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As you may remember (because I told everyone I’ve ever met and also wrote about it), last year I had a go at brewing my own beer – and I wasn’t very good at it. But whatever you want to say about the over-carbonated, browny-grey spume that frothed, geyser-style, from every bottle I cracked open, it was undeniably ‘craft’ beer. I made it in my own back garden, with my own broken thermometer and my own laissez-faire approach to timing, not to mention my own withering disdain for a recipe perfected over several millennia of brewing history. Who cares if it was crap? I’d made authentic craft crap. This, I suppose, is the problem with the whole ‘craft this, craft that’ thing, particularly when it comes to craft beer. What does the word craft really mean when those at opposite ends of the production spectrum – from huge industrialised breweries to chancers like me – can throw it around with impunity? And even if you buy from one of the growing number of great beer shops, stocked and manned by proper beer lovers, how on earth are you supposed to know which of the 7.3 billion West Coast-style IPAs on the shelf is the one for you? Well, maybe all you need to do is look at the bottle (or can) – which is exactly what we’ve done for our beer label art feature this issue (p46). As Graham O’Brien of Hackney’s Pressure Drop brewery puts it: “If you look at many of the new crop of breweries, you can get a sense of their personality from the labels.” As in life, so it is in beer – ultimately, it’s what’s inside that counts. f

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BOHEMIAN HOPS. MORAVIAN BARLEY. ˇ CZECH WATER. PLZEN, THE ORIGINAL PILSNER BREWED THE ORIGINAL WAY


— PART 1 —

GRAZE “THERE’S ARGUABLY NO CHEF BETTER PLACED TO USE FOOD AS A VEHICLE FOR TRUE EDUCATION” MIKE GIBSON ON DAN BARBER’S LONDON DEBUT, 008

008 THE FOODIST | 010 LONDON LARDER | 012 THE ESCAPIST 014 WEAPONS OF CHOICE | 019 THE RADAR | 021 RECIPES | 028 RICHARD H TURNER


TOP THREE

This month, we run down our favourite posh olive oils, including one you can adopt. Yes, really

1. B E L AZ U E AR LYHARVE ST AR B E Q U I N A

THE FOODIST

There’s haute cuisine with a conscience to be found at Dan Barber’s wastED London, says Mike Gibson

I

F YOU WERE to ask me to name my favourite chef, it wouldn’t be a Londoner, despite the amount of time I spend among the prodigious and rightly heralded culinary talent this city has to offer. That ‘honour’ belongs to Dan Barber, who arrives in London for the first time in February with a pop-up dedicated to fighting food waste, located on the rooftop of Selfridges. It marks the first time he’s cooked in this city, and has sent ripples of excitement through the chef community. He’s the man many consider to be the world’s foremost farm-to-table chef, with a restaurant in the World’s 50 Best list on a farm in upstate New York, which also happens to be attached to an educational centre for sustainable food. If you want to know what Barber’s about (and you can’t justify a trip to either of his restaurants, in Manhattan or the Hudson Valley) watch his Chef’s Table episode on Netflix, or listen to a podcast he’s contributed to. If you really want to dive in, read his book The Third Plate. It reveals the workings of a true polymath – someone who’s singularly committed to changing perceptions about

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how chef and diner can participate in a conversation that ends up changing not just the way we eat, but the way we farm, too. This is all while barely missing a service at his lauded restaurant, Blue Hill at Stone Barns. For wastED – a continuation of the hugely successful pop-up he’s run in Manhattan – Barber’s swapping Stone Barns for local fishmongers, butchers and other suppliers to showcase dishes made with traditionally wasted food, proving you don’t need your own farm to have a positive effect on your food chain. He’s also enlisting some of London’s best-known chefs to help him, including Clare Smyth, Jason Atherton and Tom Hunt. We wrote much about the reconnection many diners are making with where their food comes from in foodism’s special, sustainability-themed issue last September. To that end, there’s arguably no chef better placed to use food as a vehicle for true education. If you’re someone who longs for change in food and farming, get excited. f wastED London takes place from 24 February2 April. For more info or to reserve places, go to selfridges.com/wastedlondon

Starting off strong, here’s an olive oil that chef Mark Hix described as “too good to cook with”. That’s some accolade. It’s made on a family farm in Catalonia, and the presence of the word ‘Arbequina’ means it’s made from black olives, not green ones, but pressed when they’re a really light purple. This means a flavour that’s different from most of the olive oils you’ll find. 1l, £12.90; belazu.com

2. POM ORA This is one for people who don’t just love olive oil, they live it. For £29 per quarter, you can adopt an olive tree from one of Pomora’s specialist growers in Italy. Every three months, you’ll receive three cans of the highest-quality olive oil – olio nuovo in the first; extravirgin in the third; and flavoured oils in the third and fourth. It’s steep, but worth it if you want to really connect with the oil you’re buying. £29 every three months; pomora.com

3. ANDR E AS CAM P O L ISIO E XT RA VIR G I N Established in 1994, Andreas was a small Chelsea greengrocer – a favourite among food luminaries like Nigella Lawson – until quite recently, when its eponymous founder responded to demand and took the business online. This super-premium olive oil, made by a friend of his, is full of flavour and available in delicato and primofiore styles. 300ml, £15; andreasveg.co.uk


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TH AT’S WHAT THEY SAID Memorable quotes from the recent archives. Go to foodism.co.uk for more

THE LONDON LARDER

This month: ChicP

I’VE ALWAYS SEEN THAT THE BEST CHEFS, WHETHER THEY’RE IN ENGLAND OR AMERICA, ARE DRIVEN BY A CONNECTION TO A FARM

DAN BARBER, farm-to-table chef, on the whole-farm dining movement and his philosophy

IT ALL JUST MAKES SENSE AND TASTES JUST RIGHT. WE’RE LIVING IN A POSTSMOKESTAK WORLD NOW, AND AMERICANSTYLE BBQ JOINTS IN THE CAPITAL HAVE A NEW BENCHMARK MIKE GIBSON, on Smokestak’s restaurant

It’s quite healthy as well because of all the different food groups you’re taking in, and eating in smaller amounts. There’s lots of umami in there, too

EMMA REYNOLDS, Tonkotsu’s founder, on teishoku cuisine at new restaurant Anzu

I’m a bit impulsive and compulsive, and if I come across a wine that I love that doesn’t work at Pidgin for whatever reason, it’s nice to have an outlet for that. We favour smaller producers, less familiar grapes and regions, and value

JAMES RAMSDEN, Pidgin’s co-founder, on choosing wines for their new bar

WHEN I DEVELOPED THE CUISINE OF OSTERIA, I SWITCHED BUTTER WITH EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL. IN MY MIND I HAD THIS IDEA OF CLEANLINESS – YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO EXPERIENCE A 13-COURSE MEAL AND FINISH WITH A CLEAR PALATE, AND UNDERSTAND THE RANGE OF THE INGREDIENTS AND THE FLAVOURS MASSIMO BOTTURA, the world’s number-one-rated chef, on his new range of olive oils

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What’s the product? Gluten-, dairy- and sugar-free hummus, made with raw vegetables that would otherwise go to waste. There’s a selection of offbeat flavours – the most unusual ones being sweet ‘dessert’ dips, with combinations like banana, avocado and cacao.

Who makes it? Hannah McCollum, who’s worked for catering and events companies across Europe for the past nine years. When cooking as private chef, she’d use leftover ingredients to create dips for the next meal, and so Chic P was born. She now makes her dips in a production facility in Tottenham.

What does it taste like? Surprisingly, not all that much like hummus. The consistency is light and mousse-like, while the flavour combinations are carefully balanced. Our favourites were the beetroot, horseradish and sage – which would go down a treat with smoked salmon – and the carrot, turmeric and ginger. We also liked the banana, avocado and cacao pot – a fresher take on chocolate spread that still feels indulgently creamy.

Where can I get it? It’s currently available at Wholefoods, Fortnum & Mason, As Nature Intended and Rude Health Cafe, as well as a number of other health food-forward shops, and it costs £2.50 a pot. chicp.co.uk


LOCAL HEROES I M M ERSI VE D I NING

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BOROUGH PLATES

A restaurant that only uses ingredients sourced from one of London's best food markets? Sign. Us. Up. Borough Plates will be a two-month pop-up working with produce from Borough Market's top-notch traders. What's more, the kitchen is being run by chef Paul Hannagen, previously of Bermondsey's much-missed Zucca. boroughmarket.org.uk

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BLACKTAIL

Desperate to sample one of The Dead Rabbit's Grocery & Grog drinks ever since it became the World's Best Bar in 2016? The Bloomsbury Club has the next best thing: it's hosting NYC's BlackTail – from the same team as The Dead Rabbit – for three nights in February. Expect excellent serves, Cuban-inspired jazz, and a selection of dishes also inspired by the New York bar. Cheers to that. thebloomsburyclub.com

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MY PIE

Pie: the perfect winter food to warm the cockles of your heart, conveniently packaged up in flaky pastry. Enter street-food trader My Pie, which specialises in proper pies using free-range British chicken; roasted mushrooms; spinach and truffle oil; and steak, chilli and cheese – all of which you can get your grubby little mitts on at Clapham's The King & Co until 26 February. thekingandco.uk

Photograph by (1) Manuel Vaquez; (3) Jason Buckne

THE ESCAPIST

Tongtong Ren, co-founder of Chinese Laundry, on moving from fashion to food

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difference when compared to working in the fashion industry. The best thing about it is that the people in the food industry are happier, more friendly and more honest. On the other hand, we’re now spending our days going to the market and grocery shops and cooking in the kitchen, instead of galleries, museums and shops... So I guess we don’t look quite as good as before... Our backgrounds have been helpful, though – having a designer’s mind helps a lot in the working methodology, and the creative processes are exactly the same. On the aesthetic side, the interior, the settings and the collections of objects all benefit from our trained eyes. We also have better attention to detail because of our

previous experiences, and that helps with absolutely everything. f chineselaundryroom.com

Photograph by ###

EFORE WE FOUNDED Chinese Laundry, Peiran (Ren, my co-founder; pictured right) originally worked as a womenswear designer, and I used to make jewellery. We got to where we are now by way of a random conversation – we both love talking about food, and we wanted to set up a street-food stall at first. I guess we took our ambitions a bit too seriously, and now we’ve ended up with a restaurant. We’ve both always loved food, and we think it’s best when it’s simple and honest. It’s a nicer environment to work in. What you see is what you get. For everything you’ve cooked, you’ll have a honest and instant feedback from whoever tasted it, whether it’s good or not – it’s very clear. That’s the biggest


WEAPONS OF CHOICE Now we’re cooking... Get your juice on, pimp your spice rack and brew with the best PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID HARRISON

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JUI C E UP SMEG BLF01 BLENDER, £149.95 We failed at our January health kick. If you didn’t, and you want to keep it going, this all-purpose blender works a charm for smoothies and soups. johnlewis.com

SMEG BOTTLE TO GO BLENDER ACCESSORY, £29.99 Take the hassle out of smoothie making with this bottle, which attaches directly to the blender. smeguk.com

Photograph by ###

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T HAR SHE B REWS 1. T2 JUG-A-LOT, £32 Make iced tea like a boss by infusing it in the fridge with this handy jug with inbuilt strainer. t2tea.com

2. T2 WATER KETTLE LARGE, £56 This kettle-teapot combo takes the mystery out of brewing. Place on the stove and judge your brew by colour, not time. t2tea.com

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NIC E AND SPICY 1. 16-POD CAROUSEL SPICE RACK, £49.99 Sex up your spice collection with this futuristic-looking rack from Lakeland, with shaker tops. lakeland.co.uk

2. M&S MARBLE PESTLE & MORTAR, £39.50 Whether it’s dried mustard seeds or fresh ginger and lemongrass, everything tastes better when it’s freshly ground or pulverised. This’ll do the trick. marksandspencer.com

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Sorry salad, I've started seeing other lunches. We’ve all been there. The passion’s gone, and you find yourself sleepwalking through the same old lunch! Flirt with flavour and find your perfect match at www.newcoventgardensoup.com @NewCoventGarden

/NCGSoup

@ncg_soup


BITE-SIZED

FOODISM.CO.UK/ NEWSLETTER

Grazing

T HE GA RA G E

FEBRUARY

Dining

BA L A BAYA

DRINKING

OPEN NOW

GRAZING

There’s no denying that food from the Levant (where the Eastern Mediterranean meets the Middle East, to you and me) is enjoying what some Premier League managers would refer to as “a very good moment”. And hot on the heels of the Palomar, which exported and exalted the food of Jerusalem, Bala Baya is here to do the same with that of Tel Aviv. Israeli-born Eran Tibi will preside over the kitchen, modelling the food on that served at the city’s vibrant food hotspots. SE1 0LR; balabaya.co.uk

DINING TRENDING

THE RADAR We take you through a selection of our favourite restaurant openings from now until the end of February Dining

PALAT I N O

FEBRUARY

Photographs by (Hawksmoor) Toby Keane; (Bala Baya) Jean Cazals

When Stevie Parle’s name is attached to something, it’s fair to expect good things. The restaurateur, who owns Dock Kitchen, Rotorino, CRAFT London and is involved in Alex Jackson’s Sardine, is taking a punt on Roman fare (modern Rome, not Ancient), from a beautiful new space in Clerkenwell, built around an open kitchen at its centre. EC1V 8AB; palatino.london

The new incarnation of the legendary Garage venue in Islington will include an all-day café, a cocktail bar, and an immersive supper club destination based around the backstreets of Tokyo. N5 1RD; thegarage.london

Dining

R OSA’S T HAI CA F E

Grazing

NAPE

LATE FEBRUARY

FEBRUARY

We love Cannon & Cannon’s charcuterie – sourced directly from ethical farmers all over the UK and sold at food markets and a stall at Borough – so the thought of a restaurant devoted to it has us pretty excited. Given that the restaurant’s named after the English word for coppa (the Italian salami made from pork neck fillet), it’s no surprise that the menu focuses on cured meats, with wine and small plates, too. SE5 8TR; napelondon.com

Dining

YAR D SAL E FEBRUARY

Walthamstow is quietly turning into a culinary hub, and Yard Sale’s arrival is a great thing, going by the pizzeria’s success in Clapton and Finsbury Park. Beyond the pun-led pizza names (Cheesus Walks, anyone?), expect tasty pizzas made with fantastic British ingredients (like Cobble Lane charcuterie), local beers and a wine list from the ever-excellent Borough Wines. E17; yardsalepizza.com

The latest Rosa’s restaurant, on Brixton’s Atlantic Road, includes new seasonal dishes, art by south London collective Id-iom, and Brixton beers, too. SW9 8JW; rosasthaicafe.com

Dining

HAWKSMOOR BOROUGH

LATE FEBRUARY

Borough Market’s not exactly lacking in great food destinations, and Hawksmoor is the latest addition to its thriving landscape. SE1 9AQ; thehawksmoor.com

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Recipes

WATCH THIS SPICE

FIND OUT HOW SPICES CAN IMPROVE YOUR WELLBEING AS WELL AS YOUR FOOD, WITH A NEW BOOK BY CHEF AND WRITER NATASHA MACALLER

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MANJA WACHSMUTH

L

ONDON’S FOOD REVOLUTION has meant that – aside from eating out more, and better – we’re also expanding our repertoire at home, using recipes inspired by far-away countries and new (or longforgotten) ingredients. One of the best ways to easily tap into these different cuisines is through spices, which bring literally a whole new world of flavour, texture and colour to our plates. But there’s another benefit to these storecupboard heroes – as well as tasting great, they’re good for us, and are scientifically proven to help with everything from

regulating blood-sugar levels to fighting depression or cancer. Take, for example, cinnamon: it’s anti-inflammatory, it has wound-healing properties, and studies suggest it can help those suffering from Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Not bad going for something you sprinkle on your porridge. These recipes, either collated by some of the world’s most notable chefs or written by Natasha MacAller, are just a few of the ways you can use these spices in your kitchen, from cold- and virus-fighting garlic in a pâté, to a parfait of antioxidant-packed pomegranate that tastes as good as it looks. f

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F O O DISM RE CIPE S, IN ASSOC IAT ION W IT H Y E O VAL L EY

Photograph by ###

Show yourself a little love, and love the world we live in, too. Yeo Valley believe not just in producing tasty organic dairy, but also in changing their little corner of the world, one grain of soil at a time. On Yeo Valley’s Holt Farm in Somerset, the team focus on improving the soil through natural means. So they do things like planting clover, nature’s solar panel, which locks energy into the soil, leading to better grass for their cows, and

great British dairy for you. In each pot, there’s no added sugar, or artificial flavours – just 100% organic goodness. Best of all? It’s great for the environment, too: organic farms support on average 50% more wildlife and 30% more biodiversity, so there are benefits not just for us, but for the flora and fauna we share our world with, too. It’s a win-win... yeovalley.co.uk

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Raghavan Iyer’s

AUBERGINEGARLIC PATE RESTORATIVE GARLIC, A NATURAL ANTIBIOTIC, ADDS FLAVOUR TO SMOKY AUBERGINE FOR A MOREISH PRE-DINNER NIBBLE Method

I N GREDI EN TS ◆◆ 2 small aubergines ◆◆ 2 tsp coriander seeds, ground ◆◆ 1 tsp cumin seeds, ground ◆◆ 1 tsp coarse sea salt ◆◆ 1 tsp garam masala ◆◆ ½ tsp ground cayenne pepper ◆◆ ¼ tsp ground turmeric ◆◆ 1 small red onion, finely

chopped ◆◆ 115g passata ◆◆ Juice of ½ medium lime, plus 1 large lime, cut into wedges ◆◆ 1 tbsp freshly grated ginger ◆◆ 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped ◆◆ 25g finely chopped coriander ◆◆ 2 tbsp ghee or vegetable oil ◆◆ 1 tsp cumin seeds

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G

ARLIC HAS A reputation for being a heroic antibiotic, as well as being pretty effective at warding off colds, flu and other inflammatory diseases. As well as these germ-busting properties, it’s also really delicious – get your fix in this recipe from chef and author Raghavan Iyer, which is inspired by traditional cooking in northern Indian villages.

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TIME

Serves ◆◆ 6

Preparation ◆◆ 30 mins

Cooking

◆◆ 25 mins

1 Heat an oven grill or a gas grill for direct heat that’ll give the aubergines that smoky flavour. Pierce the aubergines with a fork in five or six different places. 2 Grill the aubergines 5-8cm away from the heat, turning them occasionally to ensure even cooking, until the skin is completely blackened and blistered, about 20-25 minutes. To cook on the gas grill, hold the aubergines 5cm-8cm above the flame. 3 Transfer the aubergines to a large bowl, then cover with cling film and set aside for about 30 minutes. The steam that rises will sweat the aubergines and help to loosen the skin for easy peeling. 4 Peel and discard the skin and stem. Put the pulp in a bowl and mash to a smooth consistency. Keep the juices and any liquid that pools at the bottom of the bowl. 5 Add the ground coriander and cumin, salt, garam masala, cayenne, turmeric, half the onion, the tomato sauce, lime juice, ginger, garlic and half the chopped coriander; mix well. 6 Heat the ghee in a wok or a deep 30cm frying pan over medium-high heat. Add the cumin seeds and allow them to sizzle and turn reddish brown in colour, about 15 seconds. Immediately add the remaining onion and stir-fry until light brown around the edges, 2-3 minutes. 7 Add the aubergine mixture and stir-fry until almost all the liquid evaporates, 15-20 minutes. 8 Transfer to a serving bowl and garnish with the remaining coriander and the lime wedges. Serve with crostini or crusty bread. f


Natasha MacAller’s

PRAWNS WITH CITRUS CLEANSING HIBISCUS IS PAIRED WITH CLASSIC CITRUS AND CHILLIES TO CREATE AN UNUSUAL CRUMB FOR THIS TANGY PRAWN STARTER

TIME

Serves ◆◆ 6

Preparation ◆◆ 10 mins

Cooking

◆◆ 10 mins

ING R E DIE NTS crumb The crunchy these at co to used chilli es nc prawns bala us zest tr ci h it w e spic

◆◆ ½ Tuscan-style cantaloupe

melon, peeled, sliced and cut into triangular pieces ◆◆ Zest and juice of 4 lemons ◆◆ Zest and juice of 4 limes ◆◆ 1½ jalapeños, minced ◆◆ 2 tsp dried hibiscus flower buds or tea, finely chopped or crumbled ◆◆ 55g dry breadcrumbs ◆◆ ¾ tsp sea salt ◆◆ 65g palm or soft brown sugar ◆◆ 4 tsp minced fresh ginger ◆◆ 3 tbsp dark rum ◆◆ 24 large prawns, peeled, cleaned and deveined and butterflied ◆◆ 6 tsp grapeseed oil ◆◆ 2 spring onions, sliced on the bias, to garnish ◆◆ 1 handful microgreens, to garnish (optional)

T

ANGY HIBISCUS FLOWER buds or tea, which can be purchased at health or specialty food shops or online, are full of vitamin C and anthocyanins and are widely touted as a natural remedy for conditions like fatty liver disease and metabolic syndrome. This dish balances the tart flavour of the hibiscus with rich prawns and delicately scented melon.

Method

Photograph by ###

1 Put the cut melon in a medium bowl and set aside. 2 In another bowl, stir together the lemon and lime zests, the jalapeños, hibiscus tea, the breadcrumbs and salt, and then set aside. 3 In a small saucepan, warm the lemon and lime juice with the sugar, ginger and 120ml water, and heat until reduced to about 120ml. Add the rum and cook for 1 minute then remove from the heat, pour over the melon and toss together. Set aside. 4 Pat the prawns dry and then coat with 2 teaspoons of the grapeseed oil. Heat the remaining 4 teaspoons of oil in a sauté pan over a medium-high heat. Coat the prawns thoroughly in the prepared crust mixture, and then sear in the oil in batches, adding some more oil if necessary. Cook for 2 minutes and then turn. 5 Spoon the melon and sauce onto individual plates or a serving platter, arrange the prawns on top and scatter with the spring onions and microgreens, if using. f

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Cyrus Todiwala’s

ROAST LAMB

THE INTENSE FLAVOUR OF SLOW-ROAST LAMB IS LIFTED BY EARTHY, AROMATIC TURMERIC AND CUMIN

T

HIS SLOW-ROASTED RECIPE is a spice powerhouse with cumin, turmeric and garlic. Both turmeric and cumin are known for their ability to help naturally regulate blood sugar levels – especially important for diabetics. Their distinct, earthy tones make them a welcome addition to many dishes, and this recipe from Cyrus Todiwala of Café Spice Namasté lets their flavour melt into an onion-carrot bed that can be served on the side, offestting the rich lamb and tart quince.

Method

1 Preheat the oven to 160°C (325°F/ gas mark 3). Scatter the onion and carrot rounds on the bottom of an oiled roasting pan. Trim and lightly score the fat on the lamb shoulder and place on top of the bed of vegetables. 2 Dry-toast the coriander, cumin, peppercorns and cardamom in a frying pan until the aromas are released, then crush with a mortar and pestle. Add the bay leaves, turmeric, garlic, salt and oil to the mortar and crush to a paste. Massage this paste all over the lamb. Scatter with the thyme sprigs and tuck the quince pieces all around the meat. 3 Sprinkle the sugar and vinegar over the top, then pour 100ml of water into the side of the roasting pan. Tightly cover the roasting pan with thick foil and slow-roast for 4 hours. 4 Raise the oven temperature to 180°C (350°F/gas mark 4). Remove the foil, skim off the fat and add more water if needed. Baste the lamb then return it, uncovered, to the oven. Cook the meat for a further 35 minutes or until it’s tender. f

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quince add Spices and twist to the l ua an unus t classic in Sunday roas ty dish ar he is th


TIME

ING R E DIE NTS

Serves

◆◆ 4

◆◆ 3 large onions (350g),

Preparation

◆◆ 10 mins

Cooking

◆◆ 4½ hours

unpeeled, sliced into rounds

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◆◆ 3 large carrots (225g), peeled

and cut into 5cm rounds ◆◆ 3kg lamb shoulder, bone in,

lightly trimmed of fat ◆◆ 2 tbsp coriander seeds ◆◆ 2 tbsp cumin seeds ◆◆ 2 tbsp black peppercorns ◆◆ 1 tsp cardamom seeds ◆◆ 3 bay leaves, torn ◆◆ 1 tsp ground turmeric ◆◆ 6 garlic cloves ◆◆ 2 tbsp salt flakes ◆◆ 2 tbsp olive oil ◆◆ 8 thyme sprigs ◆◆ 3 quince (or tart, firm apples),

peeled, cored and cut into sixths ◆◆ 3 tbsp brown sugar ◆◆ 3 tbsp rice wine vinegar

Photograph by Manja Wachsmuth Photograph by ###

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Natasha MacAller’s

LABNEH PARFAIT THIS QUICK BUT IMPRESSIVE DESSERT LEVERAGES JUICY POMEGRANATE FOR A REFRESHING PUDDING THAT’LL CLEANSE THE PALATE AFTER A RICH MEAL

TIME

Serves ◆◆ 4

Preparation ◆◆ 10 mins

Cooking

◆◆ Approx 10 mins

BITE-SIZED

FOODISM.CO.UK/ NEWSLETTER

ING R E DIE NTS For the chia cream ◆◆ 3 tbsp chia seeds ◆◆ 240ml almond milk ◆◆ 1/8 tsp almond extract pinch

salt flakes ◆◆ 2 tbsp honey ◆◆ ¼ tsp ground cardamom

For the pomegranate gelatin ◆◆ 475ml pure pomegranate

juice ◆◆ 1 tbsp honey ◆◆ 4 silver gelatin sheets

For the vanilla labneh ◆◆ ¼ tsp vanilla extract ◆◆ ¼ tsp sugar, or to taste ◆◆ Pinch ground cardamom ◆◆ 85g labneh

To serve ◆◆ 25g pistachios, chopped

Method

1 To make the chia cream, mix together all the ingredients in a bowl, cover and chill for at least 3 hours or overnight if possible. 2 Cover the gelatin leaves in ice-cold

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◆◆ 2 fresh figs, quartered or torn,

water and leave until soft. In a small saucepan, warm the pomegranate juice with the honey to dissolve. Drain and squeeze excess water from the gelatin and then stir it into the juice. Divide the liquid among four dessert glasses. Chill until firm. 3 Whisk the vanilla, sugar and ground cardamom into the labneh. 4 Spoon the chia cream layer on top of the pomegranate gelatin layer then top with vanilla labneh. 5 Sprinkle over some chopped pistachios and garnish with figs, then add a few drops of rose water. f

or dried figs, roughly chopped ◆◆ a few drops rose water

GET THE BOOK

Spice Health Heroes by Natasha MacAller. Published by Jacqui Small (£25)

Photographs by Manja Wachsmuth Photography

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ITH PROTEIN-RICH CHIA seeds and antioxidantpacked pomegranate juice, this is a light and easy-to-make pudding. Pomegranate is celebrated for its ability to aid digestion and cleanse the blood – so it’s absolutely perfect after a heavy dish.


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FOODISM.CO.UK

Richard H Turner

TASTE TEST

The deterioration of our palates as we age may be inevitable, but that doesn’t mean we can’t try and stop it in its tracks, says Richard Turner

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HAT’S YOUR SUPER power? Mine is smell, and by extension taste. My first clue to this was an ability, from a young age, to detect when food was ‘ready’ in an oven, often from another room. From an evolutionary standpoint, our sense of smell was critical in telling us what a food was, and finding it again later. Our sense of taste tells us whether we ought to swallow or spit out that food. Most people can be divided into nontasters, medium-tasters and super-tasters – a super-taster being someone who experiences taste with far greater intensity than average.

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Estimates suggest that a quarter of the population are non-tasters, half are medium-tasters, and only a quarter are super-tasters. We nearly all begin life with super powers in both smell and taste. Evolution gifted us with an enhanced ability to avoid danger while at our most vulnerable. As young children, we are extremely sensitive when it comes to taste, particularly bitterness, which is nature’s warning for potential toxins. We also favour sweetness as children, with palates largely geared toward energyefficient foods. Before modern society, we needed every bit of energy we could get to grow into adults and it was an evolutionary advantage to be able to quickly identify sources of energy (of which sweetness is an indicator). Most of us tend towards more complex flavours as young adults, and then again to different palates in middle age: our tastes in food changing as we get older. But what is unclear is why a particular person loves or hates a specific food. When you bite into a juicy burger, for example, you’re interpreting an array of signals – physical, neurochemical, memory-based – that ultimately help you decide whether you like that burger. And our age is a major factor in how our brains read – or misread – all those signals. As we enter adolescence, our senses lose the acuity of childhood, but they don’t yet suffer the drastic physical decline in discernment that occurs later in life. On average, the human tongue starts life with 5,000 taste buds, and a human mouth

as many as 10,000. A super-taster might be endowed with twice this number, while a non-taster might have to get by with half the norm, and we can’t increase our number of taste buds, ever. These taste buds contain the taste receptor cells, which are also known as gustatory cells. Taste receptors are located around the small structures known as papillae found on the upper surface of the tongue, palate, upper oesophagus, the cheek and epiglottis. Contrary to lore, all of the five tastes (salt, sweet, bitter, sour and umami) can be detected by any area of the mouth via small openings called eithelium. Parts of the food come into contact with the taste receptors, and the taste receptor cells then send the information to the brain. Physical changes can also make a difference to our sensitivity: chemical pollutants can impair and deaden our senses of taste and smell, sometimes for the long term, and smoking is a particular culprit. Another factor, though, is that as we mature we tend to become more adventurous eaters, expanding our food horizons, while at the same time taste becomes more informed by our memories than by our physical reaction to those five fundamental tastes. It’s also possible to overcome an aversion to a particular food by becoming familiar with it,

WE ALL BEGIN LIFE WITH SUPER POWERS IN BOTH SMELL AND TASTE. AS WE ENTER ADOLESCENCE, OUR SENSES LOSE THE ACUITY OF CHILDHOOD, AND LATER IN LIFE THEY DECLINE EVEN MORE


helped by factors such as nostalgia, that have absolutely nothing to do with how many taste buds one still has in one’s mouth. The big predictor of whether someone will like something such as a bitter beer, chicory or olives isn’t their sensitivity to bitter flavours; it’s their exposure and interest. Around middle age our taste buds begin to stop growing back. Until then, each taste bud has gone through a constant cycle of birth, death, and rebirth over a period of around ten days. A healthy tongue sloughs off and regrows taste buds constantly. Then, somewhere after age 40, the buds continue to die, but fewer regenerate. Our sense of taste and smell start to slowly deteriorate. It’s hard to quantify a decline in sense of smell but with fewer taste buds, flavours begin to taste blander, which can lead us to compensate with extra seasoning – something I’m aware of in my own cooking. Strangely, the particular aromas and tastes that we lose sensitivity to vary wildly from person to person. While one person might not be able to smell cinnamon well anymore, another might smell it perfectly well – but be unable to smell ginger. It is thought that environmental exposure to pollutants or viruses might be responsible for this variation between individuals. Unfortunately, chefs can’t know any of this: some customers might get a huge hit of one spice, while others might not get much at all. Taste also varies depending upon one’s own experience, so while some people develop very sophisticated palates when they’re older, some do so earlier and some never at all. Someone who has a refined palate such as a chef or a food critic probably peaks around age 50, from then on it’s usually downhill all the way. But there are exceptions; brain scans of perfumers suggest that the olfactory parts of their brains grew more developed as they got older. This suggests that by actively differentiating aromas, and probably by extension flavours, and by seeking out new ones, we may help reverse the normal effects of aging on our senses. In other words, we may be able to train our taste buds to withstand deterioration for longer, much like going to the gym. With this in mind, my New Year’s resolution is to train, train, train…f

OPEN SEASON SE ASONAL PR ODUC E AND W HE R E TO F IND I T Our columnist Tom Hunt celebrates the arrival of rhubarb season, and suggests that while it’s undoubtedly brilliant in desserts, we shouldn’t overlook it for use in drinks and savoury dishes, too Just as winter plumbs its darkest depths and snowdrops indicate the faintest hope of spring, rhubarb appears in the market, blushing pink and cheeky. Bright pink forced rhubarb is brought into existence early in warmed barns, mostly by Yorkshire farmers who pick their produce romantically by candlelight. Outdoor-grown rhubarb happens much later in the season – as the sun starts to warm the fields in April and May – and I love its green and deep red hues and strong, sour flavour that’s absolutely perfect in crumbles and pies. Rhubarb’s tartness goes well in sweet desserts but, surprisingly, it’s used as a vegetable in spicy stews and other savoury dishes in other countries’ cuisines. In my book The Natural Cook I have a rich rhubarb and pork tagine recipe, but my favourite recipe remains rhubarb pastel de nata – my version of the wonderful Portuguese

custard tart, which is accompanied perfectly by a rhubarb bellini cocktail. To make it, simply mix a shot of the surplus juice from roasting or poaching the rhubarb with a cloudy prosecco or champagne. Normally I use every part of a fruit or vegetable in cooking, but rhubarb leaves are inedible, so save them for the compost instead. If you have a glut of rhubarb, it’s good to know that the raw stalks freeze well for use later down the line. f The Natural Cook by Tom Hunt is available now (Quadrille, £20). For more on Tom and FOLLOW US his restaurants, see @FOODISMUK tomsfeast.com; FOODISMUK @tomsfeast

EARLY HARVEST: It’s just about time for forced rhubarb, with outdoor-grown hot on its heels

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— PART 2 —

FEAST “IN ALL THE EXCITEMENT ABOUT LONDON’S FOOD START-UPS, IT’S IMPORTANT NOT TO FORGET WHERE IT ALL BEGAN” GREAT BRITISH PRODUCE OLD AND NEW, 032

032 BEST OF BRITISH | 040 TOM HUNT’S ROOT-TO-FRUIT PHILOSOPHY 046 THE ARTWORK BEHIND CRAFT BREWERS | 054 INSIDE SWIFT


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T’S EASY TO think of contemporary London as a cornucopia of great produce; a hive that’s buzzing with activity from new and exciting minds creating delicious food and drink products that challenge the way things have been done. Want a British take on Mexican cheese? Try Peckham’s Gringa Dairy. Fancy some smoked salmon? London Fields’ Secret Smokehouse is hellbent on bringing the heart of smoking back to its spiritual home in the East End. But in all the excitement of London’s food start-ups, it’s important not to forget where it all began. British cuisine may not be celebrated like that of France and Italy, but its history runs deep. That’s why we’ve selected eight different traditional British food and drink products, and talked not only about the upstart Londoners making them, but also the companies that have been there and done it – and are still doing it today. In these pages, you’ll read about cider (or cyder) that’s been brewed since 1728; the jam brand that’s been shaping the way we preserve in Britain for 140 years; and you’ll finally find out the answer to the burning question: who invented the scotch egg? British food culture is in a golden age, but it’s one that’s built on centuries of tradition. Read about some of the best of it here...

EAT BRITISH Before the new wave came the old guard, and many are still going strong. We meet Britain’s food heroes, old and new

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OLD SCHOOL

Paxton & Whitfield

Paxton & Whitfield’s early history is all about knowing its market: in the late 1700s, the Cullum family’s cheese stall in Aldwych Market became a cheese shop on Southampton Street, a move made in order to bring it closer to the wealthy elites who worked in and around the embryonic Mayfair. The name comes from Harry Paxton and Charles Whitfield, business partners of the company’s founder Sam Cullum, who was responsible for the shrewd move. In 1835, the Paxton & Whitfield shop moved to Jermyn Street, where it still resides, and in 1850, the brand was appointed cheesemaker to Queen Victoria as its heritage grew and grew. It followed that up with Royal Warrants for three kings and two Princes of Wales, and the great Winston Churchill is even quoted as saying “a gentleman only buys his cheese at Paxton & Whitfield”. High praise indeed. With such a long history, the brand has had to ride out its fair share of bumps on its journey to the top. In the mid-1800s, the English appetite moved towards European cheeses over the farmhouse-style cheese England was known for. Rationing hit the cheese industry as hard as any, and its Jermyn Street shop had to bring in other groceries in place of weird and wonderful cheeses to try to aid the war effort. But today, the brand is as strong as ever, with two shops in London, one in Stratfordupon-Avon and another in Bath. It’s known for bringing some of the UK’s best cheeses to its customers, as well crackers and condiments, too. From stall to shop, and beyond... paxtonandwhitfield.co.uk

CHEESE SINCE 1742

A GENTLEMAN ONLY BUYS HIS CHEESE AT PAXTON & WHITFIELD

– SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL ON WHERE HE LIKES TO SOURCE THE GOOD STUFF

NEW SCHOOL

Wildes Cheese

Photograph by ###

Philip Wilton refers to himself as “the Urban Cheesemaker”. And, given that he makes his range of artisanal cheeses tucked away on an industrial estate in North London, it’s a pretty apt description of what he does. The company’s been around since 2012, when Wilton was made redundant from his job as a management consultant. He decided not to look for a similar role somewhere else but, presumably, to look to do a job that was about the furthest he could possibly get from his old one. What started in a home kitchen continued and flourished in said industrial estate, where Wilton and his team make some of the best cheeses to be found in London. The secret’s in the care and attention paid to the manufacturing process. Wilton sources milk from Jersey cows that graze in the Lune Valley in Lancashire, rather than from larger dairy farms closer to the capital. Today, he’s featured on the menus of restaurants all over London, as well as having provided cheese for events put on by everyone from Coutts Bank to Nike, catering weddings and functions, and being sold in markets and shops around London. Wilton describes making cheese as “magic” and “alchemy”. It seems like something he was born to do. Like many of London’s new batch of food producers, Wilton is also eager to share his (relatively) new-found expertise in cheesemaking. That’s why he and his team offer cheesemaking workshops and courses, too. wildescheese.co.uk

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OLD SCHOOL

Aspall Cyder

SMOKED SALMON SINCE 1905

OLD SCHOOL

H. Forman & Son

That Forman, one of the country’s oldest purveyors of smoked salmon and trout, would have a premises on the capital’s historic Fish Island is nominative determinism at its best. It owes its formation, though, to a Russian – the not-very-Russiansounding Harry Forman arrived at the turn of the 19th century and pursued what he knew back-to-front already: the art of curing fish. He set about importing salmon from Scotland and developing a technique that would later be known as the ‘London cure’: a perfect blend of curing salt, oak smoke, and time. What’s particularly notable about Forman – and, indeed, about many of the great British brands still creating great food and drink after decades or centuries of doing so – is that it’s still a family business. Lance Forman, Harry’s grandson, is in charge today. And, certainly not harmed by London’s recent fling with all things brunch, the product remains as popular as ever. formans.co.uk

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NEW SCHOOL

Secret Smokehouse

If smoked fish is now more closely associated with Scotland than with the East End of London, Secret Smokehouse is on a mission to redress the balance. The company was founded by Max Bergius [above], a smoker who learned his trade at Billingsgate Market and went on to smoke fish on Scotland’s West Coast. Being a resident of Stepney, in East London, Bergius was keen to make his mark on the East End’s current smoking scene. He and his company aren’t trying to reinvent the wheel – while many new London producers fuse tradition with ambitious new flavours and techniques (such as Camberwell’s Pished Fish, which infuses its salmon and trout with cocktail spirits and ingredients), Bergius wanted to pay homage to the beautiful simplicity of London smoked salmon, and carry on the tradition of those who made the area so well-known for its cured and smoked fish. His company cures MSC-certified Scottish salmon, trout, haddock and kippers by hand, just the way it always has been. secretsmokehouse.co.uk

If you’ve ever spent time in Suffolk, you’ll know it’s a treasure trove of food, drink and farms. Its apples blush, its farm animals beam, and its food-anddrink-producing scene is full of creative people making the best of what the landscape has to offer. People like Clement Chevallier are testament to this fact. Having inherited Aspall Hall in 1722, he set about planting apples weeks after moving in in 1728, from cuttings he brought over from his native Jersey. He practiced making cider (or “cyder”, as Aspall likes to refer to it) with apples bought locally, until such time as his first apple plantations bore fruit. The business is still owned by the family, run today by his descendent, Henry Chevallier-Guild. While not all of Aspall’s cyders and vinegars are certified organic, the brand has a flagship Organic Cyder and an Organic Vinegar, and can lay claim to some pretty serious organic credentials: family member Perronelle Chevallier was one of the Soil Association’s co-founders in 1946, and the brand is actually the longest-standing holder of accreditation by the charity. Today the brand’s cyders include classic British cloudy, still, sparkling and even mulled. There’s also a range of 11 eclectic vinegars, too. aspall.co.uk


BERGIUS AND HIS COMPANY AREN’T TRYING TO REINVENT THE WHEEL

OLD SCHOOL

Fortnum & Mason

SCOTCH EGGS

– SECRET SMOKEHOUSE

SINCE 1738

NEW SCHOOL

Urban Orchard

“We are here to change the face of the UK cider industry forever,“ reads the mission statement of Urban Orchard. And, with our cities getting bigger all the time, their plan seems like an achievable one. The process is a simple but brilliant way of producing great-quality cider without the luxury of an orchard: Apple Donors give quantities of their urban apples – from private gardens, allotments, community gardens and more – and in return for at least 5kg of fruit, they’re given back 10% of the weight in finished cider. If you’re a community garden, you can even set up a Donor Station – you’ll be paid for the apples you and your community give to the brand in the form of a fundraising donation to a charity of your choice. The liquid itself is a sparkling, crisp and fresh cider, made up of nothing but urban apples and a bit of champagne yeast. It’s a cider that tastes of London. urbanorchard.london

Photograph by Mowie Kay

CIDER SINCE 1728

NEW SCHOOL

Scotchtails

Until recently, the modern incarnation of the scotch egg was as bad motorway service station food; something to be avoided rather than sought out. But Scotchtails – founded by two friends, Oliver Hiam and Dominic Hamdy, while they were at university – has firmly put the original commuter snack back on the gourmet map. The pair make their eggs with artisanal ingredients in Hackney, and sell them under the arches of Borough Market – developing them into the posh street food they were always intended to be. Scotchtails sells everything from chorizowrapped eggs to inventive vegetarian versions with tomato and basil or beetroot and lentil, served with a selection of homemade relishes. The kitchen also occasionally goes off-menu, creating scotch eggs wrapped in things like squid and chorizo. The eggs have been so popular the pair have now opened a café in Aldwych – Lundenwic – which sells the snacks alongside fresh seasonal salads, juices, and some of London’s best coffee. scotchtails.com

There are many stories behind the invention of the British classic, but the most popular is that of Fortnum & Mason, which suggests that the scotch egg – in all its goldenyolked, breadcrumbed glory – was considered a treat for the department store’s most affluent clientele. Much like the pork pie, it was originally intended as a traveller’s snack; something that could be held easily and wrapped up in a handkerchief – and was developed by the department store thanks to its location in Piccadilly Circus, which was the starting point for many routes leading out of London. Fast-forward 200 years, and the recipe has had a bit of an update, swapping offal and leftover meat for sausage. Other than that, Fortnum’s has stayed true to its scotch egg roots. Today it offers two choices: traditional, with a free-range egg and outdoorreared pork, and an indulgent black pudding version. fortnumandmason. com

THE SCOTCH EGG IS THE ORIGINAL TRAVELLER’S SNACK

– FORTNUM & MASON

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GINGER BEER SINCE 1905

NEW SCHOOL

NEW SCHOOL

This Is My Jam!

Square Root’s modern-day sodaworks epitomises London’s start-up culture: it originally started out in a kitchen, and the sodas were sold from a 1920s delivery tricycle affectionately named Elsie. Within two years, the drinks because so popular that Square Root moved to a production and bottling space in a railway arch in Hackney Downs, and the company was awarded the 2015 BBC Food & Farming Award for Best Drinks Producer. The team only uses fresh ingredients that they juice or infuse themselves, often taking the wonky or softer fruits that supermarkets won’t buy. They work with seasonal ingredients, which means the flavours available often change, and the final product contains around a third less sugar than your average soda. There are a few core flavours though, with ginger beer among them – a fizzy, spicy drink that speaks of the care taken to produce it. squarerootsoda.co.uk

It’s all about unusual flavour combinations at small-scale London producer This Is My Jam!, which was founded by Bermondsey-based Michael Sampson. What was originally a one-off recipe for a friend’s party turned into the company’s bestseller: a raspberry, cherry and dark chocolate conserve. This creation led to more inventive flavour pairings, from apricot and earl grey to strawberry, rhubarb and tarragon. Partcularly popular are the delectable boozy varieities, like pear, gooseberry and London gin; plum, fig and brandy; and pear and amaretto, as well as seasonal specials like the Christmas pudding jam. This Is My Jam! moves between various food markets, but if tracking that feels too much like hard work, they’re also available online from Tabl. myjamjams.com

Square Root

JAM SINCE 1885

OLD SCHOOL

Fentiman’s

Photograph by Tiptree / Wilkin & Sons

In 1905, Thomas Fentiman, an iron puddler from Cleckheaton, was approached by a fellow tradesman for a loan. The deal was struck, and a recipe for ginger beer was provided as security. The deal fell through, and Fentiman became the owner of the recipe. He began producing the botanically brewed ginger beer, selling it door-to-door from a horse and cart in handmade stone jars, stamped with an image of his dog. A century later, and Fentiman’s is still a family-run company, owned by Thomas’s great-grandson. It’s still brewed using the traditional techniques – using crushed ginger root and other botanicals, and allowing it to ferment for a week – although the process has been brought up to date. These days the drinks are carbonated, and pasteurised to extend shelf-life. fentimans.com

OLD SCHOOL

Tiptree

Over the years, the classic jar of Tiptree’s strawberry jam has achieved near-icon status, gracing breakfast tables, supermarket shelves and afternoon teas the world over. That shouldn’t be a surprise, given that it’s been a product of superior quality since it was first made in 1885 by the Britannia Fruit Preserving Company. As the company began to grow and new varieties were added, it started to distinguish between jams made with home-grown fruit (conserves) and those made with foreign produce (preserves). Tiptree was awarded a Royal Warrant in 1911, and again in 1954. There are now hundreds of flavours, from the original Little Scarlet, made with, er, little scarlet strawberries, to rhubarb and ginger, and apricot and armagnac. tiptree.com

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OLD SCHOOL

Bowmore

SCOTCH WHISKY SINCE 1779

NEW SCHOOL

Good & Proper Tea

When it comes to a practice as ancient as making tea, it’s hard to see how it can be modernised. But, as is the way of things, it’s actually now come full circle. Good & Proper Tea founder Emilie Holmes has been propagating the benefits of loose-leaf, premium tea for years – she started out with a crowdfunded tea truck in 2012, which did so well that she went on to set up a modern-day tea house in Old Street, followed by a second site in Soho. She works closely with farmers, who make sure the tea leaf and bud are kept intact during the picking process; the leaves are then dried, roasted or fermented to achieve black, green, white and oolong teas, resulting in superior-tasting products with different terroirs and mouthfeels. You can buy Good & Proper Tea online, or from its teahouses, where you can try a cuppa brewed using the Alpha Dominche Steampunk, a sleek, futuristic contraption that heats water to the perfect temperature with steam, and completely saturates the leaves for maximum flavour. goodandpropertea.com

TEA SINCE 1706

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OLD SCHOOL

Twining’s

Twining’s is so old – more than 300 years old, in fact – that it can lay claim to being responsible for introducing Britain to the drink that has become almost synonymous with our national cultural identity. Founder Thomas Twining set up the company in 1706, buying a coffee house on the Strand and choosing to focus on tea. Ten generations later, his ancestor Stephen Twining is a company ambassador, spreading its message around the globe. Twining’s tea is still sold from the original shop, but it’s also one of the best-known tea brands around the world, selling a selection of classic teas, fruit and herbal infusions, and loose-leaf tea pyramids, each of which is sourced with care and to the highest standards. twinings.co.uk

TEAS CAN HAVE DIFFERENT TERROIRS AND MOUTHFEELS

– GOOD & PROPER TEA

The scotch whisky industry is packed full of heritage and history, and Bowmore’s no exception: founded in 1779, it’s actually the oldest distiller on the island of Islay, in the Scottish Hebrides. Bowmore’s single malts sum up a lot of what Islay fans love about the region’s whisky: the malted barley used to make the spirit is slowly smoked over peat in clay kilns. It’s also one of the few distilleries to produce its own barley, rather than buying it from nearby farms. Its water comes from the nearby Laggan River. Its coastal location is also key to the finished product’s flavour: while treacherous waves batter the walls of Bowmore’s No. 1 Vaults, the whisky ages below in former bourbon, sherry and bordeaux wine casks that lie among salty sea air, giving the finished whiskies a touch of sea-salt notes. All this history doesn’t mean the distiller is resting on its laurels, mind: as well as its core range, Bowmore regularly releases experimental limitededition expressions, too. bowmore.com

NEW SCHOOL

R&B Distillers

How’s this for a punchline: the whisky distillers without a distillery. R&B Distillers are making whisky even before they can move in to their brandspanking-new distillery on the tiny historic Isle of Raasay, near the Isle of Skye on Scotland’s West Coast, to add to the one recently built in the Scottish Borders town of Peebles. Raasay has something of a chequered history: known previously for a culture of bootlegging, it’ll soon be home to the island’s first ever legal distillery, opening in spring. That hasn’t stopped the brains behind R&B making waves in the market already, mind: their single malt Raasay While We Wait, as well as the two releases from the Borders distillery, is a taste of what’s to come, and has been well-received across the industry. rbdistillers.com


I’M ABOUT STRICT, SEASONAL COOKING, AND STANDING BY YOUR MORALS With a plan to push his already lauded restaurants to do even more for the sustainable food movement, eco-chef Tom Hunt is a man on a mission, writes Mike Gibson PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID HARRISON

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Photograph by ###

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C

LEO THE FRIENDSHIP Bread sounds like a children’s book. It could also be an offbeat coming-of-age movie. But it’s neither of those things – instead, it was a simple initiative that would become the first step on the journey of a young, ecologically minded chef; one that would result in him winning gongs from the Sustainable Restaurant Association and the Soil Association, and see him become one of the best-known faces of London’s sustainable food movement. Tom Hunt is that chef. He’s the founder of Poco, the self-described “seasonal British tapas” restaurant (the second of which is in Hackney’s Broadway Market, the original in Bristol), as well as multiple sustainable food initiatives and food writing through his “umbrella brand” Tom’s Feast. “It was a take on the Herman the German cake,” he says of the project that kicked off his fascination with sustainable food, “which is a friendship cake that you passed around. You feed it loads of sugar and yeast, and it grows. “At that point I was going through my sourdough stage, so I created Cleo the Friendship Bread. It was a recipe for sourdough, where you receive a starter, feed it over a few days, and then it multiplies to the point where you can make a loaf of bread and then pass three more starters on to different friends, and then it goes on and on.” A nice social initiative, you might say, but here’s the kicker: “That was really about the idea that if we’re making our own food and taking it to that level, we’re not going to waste a crumb.” In many ways, Hunt’s first foray into something that involved more than just dishes on a menu could sum up his entire approach to cooking, and to food waste – the issue that’s arguably at the very top of his agenda. He describes a kind of self-fulfilling prophecy: “The idea is ‘How are we going to treat this ingredient with real respect?’ “When you value it to that degree, it really pushes you to think about the ethics of your produce. That’s one of my key arguments for root-to-fruit eating: that by saving that percentage of the ingredient that’s normally wasted – on average around 30% in the home or in a restaurant, or up to 50% of the food we produce globally – you’re creating a budget for buying better-quality and higherwelfare produce, which you’re then going to value more anyway, and eat in its entirety. It’s a kind of cycle of improving your diet, nutrition and the planet – all through just really enjoying your food.” Hunt’s argument seems blindingly

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I WAS GOING THROUGH A SOURDOUGH STAGE, SO I CREATED CLEO THE FRIENDSHIP BREAD

obvious, but only now is it truly being rediscovered. In a time when convenience comes before all else, the damage being done to the global food system is just starting to be realised at scale. And a simple counter to it is, as Hunt says, to simply value your ingredients. From buying organic produce – proven by a recent independent study to be better for public health than those grown by extensive farming methods – to growing what you can yourself, and spending more money on better quality in smaller amounts. After all, if you do that, you’ll value those products more. It’s easier, for example, to throw away half a pepper that’s been grown in Peru and picked up from a local supermarket; it becomes harder to do so the


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FROM TOP: Celeriac leaves, which Hunt used to top his porridge; cutting fresh mushrooms; Hunt’s celeriac porridge in the pan; topping and serving the celeriac porridge dish

COOK WITH TOM

Photograph by ###

Tom paid a visit to foodism’s test kitchen last December, where he taught us a comforting recipe for celeriac and mushroom porridge. The aim was to show us (and you) how to make use of root greens – the fibrous but flavoursome tops of vegetables like carrot, celeriac and swede – in a classic winter dish. Check out the recipe and video at fdsm.co/tom-hunt-celeriac

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WE’VE LOST TOUCH WITH THE VALUE OF OUR FOOD – AND THAT’S WHY WE’RE WASTING IT more connected you are to its origin. There’s a reason Cleo the Friendship Bread was a catalyst for Hunt: “Bread is one of the most wasted food items there is,” he says, “so root-to-fruit carried on from that idea about how we can really teach people to value food, and it took me into the idea of whole-food eating, but taking that quite literally – using whole grains, wholewheat flour, unrefined sugar – but also taking Fergus Henderson’s philosophy for eating the whole animal a step further, and looking at how we can apply that philosophy to all of the food that we consume.” As Hunt says of his self-styled “rootto-fruit” philosophy: “It’s really about re-learning to value our food, connecting with nature, and wasting nothing. It started from my ambition to reduce waste, but through ruminating over that, I came to the conclusion that it’s as simple as the fact that we’ve lost touch with the value of our food, and that’s why we’re wasting it.” Hunt had a head start in that sense. His youth and adolescence was spent in the south-west of England, where he discovered a love not just of cooking, but of entertaining – “I really, really enjoyed food.” he reminisces, “I enjoyed the thrill of cooking, and feeding large groups of people in celebratory situations, and making the party.” He then worked with Hugh FearnleyWhittingstall at River Cottage, rising to head chef under his tutelage and getting an education in what Hunt refers to as “strict, seasonal cooking, and standing by your morals.” He went on to run a moveable café at various British music festivals, getting it to the point where “it was running itself, and I ended up enjoying the festivals a bit too →

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ENJOY WITH LEMONADE & A SQUEEZE OF FRESH LIME

SOUTHERNCOMFORTUK #SOUTHERNWELCOME

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WE ASK OURSELVES HOW WE CAN EFFECT POSITIVE CHANGE → much, letting the team get on with it, and partying. I realised it was time to get my head down and set up a restaurant space.” That space was Poco, originally in Bristol, and then in Hackney. Along with his Tom’s Feast events, largely centred around traditionally wasted food, and his writing, he uses it as a mouthpiece for his philosophy – amplified by the industry awards he’s picked up on the way. “We actually won a hat-trick of awards with the SRA – Best Independent, Best UK Restaurant and the overall Sustainable Restaurant of the Year award. “It gives you credibility – you can talk the talk, but when it’s backed up by awards that prove that you’re walking the walk, it gives you a better platform to continue that work, which is really important to me. Having a

“NONE GENUINE BUT MINE”™

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voice to communicate ideas around animals, agricultural or agro-ecology, holistic cookery, and things like that is really special.” Now that Poco can be said to be, like the festival café that preceded it, “running itself”, Hunt is doing what he’s always done: making plans to push his philosophy further. He describes his move towards vegetable-forward cooking as a natural result of having learnt to cook seasonally: “I use more vegetables than most people in my cooking because I’m true to seasonality, and that means looking at which vegetables are in season. “When I go to put a menu together, the first thing I do is look at what’s in season and focus on those vegetables, and then work from there.” It’s hard to argue with – spring lamb and game are seasonal, of course, but meat doesn’t tend to have the seasonal diversity that vegetables do. But Hunt isn’t satisfied simply by putting vegetables centre stage. Having recently turned vegetarian himself, he’s overhauling his restaurants so they only serve meat and fish that’s more than just environmentally neutral; it actually has a positive effect on the world around it. “We’re always trying to reduce our impact on the environment, on climate change, on reducing our carbon footprint,” he says. I realised quite recently that we could have a positive effect. Instead of asking ‘How can we do less damage?’, we could ask ‘How can we effect positive change?’.”


ENJOY WITH LEMONADE & A SQUEEZE OF FRESH LIME CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: Hunt obscured by a rogue celeriac, whose leaves he used to top porridge at Foodism HQ; dishes from Poco

Having decided his vegetarianism needed to have a tangible effect on the way he was cooking – not just the way he was eating – he stopped short of turning Poco into a vegetarian restaurant. “You can have a lot more power and emphasis when you’re discussing how you can eat meat well, rather than just saying to people: ‘Don’t eat it.’” So how does he intend to implement this on the menu? “It starts with the fish menu,” he says, “from what I consider to be a sustainable menu of fish, serving things like coley and dab – but reducing that right down to oysters, because oysters are generally a really environmentally positive thing to farm: they clean the estuaries that they’re grown in as they filter thousands of litres of water per day, and actually have a really positive effect on the ecosystem. It’s about starting with those products and using them, and then educating people around why. “Meat’s the same – we’re going to have to really restrict ourselves to a few ingredients, and I’m going to start with pests: conservation bodies sometimes need to cull certain animals from the environment, like wood pigeon – which was one of my favourite games when I was eating meat – and beyond that, muntjac venison, and even squirrel, which is delicious. They would have been culled anyway, so they’re essentially a living animal that would have been wasted. That leads on to other areas of meat that you can use in an environmentally positive way, such as ex-dairy cattle, billy goat – which would

normally be culled as a part of the dairy industry – and also rose veal.” It’s an ambitious move for Hunt. It’s also one he didn’t need to make, but one he wanted to. As the owner of two seasonal restaurants that presented vegetables as the stars of the show and were winning awards for their commitment to the environment, Poco was already leading by example. But Hunt recognises, as more and more chefs and diners are, that people like him can always go further; they can always do more to try to influence change outside of their dining rooms as well as just on their menus. Cleo the Friendship Bread was the beginning of a story that’s only just beginning: cooking can, in its own way, change the world. And Tom Hunt won’t rest until he’s done just that. f pocotapasbar.com; tomsfeast.com

READ ALL ABOUT IT You can read more about Tom’s vision of root-to-fruit eating, with seasonal recipes based around 26 ‘hero’ ingredients, in his book The Natural Cook: Eating the Seasons from Root to Fruit. It comes with seasonal eating guides, and handy annotations, too. (Quadrille, £20)

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Copyright © 2016 Southern Comfort.

“NONE GENUINE BUT MINE”™

All rights reserved. Southern Comfort is a registered trademark.


ART AND CRAFT

In a fiercely competitive market, how you brand your bottle can matter almost as much as the beer inside. Here’s how some of our favourite breweries do it…

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WORDS BY JON HAWKINS


Photograph by ###

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CANOPY BEER CO “Our designer, Wayne Peach, must have had the Grandville animal illustrations tucked away in his inspirations folder and it was he who suggested we use them,” says Estelle Theobalds, co-founder of Herne Hill-based Canopy. Sadly Peach, whom Theobalds met through a mutual interest in cycling, passed away last year. “He was an absolute perfectionist and so enthusiastic about everything we did; I’m just sad that he didn’t get a chance to see all the things we’re doing now because I think he would be proud of us.”

BEING CLOTHED & UPRIGHT REALLY HUMANISES THEM AS CHARACTERS. WE TRY TO CHOOSE AN APPROPRIATE ANIMAL FOR EACH BEER – ESTELLE THEOBALDS

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BRIXTON BREWERY Back in 2012, when the founders of Brixton Brewery needed inspiration for their label designs, they went for a wander. “We wanted them to convey the identity of Brixton, and a sense of where the brewery was located,” says one of those founders, Jez Galaun. “We identified places, shapes or forms that we could bring through in the branding.” When the team saw African batik fabrics in Brixton Market, they knew they’d struck gold. “They’ve got that colourful, multi-layered printing – they’re block-printed, so nothing lines up quite right.” All of the brewery’s beers are named after local landmarks, objects, places or streets.

CRAFT BEER IS AT THE INTERSECTION OF DESIGN, ART & TASTE. THERE’S A BACKSTORY & PROVENANCE PATTERN BOLDNESS: Emma Scott-Child of Junction Studio created Brixton’s core beer designs and brand identity. The brewery has also worked with Brixton-based textile designers Eley Kishimoto

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SIREN CRAFT BREW The hook in the bottom of the “S” on Siren’s bottles isn’t just there to look pretty. Like the name itself – in Greek mythology, sirens were seductive and beautiful creatures who lured sailors towards danger – it signifies the pull of brewing, which founder Darron Anley couldn’t resist when he set Siren up in 2012. “Rather than shouting out into a crowded space, we’re all about drawing people in to our beers and our way of thinking,” says Andy Nowlan, Siren’s marketing manager. “But the beer is always the starting point.”

SIRENS ARE ALL ABOUT ENTICING AND LURING YOU IN BOTTLE READY: “We’re trying to tell a story and build something that’s more than just the product,” says Andy Nowlan. The illustration below is taken from Siren’s Soundwave IPA

PRESSURE DROP The website ohbeautifulbeer.com – which celebrates great beer label design – was an inspiration for the founders of Pressure Drop. “We wanted to experiment and be creative not only in the beer we produced but also in the way it was packaged,” says co-founder Graham O’Brien. The Hackney-based brewers enlisted local designer Francis Redman to design Pressure Drop’s logo and typography, and have used several artists to illustrate the labels. “The Wu Gang Chops The Tree” label was illustrated by Ching-Li Chew, who I know because our kids are friends at school,” he explains. “The photo on the ENZ label was taken by Javier Gonzalez, who works on our bottling line.” The designs don’t so much reflect the brewery’s philosophy as its personality, he says. “If you look at many of the new crop of breweries, you can get a sense of personality from the labels. I think that’s important, but it’s hard to define.”

ABOVE: Pressure Drop has worked with a variety of different designers and artists. “We’ll often ask people we know, or we’re approached by people who want to create something for us”, says O’Brien

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GIPSY HILL “We’d seen some great work Marcus Reed had done using a character he’d created,” says Charlie Shaw, one of the founders of South London’s Gispy Hill Brewing Company. “We liked its simplicity and clarity and it looked very fresh, so our brief to him was to simply adapt that same character – in that same style – to become us.” Each of the founders is featured on one of the labels, and Shaw is Southpaw. “It was just me at the very beginning and Southpaw was actually the only beer that was my recipe – I first brewed it when I was working at Five Points.” The decision to feature a character on each label was, as Shaw admits, a bit of a risky one. “Companies don’t often use people on their branding; apparently it can get you into all sort of problems if you’re not careful.” But he’s happy with the results. “I think if you get away with the character brand thing, it can be quite powerful and recognisable. In our case it also led to us being able to have a lot of fun with our specials…”

Photograph by ###

WE HIRED EIGHT PEOPLE LAST YEAR SO IT’S LUCKY WE DO THREE SPECIALS A MONTH…

– CHARLIE SHAW

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WILD CARD The labels for Walthamstow’s Wild Card Brewery were designed by collage artist Valero Doval, a friend of director Andrew Birkby. “When we decided to have a go at making it a business – with no experience and no money – we called ourselves Wild Card Brewery,” he says. “ When we asked Valero to do the labels, the only brief was that is should be a playing card design, without any logo or branding on it.” Doval was responsible for the bird motif: “We love them – they give each beer a different character,” says Birkby.

THE BEER WILL ALWAYS BE THE MOST IMPORTANT THING, BUT IT HELPS TO HAVE A STRONG IDENTITY

– ANDREW BIRKBY 52


WE USUALLY START WITH A STYLE OF BEER, THEN A NAME COMES FROM THE BANTER IN THE BREWERY. THE DESIGNS COME FROM THE NAME MONDO “We’re steeped in culture and music. That’s what drew us all together before we started this company,” explains Thomas Palmer, director and head brewer at Battersea’s Mondo Brewing Company. Books, films and music provide much of the inspiration not just for the ethos of the brewery, but the designs, too. The artwork featured on the labels was created by Los Angeles-based designer Chris Vagnoni, whom Palmers shared a house with in central LA. From intial conversations over Skype, Vagnoni developed initial drawings, which he finally made into oil paintings. His wife – a talented photographer – made hi-res images and sent them over to be incorporated into the label designs. The comic aesthetic of Mondo’s labels is key, according to Palmer. “Beer is a fun product. We respect it and what it does for celebrations, milestones, and ritual events in peoples lives. For us it enhances the joy and celebratory atmosphere of life. We’ve often taken a comical approach that we feel adds to that.”

ART CLASS: Designer Chris Vagnoni of Shults Brothers created the original oil paintings for Mondo’s labels. The more recent designs have been done by agency Ginger Brand

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RULING THE ROOST A bar of two halves, the diminutive Swift brings a touch of top-level contemporary mixology – and a big reputation – to Old Compton Street

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MEDALLION There aren’t any particularly exotic ingredients in this drink (save for a bit of home-infused lemongrass gin), but it’s been painstakingly crafted, which sums up a lot of what’s so good about Swift’s menu. The cocktail’s built around lip-smacking lemon flavours, with herbaceous notes from the absinthe and mint.

INGRE DIE NTS ◆◆ 50ml lemongrass-infused

Beefeater gin ◆◆ 2 dashes lemon bitters ◆◆ 2 dashes absinthe ◆◆ 10ml lemon juice ◆◆ 20ml lemon sherbet ◆◆ 5ml Tosolini grappa ◆◆ 3 mint leaves

Shake up the ingredients and fine strain into a coupette glass.

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IVEN ITS PROVENANCE, it’s probably fair to expect big things from Swift. It’s technically the third opening from Edmund Weil and Rosie Stimpson, which follows Nightjar and Oriole – both on the World’s 50 Best Bars list. But it’s co-owned and run by Bobby Hiddleston and Mia Johansson, who’ve been involved in bars like Callooh Callay, Milk & Honey and the current number one in the world, The Dead Rabbit Grocery and Grog in New York. That’s some pedigree. Step into the clean and minimal groundfloor space and you’ll feel like you’re in a modern Italian aperitivo bar, with simple and affordable drinks in keeping with the feel of the place. But head down the stairs and you’ll find yourself in a 1920s-style lounge bar, which borrows a little from Nightjar’s speakeasy setting and a little from the Irishpub-style interior of The Dead Rabbit. Add in a location that’s easy to get to from pretty much anywhere, and there’s something for all discerning drinkers to be found here. Thirsty? Check out a couple of its signature cocktails for an idea of what to expect. f

12 Old Compton Street, W1D 4TQ; barswift.com

Photography by Addie Chinn

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IRISH COFFEE

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◆◆ 75ml sweetened filter coffee ◆◆ Float double cream

Pour the whiskey and coffee into a pre-heated glass. Layer the cream and garnish with grated nutmeg.

Photograph by ###

This Irish coffee is similar to the version made famous by the bar team at The Dead Rabbit, but this one makes use of Jameson’s highly rated Caskmates series – Jameson whiskey that’s been aged further in stout barrels – for that bit of extra punch.

INGREDIEN TS ◆◆ 40ml Jameson Caskmates


WINNER

Food and Drink Innovation

For the gin lover in your life this Valentine’s day AWARD WINNING GIN FROM THE SILENT POOL IN SURREY Now available at Majestic and Waitrose stores nationwide. www.silentpooldistillers.com


— NO SHORTCUTS —

INSIDE THE WORLD OF BUDWEISER BUDVAR A FOODISM GUIDE

We take you on a guide to Czech brewer Budweiser Budvar and its rich history of beer making in the city of České Budějovice

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CONTENTS ◆◆ A Taste of History: Budweiser Budvar

and the city of České Budějovice ◆◆ In the Glass: the anatomy of Budvar

◆◆ A Singular Vision: Budweiser Budvar’s

master beer sommelier Aleš Dvořák ◆◆ Czech It Out: the best pubs for Budvar


PROMOTION

B U DVA R ’ S

RO OTS

A TASTE OF HISTORY

ČESKÉ BUDĚJOVICE

Budweiser Budvar’s rich history in České Budějovice is testament to an unwillingness to compromise its values

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NLESS YOU’VE BEEN hiding under a rock for the last few years, you can’t fail to have noticed the meteroric rise of craft beer – most of it ale. But, given 7 out of 10 pints drunk in pubs and bars are still lager, what place does lager have in today’s brewing scene? What does it mean to brew a well-crafted lager, and does such a thing even exist? The Czech town of České Budějovice, known by its German name of Budweis, is home to the state-owned Budweiser Budvar brewery, and creating the very best lager possible isn’t just a job here – it’s a matter of national pride. The town can trace its brewing heritage back to 1265, when King Ottokar II granted the

town brewing rights on its founding; brewing beer has been a cornerstone of České Budějovice ever since. With a rich and storied history, Budweiser Budvar makes a strong case for being the original upstart brewery, known for saying ‘no’ to any kind of compromise. Take its colourful rivalry with German brewers, or historical links to antiestablishment thinkers and agitators – not to mention its determination to refuse any short cuts in technique or ingredients. As recently as 2012, when the Czech minister for agriculture tried to coerce the brewery to prepare for purchase by a global conglomerate, its CEO, Jiří Boček, refused. Budweiser Budvar – not to be

confused with the similarly named US beer brand brewed by AB Inbev – even has a PGI, or Protected Geographical Indication, similar to that of Champagne in France or Parmigiano Reggiano in Italy. Budweiser Budvar believes that a Budweiser beer can only be brewed in Budweis, and frequently wins trademark battles against the American brewing giant all over the world. Let’s face it, you wouldn’t go to all this trouble if the beer itself wasn’t worth it. So what does it mean to brew wellcrafted lager? A lot, if you’re Budweiser Budvar – from the past and the present to a bright and uncompromising future. ● Find out more at budweiserbudvar.co.uk/history

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MALT IN THE MOUTH: Budweiser Budvar uses smooth-tasting Moravian malts and Ice-Age water drawn from an Artesian well underneath its brewery in Česke Budějovice to expertly craft its range of beers.

A N ATO M Y

OF A

BEER

IN THE GLASS ‘No shortcuts’ is at the core of Budweiser Budvar’s unique personality. What does that mean when it comes to the beer itself?

WELL-ROOTED: Founded in 1895, Budvar has stayed true to its roots by refusing to license its name elsewhere. The brewery is still on its original site, keeping the beer and the jobs in the town of the people that founded it.

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HOPPING MAD: Budvar is one of the only sizeable lager brewers to exclusively use whole-cone Saaz hops, which gives fresh and flavoursome results. Most other large breweries use hop pellets or hop concentrate.

COOL STORY, BREW: The team at Budvar very patiently allow their beers a grand total of 102 days to brew and mature – considerably longer than the average beer, which is brewed and matured for just seven days.


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B U DVA R T I M E L I N E

1891

1895 The Czech Joint Stock Brewery, which we now know as Budvar, is formed and funded by local Czechs. The German-language press slanders the new products, saying they are ‘brewed with river water’. In retaliation, the Czech brewery suggests “straw from inside the heads of the German-speaking journalists,” might add flavour to its rivals' beers. Within five years, the Czechs are exporting their now famous lager to Alexandria, Venice, Trieste and Japan.

České Budějovice is an ethnically diverse community, largely ruled by a German-speaking minority – who also own the breweries. They pressure Czech employees to list themselves as German on census sheets to maintain their authority, and tell them to form their own breweries if they aren’t happy – they do.

1902

1930s Germany invades Czechoslovakia on 15 March 1939. The Budvar brewery provides aid to refugees by offering them living space in the brewery. The Board of Directors tries to fund schools and Czech cultural associations until forced to contribute to Nazi party activities – they continue to do it in secret until removed from their posts by architect of the holocaust, Reinhard Heydrich himself.

1991

Photograph by ###

Following the Czech Velvet Revolution, which signals the end of Communist rule in the country, Budweiser Budvar becomes independent once again – though it remains in public hands. Production soon increases by more than half as facilities are updated and distribution grows.

The Czech Joint Stock Brewery brand expands throughout Eastern Europe, and the beer becomes the drink of choice for those demanding independence from the AustroHungarian Empire. It is known as ‘the beer of our brothers’ among Balkan rebels.

1940s After the war, Budvar becomes nationalised and its anti-Nazi, pro-Czech efforts are recognised. Many of the brewery management were later fired by the Communists for continuing to support organisations promoting Czech independence and preventing a Communist rally from taking place in the brewery.

2012 The Czech agriculture minister tries to force CEO and second generation Budvar man Jiří Boček to remove Budvar from export and prepare it for purchase by global brewers. He refuses – Budvar remains independent.

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M E ET T H E

B REWER

A SINGULAR VISION Budweiser Budvar's master beer sommelier is a man whose passion, knowledge and unique approach mark him out as a true Czech original. Introducing Aleš Dvořák…

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T DOESN’T TAKE long to work out why Aleš Dvořák is known, in brewing circles, as a bit of a character. Much like Budweiser Budvar itself – defiantly state-owned and brewed using the same methods since 1895 – Aleš stands out as authentic and independent in an industry dominated by vast, pan-European commercial breweries and profit-focused, investor-owned beer brands. He drives tanks; he eats dinner with his own hunting knife; he fishes Czech rivers like a pro. He’s also an expert on beer and, having worked at Budvar for 26 years, studying its traditional processes, he’s become a sought-after ambassador for brewing culture the world over. Aleš studied at the prestigious department of brewing at the Prague Institute of Chemical Technology. After graduating and serving his

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compulsory military service, he joined Budweiser Budvar in 1990, initially as a technologist, before pulling on his “gummy boots” and cutting his teeth on the brewhouse floor and fermentation cellars, blending his scientific knowledge with the age-old art of brewing. As Jiří Pekhart, export manager at Budweiser Budvar, puts it: “There are always men behind a brand. Some are visionaries, some are passionate; some are just very good at what they do. Aleš… you will see he’s a very healthy combination of all of these.” Here, Aleš describes the philosophy that drives him, and his love for the beer he helps create.

Production of real beer is simple. When you think about it, beer is just a few ingredients: water, hops, malt, yeast and time. So what makes the

BREW LOVE: (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP) Aleš chats to ex-brewmaster Josef Tolar; only whole hops are used; the end product; the centre of characterful České Budějovice

WHEN YOU THINK ABOUT IT, BEER IS JUST A FEW INGREDIENTS: WATER, HOPS, MALT, YEAST AND TIME


PROMOTION

difference? It’s the quality of those ingredients and how they’re treated. For great lager you need to begin with the perfect, natural, soft water. This is the purest you’ll find anywhere in the world.

We never use processed hops, extracts or pellets We only use the whole cone or flower from the finest Czech noble hops. It’s expensive, of course, but it’s key to preserving the uniqueness, the tradition, the flavour, the taste and keeping the polyphenols in the hops at a maximum. They add an aroma and drinkability to the beer.

I was young when I developed my obsession for the beer I said to myself, ‘you will be a brewer’ one day. And here I am. I love it. It’s a dream job.

This [the brewery's cellars] is where the real magic happens The most important thing is time. Time for the carbon dioxide to naturally bubble through the beer, removing impurities, achieving that smoothness and clarity. All our beer is in these tanks for 90 days. You can’t shortcut that.

Every Budvar comes from right here We don’t make it anywhere else. In many ways we are the biggest craft brewery in the world. ●

CZ E CH

STORIE S

Budvar has teamed up with travel journalist Rob Cowen to produce an unfiltered guide to the Czech Republic. Watch the stories in full at czechstories.com THE PERFECT GOULASH World famous Czech lager overshadows great Czech cuisine. Somehow Ludek from the Masné Krámy, a beer hall in the centre of Budweis, still manages to find a use for Budvar as he takes us through his recipe for an authentic Brewer’s goulash.

A BOHEMIAN ROAD TRIP It’s not all about Budweis – Southern Bohemia also has incredible scenery in Kleť mountain and the fishing lakes of Třeboň as well as the UNESCOlisted town of Český Krumlov.

A MASKED CARNIVAL There’s a lot you don’t see if you just visit Prague. Masopust is the Czech version of carnival and the masked villagers of Vortova are unrecognisable in their weird and wonderful costumes – just don’t get in the way of their whips…

A WALK IN THE CZECH FOREST Photograph by ###

Deep in the tall trees and blueberry bushes of the Šumava National Park, lose yourself (not literally) in a lush, beguiling and beautiful fairytale forest.

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C A P I TA L

B E ERS THE NEW ROSE: A paredback, new-school pub on Essex Road in Angel, Islington. 84-86 Essex Road, N1 8LU; thenewrose.co.uk

CZECH IT OUT

THE DOVE: A favourite for beer fanatics in a cracking location on Hackney’s Broadway Market, this Belgian beer pub serves more than 20 craft beers at any one time. 24-28 Broadway Market, E8 4QJ; dovepubs.com

Wondering where to try Budweiser Budvar’s range? We’ve compiled a list of the best places to get it in the capital

LORD JOHN RUSSELL: A spacious pub that serves the ‘half-and-half’ – an even mix of Budvar’s light and dark beers. 91-93 Marchmont Street, WC1N 1AL; lordjohnrussell. co.uk

WIN A TRIP TO THE BREWERY

WIN WIN

Want to win a journey to the heart of Budweiser Budvar? For the chance to win a trip for two to the brewery in Budweis, all you have to do is share a photo of yourself enjoying a Budvar and tag in @Budvaruk, using #noshortcuts, on Twitter or Instagram. Ten runners-up will receive a Budvar glass each. Entrants must be over 18. See budweiserbudvar.co.uk for full T&Cs

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THE TRINITY: A quirky gastropub on Southwark’s food and drink hub Borough High Street. 202-206 Borough High Street, SE1 1JX; thetrinity.co.uk

THE TRADING HOUSE: One of the only places you can get your hands on Budvar’s Kräusened unfiltered lager. Tankové Pivo coming soon. 89-91 Gresham Street, EC2V 7NQ; thetradinghouse. uk.com


PROMOTION

THE

ZIGFRID VON UNDERBELLY: This bar and club in Hoxton serves Tankové Pivo, meaning you’ll be able to try unpasteurised Budvar straight from the tank. 11 Hoxton Square, N1 6NU; zigfridvonunderbelly.com

THE WENLOCK ARMS: A real ale pub near Old Street with a great beer range. Budvar is the only lager served. 26 Wenlock Rd, N1 7TA; wenlockarms.com

BE E RS

RESTLESS INNOVATION From its iconic Original lager to the pioneering Cryo, the Budweiser Budvar range is constantly evolving

T

HOUGH BUDWEISER BUDVAR may be best known for its flagship lager, the brewery’s range of beers takes in a variety of styles – each made with craft, innovation and an unwavering ‘no shortcuts’ approach. That’s why Original – perhaps Budvar’s best-known beer – is brewed over 102 days, which is around seven times longer than most beers. For 90 of those days the beer is matured in the Budvar cellars, where its character slowly develops and its flavours are gradually fine tuned. For a taste of Budvar just as it tastes in the cellars – fresh, unpasteurised and super smooth – try Tankové Pivo, which is delivered in sealed, temperaturecontrolled copper tanks for ultimate freshness. If it’s innovative, flavour-packed beer you’re after, look no further than Fresh-Hopped Imperial Lager. Saaz hops are picked fresh from the field in early summer, then rushed to the brewery and used straight away, before a 200day maturation period that results in a

Photograph by ###

TANKOVÉ PIVO IS A TASTE OF BUDVAR JUST AS IT IS IN THE CELLARS

striking, honeyed lager with a snappy palate and a dry finish. Sometimes, though, breaking the mould isn’t so much about what you do as what you don’t, and Kräusened is testament to that. With a cloudiness and freshness of taste that comes from being kept unfiltered and unpasteurised, Kräusened is double fermented before it's matured in the brewery’s cellars. Being unpasteurised means this ‘draught-only’ lager is amazingly fresh – but, like Tankové Pivo, only for 30 days. But for real innovation, it's time to discover Cryo, the most technologically advanced of Budvar’s beers. This beer is served at the table – with no little theatre – from a purpose-built tapping system that pours ice-cold 22%-strength lager from a frozen bottle. Keep an eye out for it – though currently only available in the Czech Republic, Cryo is due to hit the capital this year… And if you’re drawn to the dark side, Budvar has a beer for that, too. Budvar's Dark Lager is made with Saaz hops and natural spring water from Budvar’s own well, with the addition of Munich, Caramel and Roasted malts to give a dark colour and notes of coffee and chocolate. It’s a winning combination – the beer has been named World’s Best Dark Lager at the World Beer Awards. ● Find out more about the range at budweiserbudvar.co.uk/our-beer or follow @BudvarUK on Twitter and Instagram

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UNBOTTLED WATER STILL, MEDIUM OR SPARKLING

REFRESH WITH GROHE BLUE HOME A beautiful and intelligent system that transforms simple water into pure thirst-quenching pleasure. How do you like your water? Still, medium or sparkling, it’s all a matter of taste. GROHE Blue Home has a simple and intuitive mechanism that lets you carbonate your drinking water at the touch of a button. Deliciously cool filtered water. www.grohe.co.uk


— PART 3 —

EXCESS “THE MARKETS ARE LINED WITH THE VIVID VEG OF YOUR DREAMS: MAJESTIC ARTICHOKES AND SPRIGHTLY LEAF-ON LEMONS” INSIDE NICE’S FOOD MARKETS, 068

068 NICE, FRANCE | 072 BOTTLE SERVICE | 079 THE DIGEST 083 INSIDER: L’ENCLUME | 090 THE SELECTOR | 098 DECONSTRUCT


NICE TO EAT YOU TRAVEL Food markets, cute bistros and, er, more food markets – Laura Goodman finds out how to make the best of a week in Nice

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FOODISMUK

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H, THAT’LL BE nice,” says your friend, mum, builder and boss, when you tell them where you’re going. I wonder, are we all so eager to make the obvious joke that we miss what’s staring us in the face – that Nice really is nice. It’s one of France’s biggest cities, but unlike Paris, Lyon and Toulouse it’s on the Côte d’Azur, so it swaps hulking great porky sausage and opulent foie gras for pretty courgette flowers and glugs of extra virgin olive oil. Which is definitely not to say it compromises on Frenchness – as if! Sacré bleu! Wash your mouth out. The city’s food markets are lined with the vivid veg of your dreams: majestic artichokes, moody aubergines and sprightly, leaf-on lemons. And Nice is 45 minutes (by car) from Italy, which means exactly what you’re hoping it means: ravioli.

NICE IS 45 MINUTES FROM ITALY, WHICH MEANS EXACTLY WHAT YOU’RE HOPING: RAVIOLI Photograph by Inge Johnsson / Alamy Stock Photo

Add an LA-coloured sky, the grandiose swooshes of a few palm trees, and a glass of icy Provençale rosé and you have a pretty nice picture, don’t you think? Let’s eat...

THE BISTRO BOOM

STRIPE IT LUCKY: Looking out over Cours Saleya in Nice’s old town

Le Canon, close to the promenade, opened in 2014. It does carefully considered plates in the style of modern Parisian joints like Au Passage, Ellsworth and Yard. Like those places, Le Canon’s food is definitely French, but the pretty crockery and red Formica tables feel a bit Brooklyn. Owner Sébastien Perinetti sources exclusively from the surrounding land; the chalkboard menu will often tell →

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THE VEG OF GLORY: (clockwise) A couple buying peaches; a market stall; a giant crêpe; a street in the old town; a freshly cooked tart; a pasta maker

SUPER SNACKS At the first sign of peckishness, attack this vital checklist. 1. Socca

→ you whose farm your piece of meat comes from (Amelie’s, or René’s, maybe). It changes constantly but contains things like anchoïade (anchovy dip) with courgette flowers, roast Limousin beef with tabbouleh and red mullet with lemony black rice (from 23 Rue Meyerbeer). Another boomer is Fine Gueule (on 2 Rue de l’Hôtel de Ville), which opened in 2015 in the old town. Play it carefully before diving into boudin noir or steak tartare because the starters are generous. Share the Niçoise burrata with black radish and chard, or the oeuf mimosa – a smart take on devilled eggs that involves lots of grated egg yolk and tarragon mayonnaise. OLD-SCHOOL NIÇOISE It goes without saying that the traditional Niçoise establishments are mostly closed when you need them, so pay attention to opening hours before pinning your hopes on a daube (beef stew, often served with little chard-stuffed ravioli or gnocchi) or pâtes

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au pistou (pasta with pesto) or le stockfish (dried cod simmered in tomatoes, onions and garlic). I speak as someone who has walked through La Merenda’s beaded curtain just as its perfect lunch service drew to a close. La Merenda (lamerenda.net) has been overseen by Domenique Le Stanc since the nineties – before that he worked in more salubrious kitchens, but he fancied a change of pace. There’s no phone – you can only make a booking by dropping in – and it’s closed all weekend. Conversely, La Taca d’Oli (35 Rue Pairolière) is a handy address to know, because it’s open for lunch and dinner on Saturdays and Sundays. It’s good and rustic – perfect for getting that salade Niçoise down you, and slopping wine all over your green and yellow tablecloth. The ideal Sunday lunch.

PASTA PARTY Going self-catered is a good idea, because it can be quite distressing to pass through the market when you lack the means to sauté. At the Cours Saleya flower and vegetable

This feels very now, despite being ageold Niçoise business. It’s a big chickpea flour pancake, served hot from the pan with salt and pepper. At Chez Pipo it’s at its crisp best, especially with glasses of rosé (chezpipo.fr).

2. Pissaladière

This is a pizza-like base topped with onions that have been caramelised to oblivion, and a few anchovies and olives. There is a particularly wondrous one at little, organic Mama Baker (13 Rue de Lépante).

3. Pan bagnat

A hollowed-out roll filled with tuna, tomato, radish, celery, onion, black olives, anchovies and boiled eggs. The classic is at Chez Tintin, a hole in the wall with a few pavement tables (3 Place du Général de Gaulle).

4. Tourte de blettes

Swiss chard pie! Get it by the square alongside plates of hot fresh socca and pints of beer at Rene Socca, which has an al fresco pub vibe on old town cobbled streets (2 Rue Miralheti).

5. Beignet de fleurs de courgette

While perusing the old town, particularly along Rue Pairolière, keep your eyes peeled for these at all times.


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market, arm yourself with garlic, onions, tomatoes, courgettes, lemons, peppers and whatever else takes your fancy, and then you’re ready to hit Maison Barale (maison-barale.fr). This has been Nice’s premier address for pasta since 1892. Feast your eyes on cabinets of fresh tagliatelle, gnocchi and seasonal ravioli stuffed with truffle cream, daube or confit lemon and ginger. If you’d rather someone did the work for you, the brilliant Bar des Oiseaux’s (5 Rue Saint-Vincent) use of Maison Barale’s pasta is ideal: calamari with creamy orzo risotto, clams with leek ravioli, gnocchi à la daube. Elsewhere, Le Comptoir 2 Nicole (comptoir2nicole.fr )calls itself a “bistro chic Niçois”. There’s a Beverly Hills look about the place – all white and wood with the odd bit of candy-stripe fabric, like a Ralph Lauren shirt. And the service can be surly. But for a single plate of great pasta on the patio, it’s fabulous. Look out for specials like salmon tagliatelle and truffle gnocchi, or go for the classic – a pile of ricotta-stuffed ravioli topped with tomato sauce, pesto and chopped almonds.

LIQUID DINNERS All that sun is conducive to a Saturday night that’s carefree, reservation-free and mostly wine-fuelled. Vinivore (vinivore.fr; 10 Rue Lascaris) has an adjoining restaurant, but it’s much more fun to stick to the four or five little pavement tables, working your way through brilliant wines by the glass (which never cost more than £7), and a big board of good things: salami,

Photograph by allfive; Hemis; PhotoCuisine RM / Alamy Stock Photo; Hans-Peter Merten

SLOP WINE ALL OVER YOUR TABLECLOTH FOR THE PERFECT SUNDAY LUNCH

GETTING THERE British Airways offers flights from London to Nice from £35 each-way. britishairways.com

mortadella, goat’s cheese, cornichons, bread. Elsewhere, behind an inviting, aubergine shop front, La Mise au Verre (la-mise-au-verre-nice.com) is the bistro sibling of the wine bar La Part des Anges (which is only open until 8.30pm). There are more than 300 natural wines here, plus terrines, hams and goat’s cheese salads. Or, in other words, everything you’ve ever wanted.

LOLS BY LE PORT Rue Bonaparte gets popping of a weekend evening. Comptoir Central Électrique (number 10) has a grand teal frontage, velvet chairs and lots of outdoor tables that are perfect for an outdoor Aperol spritz in the thick of it. And Le Dandy (number 21) is your standard French pavement café, reimagined for, well, dandies, with a chic navy awning, black and gold tables and slightly flashier rattan chairs than you might be accustomed to. This area is worth exploring the morning after, too. Café du Bresil (brasiliaboiteacafe.com) is a little brown hatch – all wood and botanicals – that just does tapioca galettes and juices (nectarine and mango, or banana and turmeric). And Bel Oeil (12 Rue Emmanuel Philibert) is a fabulous, bright space – all white with a splash of sea breeze blue – with a full brunch menu, including daily fromage frais and bacon-parmesan scrambled eggs. f

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DRINK

BITTER FRUIT We run the rule over the bitter liqueur amaro, as well as trusty sauvignon blanc and barrel-aged beers PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID HARRISON

HARD LIQUEUR: It’s difficult to define amaro, the category of bitter, herbaceous liqueurs that originally hail from Italy, but which are finding a new home in bars all over London. Amari are traditionally thought of as digestifs, to aid digestion after a meal. Try subbing them in for Campari in a negroni or a spritz, or serve simply with soda.

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Like your spirits bitter and twisted? Check out this range of bitter liqueurs – two classics from Italy as well as three recent releases: 1 AMARO DI ANGOSTURA, Laventille, Trinidad & Tobago. An amaro from Angostura, it’s made from neutral spirit and infused with similar ingredients

to the brand’s betterknown classic cocktail bitters. 70cl, 35%; £27.45, thewhiskyexchange.com 2 FERNET-BRANCA, Milan, Italy. Fernets tend to be the most bitter and higheststrength amari, and FernetBranca is probably the best known. It’s flavoured with more than 40 herbs during the distilling process. 70cl, 39%; £19.54, thewhiskyexchange.com

3 CYNAR, Milan, Italy. The subcategory carciofo refers to amari made from artichoke leaves, and Cynar is a classic. It’s very bitter, with a low ABV. 70cl, 16.5%; £14.81, thedrinkshop.com 4 ASTERLEY BROS DISPENSE AMARO, London, UK. Based on a 17th-century recipe, this London amaro uses bitter orange, rhubarb and hops, to name a few. Just made for a negroni. 50cl, 26%; £29.95, masterofmalt.com 5 KAMM & SONS BRITISH APERITIF, London, UK. A bitter liqueur to be drunk before dinner or used in cocktails, it’s made with grapefruit peel and manuka honey. 70cl, 33cl; £26.75, 31dover.com

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1 BODEGA DEL DESIERTO DESIERTO 25 2014, Patagonia, Argentina. A sauvignon grown in the unforgiving terrain of the Patagonian desert. 75cl, 14%; £11.95, bbr.com 2 ALEX K KALEX SAUVIGNON BLANC 2015, Marlborough, New Zealand. Sauvignon may have been born in France, but New Zealand is its second home. This one’s fresh, fruitdriven, and characteristic of Marlborough. 75cl, 13%; £16.90, thenewzealandcellar.co.uk 3 LE BOIS AUX BICHES SAUVIGNON BLANC 2015, Loire Valley, France. An aromatic sauvignon that’s very dry and full of flinty notes. 75cl, 12%; £8.50, boroughwines.co.uk 4 BERRY BROS & RUDD GOOD ORDINARY WHITE 2015, Bordeaux, France. A great-value 100% sauvignon that’s classic Bordeaux. 75cl, 13%; £9.25, bbr.com 5 LONGAVI SAUVIGNON BLANC 2013, Leyda Valley, Chile. A fresh sauvignon that benefits from cooling winds from the Pacific Ocean in Chile’s Leyda Valley in the Andes. 12%, 75cl; £14.99, virginwines.com

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BLANC-ETY BLANC: Sauvignon blanc, as the name suggests, is a grape that hails from France. In the motherland, it’s best known for its use in Bordeaux and the Loire Valley, while in the New World, Chile and New Zealand have both made it their go-to grape.

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OVER A BARREL: Barrel-ageing is what gives whisky its colour, and many spirits are aged in waste barrels from other distilling processes. Beer brewers are getting in on the act, too, maturing their beer in former spirit barrels for extra flavour and character.

1 WYLAM BARREL AGED BILLY, Newcastle, UK. This dark beer has spent time in port wine barrels, giving it an even more bittersweet kick. 330ml, 5.5%; £2.89, honestbrew.co.uk 2 CAMDEN TOWN BARREL AGED LAGER, London, UK. This strong and dark lager has been rested in cognac, tequila and bourbon barrels for a year. 750ml, 8.1%; £9.99, beerhawk.co.uk 3 8 WIRED GRAND CRU 2015, Warkworth, New Zealand. This punchy sour beer is brewed with cascara and berries, before being matured in pinot noir barrels. 8 Wired claims to have the largest barrel-aged selection in the Southern Hemisphere. 500ml, 9%; £10.79, honestbrew.co.uk

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4 HARVIESTOUN OLA DUBH 16, Clackmannanshire, Scotland, UK. Harviestoun’s porter, aged in 16-yearold Highland Park whisky barrels. 330ml, 8%; £4.95, thewhiskyexchange.com

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WHAT’S NEW

RAW APPEAL

Want to know more about natural, organic and biodynamic wines? RAW Wine Fair, which takes place at the Old Truman Brewery this March, is the perfect place

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F YOU THOUGHT raw wine was a small and mysterious part of the industry, you’d be wrong – as the annual RAW Wine Fair in March is set to prove yet again. With 200 producers of organic, natural and biodynamic wine all gathered under one roof, it’s become an unmissable fixture in the calendar of wine-loving Londoners. Hosted at Shoreditch’s Old Truman Brewery, the fair aims to shed light on the burgeoning international raw wine scene, with industry professionals and consumers alike invited to join the party. Whether you’re a casual observer interested in demystifying the world of raw

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wine, you’re already a convert or you work in the wine trade, chances are you’ll find more than a few stalls to amuse you. Tastings are free of charge, and the show will include an exclusive world first – the opportunity for guests to buy bottles and fill them up with Loire vintner Olivier Cousin’s wine directly from the barrel. Expect food stalls from wine-savvy restaurants like Antidote and Taverna do Mercado, as well as a pop-up wine bar from the London EDITION, and stalls from food and drink producers, too. If you’re a raw wine fan, it’s an event you won’t want to miss. f rawwine.com

THE KEY INFO RAW Wine Fair takes place Sunday 12 and Monday 13 March from 10am-6pm both days. Standard one-day tickets cost £35 when booking in advance and £45 on the door, while two-day tickets cost £55 in advance and £65 on the door. Monday is primarily a trade and industry day. All tastings are free, and tickets include a comprehensive fair catalogue. For more information or to book tickets, go to rawwine.com


CLICK

FOODISM.CO.UK

THE DIGEST SEARCH PARTY So you think you can cook, huh? Well don’t just talk about it – especially not when one of the world’s foremost cookery schools is on a mission to find its next star. Le Cordon Bleu’s annual UK Scholarship Award is open for entries – all you have to do is submit an application via video and Instagram. The competition will see the winner

This month’s weird and wonderful food news in brief

offered a place on its Grand Diplôme course, nine months of classic chef training in both patisserie and cuisine, followed by an internship at ambassador Virgilio Martinez’s LIMA Fitzrovia restaurant – worth more than £35,000. If you’ve always harboured dreams of being a professional chef, this could be the start you’ve been waiting for. For more information or to apply, go to ukscholarship.cordonbleu.edu

SOIL PLANS After years of hearing that organic food is a “niche product”, it’s now been officially recognised as being positive for public health, with a long list of benefits that include reduced risks of obesity, allergies, diabetes and antibiotic resistance, according to an independent report by the European Parliament. Put simply, it’s a big win for organic farmers everywhere. Read the report at europarl.europa.eu

TABLE SERVICE Photograph by Tom Moggach; Paul Dodds; Rene Funk/Netflix; Picasa

HERO’S JOURNEY This March will see a team of some of London’s best-known chefs and hospitality professionals go out to Nepal and undertake a gruelling six-day trek through the Himalayas, hiking through mountainous terrain at altitudes of up to 2,800 metres. The goal is to raise at least £100,000 for Action Against Hunger’s many crucially important causes around the developing world. For more information and to donate, go to actionagainsthunger.org.uk

If you’re the type who’s already planning their next Netflix binge before the current one’s done with, listen up: Chef’s Table is back for season three. The show takes an emotional and cinematic journey through the lives of some of the world’s most notable chefs, in and out of their kitchens. After a shorter, all-French season, the third season proper includes chefs from LA chef Nancy Silverton to Central’s Virgilio Martinez (pictured) and New York and Tokyo’s ramen wizard Ivan Orkin in its six episodes. If you’re a fan of documentary TV, food, or both, grab that duvet and settle in. Chef’s Table season three premieres on Netflix on 17 February; netflix.com

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COMPETITION

FROM TOP LEFT: The exterior of The Orange, Pimlico Road; a delicately put-together lamb wellington; the beautiful Superior Room at The Grazing Goat in Marylebone

ESCAPE IN THE CITY Whether you’re eating, drinking or sleeping, Cubitt House’s beautifully restored public houses and hotels give you a much-needed escape in the heart of London

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T’S THAT AGE-OLD dilemma: what to do when you’re looking for a location that’s welcoming, memorable and doesn’t break the bank. If this sounds all too familiar, we’ve got the answer in Cubitt House, a collection of pubs and hotels that includes The Thomas Cubitt, The Alfred Tennyson, The Orange and The Grazing Goat, all in the beautiful settings of Belgravia, Knightsbridge, Pimlico and Marylebone. Cubitt House delivers upmarket but down-to-earth hospitality in a countrystyle setting in the city. The venues offer an escape from the hustle and bustle without having to leave the capital, and from the moment you walk through the door – whether it’s for dinner or a night’s stay – you instantly feel at home. Choose from a range of local ales, a wine list of aromatic whites to full-bodied reds, or

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a carefully crafted cocktail list. You can enjoy dishes from the venues’ seasonal British menus, all while overlooking some of London’s most picturesque neighbourhoods. This year, Cubitt House’s venues are hosting a series of four banquets: The Feast of Beasts. Working with their suppliers, they have carefully curated menus designed around tradition, fun and frivolity, including The Pie Banquet, The Beef Banquet, The Nose-to-Tail Banquet and The Game Banquet. ● For more information, go to cubitthouse.co.uk, or follow on social media at @cubitthouse. To make a reservation, call 020 7730 0070 or email reservations@cubitthouse.co.uk

WIN DINNER AND A NIGHT’S HOTEL STAY

WIN WIN

Want to experience all of this for yourself? We’ve got a fantastic prize for one lucky winner and a guest to enjoy a truly memorable evening on us. The prize includes a night’s stay at either The Grazing WIN Goat or The Orange, including complimentary breakfast the morning after, as well as dinner for two at your choice of either The Thomas Cubitt, The Alfred Tennyson, The Orange or The Grazing Goat. For the chance to win this great prize, just answer a simple question... For a full list of T&Cs and to enter, go to fdsm.co/cubitt-house


The Leading Global Network of Culinary Arts and Hospitality Management Institutes

YOUR LIFE-CHANGING OPPORTUNITY WORTH OVER £35,000

Prize includes: • A place on the coveted Grand Diplôme® • 12 months accommodation with Homes for Students • An internship at LIMA Fitzrovia

APPLY AT ukscholarship.cordonbleu.edu

With the generous support of


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UK TRAVEL

INSIDER

Mike Gibson gets a holistic view of Simon Rogan’s farm-to-table food in the Lake District village of Cartmel L’Enclume and L’Enclume Rooms The farm-to-table ethos is gaining steady traction in London, but long before Simon Rogan opened Fera at Claridges, he was busy turning Cartmel from a sleepy, picturesque Cumbrian village into arguably the epicentre of farm-to-table dining in the UK. To eat at L’Enclume is a near-religious experience. Every dish at the twoMichelin-starred restaurant is developed in partnership with Rogan’s farm just outside the village, and Rogan is constantly working to push the balance towards the farm and the seasons dictating the menu, rather than the other way around. This means a procession of dishes that truly represent the landscape and the time of year, plated with flair and

Got a touch of wanderlust? Visit foodism.co.uk/travel for loads more food and drink destination guides, long reads and reviews from the UK and beyond.

served with the sensitivity you expect from two Michelin stars. The tasting menu is expertly paced and full of superb dishes – our late-autumn version included turnip with lardo, pork and eel dumpling with lardo, and shorthorn beef with leek, and prawn with kalibos cabbage, to name a few. If you’re making a pilgrimage and you need somewhere to rest your head, the village is full of luxurious boltholes known as L’Enclume Rooms. Whether you’re just learning about farm-to-table dining, or you’re a convert already, there’s nowhere better to connect food to its landscape than here. Cavendish Street, Cartmel, Cumbria, LA11 6PZ; lenclume.co.uk. Double rooms start from £170 per night; lunch or dinner menu at £130 →

CARTMEL ◆◆ Population: 4,802 ◆◆ County: Cumbria ◆◆ Distance: 355km

Cartmel is characteristically Cumbrian – located among the hills of the Lake District, it’s a tiny village that’s all cobbles and olde-worlde brick walls. It’s now famous as the heart of Rogan’s operation.

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ROGAN & COMPANY Two-Michelin-starred restaurants invariably have one thing in common: they aren’t cheap. And with the huge number of highly skilled cooks and service staff that are needed to keep them running at their peak, nor should they be. But there’s good news: you can try Rogan’s farm-to-table food in a slightly different guise at Rogan & Company, a pared-down restaurant that serves beautiful food, much of which comes straight from the farm just as at L’Enclume, for a price that won’t break the bank. You can order à la carte, or choose from the set lunch menu, which is frankly ridiculous value at £18 for two courses, or £24 for three. We started off with a salty, crispy pig’s trotter and pork belly croquette with a punchy mustard dressing, and our main, guinea hen, was a piece of meat that could only have come from a high-welfare farm – gamey, and full of rich, savoury poultry flavour. It’s a great way to experience Rogan’s setup if you want to save on time and budget. roganandcompany.co.uk

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This extension of L’Enclume, based in a building just around the corner, fulfils two roles: it’s an experimental development kitchen where a team of chefs and growers can collaborate on new dishes, some of which make their way onto L’Enclume’s menu and some of which don’t. All, however, are key to the restaurant’s constant search for new and exciting ways to use the farm’s produce – even the ones that remain confined to the development kitchen are crucial to the process. The second role Aulis fulfils is that of a tiny restaurant like no other (save, perhaps, for Aulis at Fera in London). It’s ostensibly a kitchen table removed from the restaurant, where curious diners hungry for a top-to-bottom experience of Rogan’s operation can sit and try dishes that might be total one-offs. It’s an amazing way to how see chefs at this level take some of the restaurant’s most memorable dishes from concept to execution; and, with the farm’s growers involved too, to experience just how hand-in-hand the farm’s operations are with the restaurant’s. An experience you most likely won’t forget. lenclume.co.uk/restaurant/aulis

GETTING THERE Bear in mind driving to Cartmel can take six or seven hours. If you’d rather take the train, you can travel from London Euston to Grange-over-Sands – a short taxi ride away – in three hours or so. Off-peak fares are £100.30.


COMPETITION

JUST ADD SPARKLE

Finding a drink that refreshes without being overly sweet can be difficult – but the team at Cawston Press more than delivers, thanks to their use of the very best pressed juices

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S THE NAME suggests, Cawston Press is very particular about its technique – the team behind it only ever uses pressed fruit juice to make its range of delicately flavoured, lightly sparkling drinks, so each can and carton tastes of the real ingredients that have been used to make it. Founded by apple growers in 1986, Cawston Press knows a thing or two about good ingredients, avoiding cheap alternatives – unlike many other fizzy

CAWSTON PRESS’S DRINKS CAN BE USED TO CREATE COCKTAILS, TOO

drinks you’ll find today. The cans of sparkling drinks come in six natural, quintessentially British flavours including Rhubarb, Gooseberry, Cucumber & Mint, Ginger Beer, Cloudy Apple, and Elderflower Lemonade, each of them refreshing without being overpowered by sweetness. Elsewhere, the company's heritage shines through in its selection of pressed juices, with flavours including Apple & Rhubarb, Apple & Elderflower, and Apple & Ginger, among others. The drinks create a great base for other recipes, too. Try a gooseberry watermelon cooler – made by blending Cawston Press Sparkling Gooseberry with fresh watermelon – or use the Brilliant Beetroot juice to cook couscous for a beetroot and feta salad. Whether it's classic flavours or something offbeat, it's time to fall in love with Cawston Press. ● For recipes using Cawston Press’s range, visit cawstonpress.com, or search #justaddcawston

WIN A MONTH'S SUPPLY OF CAWSTON PRESS

WIN

We've teamed up with Cawston Press to offer 10 lucky readers the chance to win a month's supply of the brand's sparkling fruit drinks in a variety of flavours. To be in with a chance of winning, all you have to do is answer one question. For T&Cs and to enter, go to fdsm.co/cawston

WIN

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PROMOTION

GINGER SPICE Rich in both flavour and history, Crabbie’s Alcohol Ginger Beer still uses real Asian ginger and exotic spices – which it's using to create a modern twist on classic Scottish dishes

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T’S ALWAYS A pleasure to discover that one of your favourite drinks has a rich history – just like Crabbie’s ginger beer, which has a heritage dating back to the 1800s, in Edinburgh. Miller Crabbie ran a grocery and spirit merchant business in one of the most heavily industrialised areas of the city. In 1806, he had a son, John, who went on to capitalise on the business’s access to nearby port Leith, which had links to countries – and therefore ingredients – all over the world. That’s why, even today, Crabbie’s Alcoholic Ginger Beer is crafted for six weeks using the same Asian ginger and exotic spices as it was all those years ago. That's also where the Crabbie’s elephant trademark comes from – it represents John Crabbie’s relentless search for the finest ingredients, a principle carried on in Crabbie’s products today. Most recently, the company expanded

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beyond its time-tested recipe by adapting the warming flavours and golden hue of the Original Ginger Beer to develop a Scottish Raspberry version. This particular serve has a jammy flavour that gives way to a subtle hint of ginger, and makes for a fruity, refreshing tipple when served simply over ice. What’s more, Crabbie’s Alcoholic Ginger Beers are all gluten free, and pair well with food – and make a great base for cocktails. Try the Crabbie’s Raspberry Collins, with fresh raspberries, Whitley Neill gin, topped up with Crabbie’s Scottish Raspberry; or the Crabbie’s Apricot Cooler – dark rum and grapefruit juice topped up with Crabbie’s Original Ginger Beer. ● Crabbie’s products are available at all major supermarkets. Visit crabbiesgingerbeer.co.uk, or follow the brand on Twitter and Facebook at @crabbiesuk

COOK WITH CRABBIE’S Scottish chef Jacqueline O'Donnell – of Great British Menu fame – has put together a three-course meal celebrating Scottish cuisine, with each dish using Crabbie’s ginger beer as an ingredient. There's a haggis bon bon; venison loin; and iced Crabbie’s cranachan – all washed down with ginger beer. To see how can use Crabbie’s in your cooking, visit fdsm.co/crabbies


PROMOTION

FROM LEFT: Iconic, two-Michelin-starred chef Michel Roux Jr is the ambassador for Skrei cod, having cooked with it at Le Gavroche for years; Skrei cod simply pan-fried on board a boat

SKREI-ING POWER Catching Northern Norway’s migratory Skrei cod is only possible for a few months, but as its fans across the restaurant community know, it’s a product of unrivalled quality

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ET YOUR FISHING gear ready and pack a scarf – it’s Skrei season. We wouldn’t normally be so blunt, but seeing as this beautiful Norwegian cod is only available to catch from January to April, the people who

SKREI IS ONLY AVAILABLE TO CATCH IN RECOGNISED AREAS IN THE SEAS AROUND NORWAY

fish for it and enjoy cooking and eating it have to be on their toes. The fish has been a vital staple of the world-leading seafood of Norway for decades, and with good reason: its tradition is unmatched – it’s only available to catch in recognised areas in the seas surrounding Norway, and it must be in pristine condition when shipped. And the trick’s not only in the catching: the 1,000km swim that these heroic fish undertake – through ice-cold Arctic waters from the Barents Sea to their spawning grounds around the islands of Vesterålen and Lofoten – also contributes to their white, lean flesh and perfectly flaky texture. This level of quality before cooking means that it’s best cooked sensitively – something its many fans in the London chef community know all too well. As

well as its product ambassador Michel Roux Jr, it’s converted luminaries from Ollie Dabbous to Robin Gill, who’ve been to Norway to take a personal look at the unique environment that produces this bounteous fish. Such a small window makes Skrei a challenge to catch, but ask any chef and they’ll tell you it’s worth it. ● Skrei is available in Whole Foods Market, Selfridges and Harrods, as well as quality fishmongers and on the menus of great restaurants from late January-April. Visit facebook.com/ seafoodfromnorway or seafoodfromnorway.co.uk for

more info, or search the hashtag #Skrei2017

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THE BREWS

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he w ad e o lo f fr ok Lo om a n t d Lo so on nd me Be on gr er an ea We d t b ek be ee , yo rs nd

CO BR NT EW RO S L

Clockwise from bottom left: Canopy Beer Co’s Brockwell IPA; Gosnell’s has reinvented the mead category in London; Sharp’s Brewery Wolf Rock Red IPA; Umbrella Brewing’s alcoholic Ginger Beer; Cloudwater Brew Co Sorachi, a grisettestyle sour beer; Badger’s Fursty Ferret; Brew By Numbers’ 10 07 porter, made with smoked hops and brewed with coffee

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PROMOTION

THE INFO London Beer Week is a true celebration of beers, ales, lagers and ciders alike, set against the backdrop of the capital. The 2017 festival is currently being planned, and is already shaping up to bring something entirely new to the London beer scene. LBW 2017 will run from Monday 13 MarchSunday 19 March. Tickets are on sale now at drinkup.london/beerweek

Photograph by MH

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THE SELECTOR

As London Beer Week approaches, we’ve rounded up the leading places in the city’s ever-expanding beer scene, plus we tell you where to blow away the January diet, grab a quick but tasty working lunch, or do a date night right…

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THE SELECTOR

LONDON BEER WEEK

We take a look at some of the British beer brands you can try during this year’s London Beer Week In association with

 1  Mother Kelly’s 251 Paradise Row, E2 9LE

This year’s edition of London Beer Week takes place from 13-19 March. drinkup.london/beerweek

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In recent years, a railway arch in Bethnal Green has gone from somewhere you’d walk through very quickly to somewhere you flock to for a night out. Mother Kelly’s is inspired by New York, so you can expect lots of pared-back wood, a vaguely industrial feel, and lively, buzzy atmosphere each evening. 19 beer taps and six enormous fridges, full to the brim with bottles of both well-known beers and more

esoteric choices, mean you’ll never be far from finding something to tickle your fancy. There’s no kitchen (the team decided it would take up too much of the space reserved for beer), but the tap room hosts some of London’s best street-food traders every Friday, Saturday and Sunday. What’s more, Mother Kelly’s has two bottle shops, in Stoke Newington and Homerton, where you can stock up on beers or take part in tasting events. 020 7012 1244; motherkellys.co.uk


BEST OF THE REST  2  Fourpure Tap Room

 4  Hops & Glory

Bermondsey Trading Estate, SE16 3LL

382 Essex Road, N1 3PF

Sitting on the Bermondsey Beer Mile, the Fourpure Tap Room has gone from strength to strength since it was founded in 2013. It offers six main beers – pils, American pale, a session IPA, IPA, flatiron red and oatmeal stout – inspired by the founders’ travels, as well as various seasonal specials. The tap room is open on Fridays and Saturdays, with bar snacks and the occasional food truck.

With burgundy ceilings, amber lighting and wood-clad walls, The Hops & Glory is as cosy as boozers come. The building itself dates back to 1890, and it’s always been a taproom – which makes its modern incarnation as a pub and dining room linked to the Hops & Glory brewery a fitting one. The bar serves the eponymous IPA, and the newly refurbished kitchen dishes out proper British grub like Welsh rarebit, grouse and beef.

020 3744 2141; fourpure.com

 3  Ealing Park Tavern 222 S Ealing Road, W5 4RL

A picturesque red-brick pub and brewery in West London, Ealing Park Tavern creates modern, honest beers under the Long Arm Brewing Co. name. The result are four different pours, from IPA OK to Shadow Wolf (a smoked oat stout that’s made with beechwood-smoked malt) as well as seasonal specials. The whole lot are available in cask, keg and bottle at the pub, and – thanks to the brewery’s location in the pub garden – you can even pop in for tours, tastings and food and beer pairing dinners. 020 8758 1879; ealingparktavern.co.uk

THE BEER EDIT Some of these venues will also be popping up at the first ever Beer Edit at Bethnal Green’s Oval Space, from 16-18 March. Tickets cost just £10. To buy, go to DrinkUp.London/beerweek

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020 7226 2277; hopsandglory.co.uk

 5  The Sun Tavern 441 Bethnal Green Road, E2 0AN

The team at the Sun Tavern knows a thing or two about beer, hand-selecting local brewers to showcase in their Bethnal Green pub. They’re so passionate about the good stuff that they’ll bottle up any of their draught ales for you to take away – usually limited beers that you’ll never find in bottle form anywhere else. The team knows a thing or two about poitin, too, and you’ll find one of the finest selections of the Irish spirit in London on its shelves.

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020 7739 4097; thesuntavern.co.uk

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BEST OF THE REST  2  Le Café du Marché

 4  Trullo

22 Charterhouse Street, Charterhouse Mews, EC1M 6DX

300-302 St Paul’s Road, N1 2LH

When French cuisine is served in a charming, bare-bricked dining room, it’s hard to beat – especially as the food is delicious, from duck confit that melts off the bone to impeccable frites. Bringing out the big guns? Go on one of the monthly jazz and chanson nights.

If the spaghetti scene from Lady and the Tramp is your idea of romance, a visit to Trullo might just be in order… Although we can guarantee that the hand-rolled pasta will be too good to share – pappardelle with beef shin ragu, we’re looking at you...

020 7608 1609; cafedumarche.co.uk

020 7226 2733; trullorestaurant.com

 3  Caravan King’s Cross

 5  Morito

1 Granary Square, N1C 4AA

32 Exmouth Market, EC1R 4QE

A venue with an atmosphere is vital when it comes to initial dates, especially if, like us, your specialty is awful jokes and lengthy awkward silences. The modern, spacious feel of Caravan’s Granary Square site has just that, with great music and flattering lighting, too.

Moreish small plates are great for a light dinner – and moreish (and Moorish) is par for the course at Morito, which serves Mediterranean tapas with a bit of North African spice. Dining at the counter means you can get a bit tactile with your date (ooer).

020 7101 7661; caravanrestaurants.co.uk

020 7278 7007; morito.co.uk

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THE SELECTOR

NAIL DATE NIGHT Whether it’s for Valentine’s or otherwise, try one of these alternative date destinations on for size  1  Veneta 3 Norris Street, SW1Y 4RJ

I’m sure we can agree there are fewer things more classically romantic than drifting through Venice’s watery backstreets in a gondola. That might not be achievable in time for date night, though, so for a London-based alternative, head to Veneta, the latest restaurant in the Salt Yard stable. You’ll find all the usual suspects – charcuterie, small plates and great wine – but with a Venetian twist. Think baked scallops with pumpkin, lardo and lemon; charcoalgrilled pork ribeye, a bean purée, and fig cremosa; and chicken braised in almond milk with medjool dates and saffron. There’s a raw fish bar, too, where you can scoop up some oysters (it is date night, after all), as well as a gelato bar offering some of the most delicious ice cream you’ll find outside of Italy. 020 3874 9100; saltyardgroup.co.uk/veneta

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1  Homeslice Various locations

We imagine that Homeslice’s massive pizzas are at least nominally meant for sharing, but then again, there’s nothing quite like a 20-inch behemoth of dough, cheese and eclectic seasonal toppings to get you back on board the indulgent-eating wagon. They’re probably best enjoyed when you feel like you need a reward for being healthy or when you just fancy something tasty, and Homeslice more than delivers on both counts. Its menu changes from season to season, so you could find yourself munching on anything from oxtail and watercress with horseradish and sorrel cream to aubergine, cauliflower cheese, spinach and harissa. Share a pizza with friends… Or eat it all yourself. That’s what we’d do. homeslicepizza.co.uk

BEST OF THE REST  2  Bó Drake

 4  Smokestak

6 Greek Street, W1 4DE

35 Sclater Street, E1 6LB

We’ll admit it – Mexican-Korean BBQ is not something we ever thought we’d write about. But then along came Bó Drake and changed everything, thanks to two dishes: pork belly bao with confit New Hampshire pork, and some of the best ribs in London. Mmmm...

Barbecue is peak blow-out food, and Smokestak exemplifies exactly why it’s always, always worth it. Think brioche buns filled with beef brisket and pickled red peppers; crispy ox cheek croquettes with tangy chipotle mayo. To cap it off? Sticky toffee pudding with burnt butter ice cream.

020 7439 9989; bodrake.co.uk

 3  German Gymnasium King’s Boulevard, N1C 4BU

If ever there were a cuisine that was famously not light, it’d be German. But it’s not all pork and potatoes, as you’ll find here. Gorge on truffled potato soup with croutons; venison with Brussels sprouts, spätzle and more. 020 7287 8000; germangymnasium.com

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020 3873 1733; smokestak.co.uk

 5  Kricket Various locations

There’s one dish in particular that we had in mind at this modern Indian restaurant – Keralan fried chicken with curry leaf mayonnaise and pickled mouli. Ooh, yeah.

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@kricketlondon; kricket.co.uk

THE SELECTOR

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INDULGE YOURSELF January detox left you unfulfilled? Check out these truly indulgent eating spots and pig out guilt-free

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1  Sosharu 152-156 Shaftesbury Avenue, WC2N 8HL

We’ll admit this one’s a bit of a treat: bento boxes from Sosharu, Jason Atherton’s izakayastyle Japanese restaurant in Clerkenwell. A bento box is a traditional Japanese meal made from several boxes that stack together, with the compartments containing rice, fish or meat, with pickled or cooked veg. Sosharu’s have a distinctly high-end feel, and you can choose between chicken (fiery karaage chicken with udon noodles, seasonal salad and pickles, followed by ice cream or sorbet), seafood (with salmon teriyaki) and vegetarian (broccoli tempura), each of which has the added option of being washed down with a glass of sake. It’s the kind of midweek lunch that’ll make your working day a whole lot better.

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020 3805 2304; sosharulondon.com

THE SELECTOR

WORKING LUNCHES

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Got a lunch meeting in Town, or just desperate to escape the office? Check out these lunch spots BEST OF THE REST  2  Talli Joe

 4  Kanada-Ya

152-156 Shaftesbury Avenue, WC2N 8HL

64 St Giles High Street, WC2H 8LE

For a compact but filling lunch, Talli Joe’s new dabba menu – inspired by the Mumbai lunching tradition – will include a half plate, a small plate and a side plate, with each option reflecting the flavours of an Indian region.

Kanada-Ya’s offering ticks all of the boxes, from original ramen in 18-hour pork broth with hand-pulled noodles, nori and wood ear fungus (yes, that exists; and yes, we love it).

020 7836 5400; tallijoe.com

 3  Grab

kanada-ya.com

 5  Koshari 19 Harrington Road, South Kensington, SW7 3ES

There are many reasons to love this tiny Bangkok café, the main one being the pad prik king pork curry – pork stir-fried in red curry paste with beans and kaffir lime leaves.

Koshari (the dish, that is) is a satisfying pot of rice, pasta and lentils, topped with chickpeas, tomato sauce, caramelised onions, and served with garlic vinaigrette. You can pile it up with loads of eclectic toppings, too.

020 3253 9481; grabfood.co.uk

020 7584 5290; kosharistreet.com

5 Leonard Street, EC2A 4AQ

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Join us for the next chapter in modern Join us for the next Indianchapter cuisine... us for the next in Join modern chapter in the modern Indian cuisine... Join us for Join us for the next next chapter modern Indian cuisine... chapter in in modern

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Executive Chef Vivek Singh’s landmark London restaurant Situated in the historic Grade II-listed Old Westminster The Cinnamon Club continued to redefine Library, our stunning dining rooms &has premium bars are themodern Indian cooking for more than 15 celebratory years. perfect space for extravagant occasions, specialExecutive celebrations, Chef Vivek Singh’s landmark London restaurant Executive Chef has Vivekcontinued Singh’s landmark London restaurant Situated in the historic Grade II-listed Old Club Westminster important business lunches and sensational sharing feasts. The Cinnamon to redefine modern Indian

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London Beer Week is back for the third time taking over the capital with pop-ups, parties, masterclasses and an all new three-day event at The Oval Space, Bethnal Green. With so much to choose from – here’s a pick of the best… All tickets available via DrinkUp.London/BeerWeek

ESSENTIALS

VISIT THE BEER EDIT

GO ON A TOUR

Taking over the entire Oval Space in East London with an immersive ‘beer village’ this brand new event from DrinkUp.London is sure to be the highlight of LBW. Featuring beer, ale, cider and mead from all over, this 3-day event is a must-do for anybody looking for a great night out.

Discover London's amazing independent brewing scene as you are ferried between some of London’s best taprooms. Sip on delicious brews and see the fantastic spaces that make our capital a veritable beer mecca. You might even get the chance to chat to a brew master or two along the way!

TASTE A BOILERMAKER

BEER CONFESSIONAL

Following on the success of last year’s very popular Boilermaker bar at the LBW hub, this popular serve is back on offer at The Beer Edit. For the uninitiated, a boilermaker is quite simply, a whisky and a beer…the best of both worlds!

Sharp’s Brewery is back at London Beer Week offering festival-goers an extra special experience guaranteed to give them a beer epiphany. Those brave enough have the chance to confess their beer sins at Sharp’s infamous ‘Beer Confessional’ booth located in The Beer Edit at The Oval Space, E2.

CELEBRATE ST PATRICK’S DAY WITH GUINNESS

DON’T BE MEAD-IOCRE!

Everyone loves an excuse to party with Ireland’s patron saint, and thanks to the team at Guinness this afterhours party promises enough beer, food, and entertainment to please even Paddy himself – so let’s get together this St Patrick’s weekend!

THE COURAGE SE1 PROJECT Courage brewery returns to SE1 thanks to a collaboration between Courage and microbrewery Southwark Brewing Co. Be amongst the first to try the new Courage SE1 limited edition range on a historic London brewery tour of the former Courage site.

Step back into medieval times and rediscover Mead! It’s making a comeback and can be tasted on the DrinkUp.London bar within The Beer Edit at Oval Space.

GET INVOLVED IN BEER & FOOD MATCHING With lots of paired dinners being hosted throughout the week – this is the perfect opportunity to replace your usual wine order with a delicious beer. With so many styles to choose from – there really is a beer for everything!

DRINK A HOPTAIL

TRY BOTANICALE

London Beer Week isn’t just for diehard lager lovers, did you know that beer actually makes a great addition to your favourite cocktail, also known as a hoptail. There will be many opportunities to taste this type of tipple across LBW, not least at the week’s highlight event, The Beer Edit at Oval Space.

The 'Official Beer of the Week' is brewed at Sharp’s Brewery in Cornwall in collaboration with the LBW festival director Ali Dedianko, and the chaps at Southwestern Distillery, who masterminded ‘The Hopster’ (Sharp’s gin flavoured with hops). Botanicale is a delicious, gin inspired wheat beer flavoured with Juniper, cloves and citrus for a spicy yet mellow flavour. Grab it quick at The Beer Edit as it’s only available in limited quantities.

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ITALIAN STALLION: Romanesco, as the name suggests, is widely thought to have come from Italy. Many people think the mindbending spirals that make it up are the result of selective breeding by Italian farmers as far back as the 16th century.

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BROC AND ROLL: It might look weird and wonderful, but romanesco is actually a fairly traditional relative of broccoli, though it’s sweeter and nuttier in taste.

TELLING FIBS: The spirals on a romanesco are a particularly striking example of the Fibonacci Sequence, a mathematical phenomenon of steadily increasing numbers that’s found all over the natural world.

Photograph by PhotoCuisine RM; Alamy Stock Photo

A 500-yearold cousin of broccoli, this crazy veg is also a natural example of a logarithm that has fascinated maths geeks everywhere. Come and learn the secrets of romanesco


Restore your inner glow With 14 days of incredible organic herbal teas and supplements Discover more at pukkaherbs.com


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Foodism - 16 - London, food and drink  

Foodism Magazine - Issue 16 - The Beer Issue

Foodism - 16 - London, food and drink  

Foodism Magazine - Issue 16 - The Beer Issue