brought out two popular cookbooks, too. @TheGroundnut

Chalé! Let’s Eat – Ghana

You’ll find this street-food favourite popping up at markets across London, serving dishes like okra fries, chilli bean fritters and papaya sorbet, inspired by the founders’ Ghanaian, Guyanese and Togolese backgrounds. @ChaleLetsEat

Lemlem Kitchen – Eritrea

Catch Lem Lem Kitchen at Netil Market every weekend, recreating the Italianinfluenced dishes of founder Makda’s hometown of Asmara, the capital of Eritrea. The menu features reimagined favourites, like afro-tacos and shiro fries, too. @lemlemkitchen

Jason’s Little Kitchen – Ghana

This supper club uses organic, locally sourced ingredients to put a slightly posher spin on Ghanaian cuisine. It was set up by Jason, who wanted to share his mum’s traditional west African cooking, and has gone from strength to strength ever since. @Jslittlekitchen

The Bantu Chef – southern Africa

Based in South Norwood, chef Ray focuses on South and southern African food, highlighting countries including Botswana. You’ll find everything from Afrikaans classics like boerewors, a dried lamb and beef sausage, to a smoky goat burger. @BantuChef

Tasty – Nigeria

→ about tribal culture, but when people ask me about it, there’s usually a story behind it.

How did you get into cooking?

Find out more at zoesghanakitchen.co.uk. ‘Zoe’s Ghana Kitchen: Traditional Recipes Mixed for the Modern Kitchen’ is out on 20 April

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Nim’s Din – Liberia and Sierra Leone

Nim started out with a blog celebrating her love of food, but went on to host supper clubs showcasing Sierra Leonean and Liberian food, raising money for the ebola crisis in the process. @NimsDin

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Chuku’s – Nigeria

Putting a modern twist on African favourites, this pop-up dishes up Nigerian tapas. This means you’ll be able to sample the likes of jollof quinoa, honey-glazed prawns and caramel kuli kuli chicken – mouth-watering wings tossed in a sticky caramel, ground peanut and spice mix. @chukusLDN

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NEW FLAVOURS: The food at Zoe’s Ghana Kitchen is a new take on traditional dishes

Photograph by ###

My career as a cook and a chef has grown organically. I did law as my first degree, and creative writing as my second, and had jobs in PR, marketing, journalism, music promotion and management. The whole Ghana Kitchen project came from a sense of fun and adventure and wanting to share something with people – wouldn’t it be wonderful if, in ten years, people were making dishes like red red and jollof at home, the same way that everybody makes a curry on a Friday night? Why shouldn’t that happen? f

WHERE TO FIND IT: ZOE’S HOT SPOTS FOR AFRICAN FOOD IN LONDON

Having gone from one site in Woolwich to branches all over London, Tasty is a super authentic restaurant showcasing traditional African dishes like grilled croaka fish, fresh tilapia pepper soup and a fish and yam pepper soup, alongside hearty plates like Nigerian jollof. tastyafricanfood.com


THE VEAL DEAL 70


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Photograph by ###

Veal has had its fair share of bad press, but with improved production values, things are changing. Clare Finney explores the rise of British rose veal

HE YEAR IS 2012; the place is Longley Farm, East Sussex, where I’m standing in wellies trying to resist the affectionate attentions of a four-year-old Fresian Holstein. Steve Hook, the farmer, stands beside me, chuckling. “Ada is our PR cow.” She’s certainly friendly, I smile nervously, gingerly petting her nose. Ada, I’m told, has recently given birth to a calf, after two months’ holiday on the ancient Pevensey pastures. “Where is she?” I ask eagerly. “He,” Steve corrects. “He’s a bull calf. We’re raising him for veal.” I gasp, cast my eyes around for some small wooden crates, then stammer “You’re producing veal?” But I thought you were all ethical?!” “Absolutely. That’s just why we do it,” comes Steve’s simple but bewildering reply. A quick tour round the rest of the farm shows that my fears are unfounded. There are no crates, no pained cries, just some gangly calves cavorting around an airy, straw-strewn barn with their mates. Nevertheless, in the months following my visit I still struggled to evangelise many of my friends at home. Fast forward to 2017, and the idea that veal could be ethical is almost normalised in London, if not quite the rest of country. The sight of British veal on the menu no longer prompts the horrified reaction I had then: the meat is served at The Savoy; grilled at Gordon Ramsey-owned Bread Street Kitchen; dished up at Dabbous, and stewed with coconut at Vivek Singh’s Cinnamon Kitchen, as chefs and customers become increasingly aware of the reality of ethical veal – high welfare, sustainable, delicious – and the grisly alternative awaiting male calves. “For a long time,” Paul Shearing, Bread Street’s spirited head chef explains, “it was more profitable for farmers to simply shoot male calves at birth. They weren’t worth the cost of grain and shelter.” Forget Darling Buds of May visions of Barbour-clad farmers striding about in sunshine, Shearing continues. “It’s a very hard life. Most dairy farmers are on pitifully low incomes. It’s utterly heartbreaking for a farmer to shoot their animals, but, until recently they were perceived to have no value at all.” They can’t lactate – for obvious reasons – and there was until recently scant appetite for them within the UK, where veal had little precedent. Veal milanese, wiener schnitzel, osso bucco – these were the culinary heritage of the continent, not us little islanders. We keep a handful as studs, but to rear the rest to an age where they could be sold as beef involves dehorning and castrating: expensive vet procedures on which the farmer would →

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→ get little or no return, and that’s before you count the cost of shelter. Dairy bulls have a low meat-to-bone ratio in comparison with beef bulls, so they are poorly valued at market. What’s more, the veal protests of the early 1990s brought to light the horrifying conditions in which some calves were being kept, putting most consumers off. The reporting on veal was devastatingly misleading, Nadia Stokes of Gourmet Goat in Borough Market recalls darkly. “The media sensationalised a horrific problem that was very small here, and largely confined to European countries.” She was in the UK at the time and like many non-natives found our attitude baffling: even outside of Europe there aren’t many countries producing dairy, while at the same time recklessly rejecting their veal. Vivek Singh cites Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and even southern India (before it was banned there) as having a rich veal tradition. Stokes is Greek Cypriot, and grew up eating veal. “Selling rose veal here as well as goat felt like a natural progression – it’s authentic and, like kid goat, it’s a resource that would otherwise be discarded. Yes it’s a short life – but at nine months old, it’s older than most lambs and pigs are when they are slaughtered.” Better a short happy life, runs the rose veal argument, than none at all. Still, images of dark, tiny crates with slatted floors; of animals being wrenched, screaming, from their mothers within 48 hours of being born and kept in solitude; of

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their milk-only diet, imposed in order to keep their flesh snow white and tender, had caught the public’s imagination. “Since introducing our rose veal we’ve had a few people say they didn’t fancy it, and some nasty comments on Twitter,” says Stokes sadly, “but when I explained to them what the law is here, and where we get our veal from” – the RSPCAendorsed Weston Farm in Devon – “they tended to change their mind. Now it’s outselling the goat kofta, which is our star dish. People are going nuts for the rose veal.” Like Longley, Weston Farm’s veal is about as ethical a meat you will get in this country, so long as there’s an appetite for milk and cows to provide it. Vegetarianism’s all well and good until you realise that cheese-stuffed

WESTON FARM’S VEAL IS ABOUT AS ETHICAL A MEAT AS YOU CAN GET


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THE NEW BREED: [left] Calves raised for rose veal are now kept in better conditions; [below] Vivek Singh recognises the meat’s traditional uses

Photograph (calves) by Vince Bevan/Alamy

mushroom you’re chowing down on in place of roast beef indirectly contributes toward the slaughter of thousands of bull calves each year. “You can’t eat dairy and not deal with the consequences of that,” says Nadia Stokes of Gourmet Goat. “We would never advocate eating more meat in general, for environmental reasons, but unlike with most meat, rose veal and kid goat are a no-brainer.” Eat veal, she says – preferably in the form of one of her slow-roast veal wraps with grape molasses and smoky pepper sauce – or reconcile yourself to the fact they will either be shot at birth, or transported to the countries where they have a longer tradition of whiter-than-white veal, softer legislation around farm-animal welfare, and thus less of an issue with veal raised in conditions that, while not as bad as those described above, are still lamentably poor. “Veal crates were banned in Europe in 2006, but on the continent many cows are still kept in barren houses with slatted floors and no straw bedding,” the RSPCA’s Farm Assured scheme informs me. They are kept in confined isolation – a purgatory for these cows, for whom social interaction is vital for mental health. Being transported to the continent means the calves travel for up to 18 hours in hot lorries, unable to lie down and with little more than an hour’s rest. In many cases, their diet remains deficient in iron and fibre in order to achieve the silky texture, anaemic colour and milky-sweet taste of traditional veal. “Straw provides a source of fibre which helps the animals’ digestive system develop properly. Continental veal cows are often given a diet without fibre, which can cause ill health,” the RSPCA continues. On the contrary, RSPCA Farm Assured veal suppliers – of which Weston is one, Longley another – must be fed a diet with sufficient iron and fibre to keep them healthy, and kept in high-welfare conditions informed by scientific evidence, rather than a blind adherence to Larousse Gastronomique and haute cuisine. Of course, things are not rose and white with veal, especially as far as cooking’s concerned. Michelin-starred wunder-chef Ollie Dabbous is a passionate advocate of rose veal, but he does not dismiss its paler cousin out of hand. “People think immediately of the containers of the 1980s and 1990s that calves can’t turn around in

when they hear continental veal – but they’ve been banned there since 2007,” he points out. Yet rose veal “gives calves in this country a purpose” and, slow roasted, the skin crisped up as crackling and served alongside runner beans from Kent and some Spenwood cheese pistou is his “perfect example of modern British cooking”; but milk-fed has its place in his heart and on his menu. “It’s milder and milkier – more like chicken or quail than beef, really – and is perfect for more delicate dishes.” Within the EU, though the barbaric regimes described above are still widespread, the number of farmers turning to more humane methods is rising slowly. Both Dabbous and the Ginger Pig, for example, source Limousin veal, a high-welfare meat from Rungis market in France which has “no comparison” with the rose version. “While rose veal is a worthwhile and hugely necessary use of bull calves from the dairy industry, Limousin is reared just for its eating quality.” Calves are reared outside with their mother until slaughter, Ginger Pig founder Tim Wilson continues, so their meat benefits from both their mothers’ milk and pasture grazing. It has all the qualities a top chef like Dabbous might look for, while at the same time boasting some of the highest veal welfare standards in Europe . There are British equivalents. The Telegraph’s food writer Xanthe Clay cites Mike Brend, a dairy farmer in Devon as one such example of a British farmer producing paler veal. Writing for cooks as well as responsible consumers, she describes how Brend’s calves are kept together in an airy barn and fed on a diet of just milk and barley straw – making for a veal that is “closer to traditional, old-fashioned veal in flavour, but without the appalling welfare issues” one associates with this fare. Brend supplies his veal and milk to Sainsbury’s, as part of the →

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VEAL OF APPROVAL: [left] A slow-roast veal wrap from the Gourmet Goat; [below] cattle being raised on a Freedom Food accredited veal farm

→ supermarket’s wider efforts to provide higher-welfare veal while making their dairy supply more sustainable. “White veal, as we call it, was chosen to ensure the best tasting product was produced. The RSPCA Assured white veal system that we have set up marries the excellent quality and flavour of traditional veal with the high welfare systems of today that our customers expect,” a Sainsbury’s spokesperson told me. To date, only six of the company’s 320 dairy farms use their male

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calves for veal – a mere trifle, in other words, but sales are rising and, since 2014, 209,000 packs of veal have been sold. Elsewhere, the majority of veal you’ll find labelled British will be rose veal: reared, like Weston’s, on a varied diet with other calves and space to roam around in. “Our veal calves are kept in groups of 12 in large barns with plenty of straw for bedding and rough forage, and fed on homegrown barley as well as milk,” fourth generation farmer Neil Weston explains. “They’ve room to play and hang out with their mates.” Having joined his father William on the family farm in 2005, in 2011 he set out to keep their young jersey bulls as stud animals so they could cease the buying of studs from outside and thus keep closer management of their herd. “He said I could, provided I could find a market for all the rest of the young bulls – and it was around that time he saw Gordon Ramsey on The F-Word promoting British rose veal” – a concept almost unheard of back then, but which caught the young farmer’s attention. “I thought we could give it a try – and we did, and people liked it. It went on from there.” Today, along with the award-laden Gourmet Goat, Weston’s client list includes such illustrious establishments as The

Photograph (farmer) by Alexander Caminada/Alamy

OUR VEAL CALVES ARE KEPT IN LARGE BARNS AND HAVE ROOM TO HANG OUT AND PLAY

Ledbury, the Portland and The Clove Club. Lizzie Vines of Wild Beef, who stock Weston’s veal and an even rosier outdoorreared version, tells me they simply cannot get enough of it; its versatility – “lean, tender, delicious,” she enthuses – renders it hugely popular with the market’s foodies. “It’s incredibly versatile. It can really hold flavours,” agrees Paul Shearing, who sources his from Lake District Farmers and suggests braising, roasting or grilling it and serving with truffle mashed potato. It might not get past some of the stuffier gentleman’s clubs or the House of Lords, he continues, grinning mischievously – “they’ll want the pale Dutch veal, which will naturally be softer. But this is English veal. It’s a by-product. If the flavour profile is there, why wouldn’t you? We’ve 30 different palates in this kitchen, and when we tasted this meat the other day we were all laughing.” Even the texture, the alleged sticking point of rose veal when it comes to culinary principles, is rendered – at least to the uninitiated – almost indistinguishable from white, thanks to the practice among British veal producers of hanging the meat. He is about to go on talking, but at this point he’s interrupted by the arrival of my first veal cutlet, Josper-grilled to a juicy tan coat just shy of crispy, with sweet, soft flesh blushing crimson within. Shearing, wisely, looks quietly satisfied and says no more. He doesn’t need to. He knows that one mouthful of this meat will be enough to convince me that when it comes to sustainable, ethical and high quality food, British rose veal ticks all the boxes – and let’s face it, it’s not often you can say that about a meat. f


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When it comes to cod, it doesn't get any better than Skrei. But what exactly is it that makes it so revered? Mike Gibson heads to Norway to find out PHOTOGRAPHY BY STEVE LEE

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T

HE LINE CATCHES. From gazing into middle-distance at the mountains that surround us, I snap back to look into the freezing, stone-grey water below the boat; the top of my rod bends under the strain and it feels like I’m on to something big. Even for a complete novice like me, it’s unmistakably not a rock – my first chance to catch a fish feels like an open goal. I focus my attention on pulling the line up steadily, and by the time the line nears the end of the spindle, I can make out a bronzey, blurred shape that crystallises as it reaches the surface. I grit my teeth. This is it. As it breaks the water, I get a full view of the fish I’ve caught. I’m stony-faced, needing just to bring it level with the deck before it’s helped aboard. But it squirms, somehow frees itself from the hook, and splashes back into the water. It’s uncharacteristic – maybe it’s my steely eyed determination not to come back from my first fishing trip empty-handed – but I don’t panic; instead, like a claw machine in the bowels of a weathered British pier, I hold the line just above the fish, still thrashing no more than a metre under the water, and in a second that feels like it’s going past in super slow-motion, I dip it in the water just underneath its mouth and manage to snare it

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again. This time I make no mistake – I reel it in quickly and haul it up onto the deck. Bracing Arctic winds whip against my face, the sunlight just beginning to creep over the tops of the mountainous archipelagos that loom stoically around us, the boat’s scythe and the churn of the sea the only things lending the serene landscape any movement. For someone who’s never fished before, this is a beautiful place to start. My catch is huge and it looks like it’ll taste delicious, but as quickly as my excitement comes, it’s cut short – it’s a beautiful fish, but Jack Robert Møller, the UK director of the Norwegian Seafood Council, can tell from a cursory glance from across the boat: it’s not a Skrei. I’m here in Sommarøy in northern Norway, an hour’s drive north of Tromsø, with a troupe of chefs, among them Michel Roux Jr, Glynn Purnell, The Frog’s Adam Handling, Barrafina’s Nieves Barragán Mohacho and The Ritz’s Young Chef of the Year, Ruth Hansom. We’re on a mission to discover migratory Skrei cod, the jewel in the crown of Norway’s vaunted, fruitful waters. The country is famous for its fish and seafood, much of which is sustainably farmed, and it contributes around £8.6bn per year to Norway’s famously healthy economy, providing 34 million meals around the world

every day in the process. Chances are that you’ve had Norwegian cod before, whether it’s wrapped in batter with chips or in an artful dish at Le Gavroche. But Skrei is not a farmed fish, which is why we’re bracing the winds to get a taste of the action for ourselves. To earn its title (Skrei is a classification, not a species), it must be caught in specific areas in northern Norway between January and April, when it’s returning from the Barents Sea. It must also be bled quickly, and packed and processed within 12 hours of being caught, with no

SKREI IS NOT FARMED, WHICH IS WHY WE’RE BRACING THE ARCTIC WINDS


damage to its flesh, scales or fins. Only then is it imbued with its quality Skrei tag, elevating it from a simply beautiful product to a truly revered one. Over the course of the voyage, we hit a fair few deep-sea fish – some beautiful ling and tusk, as well as some non-migratory cod like my second-time-lucky catch earlier – but no one snares a Skrei. This is fairly standard: we’re early on in the season, and it’ll be a month or so before they become genuinely plentiful in these waters. That’s because, as well as being a cultural icon, Skrei is a truly seasonal product – something that’s arguably still new to the British. I talk to Adam Handling when we take a break inside the deck, who asserts that “we’re used to having fish all year ’round, but that’s because we don’t understand the sea. We don’t understand fish.” It sounds crazy, given the undeniable quality of much of the British Isles’ seafood. But, while restaurants are promoting the virtues of seasonal eating more than ever and consumers, too, are realising the benefits of putting sustainability and sourcing higher up the agenda when shopping, we’re used to having reasonably unfettered access to the seafood we’ve grown accustomed to eating. “There are certain times of the year when I don’t think we should be serving certain kinds of fish,” says Michel Roux Jr, who’s leading the trip as an ambassador, having been cooking with Skrei for years. “Especially flat fish like sole and turbot, when they’re full of roe – the actual flesh is small and not firm, because the energy of the fish has gone into producing eggs and spawning. “Likewise with scallops,” he continues. “In France, there’s a scallop season,

AS WELL AS BEING A CULTURAL ICON, SKREI IS A TRULY SEASONAL PRODUCT whereas here in Britain we eat scallops all year ’round. There are certain fish that spring to mind, like tuna from the Mediterranean – there’s a very short window for that – which you should actually put on your menu as Mediterranean tuna. Chefs should be printing it on their menus to make people aware, and making sure their staff understand that it’s a seasonal product, so that they can convey that to the customer.” He’s right. For all the fuss we (rightfully) make over game season in the UK – and indeed over seasonal vegetables, too – it’s all too easy to forget that fish and seafood, like anything with a life cycle, is a seasonal product. I ask Jose Souto, chef-lecturer at Westminster Kingsway College and author of the comprehensive game manual Venison: The Game Larder, to compare his experiences of game hunting with those of Skrei fishing:

“It’s not that different,” he replies, when I catch a spare couple of minutes on board to ask how fishing in Norway compares to hunting game. “You’re in an area of outstanding natural beauty,” he says. “It’s a natural harvest that happens at a certain time of the year, the same as with game: there’s a similarity between Skrei and game. Skrei only happens at a short period in a certain time of the year, where it can be harvested, and there’s a sustainable harvest of a small amount of that fish. It’s all about managing the rate of consumption. “I always say, especially when it comes to deer management, that it’s not about going out and taking every deer in the wild. It’s about managing them to a state where my son and my son’s sons will be able to go out there and see them. That’s the same as these guys in Norway want to do: they want to manage the environment so future generations will still be able to take Skrei out of the sea.” That mentality is why the culture of Skrei – of catching the highest-quality cod at the point where it’s migrating – has existed long before the era of buzzing London restaurants. In fact the villages around here have been hotbeds of Skrei fishermen since before the discovery of the New World, and dried Skrei was even used as currency on voyages. In 1816, regulations were placed on it; now, in 2017, they’re working on a PGI (Protected Geographical Indicator) for Skrei. The industry, and the culture that runs alongside it, could not have survived →

HOOKING GOOD: (clockwise from main) Sommarøy’s polar landscape; Mike with his catch; Bob Bob Ricard’s John Ellison

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ROD TRIP: Chefs Simon Hulstone, Jose Souto and Glyn Purnell fishing for Skrei around Sommarøy

THE FACTORY RUNS LIKE A FINELY TUNED MACHINE → without an intrinsic understanding on the part of the people harvesting it that it cannot be an exhaustive practice. After the adrenaline of the boat, we go back to the Lorentzen Factory to see the packaging for ourselves. During our tour, the head of the factory – a family business since 1896 – explains that of Norway’s 400,000-tonne annual quota for cod, only 10,000 tonnes were actually caught and sold as quality labeled Skrei in the January-April Skrei season. He also explains the ebb and flow of Skrei’s pricing: it tends to be 20-30% more expensive than regular Norwegian cod in full season, but can be as much as 50% more depending on supply. There are obvious parallels with the annual Almadraba harvest in Spain’s Cadiz region, where, at the same point in the season every year, Atlantic bluefin tuna are redirected down a series of river estuaries before being caught in nets. It’s a harvest that draws controversy because of the scarcity of bluefin tuna as a species, yet at the same time maps out a perfectly sustainable template for using the flow of the season – and centuries of know-how – to elicit the capture of a truly prized product. Thankfully, despite historical

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problems with cod quotas around Britain, they’re not nearly as scarce as they have been; and Skrei has never had a problem coordinating supply and demand. Considering the importance of processing and packaging to the classification, the factory has to run like a finely tuned machine. Diligent workers pack Skrei into polystyrene boxes covered in frosted shards of ice, and we see a long-standing tradition whereby children from the surrounding villages come to harvest the tongues from the heads of cod and, this being Norway, they earn a pretty tidy sum for doing so. After our day's fishing, we head upstairs to a cosy apartment, decked out in plush sofas, and we’re given woollen boots to stave off the residual cold of the factory. We partake in a traditional lunch of poached Skrei, with its unctuously fatty liver cooked the same way, cod roe ‘sausages’, and stomachs. Eating it is a transcendent moment; it’s a chance to see the exalted fish in its purest form, and to taste a sense of its history. The Skrei’s flesh flakes beautifully; the liver is nutty and buttery, more reminiscent of foie gras than irony liver. That night, there’s an assignment on the cards. We squeeze into the office canteen at the Norwegian Seafood Council’s offices in Tromsø, which looks out across the city lights from panoramic windows, and the chefs are tasked with inventing a dish using Skrei and other Norwegian seafood, along with leg of reindeer and a host of fresh ingredients. Four keen students from the local culinary school are given an education in the process. There’s a flurry of activity as the chefs set about designing and prepping dishes on the fly, and the small kitchen becomes a hive of activity. They grab products: Jose, the resident game expert, picks out the hulking reindeer leg to break down; nearly everyone else seeks out the star of the day and plans

their dish around Skrei. I’ll wager it’s one of the only times I’ll see a beautiful Norwegian king crab get upstaged, in the form of the resplendent, silvery cod. Nieves prepares cod cheeks with pil pil; Adam Handling and Ruth Hansom collaborate on a simple salt-crusted Skrei and salmon; Glyn Purnell and Luke Tipping set about making curry-spiced Skrei with fermented carrot and a prawn and crab velouté; Michel Roux Jr – with two Michelin stars, no less – takes on a salt cod omelette. Despite the limitations of the kitchen, the dishes are as good as you’d expect from some of the country’s top chefs using one of their favourite products. They’re singularly delicious, inventive, and complex even when they’re straightforward. They pay homage to the Skrei in a very different way to the simple, traditional dishes from earlier, playing their part in a system that elevates it from a Norwegian cultural icon to a mighty, super-premium export. “I think it’s fundamentally important that chefs understand where their food comes from,” Jose Souto had told me on the boat earlier. “They shouldn’t just see their produce as a ‘thing’.” And, after they’ve braved the elements to catch it, learnt its painstaking personal history, and seen for themselves how it’s become a hugely important part of the very fabric of northern Norway’s anthropology, it’s abundantly clear that these chefs see Skrei as anything but. f

COOK WITH SKREI Want to learn to use Skrei cod in your kitchen like a pro? We’ve enlisted Michel Roux Jr to share three recipes based around his favourite fish. See them at fdsm.co/recipes


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HISTORY’S IN THE MAKING It’s just released a new menu, but The Savoy hotel’s Beaufort Bar is a venue steeped in heritage PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID HARRISON

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I

T’S REALLY NO coincidence that stepping into the Beaufort Bar feels like going back in time. The bar – one of two at the Strand’s iconic Savoy hotel alongside the American Bar – might only have been open since 2010, after a multi-millionpound renovation of the hotel, but it’s on hallowed ground: the bar takes pride of place in the hotel’s former cabaret stage, a nighttime haunt for the hoi polloi of London for more than a century. With ample space, untouchable heritage, and a new-school appreciation of the art of bartending, it’s no surprise that the bar has regularly appeared alongside its sister the American Bar in the World’s 50 Best Bars list. The room is sweeping, the seats are plush, the bartenders serve drinks with a deft touch from a towering, monolithic back bar, the lighting is just right. And, crucially, the drinks are some of the best in London. Simply put, the whole proposition feels like a cathedral to the golden age of bartending; a luxurious space where antiquity and modernity collide to create something that feels not only historic, but timeless. f fairmont.com/savoy-london

UNDER THE STARS This cocktail is inspired by the great Fred Astaire, who danced on the roof of The Savoy in the 1920s. Although he was pictured in an iconic photograph drinking champagne, his favourite cocktail was an old fashioned. This one uses Woodford Reserve rye and bourbon, sherry and – cheekily – champagne syrup.

INGREDIEN TS ◆◆ 30ml Woodford Rye ◆◆ 10ml Woodford Reserve ◆◆ 71/2ml oloroso sherry ◆◆ 71/2ml amontillado sherry ◆◆ 10ml chestnut liqueur ◆◆ 71/2ml champagne syrup ◆◆ 5 dash Angostura bitters ◆◆ sherry blend

Photograph by ###

◆◆ bitters

Stir over ice and serve in a rocks glass with a large block of ice.

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THE SHOWGIRL

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IN G R ED IEN TS ◆◆ 20ml Grey Goose ◆◆ 10ml rose liqueur ◆◆ 10ml Aperol cordial ◆◆ Chambord ◆◆ 10ml Martini Ambrato ◆◆ 50ml Dom Pérignon ◆◆ 2 dashes grapefruit bitters

Stir over ice and strain into a vintage coupette glass.

Photograph by ###

The Savoy has been no stranger to iconic celebrities during its 128-year history. This drink – a complex cocktail involving sweet and sour flavours and topped with Dom Pérignon – is inspired by Marilyn Monroe, who gave a press conference in the hotel’s Lancaster Ballroom in 1956 to promote her film The Prince and the Showgirl.


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— JARLSBERG —

INSIDE THE MAKING OF JARLSBERG® CHEESE A FOODISM GUIDE

Fresh milk, good bacteria, and holes: how much do you know about Jarlsberg, the delicious cheese from Norway?

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CONTENTS ◆◆ An introduction to Jarlsberg, including

when and how it was created ◆◆ The science of Jarlsberg and a potted

timeline of the brand’s history ◆◆ Four great recipes to make the most

out of Jarlsberg’s unique flavour


PROMOTION

T H E

STO RY

A TRUE TASTE OF NORWAY Jarlsberg has been Norway’s favourite cheeses since it was created back in 1956. The story behind it is one of innovation, great flavour, and a little bit of chemistry, too...

W

E DON’T KNOW whether it’s the subtle nutty flavours, the soft and supple texture, or those characteristic air holes – but there’s something about Jarlsberg that keeps us coming back for more.

ONLY A HANDFUL OF PEOPLE KNOW JARLSBERG’S SECRET RECIPE

That’s the reason that Jarlsberg’s been the world’s favourite Norwegian cheese for more than six decades and counting, and one whose roots stretch back a century or more before that. It’s a cheese that’s straightforward but also complex; delicious, but versatile, too. Its story began in a university laboratory – the Norwegian Agricultural University, to be precise – where a research project culminated in a partnership with a huge dairy cooperative called TINE, and Jarlsberg cheese was born. The recipe is famously elusive – while there are many cheesemakers around Europe and beyond, only a handful of

people know how the secret behind what we’ve come to know as Jarlsberg. It involves being extremely picky about milk (only the freshest will do), and a bit of alchemy, too – the process that imbues the cheese with both its distinctive holes and its sweet flavours involves bacteria, miniature explosions, and a specific maturation process, too. With that in mind, when we talk about Jarlsberg, how it’s made, how it pairs with other food and with drinks, and its long, distinguished tradition, it’s not a simple matter. Let us guide you through a world of chemical reactions, of old-meets-new, and of exceptional flavour. ●

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T H E

S C I E N C E

THE HOLE TRUTH Those air holes aren’t just for show – they’re the result of some complex chemistry. Here, we shed a light on how Jarlsberg goes from milk to cheese

DAIRY QUEEN: Jarlsberg’s cheesemakers are fastidious about the standard of milk used in Jarlsberg. It’s produced by a cooperative of more than 13,000 dairy farmers, who deliver more than 1.4 billion litres of cow’s milk every year.

HOLEY SPIRIT: Those air holes in Jarlsberg’s cheese are the result of a unique chemical reaction: a specific bacteria, introduced in the form of a culture to the milk, breaks down the lactic acid and forces air between the curds.

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PROMOTION

T HE T IME L INE

1956

PLASTIC DREAMS: To protect the nutty, delicate flavour of Jarlsberg, it’s endowed with a plastic rind before maturation. It’s not designed to eat, although it’s made with food-grade plastic, meaning it’s not harmful.

In 1956, at the Agricultural University of Norway, professor Ole Martin Ystgaard presided over a very special cheesemaking project. It was a collaboration between students of the university and food scientists, the result of which was a uniquely textured and flavoured cheese studded with perfectly round air pockets that widened as the cheese matured. They christened their new creation “Jarlsberg”.

1978 Keen to take advantage of its new-found status in America, but not to let the brand’s principles become compromised, the Norwegian farmers of the TINE cooperative oversaw the founding of Norseland Foods Inc. in the USA. The aim of this company was to ensure quality at every stage during the manufacturing process, from the dairy farms in Norway to the final product. The idea was a resounding success: Jarlsberg is now by some distance the most popular imported cheese in the USA.

1960-65 The Jarlsberg branded range and cheeses were introduced to Australia by the Cantarella family in 1960, and Canada and the UK followed shortly after. After that, it started being exported to America, where it became hugely popular.

1988 As a measure of its popularity in the US, nothing beats the year 1988, which brought a milestone for its American operations: the ten millionth wheel of Jarlsberg shipped there. That means that in the 13 years since it was introduced, Americans consumed a whopping 100 million kilograms of Jarlsberg.

2001 A year after the production of Jarlsberg destined for the American market is relocated to the US, the 15 millionth wheel of Jarlsberg is sold in the country. If you were to line up all those wheels, it would stretch across the country from New York to Los Angeles. That’s a hole (sorry) lot of cheese...

2016 Last year brought another milestone for Jarlsberg: the brand’s 60th birthday. What started in a laboratory at a university has since become a beloved food product that sells around 27,000 tons globally each year. How about that?

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INGREDIENTS Makes 40 ◆◆ Salt

◆◆ 50g melted butter ◆◆ butter for frying ◆◆ 25g yeast

◆◆ 200g sliced smoked salmon ◆◆ 300g plain flour

◆◆ 75g buckwheat flour

◆◆ 4 tbsp. lukewarm water ◆◆ 500ml lukewarm milk ◆◆ 3 egg yolks

◆◆ 3 egg whites

◆◆ 3 tbsp. sour cream

◆◆ 125g grated Jarlsberg ◆◆ 30g flour

R E CI PES

JARLSBERG BLINIS Blinis are a classic, elegant nibble for a dinner party, especially topped with smoked salmon and sour cream. Take them one step further by topping with Jarlsberg crisps

S

WEET, SALTY AND creamy, smoked salmon and cream cheese blinis are a sure-fire crowd pleaser – and feel especially decadent served with a glass of fizz. You can elevate the snacks with the addition of crunchy, golden Jarlsberg crisps – the texture will take them to the next level.

Method

1 Dissolve the yeast in lukewarm water, mix with 3 to 4 tbsp of plain flour and put it

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aside for 20 minutes until it has risen. 2 Combine the rest of the plain flour and the buckwheat flour in a large bowl. Add the milk, yeast mixture, egg yolks, sour cream and salt and mix together. Allow it to rise for 2 to 3 hours. 3 To make the Jarlsberg crisps, preheat your oven to 180 ° C. Mix the melted butter and grated Jarlsberg in a food processor, add the flour and let the mixture rest in the refrigerator for 1 to 2 hours.

4 Make small balls, about one teaspoon in size, and bake them on greased baking paper until golden brown. 5 Beat the egg whites until stiff and fold them into the batter. 6 Drop small spoons of the batter into a hot frying pan to make little pancakes. Fry on both sides until golden brown, then drain. 7 To serve, top the blinis with sour cream and smoked salmon, and garnish with the crispy Jarlsberg chips. ●


PROMOTION

CREAMY PASTA WITH CRAYFISH Pasta that’s topped with nutty Jarlsberg, fresh seafood and a tangy lemon-tarragon sauce. What’s not to love?

T

HE UNIQUE FLAVOURS of Jarlsberg make it the perfect addition to this simple yet tasty pasta recipe – and you can make it in minutes, too.

METHOD

1 Cook the pasta according to the instructions on the pack. 2 Whisk together 1 egg, 2 egg yolks, the zested peel and juice. Roughly chop the tarragon and stir it into the mixture.

3 Add salt and pepper to taste. 4 When the pasta has cooked, strain off the water. 5 Add the butter to the pasta pan and allow to melt into the pasta. Then add the egg and herb mixture and stir carefully. 6 Grate the Jarlsberg cheese over the hot pasta, turning it carefully so that the cheese is evenly distributed. 7 To serve, top with fresh-fried prawns or crayfish tails. ●

T HE

PA I R I N G S

Jarlsberg is a great complement to so much more than cheese toasties. Here are some of our favourite flavour pairings. You’re welcome... ORANGE MARMALADE Caramelised red onion chuntey is so last year – try adding a generous swipe of zingy orange marmalade instead. Perfect on cheese on toast or in a simple sandwich.

HOT CHORIZO The spicy smokiness of chorizo is the perfect counterpoint to Jarlsberg’s nutty sweetness. Try it as a pasta topping, putting it in the oven to make the cheese melt. Simple yet satisfying.

DARK CHOCOLATE Cheese and... dark chocolate? Yep, you read that right. The bitterness enhances Jarlsberg’s unique flavours – make it extra dark (80% or more) for maximum, palate-bending impact.

BLOND BEER

INGREDIENTS Serves 4 ◆◆ 1 egg

◆◆ 2 egg yolks

◆◆ 1 packet of pasta of your choice ◆◆ A little lemon zest Photograph by ###

◆◆ ½ lemon, juiced

◆◆ ½ pot of fresh tarragon ◆◆ Salt and pepper ◆◆ 20g butter

◆◆ 100g Jarlsberg cheese

The only thing that makes a cold beer at the end of a long day better? The perfect snack to soak it all up with (that means you can drink more, right?) Our favourite is bite-sized chunks of Jarlsberg cheese. Try it with grapes and cubes of apple for extra texture and flavour, or dip the cheese into hot sauce for a fiery kick.

◆◆ Prawns or crayfish tails, to serve

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PUFF PASTRY SWIRLS Give crowd-pleasing, classic cheese twists a, er, twist with Jarlsberg, rosemary and pepper

INGREDIENTS Makes 12 ◆◆ 4 ready-rolled puff pastry sheets ◆◆ 300g Jarlsberg cheese, grated ◆◆ 2 sprigs fresh rosemary ◆◆ Black pepper

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NY KIND OF cheese and puff pastry party nibble always go down a treat, so why not try making your own? This recipe from Jarlsberg is simple, impressive and packed with flavour.

METHOD

1 On a lightly floured work surface, roll out

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the pastry sheets into rectangles about 20cm x 10cm each. 2 Mix the grated cheese, chopped rosemary, and pepper. Spread the mixture over the puff pastry. 3 Roll up each pastry rectangle from the short end. Press the edges firmly together to seal the roll on the long edge.

4 Slice each roll into 3cm thick slices. 5 Place face down on a baking sheet and bake in the oven for about 15-20 mins. at 220 °C, until risen and golden. 6 Tip: If you want the pastry swirls to rise even more, use the pastry straight from the pack, unrolled, for maximum puff. 7 Serve with a pesto dip. ●


PROMOTION

INGREDIENTS Serves 4 ◆◆ 2 egg whites

◆◆ 4 large hamburger buns ◆◆ 1 red onion

◆◆ ½ iceberg lettuce ◆◆ 1 large dill pickle ◆◆ 2 tomatoes

◆◆ Mayonnaise, ketchup and mustard, to

taste

◆◆ 4 slices Jarlsberg

◆◆ 2 tsp salt and black pepper ◆◆ 800 g minced beef

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UT SIMPLY, THIS recipe is perfection between burger buns. Whether you cook yours over coals, under a grill or in a frying pan, here are some top tips for the perfect burger. What makes a difference is choosing the best meat and the best cheese. Jarlsberg comes out tops when it comes to that classic cheeseburger taste. How you make the actual hamburger is important, too. This recipe adds egg whites for more succulence, and allows you to make a big, juicy patty. After that just make sure the classic fillings are super fresh. And of course, don’t forget to melt the cheese all the way through.

Method

1 Mix the minced beef and egg whites together to large patties, one for each person. Season well with salt and pepper. 2 Fry or grill the burgers for about 3 minutes on each side. 3 During the final minutes of cooking, place a slice of Jarlsberg on each burger. 4 Heat the buns using either a toaster, frying pan, or grill. 5 Spread mayonnaise, a little mustard and ketchup on the bottom half of the buns. 6 Layer lettuce leaves, sliced pickle, tomato and red onion, and then top with the burger and melted Jarlsberg. 7 Finish with the other half of the bun, and serve. Chips optional. ●

THE BURGER Burgers are straightforward, but getting them right is no mean feat. This recipe shows you exactly how it’s done

WHERE TO FIND JARLSBERG Jarlsberg is available in wheels, wedges and slices from the deli counter and pre-pack cheese aisle of selected Sainsbury’s, Waitrose, Tesco, Morrisons, Ocado and Co-op stores nationwide. RRP £11 per kg and £1.75 per pack of 160g slices. Jarlsberg® Reserve can be found at the deli counter of selected Waitrose and Sainsbury’s stores nationwide (£16 per kg). Look out for special promotional packs of Jarlsberg in store for your chance to win great prizes. For more info: jarlsberg.com/win

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YOUR LIFE-CHANGING OPPORTUNITY WORTH OVER £35,000

Prize includes: • A place on the coveted Grand Diplôme® • 12 months accommodation with Homes for Students • An internship at LIMA Fitzrovia

APPLY AT ukscholarship.cordonbleu.edu

With the generous support of


— PART 3 —

EXCESS “EVEN IF YOU DON’T HAPPEN TO LIVE IN A 14TH-CENTURY COACHING INN, YOU’LL FEEL RIGHT AT HOME” JON HAWKINS IN THE COTSWOLDS, 114

096 NEW ORLEANS | 102 BOTTLE SERVICE | 108 THE DIGEST | 112 LE CORDON BLEU 114 INSIDER: THE COTSWOLDS | 118 THE SELECTOR | 130 DECONSTRUCT


TRAVEL

SOUTHERN PRIDE The Louisiana city of New Orleans is a melting pot of great restaurants. In a city where food options abound, Chris Osburn gives us his hot takes

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Photograph by f11photo/Shutterstock.com Photograph by ###

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your New Orleans essentials, from age-old to brand new and everything in between…

The Grandes Dames of Haute Creole Cuisine There’s a strong argument that NOLA is home to America’s only truly authentic cuisine: Creole. As très Américain as ‘hot

HAUTE CREOLE RESTAURANTS RANK AMONG THE CITY’S MOST CHERISHED

dogs and apple pie’ may be, the US holds no patent for either. If you want indigenous eats evolved over generations, then you want Creole. This homegrown cuisine is a mélange of ingredient, method and attitude that encompasses elements from primarily French, African and Native American people (but also Spanish and Caribbean folks, and more) who at some point called New Orleans and its environs home and swapped and/or stole recipes from each other. As Creole cooking developed, a refined approach to preparing its dishes emerged. Fusing technique, resourcefulness and ingenuity, Creole’s uppity sister, haute Creole, was born. Today, the best-known haute Creole restaurants rank among the city’s oldest and most cherished places to eat. COMMANDER’S PALACE

Setting a high bar since the late 1800s, this family-owned Garden District restaurant has won practically every award applicable, while building one of the most impressive rosters of chefs of any restaurant in America.

Photograph by (outdoor dining) Education Images; (gumbo) Lauri Patterson; (Galatoire’s) Stephen Saks Photography / Alamy; (tomatoes) Charles O. Cecil / Alamy

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HERE’S A GOOD reason food lovers across the globe have long revered the Southern US city of New Orleans, Louisiana as one of the world’s greatest dining destinations. I’ve been visiting this bastion of culinary heritage and epicentre for cutting-edge cuisine for years, and I’ve come to expect food flavoured with a blend of cultural continuity and on-trend distinction – something I’ve found increasingly hard to come by almost anywhere else. Almost twelve years have passed since Hurricane Katrina devastated the city, and its restaurant scene has made a major comeback, with nearly double the number of places to eat than it had before the storm. Pre-Katrina, NOLA had fewer than 800 restaurants; today it claims more than 1,400. That’s an intense concentration for a town with a population under half a million. With the rise in quantity, quality has not diminished – my latest pilgrimage proved at least as appetising as prior trips, possibly more so. So without further ado, here are


Alumni include Paul Prudhomme, Emeril Lagasse, Jamie Shannon, and currently Tory McPhail. De rigueur dishes at the Palace are myriad, but one not to miss is the house specialty, shrimp and tasso henican, comprised of wild Louisiana white shrimp, tasso ham, pickled okra, sweet onions, five pepper jelly and Crystal hot sauce beurre blanc. 1403 Washington Avenue; commanderspalace.com GALATOIRE’S

For a lesson in haute Creole history, with a side of joie de vivre, there’s nowhere more representative than 112-year-old Galatoire’s. Located along the

French Quarter’s most infamously touristic thoroughfare, clientele at this cultured if calamitous Bourbon Street mainstay is ardently local and well aware of protocol – namely to eat, drink and party like there’s no tomorrow. Indeed, the dining room during my Friday lunch was the loudest I’d ever entered. Much of the reason for the volume came compliments of a brass band bounding in off the street to march along the aisles of crowded tables. Food was as sophisticated as the atmosphere was frisky. The most gorgeous moment of my meal was a main course of tender pompano broiled with a crab meat yvonne garnish (Louisiana jumbo lump crab meat, artichoke hearts, mushrooms, green onions and meunière sauce). 209 Bourbon Street; galatoires.com

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: Outdoor dining in the French Quarter; Creole-style gumbo; Galatoire’s restaurant; fried green tomatos, a Louisianian classic

UPPERLINE RESTAURANT

For a quaint dinner to remember the rest of your life, build your itinerary around the chance to dine at this charming uptown institution. And when you go by all means try the fried green tomatoes with shrimp remoulade. The dish originated at Upperline in the early 1990s, but it’s now a mainstay on many NOLA menus. In between bites, take note of the dozens of museum quality paintings by New Orleans artists on display throughout the elegant townhouse interior. 1413 Upperline Street; upperline.com

Stalwarts of Tradition Creole is only half the story of edible culture in Louisiana. Cajun is the other. Mostly associated with upstate doings in the traditionally French-Canadian enclaves around Lafayette, Cajun recipes and dishes have nevertheless made it to the kitchens of some of NOLA’s most celebrated chefs, many of whom are of Cajun lineage themselves. Homely (but to a high standard) Cajun cuisine is the feature food at a handful of outstanding eateries bent on keeping Louisianan cookery alive. COCHON BUTCHER

This Warehouse District ‘swine bar’ and butcher shop finds inspiration in ‘Old World meat markets’ and in making its own Louisiana heritage foods, such as boudin and andouille. Ideal nosh here is Le Pig Mac: →

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keenly regional focus. Creating dishes that are determinedly idiosyncratic but which, equally, are steadfastly deferential to the city’s unique dining legacy, such restaurants guarantee dynamic and distinctive dining in New Orleans for many years to come. COMPERE LAPIN

FROM TOP: New Orleans’ vibrant French Quarter is home to historic restaurants and a contemporary Creole influence; a shrimp beignet

a side of praline bacon ‘pig candy’. 601 Gallier Street; elizabethsrestaurantnola.com K-PAUL’S LOUISIANA KITCHEN

→ a cheeseburger comprised of ‘two all-pork patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickle, onion on a sesame bun’ that’s handmade with regionally sourced ingredients and best washed back with a locally brewed craft beer as recommended by your bartender.

Celebrity chef Paul Prudhomme is widely recognised as the man who brought Louisiana flavours to the masses. Prudhomme passed away in 2015, but his legacy lives on in scrumptious glory at his French Quarter restaurant, still run by his family. A K-Paul staple, blackened Louisiana drum (seasoned and blackened in a cast-iron skillet and served with drawn butter, potatoes and vegetables) turned out to be one of the finest fish dishes I’ve ever had – and by ‘finest’, I mean every morsel was moist and delicate, with complex flavour and a long-lasting finish.

930 Tchoupitoulas St; cochonbutcher.com

416 Chartres Street; kpauls.com

ELIZABETH’S

Newest New Orleans

Diners love tucking in to giant portions of Chef Bryon Peck’s ‘from-scratch’ cooking at this laid back and creaky floored restaurant in Bywater, all while admiring the vibrant folk art on the walls (inside and out). A leisurely late breakfast is a wonderfully delectable reason to make for Elizabeth’s. But whenever you go and whatever you eat, be sure to order

As important as heritage is to dining in New Orleans, the city maintains an open-minded outlook, especially with respect to chefs and restaurateurs who reckon they’re good enough (and brave enough) to withstand the scrutiny and competition. A remarkable raft of new restaurants promises an especially flavourful future of worldly perspective and

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535 Tchoupitoulas; comperelapin.com LA PETITE GROCERY

This restaurant opened a year before Katrina but, happily, survived to garner great acclaim. Chef-patron Justin Devillier’s cosmopolitan take on regional fare makes an emptystomached visit to La Petite Grocery a must. The Magazine Street restaurant rewards the rapacious with inventive starters such as blue crab beignets with malt vinegar aioli, while presenting a discerning approach to indulgence with ampedup main courses along the lines of turtle bolognese with bucatini, dry sherry, parsley and fried softboiled egg. 4238 Magazine Street; lapetitegrocery.com SHAYA

Only a few years old, this Magazine Street restaurant (right across the street from Le Petite Grocery) is among New Orleans’ most popular and lauded places to eat. Dishes reflect executive chef Alon Shaya’s Israeli roots and centre on his use of a wood-fired oven to cook seasonal ingredients sourced locally and responsibly. f 4213 Magazine Street; shayarestaurant.com

GETTING THERE British Airways runs direct flights from London Heathrow to New Orleans from £645 both ways; britishairways.com

Photograph by (French Quarter) Zephyr Picture; (Shrimp Beignet) John Zada / Alamy

LA PETITE GROCERIE REWARDS THE RAPACIOUS WITH CRAB BEIGNETS

Chef Nina Compton is best known as Fan Favorite from Season 11 of US television program Top Chef. Her first and only restaurant, Compère Lapin opened in 2016 in the lobby of the Old No. 77 Hotel & Chandlery. Dishes like curried goat with sweet potato gnocchi and cashews bring flavours from her Saint Lucian home to the fore, all while providing a delicious update on Creole concept cooking.


New soul. New menu. Launching in April St. Bart’s Bart’s Smithfield Smithfield will will be offering a new slow-cooked barbecue St. barbecue concept concept menu, menu, cooked on on apple apple wood wood charcoal from our very own Hush Heath cooked Heath Estate Estate in in Kent Kent

bar ·· restaurant restaurant ·· private private dining dining · bar · live live music music ·· event event venue venue

Part of of Hush Hush Heath Part Heath Estate Estate

Passionately playing playing our our part part as as champions champions of of gloriously Passionately gloriously refreshing refreshing English English wines wines and and ciders ciders

call us us 020 020 7600 7600 2705 2705 to to book book || stbartsbrewery.com stbartsbrewery.com || info@stbartsbrewery.com call info@stbartsbrewery.com


BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOUR: Tequila and mezcal are, in broad terms, pretty similar: they’re both made by distilling the roasted heads of agave, a cactus-like plant native to Mexico. While tequila can only be made with blue agave, mezcal’s laws are more relaxed and can be made with any of the 30-plus varieties. That means tequila is technically a mezcal, but mezcal is not a tequila. Got it? Good.

DRINK

SWEET NECTAR Mezcal, sometimes thought of as tequila’s little sister, is all grown up. We look at three varieties, plus Eastern European wines and London rye beers PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID HARRISON

Just getting into mezcal? Let us guide you with three unique styles, chosen by Dawn Davies, buyer at drinks retailer The Whisky Exchange:

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1 DERRUMBES SAN LUIS POTOSI, San Luis, Mexico. Made from agave salmiana, with a lightly herbal note to it. 70cl, 43%; £42.45 2 ILEGAL REPOSADO, Tlacolula, Mexico. Aged in American oak barrels, with a gentle smoky note. 50cl, 40%; £44.95

3 PAPADIABLO MADE SOLELY WITH ESPADIN, Miahuatlan, Mexico. Made from 100% espadin agave, this is a very pure, fresh style of mezcal, with plenty of lively fruit notes. 70cl, 47.7%; £50.45 All available from thewhiskyexchange.com

2 1

3


Coffee beans provided by Lavazza; lavazza.co.uk

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GO EAST: Eastern European wines are, rightfully, starting to appear more often on restaurant wine lists, while interesting wines from places like Moldova are appearing in wine shops, too. Some countries are newer to the game and adapt existing European styles; others, like Georgia and Moldova, have a winemaking history that goes back generations and use lots of grapes native to their regions.

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3 4

1 5


1 KRASNO SAUVIGNON BLANC RIBOLLA 2016, Krasno, Slovenia. This sauvignon blanc blend, made with a touch of Italian native grape ribolla gialla, is made by a cooperative of more than 500 growers. 75cl, 12.6%; £7.99, majestic.co.uk 2 BOROVITZA GAMZA BLACK PACK 2013, Borovitza, Bulgaria. A ripe, fresh but rich red made with the native gamza grape. 75cl, 13%; £13.75, bbr.com

3 DRAGON HILLS PINOT NOIR 2015, Recas, Bulgaria. A pinot that’s been created in partnership with Romania’s Cramele Recas winery. 75cl, 12.5%; £8.99, virginwines.co.uk 4 KRAUTHAKER GRASEVINA MITROVAC 2014, Kutjevo, Croatia. A floral, borderline off-dry wine made with welschriesling. It’s unrelated to the German riesling, and grown across central and eastern Europe. 75cl, 13%; £15, mwinestore.co.uk

5 PURCARI ESTATE FREEDOM BLEND 2011, Nistru River, Moldova. This rich wine, bursting with red fruit, is made from rara neagra, a grape that’s indigenous to Moldova. 75cl, 13.5%; £10.95, bbr.com

Photograph by ###

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RYE ME A RIVER: Beer is, usually, made with malted barley and hops, with yeast to kick off the fermentation. Rye beers, like the ones from four contemporary London brewers pictured here, are where a portion of the malted barley is replaced with rye. It gives it a spicier character.

2 3 1 4

3 WEIRD BEARD NIGHT OF THE RYECLOPS, Hanwell. A big, punchy rye stout, where the trademark chocolate notes make way for a spicy liquorice finish. 330ml, 6.9%; weirdbeardbrewco.com

2 LONDON BEER LAB RYE & SMOKE, Brixton. The savoury rye in this beer is pushed on even further by being smoked before brewing. 330ml, 6%; londonbeerlab.com

4 RED BRICK BREWERY RED BRICK RYE, Peckham, UK. A softly toffeed amber rye beer, which has 18% rye along with the malt. 330ml, 5%; brickbrewery.co.uk

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Coffee beans provided by Lavazza; Photograph lavazza.co.uk by ###

1 BEAVERTOWN 8 BALL RYE IPA, Tottenham. Caramalt is mixed with a “big chunk” of rye in this twisted IPA, inspired by the contemporary IPAS of the USA. 330ml, 6.2%; beavertownbrewery.co.uk


Expensive craft beer. Now £0.00 Supermarkets refuse to stock the beers you drink in pubs. With Craft Metropolis, you get them delivered to your door.

It’s the only craft beer club that let’s YOU choose your own beers ...And right now, you can get 4 beers Get a box of 12

free

Pay for just 8

That’s £2 a craft beer When you trial any subscription.

To get your free beers, go to craftmetropolis.co.uk/foodism before 28/04/2017 Or don’t. And continue drinking steely, massproduced lager-water long into the future.


WHAT’S NEW

ALL MIXED UP

Fancy getting a taste of London’s eclectic bar scene, all in one place? The fifth annual Cocktails in the City event at One Marylebone will let you do just that...

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ONDON IS MANY things to many people, but one thing is abundantly clear: when our city throws a party, everyone wants in. That’s certainly the case this late March and early April, when this year’s Cocktails in the City festival hits London for the fifth time, and brings with it a wealth of international bartending talent. To put its popularity into context, last year saw more than 6,000 thirsty Londoners attend across three days, and the100,000th cocktail will be served at this year’s festival. Unlike a city-wide bar takeover, Cocktails in the City will bring loads of pop-up bars together all under one roof: in this case, the historic One Marylebone exhibition centre.

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The London representatives include Reverend JW Simpson, Trader Vic’s, The Lucky Pig and Artesian, to name a few, while there’s also a Nordic takeover from Himkok in Oslo, Linje Tio in Stockholm and Ruby from Copenhagen in association with Woodford Reserve. There’ll be one-off experiences from drinks brands, too: you can participate in spirit-blending masterclasses from London gin and vermouth distiller Sacred, or try your hand at creating rum punch with Caribbean rum brand The Duppy Share. There’s loads to do, which is why London’s only the first stop in a list of destinations that includes Liverpool, Glasgow, Manchester and more, before heading back down to London for its Summer Edition. Cin cin... f

THE KEY INFO Feeling thirsty? The London edition of Cocktails in the City takes place at One Marylebone, 1 Marylebone Road, NW1 4AQ from Thursday 30 March-Saturday 1 April, with sessions running 6:30pm-11pm daily. Cocktails in the City runs in other UK cities including Leeds, Manchester, Edinburgh and Bristol in other weekends throughout the year. Tickets are priced at £15 and include a cocktail. For more information, a list of events or to book tickets, go to cocktailsinthecity.com


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FOODISM.CO.UK

THE DIGEST

Our round up of the latest news from the food and drink industry

HOT TO TROT Want to cook like Fergus Henderson? Yeah, you and the rest of the world. Well, thanks to a couple of new product launches from the iconic nose-to-tail chef, now you can. Pop in to any St John restaurant, or industry favourite butcher Turner & George, and you can now pick up Henderson’s signature Welsh rarebit mix in a pot, or his Trotter Gear – a kind of mixture between ready-made pork gravy and meat stock, made of one of Henderson’s favourite ingredients: pig’s trotter. The latter will jazz up everything from lobster (pictured) to whole-braised duck. And we should know – Mr Henderson enlisted his friend and foodism columnist Richard H Turner to prepare some great recipes in our test kitchen at Tun Yard Studios. For info: stjohngroup.uk.com; find recipes on Twitter at @StJohnatHome

MAGIC OF THE CUP Baristas, start your engines. That’s right: it’s the time of year again where coffee professionals around London – and from all over the world, too – flock to the Old Truman Brewery in Brick Lane for the biggest event in the coffee calendar. From small-scale roasters to huge coffee brands, a world-leading, multidisciplinary barista tournament, and with

WASTE NOT... The war on waste is by now in full flow, and people are eating more conscientiously than ever, but it’s more than just craft brands that need to pull their weight. Thankfully, Yeo Valley has always been a leader in terms of ethical eating, and its new collaboration with FareShare puts the food waste crisis at the top of the agenda. The concept is simple: Yeo Valley takes leftover Santana apples from British farmer Adam Wakeley’s Ethical Fruit Company –

everything from portable café setups to bars serving coffee-infused cocktails, chances are you’ll find something that floats your boat. Maybe you saw us there last year, drinking more than a few espresso martinis and dancing to DJ Yoda. No, seriously. London Coffee Festival runs from 6-9 April at Old Truman Brewery, with adult tickets starting from £16.50 when bought online; londoncoffeefestival.com

the UK’s biggest organic fruit wholesaler – and uses them in a new apple and custard-flavoured yoghurt. The milk comes from British farms, and for every pot of LeftYeovers you buy from Tesco, 10p will be donated to FareShare. The Deptford-based initiative redistributes food that would be wasted to those in need all over the capital and beyond. Since January, it’s raised more than £20,000 for the charity. Now that’s a partnership we can get on board with. Loop: closed. yeovalley.co.uk/leftyeovers

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HIGH ACHIEVER

NEW CHEF SWING Barrafina’s Nieves Barragán Mohacho has done more for tapas in London than arguably any other chef, elevating it to new heights and winning her restaurant a Michelin star in the process. But all good things come to an end, and she, along with the group’s general manager José Etura, are heading to

SHAKE IT UP We love a bartending competition, and we love a margarita, so when the two come together, we’re all ears. Patrón Tequila’s Margarita of the Year competition is a hotly contested one, and flying the flag for the UK is Sophie Bratt from London’s OXO Tower Restaurant. Her entry is named the English Garden Margarita, and if you want to taste it, you can – just head down to OXO and ask. patrontequila.com

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pastures new for an unconfirmed project. Taking the reins will be the three head chefs of the three existing Barrafina restaurants – Carlos Manuel Miranda Gomes, Gisela Fernandez Moles and Javier Duarte Campos – each of whom will assume more control of the menu development in the process. As for Nieves’s next big thing? Watch this space. barrafina.co.uk

Photograph (Heston Blumenthal) by Alisa Connan; (Barrafina) by Greg Funnell

At this stage, Heston Blumenthal has the kind of all-out visibility that can make you forget he’s still very much in the thick of the London restaurant scene with the two-Michelin-starred Dinner, plus The Fat Duck and The Hind’s Head in Bray. But the restaurant community doesn’t forget this stuff, even if you do, and the Diners Club is about to honour his legendary achievements with one of its highest honours: the Lifetime Achievement Award. It’s rightful praise for a stellar career, and one that’s influenced countless other chefs and restaurateurs. It’ll be handed to him at The World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards in Melbourne this April. theworlds50best.com


PROMOTION

BANANAS DON’T GROW ON TREES? This is just one of the things you might not know about our favourite tropical fruit. But don’t worry – Fyffes is here to shed some light on the not-so-humble banana

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HEN YOU CONSIDER that the banana is arguably the UK’s best-loved fruit, there’s a lot about it that may surprise you. For instance, the plant itself – named Musa cavendishii – is actually from the orchid family, and the stem is made of overlapping leaves (a bit like a

LIKE MOST PLANTS, BANANAS ARE PHOTOTROPIC – THIS CHANGES THEIR SHAPE

leek). Because there is no woody trunk, it's technically not a tree. You’re probably comfortable with the notion that they come from sunny countries thousands of kilometres away, but did you know that they’re harvested while still hard and bright green? And that after being shipped half-way around the world, they’re encouraged to turn yellow in gigantic ripening rooms in places like Basingstoke and Coventry? And their iconic shape is no simple matter either. We’re willing to bet you didn’t know that they start off straight. Like most plants, bananas are phototropic – this changes their shape, so it’s only when they begin to turn upwards towards the sun and bend around the banana above them that they take on that distinctive curve. In fact, there’s plenty waiting to be

discovered about this wonderful fruit, the amazing people who grow it and its epic journey from farm to fruit bowl. You might also be curious to know how the big importers of bananas work with local communities and help look after the environment. And then there’s the practical stuff – things like ways you can include more bananas in your diet and what to do with some of the more exotic varieties like Manzano and Prata (which tastes of kiwi fruit, apparently). So if you find you have a spare moment during the Easter break, you might want to take a look at the new Fyffes website. ● fyffes.com

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BITE-SIZED

FOODISM.CO.UK/ NEWSLETTER

EDUCATION

NEXT BIG THING If you’ve always wanted to rub shoulders with your chef idols, Le Cordon Bleu’s sixth UK Scholarship could give you the year of your dreams and a new start...

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F YOU’RE ANYTHING like us, cooking at home is a privilege, not a chore. And when you eat at your favourite restaurants, you pick up a little inspiration for your home cooking with each new dish you try. That’s why we’ve partnered with iconic cookery school Le Cordon Bleu to bring you what we consider to be the opportunity of a lifetime for enthusiastic home cooks. If you think you’ve got what it takes, read on...

The format

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The ambassador Having a leading light is never a bad thing – and when the industry luminary is the fourthbest chef in the world, you know you’re in good hands. The chef in question is Virgilio Martinez, chef-patron of LIMA London and the iconic Central in his native Peru – fourth in the 2016 World’s 50 Best Restaurants list – and, given that he’s an alumnus of the school, he’s in a great position to lead the initiative. The winner of the competition will not only gain entry to the Grand Diplôme course, but will also get a taste of the real thing afterwards, training at LIMA London under the tutelage of Martinez and the restaurant’s head chef Robert Ortiz. No restaurant experience is necessary; just a hunger to learn and boundless enthusiasm. If you’re looking for a career in restaurants, this might just be the opportunity you’ve been waiting for... f

HOW TO ENTER If you want to apply, prepare a minutelong video that introduces your country or city and tells the school why you’re so enthusiastic about the opportunity. Prepare an Instagram post of your favourite British pastry, as well as telling the school why you’d be the perfect candidate. Hurry, though: the deadline for applications is 5 April. For more information and to apply, go to ukscholarship.cordonbleu.edu

Photograph by Alan Donaldson

Put simply, this isn’t one for the faint-hearted. Le Cordon Bleu is rightly considered one of the world’s top cookery schools, with more than 120 years’ experience of turning keen amateurs into kitchen-ready chefs, from Mary Berry to Yotam Ottolenghi. If you manage to win the school’s 2017 UK Scholarship award, you’ll gain entry into the school’s most prestigious qualification, the Grand Diplôme, where you’ll spend nine months training comprehensively in both pâtisserie and cuisine, plus an internship

under this year’s competition’s ambassador. There’s no need to worry about the logistics, either – your accommodation will be sorted, courtesy of Homes4Students.


PROMOTION

HOLD YOUR SERVE Want to bump up your cocktail repertoire as we head into spring? Try out these three hero cocktails from three big hitters: Cointreau, The Botanist Gin and Mount Gay Rum

COINTREAU FIZZ Some liqueurs are trendy, but Cointreau’s story is one of consistency of flavour and of popularity, and one that’s almost 170 years old. The brand of triple sec – a unique blend of sweet and bitter orange peels – has been made in Angers since 1849. It’s an incredibly versatile liqueur, at the heart of many classic cocktails, including the ever-popular Margarita. But it can also be used in a refreshing fizz – check out this recipe, which adds lime for a lip-smacking spring drink. It’s easy to

THE BOTANIST GIN & TONIC The first and only Islay gin, The Botanist as the name suggests, is all about foraged botanicals. In fact, 22 of its 31 ingredients are foraged, each one hand-selected to beyond to bring the best out of the rest. Some of these include heather, meadowsweet and wild thyme, which go alongside nine core botanicals. What does this mean? Well, that you end up with a gin that’s herbacious, with a slightly savoury note. You can amp up this element of

make, with endless twisting possibilities.

Ingredients ◆◆ 50ml Cointreau ◆◆ 20ml lime juice ◆◆ 100ml sparkling water ◆◆ Ice cubes ◆◆ Orange wedges, to garnish

Method Add the ice, Cointreau and lime juice to a glass. Top with sparkling water and then garnish with an orange wedge. Find out more at cointreau.com

the drink by using rosemary as a garnish, instead of lime.

Ingredients ◆◆ 50ml The Botanist Gin ◆◆ 125ml tonic water ◆◆ Ice cubes ◆◆ Rosemary sprig, to garnish

Method Add the ice and The Botanist gin to the glass, top with tonic water and then garnish with a rosemary sprig. Find out more at thebotanist.com

MOUNT GAY BLACK STORM

Photography by Alex Watson

Mount Gay is a golden rum: its colour (and much of its dried-fruit and vanilla character) comes from being rested in oak barrels. Many rums are aged in barrels formerly used in other spirits. For its Black Barrel bottling, Barbadian distiller Mount Gay – the world’s oldest distiller of rum – makes use of former American whiskey barrels. The rum is then further rested in heavily charred bourbon casks, giving it its distinct

smoky-spiced, complex character. Here, it’s served with ginger ale and zesty orange.

Ingredients ◆◆ 50ml Mount Gay Black Barrel Rum ◆◆ 125ml ginger ale ◆◆ Ice cubes ◆◆ Orange wedge, to garnish

Method Add the ice and Mount Gay to a glass, then top with ginger ale and garnish with an orange wedge. Find out more at mountgayrum.com

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UK TRAVEL

INSIDER

If you’re planning a trip to Cirencester, make sure eating and drinking are high on your agenda, says Jon Hawkins The Kings Head Tell anyone in Cirencester you’re staying in the Kings Head and they’ll likely have two things to say. First, that you’re lucky, and second that it was closed for eight whole years for renovations before reopening in late 2014 – both of which are true. There’s been a hotel on the Kings Head’s marketplace site for a few hundred years at least, and part of that eight-year hiatus involved unearthing some of that history. The extensive archaeological dig turned up, among other things, a Roman mosaic that’s now on show in reception. The design ethic throughout the hotel marries its history with carefully chosen modern art and comfy-luxe furnishings, and

Got a touch of wanderlust? Visit foodism.co.uk/travel for loads more food and drink destination guides, long reads and reviews from the UK and beyond.

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it works. A wall in our suite was stripped to expose bare stone and brick and original beams, which contrasted neatly with the punches of colour sprinkled throughout the room’s tastefully subtle décor. Even if you don’t happen to live in a 14th-century coaching inn, you’ll feel right at home. The ground-floor restaurant continues the theme, using tried-and-tested local ingredients (check out the excellent steak from nearby rare-breed specialists Butts Farm) in dishes that feel modern without being flashy. Hit the bar for a strong gin list and wines from the hotel’s extensive cellar (which doubles as a private dining room, if you’re into that kind of thing). f Rooms from £120 B&B; kingshead-hotel.co.uk

CIRENCESTER ◆◆ Population: 19,000 ◆◆ Gloucestershire ◆◆ 150km from London

The de facto capital of the Cotswolds, Ciren is packed with charm, history and – thanks to its agricultural college – young people in posh wellies. If you like good eating and drinking, you‘re in luck…


FORCE BREWERY Though Charles Malet only founded Force Brewery in early 2014, flagship beer Yankee Zulu was soon named CAMRA Champion Best Bitter for Gloucestershire, and the rest is history. Check out core and seasonal ales at the Brewery Tap, just outside the town centre, open from 2-9pm every Friday and 12-6pm on Saturday, with food (and darts!). forcebrewery.com

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CAPREOLUS

Photographs by (Kings Head) Amy Murrell; (Capreolous) Barney Wilczak; Facebook (Made by Bob)

Brilliant things are emerging from this most boutiquey of boutique distilleries in a village just outside of Cirencester. Barney Wilczak is the man behind Capreolus, which produces a range of sophisticated spirits made with fruit and botanicals that Wilczak processes on site. “We‘ve just finished zesting the last of 2,600kg of organic blood oranges and lemons on site,” he says – the fresh zest

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GETTING THERE The nearest train station is Kemble, five miles away – it‘s around 1hr 20 from London Paddington. For more short breaks, go to foodism.co.uk

will be used to make the award-winning Garden Tiger gin, and the pressed fruit will be distilled into eau de vie. The gin has a varied and complex flavour profile, which Wilczak arrived at by distilling a "vast library" of 34 botanicals, and testing and blending extensively over four months. “I’m afraid I couldn’t trust anybody else to do the distilling,” he says. “It’s taken years to learn and that sensorial separation is a personal thing.” capreolusdistillery.co.uk

MADE BY BOB This local institution in the historic Corn Hall – run, as you‘d expect, by a man called Bob (Parkinson) – started life in 2008. Now, thanks to its enterprising chef-patron, you‘ll find both a well-stocked deli and a freshly renovated restaurant (with a Michelin Bib Gourmand, no less) and bar. The deli‘s the perfect place to pick up a quick lunch or grub for a picnic, with everything from own-brand preserves and interesting products from all over the world to pastries and salads to go. The restaurant, on the other hand, is a properly swanky contemporary-meets-Cotswolds space where you can dine on inventive dishes that lean heavily on great local produce. foodmadebybob.com

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COMPETITION

THE TEA OF CHOICE JING’s loose-leaf tea is used by more than 70 Michelin-starred restaurants around the world – and you can enjoy the tea of choice of renowned chefs in your own home, too

U

NLESS YOU HAPPEN to be a top-level chef, you know that when you eat at a Michelinstarred restaurant, you’re safe in the knowledge that you’re eating well beyond the level of cooking you can realistically achieve at home. But the same doesn’t extend to drinking. Not tea, anyway – because when it comes to enjoying the same cup of tea at a high-end restaurant as you can at home, the ‘secret’ couldn’t be more straightforward: just choose the brand that chefs trust to accompany their acclaimed food. By choosing JING’s loose-leaf teas, that’s exactly what you’ll do. And it’s no surprise, either: since its inception, JING has put quality sourcing at the top of its agenda, their tea leaves coming from small-scale, skilled and knowledgable farmers, culminating in a tea whose unique taste truly reflects its place of origin – not even just the region, but the soil, too.

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In a world where food and drink enthusiasts want to be able to know exactly where their food comes from, it’s comforting to know that JING’s teas can be easily traced back to farmers and suppliers in tea gardens across Asia. JING’s tea farmers are not only highly skilled and with a truly sustainable mindset, but their methods are steeped in tradition, too, having been passed down over generations. At a time when consumers are looking for quality and ethics in products sourced from nearby and far-flung places alike – from grass-fed British meat, to sustainably caught fish and seafood from Europe, and coffee and chocolate farmed in the tropics – JING’s answer to the high-yield, lowmargin tea products Britain has become accustomed to is a rallying call. ‘Good enough’ is no longer good enough. And if you need any further reason, just ask a chef. ● jingtea.com

WIN A TEA SET

WIN

Why settle for a dusty tea bags or dried-out herbal infusions? Now, you can enjoy exceptional wholeleaf tea at home and at the office: five lucky winners will receive the ultimate loose-tea gift set, including two caddies of the finest fresh loose tea, a hand-blown tea infuser WIN mug and timer, all worth £65. To enter, go to fdsm.co/jing. For more inspiration and an exclusive reader offer, go to jingtea.com/foodism

WIN


Best Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey For over 200 years, the Buffalo Trace Distillery has been defined by a dedication to one craft:

Making fine bourbon whiskey. Using the finest Kentucky and Indiana corn, selected rye and superior malted barley, Buffalo Trace is gently aged in new American oak barrels to create a perfectly balanced flavour of sweet, oak and spice, leaving a long, smooth finish. Simply everything you could want in a bourbon.

WWW.BUFFALOTRACE.CO.UK

Available to buy from bars nationwide and online at www.Amazon.co.uk

Copyright Š 2017 Buffalo Trace. All rights reserved. Buffalo Trace is a registered trademark.

BUFFALOTRACEUK


THE SELECTOR

This month, we’ve brought you some great options for a boozy (but sensible) Thursday-night dinner, plus globetrotting coffee shops, Italian-inspired aperitivo bars, Portuguese restaurants, and the best places for raw fish in all its forms

In association with

For more information: southerncomfort.com brokersgin.com buffalotrace.com ourvodka.com/ourlondon

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 1  Merchants Tavern 36 Charlotte Road, EC2A 3PG

With a menu well-seasoned with dishes like chickpea and cavolo nero soup and curried salt cod brandade, the Italian influence of Angela Harnett is unmistakeable – and it’s no surprise that Merchants Tavern has become a popular East London spot. Head here for a tasty midweek supper on a Thursday night and dive into sharing plates of modern Italian

and European cuisine. With only one night to go until the weekend, you don’t have to feel guilty about staying for a nightcap or two at its well-stocked bar, too, with cocktails that include an unusual white negroni that balances sloe gin with grapefruit bitters. What to drink: Lil Suze, with Brokers Gin, Ampleforth’s sloe gin, Suze Saveur D’Autrefois, grapefruit bitters and Lillet Blanc 020 7060 5335; merchantstavern.co.uk

THE SELECTOR

THURSDAY NIGHT HAUNTS Where to go when you’re up for big school night out. Because eatin’ ain’t cheatin’ on our watch…

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BEST OF THE REST 3  2  MASH

 4  Ninth Ward

77 Brewer Street, W1F 9ZN

99-101 Farringdon Road, EC1R 3BN

What started as a single steakhouse in Copenhagen has become a European restaurant empire. The London outpost brings a decadent dining experience to a huge room hidden underneath Soho – it’s a balls-out journey into US steak and wine culture, with plenty of cocktails thrown in. What to drink: MASH has created another OUR/London cocktail for its cocktail of the month – ask the bar team to try it.

From the rustic, Louisana-style interiors to the hearty BBQ menu, Ninth Ward is made for kicking back. If you’re with friends, here’s a novel way to start off: order the hot wing oodoo roulette – the bucket of hot sauce-coated chicken wings containing one ‘nuclear’ wing. You’ve been warned... What to drink: New Orleans Mule 9.0, with Southern Comfort, freshly squeezed lime juice and Fever-Tree ginger beer

020 7734 2608; mashsteak.com

020 7833 2949; ninthwardlondon.com

 3  Ma’Plucker

 5  Hotbox

75 Beak Street; W1F 9SS

46-48 Commercial Street, E1 6LT

Ma’Plucker’s menu revolves around chicken cooked in three ways: rotisserie, rubbed and roasted with smoky chipotle; deep-fried in buttermilk; and pulled low and slow with hickory. There are plenty of cocktails too, from frozen margaritas to boozy iced tea. What to drink: Southern Shrub, built around Southern Comfort, with shrub syrup and lemonade.

Hotbox boasts a holy trinity of music, booze and meat – which means it’s a great place to head for a fun dinner. Meat is cooked over hickory and oak in a huge rotisserie smoker, and basement bar 46 & Mercy pays tribute to its former life as an art gallery. What to drink: Grapeshot Hornet, with Buffalo Trace bourbon, Tabasco, grapefruit juice and amaretto.

020 7096 2046; maplucker.com

020 7247 1817; hotboxlondon.co.uk

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1  Allpress Various locations

When Allpress set up shop in the UK for the first time in 2010 (originally in a small premises in Shoreditch, now anchored in a rather bigger one in Dalston), the plan was to bring some of its Antipodean fussiness about coffee to the burgeoning London coffee scene. The roaster – originally set up in Auckland, New Zealand in 1986, and breaking Australia at the turn of the millennium – has always been first and foremost an espresso specialist. Its Shoreditch site is the kind of compact espresso bar you’re likely to find gracing an Auckland backstreet, while its bigger Dalston cafe and roastery serves up brunch, lunch and pastries, too. allpressespresso.com

THE SELECTOR

TAKE A SHOT

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In search of a unique coffee break? Check out our pick of London’s best regionally-inspired cafés

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 2  Shot Espresso

 4  Frequency Coffee

11 Jerdan Place, SW6 1BE

121 King’s Cross Road, WC1X 9NH

You can’t match a proper Italian espresso bar, and when Shot’s Fulham location isn’t dishing out small plates and aperitivo drinks, you can dip in and out for an espresso or a macchiato at the counter (or a cappuccino – although if it’s after 11am, you can consider yourself thoroughly un-Italian). It’s also a deli, and has a cracking wine list, too.

You might not be able to tell from the outside, but Frequency is all about authentic coffee and small plates from Venezuela. Drop in for an espresso; stay for home-made cachapas made by owner Justo Tripier’s fair hands – they’re Venezuelan roadside snacks, similar to arepas. The café hosts regular band nights, as well as tapas and wine evenings.

020 7381 5572; shotespresso.com

07772 309231; frequencycoffee.com

 3  The Black Penny

 5  Scandi Kitchen

34 Great Queen Street, WC2B 5AA

61 Great Titchfield Street, W1W 7PP

Covent Garden café The Black Penny is named in homage to the olde-world coffee shops of Westminster, where entry cost a penny, and people would gather to do everything from casually shooting the breeze to, er, casually and somewhat inadvertently inventing the ballot system. Interiors are all styled up to resemble the 19th century, and coffee comes by way of roaster Alchemy.

If you’ve not heard of it, the Swedish tradition of fika is simply about taking time in the afternoon to sit and drink a coffee or two, with a slice of cake or a sandwich. If that sounds like your kind of thing, get down to Scandi Kitchen in Great Titchfield Street, where alongside your coffee, you can order a smorgasbord to share, meatballs, or a Nordicstyle open-faced sandwich on rye bread.

020 7242 2580; theblackpenny.com

020 7580 7161; scandikitchen.co.uk


BEST OF THE REST 2  2  Taberna do Mercado

 4  Canela

Old Spitalfields Market, 107B Commercial Street, E1 6BG

Seven Dials London, 33 Earlham Street, WC2H 9LS

If there’s a face of the Portuguese revival currently happening in London, it’s Nuno Mendes. The chef most recently opened Taberno Mercado, where there’s a distinct Portuguese flavour in the form of beef prego and pork bifana sandwiches, as well as specials including 100-day aged barrosa ox.

For authentic, no-frills Portuguese cooking, head to Covent Garden’s Canela, which imports its produce directly from, well, Portugal. It’s been around since before Portuguese food was cool, with traditional recipes like game sausage with quail eggs and salt cod croquettes alongside a great wine list.

020 7375 0649; tabernamercado.co.uk

020 7240 6926; canelacafe.com

 3  Madeira London

 5  TaTa Eatery

Various locations

258 Kingsland Road, E8 4DG

Perhap the most famous of all Portuguese dishes is the mouth-coatingly moreish yellow custard tart known as pastel de nata. These little cups of goodness are worth it for the Instagram kudos alone, particularly when they come from Café Madeira, which boasts a stable of cafés and restaurants across London. There are all the usual suspects, too: salt cod, sardines and excellent Portuguese wine.

Macanese, Goan and Mozambican cooking have been shaped by the input of Portuguese colonists. To get a taste of one of these unique fusion cuisines, head to TaTa eatery, where husband-and-wife chefs Zijun Meng and Ana Goncalves (trained by Nuno Mendes, no less) are serving up Portugese-influenced Asian food: think sweet rice ice cream sundaes and prawn tartare with caviar and egg yolk.

020 7254 4945; tataeatery.co.uk

020 7254 4945; tataeatery.co.uk

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THE SELECTOR

PORTUJEEZ

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Portuguese food is flying in London at the moment – here’s where you should go and get some  1  Bar Douro Arch 35b, Flat Iron Square, Union Street, SE1 1TD

The Douro Valley, which surrounds the city of Porto, has a food and wine culture that’s up there with the best of them. Restaurant founder Max Graham has some serious credentials, being from a long line of English port makers in the Douro, and he’s teamed up with head chef Tiago Santos for this venture in the new Flat Iron Square development. There’s no bar – giving all the more room to focus on the wine and port, natch – and the food revolves around great Portuguese small plates at great prices. Winner. 020 7378 0524; bardouro.co.uk

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1  Butifarra 24 Rupert Street, W1D 6DQ

 1 THE SELECTOR

RAW DEAL

Although named after Peru’s infamous slowcooked meat sandwiches, this fun, street food-inspired restaurant actually specialises in ceviche. The choices are simple but flavour-packed: select between sea bream or mixto (sea bream, prawns, scallops and octopus), and the team will whip together a dish with sweet potato, red onion, coriander and choclocorn – a giant, pale yellow version of the sweetcorn we’re more familiar with here. Top things up with a fresh-tasting quinoa salad, or a hearty arepa, a corn pancake filled with veg, short rib beef, pork, chicken and chorizo, or smoked duck breast. 020 7287 8855; thebutifarra.com

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Fresh and cured fish is a staple of loads of great international cuisines – try these ones on for size BEST OF THE REST  2  Black Roe

 4  Sushi Tetsu

4 Mill Street, W1S 2AX

12 Jerusalem Passage, EC1V 4JP

Poké (bowls of cured raw fish, seasoned rice and zingy, citrus-dressed vegetables pronounced po-kay) is shaping up to be the dish of 2017. But not all poké was created equal, and self-styled poké bar and grill Black Roe offers a slightly posher take on the Hawaiian dish, made with scallops, sea bass, salmon or beef tataki, served on a bed of sticky white rice and a variety of salsas.

Seven seats, one chef, and a whole lot of flipping fresh fish: this tiny countertop restaurant is as close as you’ll get to an authentic sushi ya (sushi shop) experience this side of Tokyo. Scouring Billingsgate market daily for only the best seafood, chef Toro is an artist. But there’s a catch: it’s the most difficult reservation to bag in London.

020 3794 8448; blackroe.com

 3  Breddos Taqueria

020 3217 0090; sushitetsu.co.uk

 5  Ceviche 17 Frith Street, W1D 4RG

It turns out that Mexico has its own take on ceviche, and it’s Breddos Taqueria’s aguachile that helps cement it as an authentic Mexican restaurant in London. Here, it’s made with cherry stone clams and salty sea urchins, and served with avocado, miso and jalapeno.

No prizes for guessing what Ceviche’s speciality is. Yep, this is the place to try the Latin American and Caribbean dish. There’s sea bass in amarillo chilli tiger’s milk; scallop tiradito with sea fennel and black tobiko caviar; and king prawn and rocoto chilli salad; as well as other Peruvian starters and sides.

020 3535 8301; breddostacos.com

020 7292 2040; cevicheuk.com

82 Goswell Road, EC1V 7DB

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SOUTHERNCOMFORTUK #SOUTHERNWELCOME

THE TASTE OF WHISKEY MADE COMFORTABLE. SWEET, SMOOTH AND DELICIOUS BEST ENJOYED WITH LEMONADE AND A SQUEEZE OF FRESH LIME Available to buy from bars nationwide and online at www.Amazon.co.uk DRINK RESPONSIBLY

|

Copyright © 2017 Southern Comfort. All rights reserved. Southern Comfort is a registered trademark.


BEST OF THE REST 2  4  The Hive of Vyner Street

7 Old Compton Street, W1D 5JE

286-290 Cambridge Heath Road, E2 9DA

If there’s a place to embrace authentic 1950s Italian culture in London, Bar Termini is it. There are three of Tony Conigliaro’s signature bottled negronis on offer – rosato, superiore and classico – and the snacks! Mini ham and cheese paninis, prosciutto crudo, burrata and beef carpaccio are some of the options with which to soak up all that booze.

Time for the left-field one: this Bethnal Green natural wine bar offers an entirely vegetarian aperitivo menu to accompany its selection of natural, northern Italian wines. This means treats such as artichoke hearts, almonds, cheese boards, and farinata – an unleavened pancake made with chickpea flour, a dish typical of the Ligurian coast.

07860 945018; bar-termini.com

020 8981 9245; thehivewellbeing.com

 3  Ritorno

 5  Osteria

442 King’s Rd, Chelsea, SW10 0LQ

Barbican Centre, Silk Street, EC2Y 8DS

For even more Italian glamour, head to Ritorno, where former Ritz head bartender Paolo Viola and chef Filippo Salzano have put together a unique cocktail and food pairing experience revolving around a menu of more than 40 small plates. Plush interiors are accented by murano glass and silk velvets.

Head to the top floor of the Barbican for an unexpected treat: Antony Demetre’s newest restaurant, a refined trattoria with a killer list of seven negronis, from purist pleasers to rye whiskey twists. There’s wine aplenty, too, and a menu from former Arbutus man Patrick Leano – don’t miss the smoky curl of octopus.

020 3301 6333; ritorno.co.uk

020 7588 3008; osterialondon.co.uk

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Photograph (Bar Termini) by Addie Chinn

 2  Bar Termini

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THE SELECTOR

APERITIVO HOUR The Italian aperitivo – a pre-dinner bitter cocktail and snacks – is sacred. Here’s where to get yours  1  Mele e Pere 46 Brewer Street, W1F 9TF

Mele e Pere boasts a back bar full-to-bursting with bottles of bittersweet, herbacious vermouth, including varieties from niche Italian producers, or even blended in-house by vermouthier Ed Scothern. Complemented by a stellar set of gins and amari, this means you’re likely to sup on one of the best negronis in London. All that booze can’t be served without some serious food, though, so make sure you head here when you’re hungry as well as thirsty: choose from small bites like deep-fried olives and calamari; or get stuck into San Daniele with gnocchi fritti. 020 7096 2096; meleepere.co.uk

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Especially blended to be dry... ...perfect for a martini

Made with the herbs, spices and fruit imported from three continents. Broker’s Gin is especially blended to be dry... ...not unlike the British sense of humour. www.BrokersGin.com

BrokersGin

Available to buy from bars nationwide and online at www.Amazon.co.uk


HIGH SOCIETY

WIN

Last year’s inaugural Spirit Show brought hordes of people together to discover the world’s finest spirits. Its new subscription service will deliver these direct to you

W

ITH A RAFT of subscription services hitting the market, taking care of everything from organic vegetables to chocolate, sometimes it’s worth thinking outside the box. And, given that The Spirits Society is from the same team that brought you The Spirit Show – which returns this year after a hugely successful debut last December – you know that its new subscription service will do just that. The Spirits Society is all about enriching your knowledge – and your booze cabinet – by helping you discover new premium spirits from world-class distilleries, delivering them direct to your home. On a monthly basis, you’ll receive new, unusual, premium bottles of gin, rum, vodka, whisky and more. And

MANY PEOPLE ARE CHOOSING THE ‘SPIRIT SURPRISE’ SUBSCRIPTION. ITS PREMISE IS SO SIMPLE YOU’LL WONDER WHY IT’S NEVER BEEN DONE 126

because the service is all about thinking about more than what’s inside the box, you’ll get detailed tasting notes and information about the distillers, as well as mixers, garnishes, and recipes, too. The first box, for example, contained a 70cl bottle of Trevethan gin (with an RRP of £37.95), as well as a miniature bottle of Edgerton pink gin, two Franklin & Sons tonic waters, orange and rosemary to garnish, dried chorizo from Cleaver & Keg, and a pouch of botanicals, so that subscribers could get to know not just the ‘what’ of the spirit they’re drinking, but the ‘how’, too. You can choose which world-class spirit you’ll receive in your next box (vodka, whisky, gin, rum, to name just a few), but many subscribers are choosing to make use of the ‘Spirit Surprise’ subscription. Its premise is so simple you’ll wonder why it’s not been done before: each month, you’ll receive a specially selected bottle of premium spirit, hand-chosen by The Spirits Society’s team, with all of the accompaniments. The idea is to take you outside your comfort zone and to open yourself up to spirits and flavours you either didn’t realise you liked, or simply hadn’t come across before. The extensive tasting notes will be your guide, and you can relax knowing you’re sampling something that’s vouched for by experts, helping you build a back bar that’ll be the toast of the town. ● The Spirits Society’s subscriptions cost £40 per month. Subscribe at thespiritssociety.co.uk or follow @Spirits_Society on Twitter

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: A Trevethan gin & tonic; Franklin & Sons’ line of craft tonic waters; a G&T gets a boost with an orange, rosemary and juniper berry garnish


COMPETITION

WIN A SPIRIT SURPRISE SUBSCRIPTION

WIN

Photograph by ###

Fancy road-testing the service? You could be in with a chance of winning a three-month ‘Spirit Surprise’ subscription, meaning you’ll receive one surprise bottle per month for three months along with mixers, treats and garnishes. For T&Cs and to enter, go to fdsm.co/spirits-society

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WIN

WIN


PROMOTION

A PERFECT SERVE Whitley Neill infuses a little bit of the spirit of Cape Town into its spirit, and the brand’s signature gin and tonic is a perfect drink for spring’s longer, brighter evenings

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F YOU’RE TALKING about flora and fauna, there’s no doubt that Africa is one of the most naturally blessed environments in the world. Whitley Neill is a gin that’s used this fact to its advantage while remaining true to its British roots, resulting in a product that’s characteristically English, but that tastes nothing quite like any gin you’ve ever tasted before. The secret is in the sourcing: two of the key botanicals used in the distilling of Whitley Neill are the baobab and the physalis, otherwise known as the cape gooseberry. The former is known in Africa as the “tree of life”, owing to the fact that it provides shelter through its canopy, firewood through its trunk and food through its fruit. Johnny Neill, the brains behind the brand, wanted to use elements of his wife’s childhood in South Africa

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to create a gin with both a unique character and an indelible link to her background and personal history. The use of these African fruits does just that – but it’s also what lends Whitley Neill its characteristic fruitfilled taste, which you can complement

JOHNNY NEILL WANTED TO USE ELEMENTS OF HIS WIFE’S CHILDHOOD IN SOUTH AFRICA IN HIS GIN

perfectly with just a simple twist on the classic G&T serve. While most gins call for a lime garnish, you can open up the taste of Whitley Neill with a wheel of orange, instead. Just half-fill a balloon glass with ice, add 50ml (two shots) of Whitley Neill, top with premium tonic water and add that zesty, bright orange garnish. As spring approaches, having a new drink in the armoury to wile away balmy evenings is no bad thing. And, like with Whitley Neill’s G&T, sometimes all a classic needs is a little twist. ● Whitley Neill is available at most major retailers with an RRP of £26. For a bit of cocktail inspiration, check out the brand’s Facebook, Twitter or Instagram at @whitleyneill; whitleyneill.com


@sandows sandows.com

D ON’T MIND IF IT’S COLD, S O LONG A S IT’S BRIGHT

● To advertise in this section please call 020 7819 9999


SIZE DOESN’T MATTER: They may be tiny, but quail’s eggs make up an important part of many cuisines worldwide, particularly in Asian countries. In the Philippines, the dish kwek-kwek sees the petite spheres dipped in batter and fried. Yes. Please.

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EGGS WITH BENEFITS: Thanks to their high levels of vitamin A, quail’s eggs can help protect your vision. They can also balance cholesterol thanks to their beneficial fatty acids, and stimulate growth thanks to protein.

Photograph by Omid Scheybani/EyeEm/Getty

It’s nearly Easter, so we’ve turned our attentions to eggs. Not just any ones, though – these are tiny, speckled and rather refined. Here’s all you need to know about quail’s eggs

SAME BUT DIFFERENT: These delicate little snacks are about the size of a large olive, and have a higher yolk:white ratio than regular hen’s eggs.


Win A SPIRIT LOVER’S HAMPER CONTAINING: 3 bottles of Silent Pool Gin 2 bottles of WRY English Vodka 1 ALR Blackberry and Gin Cordial 1 ALR Strawberry and Gin Cordial 1 bottle of Eau de Vie and 2 elegant copa glasses, all in a sturdy wooden crate For your chance to win, tell us what ‘Intricately Realised’ means to you

TO SEND YOUR ENTRY, VISIT: FDSM.CO/SILENTPOOL See the competition page for a full list of T&Cs

AWARD WINNING GIN FROM THE SILENT POOL IN SURREY

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WINNER

Food and Drink Innovation

AWARD WINNING GIN FROM THE SILENT POOL IN SURREY Now available at Majestic and Waitrose stores nationwide. www.silentpooldistillers.com

Foodism - 17 - London, food and drink  

Foodism Magazine - Issue 17 - The Coffee Issue

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