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L O N D O N , O N E B I T E AT A T I M E


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I don’t want to brag (too late), but those mince pies on the cover? I made them with my own fair hands. (With the notable exception of the fiddly ‘f’ bit, which was made by the even fairer and much steadier hands of art director Matt Hasteley. Credit where credit’s due etc.) Unfortunately for me and my self image as some kind of all-singing, all-dancing, all-baking, all-editing renaissance man, I was chosen for the job because the mince pies needed to look authentically home made and rustic. To put it another way, they wanted someone who could be relied upon to deliver a suitably wonky-looking end result – and on that front, I delivered in spades. If you could only see the mince pies that didn’t make it onto the cover… The good news, I suppose, is that shovelling most of them into my mouth – the good, the bad and the ugly; I didn’t discriminate – has got me all tinsel-round-the-neckand-crap-santa-hat-on excited about Christmas. Mostly, I’m thinking (a lot) about what I’m going to cook, what I’m going to eat, and what I’m going to drink, and I imagine you are too. With that in mind, we’ve asked a few of our friends – from Sarah Wasserman of vegetarian restaurant Mildred’s to Massimo Bottura, the man behind the world’s best restaurant – to share their tips for taking festive eating and drinking to the next level (page 61). Oh, and I visited a farm where the turkeys have alpacas for bodyguards, and you can read about it on page 73. Don’t say we don’t bring you the big stories. Enjoy the break! f

FRONT COVER: Photography by Ian Dingle

GRAZE 012 THE FOODIST

012 LOCAL HEROES 016 LONDON LARDER 022 WEAPONS OF CHOICE 030 THE RADAR 033 RECIPES 041 RICHARD H TURNER

FEAST

044 THE SETHI SIBLINGS 050 MILK 056 MIXOLOGY 061 FESTIVE ENTERTAINING 068 KINDNESS.ORG 073 TURKEY 080 FOOD AND DRINK GUIDE

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© Square Up Media Limited 2016. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. All information contained in this magazine is, as far as we are aware, correct at the time of going to press. Square Up Media cannot accept responsibility for errors or inaccuracies in such information. If you submit unsolicited material to us, you automatically grant Square Up Media a licence to publish your submission in whole or in part in all editions of the magazine. All material is sent at your own risk and although every care is taken, neither Square Up Media nor its employees, agents or subcontractors shall be held liable resulting for loss or damage. Square Up Media endeavours to respect the intellectual property of the owners of copyrighted material reproduced herein. If you identify yourself as the copyright holder of material we have wrongly attributed, please contact the office.

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012 THE FOODIST | 012 LOCAL HEROES | 016 OPEN SEASON 016 LONDON LARDER | 018 TOP THREE | 018 THE ESCAPIST | 022 WEAPONS OF CHOICE 030 THE RADAR | 033 RECIPES | 041 RICHARD H TURNER

— PART 1 —

GRAZE “EARTHY, SAVOURY, RICH, EVEN MYSTICAL – MUSHROOMS BRING A BIT OF ALCHEMY TO THE KITCHEN” TOM HUNT, 016


THE FOODIST

Our regional cuisine isn’t great, but London’s restaurant scene makes up for it, writes Mike Gibson

LOCAL HEROES W INT E R POP-U PS

1 CAMDEN MARKET NW1 8AB; until 22 December

P

UTTING CERTAIN RECENT events to one side, there are a lot of things I love about my country. If I’m honest, though, its indigenous food culture – to put it politely – is not one of them. During times I’ve spent travelling across Europe, I’ve seen food culture change dramatically within just 20 miles – it’s as rapid and striking as the change in accent from Scouse to Manc. But for whatever reason, when discussing the shift in cultural identity between Britain’s regions, food’s never really part of the conversation. Meanwhile, at the same time, London’s foreign restaurants seem to be evolving all the time to be not just Italian or French, but Venetian or Niçois. I’ve eaten at Hackney’s Il Cudega, which serves food sourced from and inspired by Lombardy, in Italy. I’ve eaten at Lurra and

Sagardi (pictured above), which specialise not in ‘Spanish food’, but in food from the Basque Country. Just opening is Cabotte, a new restaurant on whose menus you’ll find dishes and wine from, and only from, Burgundy. It makes total sense – with the exchange of information around the world untethered by the internet, and a more learned dining populace than ever, it’s no longer good enough to open an Italian restaurant – diners want to be educated as well as fed. So, while it’s lamentable, possibly, that food from Yorkshire is not strikingly different, bar the odd dish, from that of Devon, or Suffolk (proximity to the sea being the only real diversifying element) it’s comforting to know that when it comes to dining truly regionally, London’s got you covered – even if it’s not our own food we’re eating. f

LEAN MACHINE We’re fans of curves. Wait – let us finish. We like our machines to be sleek, arcing and ergonomic – like this new Dolce Gusto Eclipse, which starts off in a bagel shape, before unlocking to reveal a hidden barista (metaphorically

12

NESCAFÉ, £169.99

speaking) capable of making up to 30 different coffee styles, all with Dolce Gusto and other compatible capsules. A high-pressure system means a smooth, velvety crema on top of the coffee, and there are bonus points for it looking like a cool modern art piece when it’s not in use. dolce-gusto.co.uk

Not quite started on the Christmas shopping? Head to Camden’s newly revamped market, grab a mulled wine and get in the festive spirit as you peruse a selection of alternative Christmas stalls, with a theme that changes each week – this week’s is ‘stocking fillers’. Thursdays only. camdenmarket.com

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SKYE HALLA AT QUEEN OF HOXTON

EC2A 3JX; until March 2017 Keep warm Viking-style, with hearty Nordic food, horns of booze, and raucous feasts at The Queen of Hoxton’s rooftop Viking stronghold. Horned helmet and furs optional. queenofhoxton.com


LOCAL HEROES + MORE WINTER POP-UPS

3

THE SPIRIT SHOW N1 0QH; 9-10 December

Christmas may be all about the food, but the drinks are just as important – so make sure your game is up to scratch with a trip to The Spirit Show, where hundreds of different premium craft drinks brands will be gathering together under one roof. There’ll be masterclasses with world experts, as well as food from the Street Food Village. And, with unlimited tastings, we’re pretty sure you’ll be feeling pretty merry at the end of it. thespiritshow.com

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DRAM & SMOKE SE1 3XW; 10-23 Dec

There’s nothing more festive than a former leather tannery warehouse, right? Well, that’s definitely the case for Dram & Smoke’s Xmas Project, which makes a triumphant return to London Bridge for its second installment. The Scottish pop-up maestros will be serving up a five-course feast isnpired by the spirit of Christmas and the best of Scottish produce, alongside Naked Grouse whisky cocktails, Scottish gin, great wine and beer, and a solid playlist. Think mistletoe, live music, festive cheer and – obviously – plenty of tartan. Note: booking is essential. dramandsmoke.com

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PERGOLA ON THE ROOF W12 7RJ; until 23 Dec

This summer’s smash-hit rooftop pop-up is back – and it’s now fully weather-proof, thanks to a heated, wind-proof, water-proof and snowproof dome that’s been erected over the Television Centre’s roof. Huzzah! Just like the summer edition, there are 600 seats, four restaurants, two bars and five day beds for you to enjoy, with food coming from Snaps & Rye, Patty & Bun, Le Bao and kebab favourites Le Bab. With worries about warmth taken care of, your only problem will be choosing which food to eat. pergolaontheroof.co.uk

Photograph by (3) Elephant Gin; (4) Ben Carpenter

  THE ULTIMATE CHRISTMAS SANDWICH 

WELL SEASONED Why bother with Christmas dinner when you can get the whole lot in one handy, breadencased package at a supermarket or petrol station near you? We explore the essential elements of the typical festive sarnie.

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PURE, UNADULTERATED FEAR 25% THAT REALLY EXPENSIVE HAM YOU FORGOT TO SERVE 37.5% QUEENS-SPEECH-INFUSED SMALL TALK 12% DESSICATED TURKEY 12% SEASONAL ANXIETY 10% CRANBERRY SAUCE FROM 1988 THAT’S PROBABLY STILL OK 3% A NAGGING SENSE THAT FATHER CHRISTMAS MAY NOT BE REAL 0.5%


OPEN SEASON

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THE LONDON LARDER

This month: The Pished Fish

Our columnist and sustainably minded chef Tom Hunt is talking about mushrooms, readily available at this time of year and a great flavour to harness in winter meals What’s the product?

E

ARTHY, SAVOURY, RICH, even mystical – mushrooms bring a touch of alchemy to the kitchen. Their pungent, autumnal aromas work their umami magic stirred into our domestic cauldron. Umami is described as the fifth taste, with the same characteristics as monosodium glutamate, but without the stigma: meaty, savoury, rounded and fulfilling. Sautéed in a skillet with butter on sourdough toast, topped with freshly cracked pepper; a meaty grilled portobello with melted blue cheese sandwiched in a bun for lunch; or braised in red wine in a casserole for dinner – mushrooms are full of flavour. Commercially grown varieties of mushroom use very few pesticides. The main cultivated mushrooms that we see on our shelves, the button mushroom, chestnut and portobello, are all of the same variety at different stages of growth. Shiitake and oyster are two other varieties that are now widely grown. Shiitakes are a true superfood, full of antioxidants, iron and lentinan – a natural immune booster, and anti-tumour, too. Buy fresh, dry mushrooms that don’t have

The Natural Cook by Tom Hunt is available now (Quadrille, £20). For more on Tom and his restaurants: tomsfeast.com; @tomsfeast

Who makes it? Camberwell resident James Eagle, who started curing as a hobby before friends convinced him to take it full-time.

What does it taste like? The flavours are subtle, and the salmon comes in thick slices, meaning more chewing while the flavours unravel. A gentle hit of booze is there initially, while the zesty citrus flavours prevail on the finish. Our favourite was the crowdpleasing, beetroot-laden Erik the Red. Delicious on its own, or in a toasted bagel with crème fraîche and pepper.

Where can I get it?

READ THE FULL INTERVIEW AT FOODISM.CO.UK

IT BRINGS PEOPLE TOGETHER. EATING SOMETHING SWEET IS ALWAYS A TIME WHEN PEOPLE MAKE THEMSELVES HAPPY DOMINIQUE ANSEL, founder of the iconic Dominique Ansel Bakery in Manhattan – and now London – on what it is about baked goods that inspires him

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RSPCA-assured, sustainably caught salmon cured with combinations of booze and botanicals and then smoked over wood. Think Erik the Red, flavoured with aquavit, beetroot, juniper and star anise; or the Old Fashioned, with whisky, maple syrup and orange zest.

At the time of writing, there are nine flavours available on the brand’s website, plus a bit of merch and the option of a monthly salmon subscription called the Smoking Club, which includes one-off flavours. You can also find it at Duke of York Square, Oval and Chiswick farmers’ markets on weekends, and at Selfridges and the Fin and Flounder fishmonger. The Pished Fish recommends 50g per serving – 100g packs are priced at £6.95. thepishedfish.com

Photograph by (mushrooms) Casanisa

QUOT E OF T HE MO NTH

wet spots as they won’t go off as quickly. Keep them fresh by removing them from plastic packaging and storing them in a covered glass container or paper bag in the fridge, with plenty of space for them to breathe. Never wash them, as they will soak up the water and become soggy. Brush any dirt off if necessary. Mushroom stalks are delicious and should be cooked along with the cap. If they are particularly woody, then use them to add delicious fragrances to stocks and soup. f


ALTERNATIVE ADVENT CALENDARS TOP P I C KS T HI S MO NTH

1

BEER

If you’re after some alternative advent inspiration, look no further than craft beer delivery service Honest Brew’s calendar. Instead of chocolate, you’ll be treated to a bottle a day from breweries like Beavertown, Wild Beer Co., Fourpure and more. There’ll be a few festive brews and limited-editions there, too. £64.90; honestbrew.co.uk

2

WINE

Christmas is a time of year when you can enjoy drinking as much wine as you want, without a care in the world about the judgement of others. We think that should extend to advent as well, which is why we love this calendar from Virgin Wines. It hides 24 mini bottles of hearty reds and flinty whites, plus the occasional port and sparkling, too. It’s basically a scaleddown version of Christmas Day. £69.99; virginwines.co.uk

3

SPIRITS

The price tag of this advent calendar from Drinks by the Dram might seem a significant outlay. But when you consider that it’ll let you try some of the world’s iconic whiskies, some of them worth about £600 by the bottle, it makes a lot more sense. If you’re not a whisky drinker, don’t worry – the brand makes 18 other calendars consisting of many different types of spirits. £149.95; drinksbythedram.com

THE ESCAPIST

Rahul Parekh, founder and CEO of EatFirst, on revolutionising takeaway food

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The result was a premium, online-only restaurant that delivers chilled, fully prepped, fresh meals that are created by a team of top chefs, led by Benn Hodges who has joined us from Roka and The Ivy Grill. We’ve seen EatFirst take off this year and we now deliver brunch, lunch, dinner and fine wines, from 10am to 10pm, seven days a week to neighbourhoods in Zones 1-4. We’ve also developed a technique that allows us to part cook, then blast-chill our dishes to lock in the nutrients and flavours. The customer then quickly ‘finishes’ heating the meal, in the oven or the microwave, and the result is a delicious, restaurant-quality meal in minutes. Everyone who works at EatFirst loves seeing feedback on our Instagram feed from

customers who, initially sceptical, end up so amazed by the results that they share their experience with the world. This helps us focus our mind every single day on our mission: delivering the very best meal experience. f eatfirst.com

Photograph by ###

EFORE LAUNCHING EATFIRST, I spent seven years working long hours in an investment bank in London. Like most busy people, I’d become used to putting up with highly processed ready meals or mediocre takeaways that often arrived lukewarm in unsealed, leaking boxes.  I often asked myself, in a city as diverse as London with restaurants full of talented chefs, why was it so difficult to get a highquality food experience delivered to my home or office? The solution seemed simple; create meals that are 100% designed for delivery, put the customer experience at the forefront of the development process, and work backwards. But as nobody else was doing this in London, I left the City and set up EatFirst.


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Grazing

BAR RA F I N A

OPEN NOW

Dining

C L E R K E NW E L L G R IND

DRINKING

OPEN NOW

GRAZING

The Grind group of venues might have started out as a solo espresso bar on the Old Street roundabout, but with each opening the group’s venues have slowly morphed into much more, incorporating cocktail bars and even downstairs late-night clubs. Clerkenwell Grind, the group’s latest, is all of the above and more, with a full restaurant menu that’ll run from early breakfast to dinner, and brunch on weekends, just a stone’s throw from where it all began. EC1V 9AA; grind.co.uk

DINING TRENDING

THE RADAR We take you through the hottest bar and restaurant openings from now until the end of December Grazing

B R EDD OS TAQ UE RIA

EARLY DECEMBER

Drinking

T HE C L I F TO N

Trending

B ONNIE G UL L SE AF OOD SHAC K

DECEMBER

The guys at Bonnie Gull have been pretty busy of late, preparing to move into Soho after much success in both Marylebone and Exmouth Market. The new Soho site will be a Seafood Shack, a bells-and-whistles seafood restaurant serving dishes like squid toast with ink aioli, and wild Hayle mussels cooked over embers and served with parsley hollandaise. W1D 3AN; bonniegull.com

Grazing

SM OK E STAK OPEN NOW

Smokestak’s story isn’t dissimilar to Breddos’ – both traders found a wider audience and hefty acclaim through Street Feast’s food market, and both waited until the timing was just right to set up shop permanently. Smokestak’s excellent restaurant features favourites from the food stalls, as well as cracking whiskey cocktails and fish and vegetable dishes, too. E1 6LB; smokestak.co.uk

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EARLY DECEMBER

One for north Londoners: a new gastropub in St John’s Wood which will brew its own beer, and puts an emphasis on brunch over the Sunday roast. We know – shocking... NW8 0JT; @thecliftonnw8

Dining

IVY SO H O B RASS ER I E

DECEMBER

The Ivy group’s latest opening is a spacious, casual brasserie on Broadwick Street, complete with a private dining room. W1F 8JB; theivysoho brasserie.com

Photograph by (Bonnie Gull) Helen Cathcart (The Ivy) Paul Winch-Furness

Finally, it’s here. One of our favourite street-food traders in the capital, Breddos Tacos, has taken its time in opening a permanent site, but we reckon it’ll be more than worth the wait. The restaurant will take inspiration from roadside taquerias in Mexico and the US, with a menu full of non-wrapped-up dishes cooked over a wood grill. breddostacos.com

Not a new opening as such, but an uprooting of the acclaimed tapas group’s original Michelin-starred restaurant – along with its team and menu – to a new site around the corner on Dean Street. W1D 3LL; barrafina.co.uk


DISCOVER DELICIOUS HOMECOOKING

WITH M A RCUS WA REING

The acclaimed chef invites you into his kitchen and reveals his ultimate family favourites

* *Selected stores. Whilst stocks last.


Recipes

FEAST OF THE SOUTH EAST

SUFFERING FROM TURKEY OVERLOAD? SHH... WE ARE TOO, SO THIS MONTH WE’VE SOURCED FOUR DISHES INSPIRED BY THE FLAVOURS OF THE PHILIPPINES

PHOTOGRAPHS BY BENJAMIN BACKHOUSE

W

HILE THE VIBRANT cooking of Thailand and Vietnam is pretty well-known in London, the cuisine of the Philippines has been somewhat overshadowed by its neighbours –and unduly so, as the South East Asian country has more than its fair share of bright, complex flavours. The 7,000 island-strong archipelago is, unsurprisingly, blessed with an abundance of fantastic seafood, which chef Emma Power uses here to create a tuna kilawin, a dish that’s not dissimilar to Peruvian ceviche. Former head of product development at

the ever-popular Hummingbird Bakery and product developer at Marks & Spencer, she’s now using her foodie talents to explore cooking styles from around the world. She’s also shared her recipe for kwekkwek, or battered quails’ eggs, that – although not traditional – would make for a moreish amuse bouche at any party, festive or otherwise. Elsewhere, sweet, sour and salty chicken adobo will bring you up to speed with The Philippines’ national dish, while the banana spring roll dessert with coconut sauce is crispy, gooey and irresistibly indulgent. f

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F O O DISM RE CIPE S, I N ASSOC IAT ION W IT H W HIT L EY NE IL L

Photograph by ###

foodism’s recipe section is brought to you in partnership with WHITLEY NEILL, whose premium, handcrafted gins and vodkas are inspired by the fruits of travel, the mysterious beauty of the world, and the never-ending drive to explore. The original multi-award-winning Whitley Neill gin skilfully blends two

African botanicals with seven others used in traditional English gins to create a deliciously unique citrus burst. There’s also a stunning Persian quince gin and a Sicilian blood orange vodka. Keep an eye out to see what comes next! Whitley Neill’s full range of spirits is available online for an RRP of £26

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Emma Power’s

TUNA KILAWIN A FRESH, VIBRANT CURED FISH DISH THAT USES CHUNKS OF SUCCULENT TUNA AND A PUNCHY ONION AND CHILLI SALAD

e viche uses th Just like ce re cu to us tr acidity of ci gar is used the fish, vine recipe ino lip in this Fi

I N GRED I ENTS ◆◆ 500g yellowfin tuna ◆◆ 375ml coconut vinegar or

palm vinegar ◆◆ ½ red onion, finely sliced ◆◆ ½ red onion, finely diced ◆◆ 1 clove garlic, finely chopped ◆◆ 1 inch fresh ginger, finely

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ILAWIN IS THE Philippines’ equivalent to Italian crudo or Peruvian ceviche,” writes food writer and recipe developer Emma Power, who devised this batch of Filipino recipes just for foodism. The four dishes draw from her experience of the modern cuisine of the islands, which she’s harnessed to devise simple, delicious and authentic recipes inspired by the region’s underdocumented food culture. “In the southern Philippines, tuna is especially plentiful and fresh, and it

has become one of the country’s best food exports,” she says.

Method

1 Cut tuna into 1-inch cubes. Season with salt and pepper. Add the vinegar and chill for 2-4 hours. 2 Strain the fish and place back in the bowl. Add the onions, garlic, ginger, red pepper, chillies, lemon and lime juice. Mix well and season with salt and pepper. 3 Garnish with chopped and whole leaves of coriander. Serve very cold. f

TIME

Serves ◆◆ 4-6

Prep time

◆◆ 20 mins

Photography by Ben Backhouse

chopped ◆◆ 1 red pepper, small dice ◆◆ 3 red chilli peppers, sliced into rings and de-seeded ◆◆ 1 jalapeño, sliced into rings and de-seeded ◆◆ 60ml lemon juice ◆◆ 60ml lime juice ◆◆ Coriander sprigs, to garnish

K


Emma Power’s

KWEK-KWEK

OOZY SOFT-BOILED QUAILS’ EGGS IN CRUNCHY BATTER MAKES FOR A DELICIOUS SNACK THAT’S SIMPLER TO PREPARE THAN YOU’D THINK

A

VEGETARIAN STARTER THAT’S moreish and delicious, this recipe can be used as an accompaniment to a main course, a starter, or even a pub-style snack. “Kwek-kwek is a popular Filipino street food made with quails’ eggs, battered and deep fried until golden,” Power says. “Serve with a spiced vinegar sauce to dip.”

The vinegar sauce

1 Place a small saucepan over medium heat. Combine the salt, sugar, vinegar and soy sauce. 2 Whisk continuously until the salt and the sugar are completely dissolved. Simmer for 3-5 minutes. Remove from the heat.  3 Add the garlic, red onion, black pepper, spring onion and chilli. Stir the mixture until well blended. Allow the vinegar sauce to cool. 4 Pour the vinegar sauce in a bottle or glass jar. You can use right away or store in the refrigerator for future use. This can be kept refrigerated and sealed for a month. The longer it sits, the stronger and more intensified the spiciness and the flavour will be. 

5 Place all the quails’ eggs in the mixing bowl and coat with the batter. 6 Pour the cooking oil into the pan or deep fat fryer and heat up. 7 When the oil is hot enough (about 180°C), deep-fry the quails’ eggs by scooping them from the mixing bowl using a spoon (or your hands, which is messier but more precise). Make sure that each is coated with batter. 8 Deep-fry, and after a few minutes, remove the fried quail eggs from the pan and place on a serving plate with chopped chillies and spring onions. 9 Serve with the vinegar sauce while the eggs are still crispy. f

TIME

Serves ◆◆ 4

Prep time

◆◆ 20 mins

Cooking time ◆◆ 7 mins

ING R E DIE NTS The kwek-kwek ◆◆ 12 to 24 soft-boiled quails’

eggs ◆◆ 150g flour ◆◆ 3 tbsp cornstarch ◆◆ 235ml water ◆◆ 1 tbsp annatto powder (this

BITE-SIZED

FOODISM.CO.UK/ NEWSLETTER

can be found in Asian or Pinoy supermarkets) ◆◆ ½ tsp salt ◆◆ ½ tsp ground black pepper ◆◆ Vegetable oil for cooking

The vinegar sauce ◆◆ 470ml of palm vinegar ◆◆ 120ml of soy sauce ◆◆ 2 cloves of minced garlic ◆◆ 1 small red onion finely diced ◆◆ ½ tsp ground black pepper ◆◆ ½ tsp sugar ◆◆ ½ tsp salt ◆◆ 2 spring onions, finely

chopped ◆◆ 1 red chilli, finely diced

The kwek-kwek

1 Cook the quails’ eggs for 2 minutes in water that’s reaching boiling and, once cooked, immediately cool – this will stop the yolks going grey. Place the pan under a cold tap and pour water constantly until the eggs feel cold to touch. Lightly tap all the shells to allow the water to permeate the shell and make peeling easier. 2 Place the cornflour in a container and dredge the peeled boiled quail eggs. Set aside. 3 In a mixing bowl, combine flour, salt and pepper, then mix thoroughly. 4 Dilute the annatto powder in warm water, then pour in the mixing bowl with the other ingredients. Mix well.

35


Emma Power’s

CHICKEN ADOBO

A SIMPLE BUT EFFECTIVE FIERY CHICKEN DISH, SERVED WITH A REFRESHING TOMATO SALSA

A

CCORDING TO MANY Filipinos, this is the country’s national dish. That’s what Power says, describing this chicken adobo as “protein that’s braised in vinegar until pungent and rich – a dish that’s sweet, sour and salty all at once.” “Cooking softens the acidity of the vinegar,” she says, “which then combines with the flavour of the meat to enhance it.” The sweet, tangy sauce is offset by the acidity of the salsa.

Method

1 Combine all of the marinade ingredients in a large bowl. Add the chicken and turn to coat. Refrigerate overnight, or for at least 2 hours. 2 Place the chicken in its marinade in a large pan over high heat and bring to a boil. Immediately reduce heat to a simmer and cook, stirring occasionally, until the chicken is tender – around 30 minutes. 3 Heat the oven to 190ºC (fan) and transfer the chicken thighs on to a baking tray. Increase the heat under the pan to medium-high, and reduce the sauce down for about 10 minutes until it’s got a creamy consistency. Remove the bay leaves and chillies. 4 Place the chicken on the baking tray and place in the oven for 10 minutes, until it begins to caramelize. 5 Return the chicken to the reduced sauce and cook for a few minutes more, then place on a platter and drizzle heavily with sauce.

The relish

1 Finely dice the tomatoes, add the sliced red onions and lemon juice and season. Coriander or flat-leaf parsley can be added for extra colour. f

36

ato and A fresh tom is the h lis onion re r to the ne rt pa t ec perf icken ch y ng hot, ta


TIME

Serves

◆◆ 4

CLICK

FOODISM.CO.UK

Prep time

◆◆ 130 mins

Cooking time

◆◆ 55 mins

ING R E DIE NTS For the chicken ◆◆ 60ml soy sauce ◆◆ 375ml rice vinegar ◆◆ 12 garlic cloves, peeled ◆◆ 3 whole bird’s-eye chilies or

other fiery chilli ◆◆ 3 bay leaves ◆◆ 1½ teaspoons peppercorns ◆◆ 12 chicken thighs, bone in

and skin on

For the relish ◆◆ 2 ripe tomatoes ◆◆ ½ red onion finely sliced ◆◆ 1 lemon juiced

Photograph by Ben Backhouse

37


Emma Power’s

BANANA LUMPIA

A BANANA AND COCONUT SPRING ROLL DESSERT? YOU’D BETTER BELIEVE IT. THIS RECIPE IS FUN AND DELICIOUS

ING R E DIE NTS The coconut caramel sauce ◆◆ 250ml coconut milk ◆◆ 165g brown sugar

The lumpia ◆◆ 10 small Asian Saba bananas

(ask your local Asian/Pinoy shop) ◆◆ 20 fresh lumpia wrappers (spring roll wrappers) ◆◆ Vegetable oil, for frying ◆◆ 1 egg white ◆◆ 40g toasted coconut shavings

mel Coconut cara ese th s rn sauce tu lls into ro ng ri sp t swee ecial something sp

TIME

Makes

◆◆ 20 rolls

Prep time

◆◆ 20 mins

Cooking time ◆◆ 5 mins

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EFORE YOU START thinking we’re recommending the sweetest dessert dish under the sun, hold up. “These banana spring rolls are not too sweet, as the Saba bananas are very fresh-tasting,” Power says. “The coconut caramel sauce adds the sweetness, and makes it a delicious dessert, although these could be served at any time of day.”

The coconut caramel sauce

1 Pour the coconut milk into a medium saucepan over low heat, and heat for about 5 minutes, until it’s bubbling slightly. Add the brown sugar and stir until smooth.

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2 Thicken the sauce to your desired consistency by keeping it at a low boil and stirring very frequently. Cook for around 30 minutes.

The lumpia

1 Gently pull the lumpia wrappers apart and set aside to use for wrapping. Don’t let them get dry – place a damp cloth on the top while working with them. 2 Peel the bananas and cut them in half lengthways. Place the banana on the lumpia wrapper. If they are still too long to fit inside your wrappers, cut the ends off or cut them in half again. 3 With the wrapper at an angle

(diamond-shaped in front of you), fold the bottom over the banana, and then fold in the sides and continue rolling up. Once you get to the top, dip your fingers in the egg white and run them along the edge of the lumpia to make the wrapper stick together. 4 Heat the oil in a large pan over low heat or a deep fat fryer at 180°C, and add the lumpia, a few at a time. Fry for 5 minutes or until golden brown and crispy. Drain on paper towels and allow to cool slightly. Serve with the dipping sauce and scatter with toasted coconut shavings. f See more of Emma Power’s recipes at powerful-cooking.com


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Richard H Turner

THE BIG FEAST For Richard Turner, Christmas dinner isn’t about turkey – he’s opting for a traditionally English goose, and a ham that’ll provide rich pickings for days

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Photograph by Paul Winch-Furness

S THE OLD nursery rhyme goes: “Christmas is coming, the geese are getting fat. Please do put a penny in the old man’s hat.” Note that it’s the geese that are getting fat, not the turkeys. Like every other Christmas, this year I’ll be sticking to a roast goose and a baked ham – proper English fayre. I’ve ordered a large, but by goose standards, lean, Legarth bird, reared free-range on a farm at Leven in Yorkshire, where it spent most of its life grazing upon 40 acres of grassland. Grazing is the goose’s natural way of feeding and, in my book, nature will always deliver when it comes to flavour. They’re then ‘finished’ with an adlib diet of home-produced cereals in much the same way as cattle. To roast a goose successfully, a capacious roasting tray is needed to catch the vast

quantities of valuable fat rendered from even a lean bird such as mine. With goose, less is most certainly more – it’s very rich. And it is a roast that keeps on giving; the fat going on to make the finest roast potatoes and any leftovers to a bubble and squeak worthy of royalty. Alternatively, the cavity can be stuffed with par-cooked potatoes, onions and a few tart apples to soak up some of the excess goose fat: this produces a tasty side dish. Alternatively – or additionally, if you’re greedy like me – ham can be the most versatile of meats, and a good ham can be revelatory in its deliciousness. Unfortunately, mediocrity is more the norm of what is available in this country, and for this reason I urge you to seek out the very best you can from families with generations of tradition to fall back on. A proper ham, from a proper pig, is truly a sight to behold and will last for days in even the largest of houses. (And by proper, I mean free range and extensively reared). Ham has a distinct and wonderful flavour that will happily go with almost anything – cheese, carbs, vegetables, fruits, other meats, and even fish – and it really is a perfect Christmas meat. I reserved my ham months ago from the Woodall family in Cumbria. Hannah Woodall began producing quality dry cured hams from her village shop in Waberthwaite almost two centuries ago, with the local villagers benefitting mightily from her farmhouse butchery and curing skills. These hams would sustain local families through the long winter months. At the beginning of the winter the hams would be cooked from fresh and eaten; through the winter the meat would dry out where it was hung in the farmhouses and would be ready to eat by the end of the season. This traditional farmhouse air-drying method of preserving meat almost became a lost skill in England as more industrial methods of

preservation emerged such as wet curing, canning and refrigerating. Luckily, the Woodall family continued from one generation to the next and thankfully their hams are still available today. To make my glaze I place water, dark Muscovado sugar, a knob of fresh ginger, one cinnamon stick, one star anise, a few cloves and a teaspoon of fennel seeds into a pan and bring to a simmer, remove from the heat and then blend to a smooth paste. I then place the poached and peeled ham into a deep roasting tray with 300ml of water and place in a preheated oven at 160°C for 20 minutes. At this point, I pour half the glaze recipe over the ham, return to the oven and roast for a further 45 minutes per kilo. Half way through I remove from the oven and pour the other half of the glaze over the top and coat generously with 300g of pain d’epice or gingerbread crumbs. When the allotted time is up, I remove from the oven and transfer my ham to a clean dish to rest for 30 minutes while pouring off the glaze from the roasting tray, passing through a fine sieve and reducing to a sticky syrup before serving alongside my ham. It’ll sit quite happily on the side for a couple of days to be picked at and eaten at leisure. I’m in two minds about turkey – on the one hand it’s not a very British roast, coming, as it does, from America. It is also notoriously difficult to get right and often ends up dry. On the other hand, it does make the most spectacular gravy. I’m going to let you into a secret: if you can buy a good bird, free range, game hung and dry plucked, season it inside and out the night before, and roast it the next day, 20 or so degrees lower than you normally would, then turn the oven off and let it rest inside as the oven cools, you should have the tastiest, most succulent turkey possible. It still won’t be a goose though… f Follow Richard on Twitter: @RichardHTurner; Stock up on meat for Christmas at turnerandgeorge.co.uk

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Ever so slightly

Lakeland Roasting Tins. A festive life-changer. Ours come with a pouring ‘nose’, so you can easily pour out the juice... without losing your goose.

69 stores nationwide lakeland.co.uk


044 THE SETHI SIBLINGS | 050 MILK | 056 MIXOLOGY 061 FESTIVE ENTERTAINING | 068 KINDNESS.ORG | 073 TURKEY 073 CHRISTMAS FOOD AND DRINK GUIDE

— PART 2 —

FEAST “MY ONE REAL PIECE OF ADVICE FOR CHRISTMAS IS TO KEEP IT NOSTALGIC” MASSIMO BOTTURA ON THE CHRISTMAS MEAL, 061


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FAMILY DINNERS

The Sethi siblings are behind some of London’s best new restaurants. Hugh Thomas meets a truly food-forward family 45


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ULTURAL DIVERSITY. INAUTHENTIC cuisines. Queuing. These are a few of the things Brits do. And boy, don’t we do them well. In building their mini empire, JKS Restaurants, the Sethi siblings are more than familiar with the same characteristics. There’s a strong cultural diversity in the restaurants they manage; they’re trying to overcome stigmas attached to inauthentic cuisine; and queuing has become a well-known pastime on London’s streets – thanks in no small part to them. The JKS group comprises restaurants that the Sethis have created – Trishna, Gymkana, and Hoppers – as well as those headed up by the young talent they choose to partner with and, critically, also invest in. This year, four JKS Restaurants were named in the top 45 in the country by the National Restaurant Awards. In 2014, their Michelinstarred flagship restaurant, Gymkana, was considered by many to be the best in the UK. Some still do. Two Soho street food-inspired ventures – Bao and Hoppers – earned Michelin Bib Gourmands for 2017. You get the point. The three Sethi siblings – Sunaina, Karam and Jyotin – are restaurateurs at the top of their game. And they’re among the youngest, too. According to Karam, who’s in his early 30s, that might have something to do with how they got to where they are. “Our restaurants appeal to the millennial demographic,” says Karam, who manages the

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YOU HAVE TO SHARE A VISION WITH THE PEOPLE THAT YOU WORK AND TEAM UP WITH… SOMETHING YOU ALL BELIEVE IN food side of the enterprise. “The same one all three of us fit in. But that’s not to say we open a restaurant for anyone in particular.” “To an extent,” adds youngest sibling Sunaina, who’s in charge of wine and operations, “you have to share a vision with the people you work with, and who you team up with. The common thing with all the people we’ve backed, from Bao to Bubbledogs to Lyle’s, is the like-mindedness, where they have something we all believe in.” As you may have already guessed, one of those common grounds is the appetite for something out of the ordinary. The JKS portfolio has covered a lot of ground in its first year as a collective, encompassing Taiwanese gua bao, Sri Lankan hoppers, contemporary British fare, and a slightly unconventional take on American hotdogs. “They’re restaurants we all want to eat in. And experiences and spaces we think London can benefit from,” says Sunaina. “We feel like we can tell a story. With Hoppers for example, Sri Lankan cuisine isn’t that well known in London or as accessible in the past, and you might not get a comprehensive understanding of the little places in say Tooting or East Ham. For us to bring that into [central] London, it was almost demystifying it a little bit.” As for keeping the next restaurant diverse but pertinent at the same time, “that’s where our biggest effort goes,” says Karam. The

one with the cheffing background, Karam, develops new menus and concepts, working alongside the head chef of each restaurant to keep what they’re doing fresh. When he’s not in his whites knocking out some of London’s best Indian dishes, that is. Karam’s entrepreneurial mettle was quickly realised in London with his opening of the now Michelin-starred seafood joint Trishna when he was 22. Not long after, he was firing the head chef to assume cooking duties himself. For those that know him, this was hardly surprising (his parents wanted him to be a banker), but if it weren’t for his maverick tendencies, perhaps dining out in London wouldn’t be quite so exciting. With Sunaina on the restaurant floor, and Jyotin looking after the accounts (it’s


great what ten years at Barclays can do for you), you’d do well to find a much more complementary team of people. “We’re lucky,” says Sunaina. “Between me and my two brothers, we’re quite defined by the roles we’ve fallen into, because of the skillsets each of us has. When opening a restaurant, I’ll lead on the front of house and operations, with Karam on the kitchen side, with my elder brother [Jyotin] telling us not to spend too much money.” It should go without saying that starting up any business is a stressful experience. But that doesn’t compare to what it’s like when your siblings are involved. “Work never stops,” says Sunaina. “Whenever we’re together, we’re always talking about food and restaurants. And restaurants, and restaurants.

ABOVE: Karam, Sunaina and Jyotin Sethi are behind some of London’s best restaurants; LEFT: Michelin-starred dishes at Gymkhana

There’s no switching off because for each of us it’s become an obsession. “On the positive side, you get things done so much quicker, and ultimately you do have the same end goal. Even if that means shouting and screaming at each other. In a way you don’t have to be as diplomatic as you would with non-family members – we tend to get to the point a lot quicker.” With all the expertise in the room, those running the subsidiary restaurants certainly aren’t any worse off either. As a trained →

THERE’S NO SWITCHING OFF, BECAUSE IT’S AN OBSESSION FOR EACH OF US 47


ABOVE [LEFT TO RIGH]: Ceylonese spit chicken at Hoppers; the first Sethi restaurant, Trishna; [BELOW] an unusually queue-free Hoppers

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The kitchen will be based in Battersea, and with the help of Deliveroo will deliver only to Chelsea, Fulham, Wandsworth, and also to some areas of Putney. “Ideally we’ll open more than one if liked by the public and the system works,” says Karam. Seeing as much of the Sethis’ success is down to predicting the next big thing, and seeing as they’ve yet to get it wrong, I ask Karam what London’ll next go weak at the knees for. “Ethnic cuisine,” he says. “Everything from southeast Asian to more regional Asian, which is the more exciting thing for me. I went to Kiln [the new sister restaurant to Smoking Goat] the other day, which is bloody good. The quality of the produce, the punchiness of the cuisine, in a great vibey environment. That whole style very much fits, in my mind, with the perfect current day restaurant.” Who am I to argue with that? f

Photographs by David Loftus

→ sommelier, Sunaina makes sure the wine lists are all on point. Though it can’t be the easiest job when you’re tasked with matching Taiwanese gua bao or traditional Indian chatpata to an appropriate vino. “Generally speaking, Italian wines go well with Italian food, and French wines go well with French food. With Bao I worked with Wai-Ting, who looks after operations there, and we did the wine list together. I think what’s important is when I’m not on site, she understands the thought process behind the wine so she can pass that on to staff.’ Even with her obvious enthusiasm for wine (she indulges me on her adventures unearthing some esoteric Polish and Croatian varieties), Sunaina suggests passing on knowledge is definitely a two-way road. “Sandia at Bubbledogs? I can learn a lot from her when it comes to champagne.” Spend ten minutes talking to a Sethi and you very much get the impression that they’re thinking about what’s next on the boil. Their latest project – Motu in Battersea– is what we’ve come to expect; that is, not something they’ve attempted before. You could describe their most recent venture as similar to an Indian takeaway, only more bona fide than the kind that we’re used to. “It’ll be indulgent home-style Indian food. We’ll be giving the customer the compete meal, packaged really nicely, with food cooked to the standard you’d find in our restaurants,” says Karam. “You order what we’re calling a Feast Box – choose your curry, or biryani or mixed grill. Then three sides – naan, pilau, chutney. And then the dessert.’

MUCH OF THE SETHIS’ SUCCESS IS DOWN TO CORRECTLY PREDICTING THE NEXT BIG THING IN FOOD


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BETTER LATTE THAN NEVER

What do you get when you pair a London-based barista with a rural dairy farmer? A brand new perspective on milk, that’s what, says Emily Scaife

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Photograph by ###

LEFT: The milk produced by The Estate Dairy is carefully made to ensure it’ll enhance your cup of coffee

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L

OOK IN A standard supermarket trolley and there is one thing most of us always buy. It’s simple, basic and there’s a strong chance it’s the cheapest purchase you’ll make that day. Usually, it costs less than a bottle of water. Sure, you can treat yourself and buy organic, but that’s about as fancy as it gets. If you guessed that I was talking about milk, you’d be right. But this isn’t going to be yet another feature about how we all take it for granted, or how you should feel guilty that your pint costs you next to nothing. After all, when was the last time you got a bargain and said: “Here, have another quid on top of that – this is simply too good a deal”? Thought so. Instead, this feature is about two men who have decided to do something about it. To make milk a luxury and to finally get it recognised as such. They demand a higher price for their product, and London-based baristas are happy to pay it. Meet Joe Towers and Shaun Young. If you’re partial to a latte from somewhere other than the obvious (yes, Starbucks, I’m looking at you) then you may have come into contact with their wares. One thing’s for sure – you’ll want to after reading this.

The idea Shaun Young heads up Noble Espresso, a team of young baristas providing speciality coffee for events. Alongside his business partner Rebecca Young (it’s a truth, universally acknowledged, that if you meet someone who happens to have the same surname as you, you must set up a business together), Shaun identified a gap in the market. Baristas were putting all their energy into offering the very best coffee. From sourcing the finest beans available and

THERE WAS A GAP IN THE MARKET – BARISTAS PUT ALL THEIR ENERGY INTO OFFERING THE BEST COFFEE, BUT WHAT ABOUT THE MILK? CLOCKWISE FROM RIGHT: Jersey cows, prized for their high-fat milk; the new ‘designer’ blend is perfect for using in coffee; The Estate Dairy team

dabbling with temperatures, to perfecting new methods and being creative with presentation, it was all about the coffee. No one had spared much time or thought towards the milk at all, bunging any old semi-

skimmed into their perfectly cultivated brew. After being made aware of the research of Morten Münchow, who had embarked upon a similar project in Copenhagen, Shaun became convinced of the difference the right milk could make and embarked upon the Holy Grail of discovering the secret to the ideal milk for the perfect cup of caffeine. But first, he needed buy in from a farmer. This turned out to be a little bit harder than he had expected it to be; together Shaun and Rebecca visited more than 50 farms, hitting brick wall after brick wall. Until, finally, they came across Joe Towers.

The farm At the time that Shaun found Lune Valley Dairy in Lancashire, the farm was in the middle of a tricky period. The industry was in trouble, milk prices had taken a tumble and the family was having difficulty finding a home for their milk. But, rather than being risk-adverse like the 49 farmers before them, this put them in the mood to gamble.

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“Shaun didn’t have any existing sales – he just believed that he could get certain cafés to buy it, which was probably why other dairies thought it couldn’t be done,” Joe says. “We had to have complete confidence that he would actually be able to go out and sell it.” It was even more of a gamble when you consider that Joe and his family needed to invest in a new herd of Jersey cows and, in order to make it worth the farm’s while, they would need to sell at least 7,000 litres a week from the word go – that’s 12,318 pints of milk.

The perfect coffee milk Photographs by jonathan Simpson

So, why Jersey cows? The farm already had a herd of Holstein Friesians (black and white cows, to those not versed in bovine terminology). Well, the answer is in the milk: The Estate Dairy, the company set up to distribute the wares of this brave new world, conducted an enormous amount of research into creating the country’s first barista milk. But what makes it special? Jersey cows’ milk is much higher in protein and fat, both

of which are vital components for getting the perfect product for coffee. “If you use conventional milk products and pour latte art, it will start to break down as soon as it’s in the cup,” Shaun says. “Ours holds for four to five minutes. Then there’s the higher fat content – ours is currently 4.5% which is a whole point higher than that of conventional milk. We worked very hard on getting exactly the right amount of fat – it makes a huge different to the taste of a cup of coffee.” The final key difference is that the milk isn’t homogenised. “A lot of milk on the supermarket shelf is, because it affects its appearance,” Shaun says. “The fat rises to the top in our milk over a period of time, but with that you’re actually retaining all the good qualities.” Joe adds: “Anyone who uses our milk is told to give the bottle a good shake before use to spread the cream out!” It’s also vital that the milk comes from one farm, and one farm alone, as The Estate Dairy believes this is what gives it a unique taste. Milk bought in a supermarket, Joe explains, →

WE WORKED VERY HARD ON GETTING THE RIGHT AMOUNT OF FAT – IT MAKES A HUGE DIFFERENCE TO THE TASTE 53


FROM ABOVE: The Estate Dairy’s milk is popular with baristas thanks to its unique taste; the company’s cows graze on only one farm

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The story so far Initially, Shaun approached close friends in the coffee industry, securing seven accounts. Today, they work with 140 accounts and distribute 29,000 litres of milk a week. “It quickly went absolutely crazy,” Shaun says. “We’ve given businesses a traceable dairy product and that’s key for so many cafés.” He also believes that it’s a great thing for the dairy industry, which has struggled to add value and luxury to what has always been considered a basic product. “Milk is a staple in every café – it should be talked about and have value,” explains Shaun. “What we pay

Joe is much higher than the farm gate price most farmers receive and rightly so.” In terms of the future, Shaun and Joe admit they need to take stock after a whirlwind nine months and think about what direction they want to go in. Whether it’s selling to cafés further afield than London, or launching their own retail product for wannabe baristas brewing at home, one thing’s for certain – milk has had a makeover. f

Photograph (barista) by Constantin Stanciu/Shutterstock

THE MILK IS TESTED WITH ESPRESSOBASED COFFEE TO ENSURE IT’S FIT FOR PURPOSE

→ can be a combination of milk from hundreds of different farms, rendering it ‘white noise’. By keeping it pure and simple, you’re guaranteed a better-tasting product. The milk is tested with a 50/50 brew ratio of light- to medium-roasted espresso-based coffee from London-based speciality roasters to ensure that it’s fit for purpose. What the cows eat is monitored and tweaked, the ratio of Jersey to black-and-white milk is subject to laboratory analysis to guarantee flavour and ‘foam stability’, and it’s steamed at 50-70 degrees before being passed for distribution.


MEGA MIX

Feeling festive yet? Whether you’re entertaining or sipping solo, these wintry cocktails will bring a bit of Christmas cheer

STK BARTENDER: STK bar team COCKTAIL: The Solera Slipper Somewhere between a manhattan and a whisky sour, this cocktail uses chestnut liqueur, thyme and honey along with Glenfiddich whisky for a sweet and spicy, warming but refreshing drink.

INGREDIENTS ◆◆ 50ml Glenfiddich 15-year-old ◆◆ 20ml chestnut liqueur ◆◆ 20ml lemon juice ◆◆ 5ml honey ◆◆ 2 dashes Angostura Bitters ◆◆ Thyme sprigs, to garnish

Put all the ingredients together and shake hard. Strain into a coupe glass over ice, and serve with a garnish of thyme. togrp.com/restaurant/stk-london

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BÓ DRAKE BARTENDER: Natalina Marano COCKTAIL: Spice & Easy A lip-smacking rum cocktail gets a warming kick in the form of fresh wasabi. The use of citrus – lemon juice and garnish, and grapefruit bitters – makes it a great aperitif, too.

I N GREDIENTS ◆◆ 40ml spiced rum ◆◆ 1cm fresh wasabi ◆◆ 25ml lemon juice ◆◆ 20ml sugar syrup ◆◆ 5ml Bittermens hopped grapefruit bitters

Pour all ingredients into a Boston shaker and shake over ice. Strain into a large rocks glass, and garnish with lemon peel. bodrake.co.uk

RAY’S BAR BARTENDER: Waseem Akbar COCKTAIL: Spice World Decadent, creamy cocktails suit cold winter nights down to the ground. Try this one from Ray’s Bar – velvety and soothing, but with a spicy punch from the rye and a bit of herbaceousness from Antica Formula sweet vermouth.

IN G R ED IEN TS ◆◆ 40ml Rittenhouse Rye ◆◆ 25ml chai syrup ◆◆ 20ml Antica Formula ◆◆ Cream float ◆◆ Nutmeg, to garnish

Pour all ingredients except the cream into a mixing glass and stir until everything is chilled and mixed. Pour over ice into the glass and float cream on top to taste. Garnish with a dusting of nutmeg. raysbarlondon.com

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TALLI JOE BARTENDER: Nitin Tewari COCKTAIL: Chai Nog Eggnog is an American festive tradition, and it’s simpler to make than you might think. This recipe from Soho’s modern Indian Talli Joe includes the instructions to make a masala-infused rum, which you can use in all manner of other mixes, for the winter and beyond.

INGREDIENTS The eggnog

◆◆ 700ml milk ◆◆ 250ml double cream ◆◆ 3 cinnamon sticks ◆◆ 1 split vanilla pod ◆◆ 1 tbsp nutmeg ◆◆ 130g sugar ◆◆ 5 egg yolks

The cocktail

◆◆ 75ml eggnog ◆◆ 5ml egg whites ◆◆ 50ml white rum ◆◆ 6 masala teabags

Prepare a batch of eggnog by placing the milk, double cream, cinnamon sticks, vanilla pod and nutmeg in a saucepan, bringing to the boil and then down to a simmer. Whisk together 130g sugar and five egg yolks, then add to the saucepan and whisk before leaving to cool. Make your masala rum by placing 6 masala teabags into a 1l bottle of white rum, and leave to infuse overnight. To make the cocktail, dry shake 75ml eggnog, 50ml masala rum and 5ml egg whites in a Boston shaker, before shaking again with ice. Strain into a chai glass, garnish with freshly grated nutmeg and a star anise and serve. tallijoe.com

THE PROVIDORES BARTENDER: Roberto Francioso COCKTAIL: Framboise de Noël For a light drink that’s still got a proper, wintry twist, look no further than this tasty cocktail from Peter Gordon’s iconic Marylebone restaurant The Providores. A classic vodka, cranberry and lemon-based long drink gets a festive twist in the form of Chambord liqueur, vanilla from the vodka, and a pinch of cinnamon. It’s easy to make on a large scale, too, so you can batch it and serve it to however many you’re catering for. Your Christmas Eve party: sorted.

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IN G R ED IEN TS ◆◆ 35ml vanilla vodka ◆◆ 20ml Chambord ◆◆ 3 fresh raspberries ◆◆ Pinch of cinnamon ◆◆ 35ml cranberry juice ◆◆ 20ml lemon juice ◆◆ 10ml sugar ◆◆ Egg white

Muddle the fresh raspberries in a Boston glass, add all the ingredients and shake over ice. Double strain into a coupe glass and garnish with a raspberry – freezedried if possible. theprovidores.co.uk


A TASTE OF CHRISTMAS...

Wookey Hole Cave Aged Cheddar is a PDO traditional West Country Farmhouse Cheddar handmade in Dorset and aged in Somerset’s famous Wookey Hole Caves. It is rich, tangy and mature in flavour and will add a genuine taste of adventure to the Christmas cheeseboard.

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DON’T PANIC Dig yourself out of a festive eating-anddrinking rut with tips from the best in the business. You’ll be rustling up golden quail’s eggs in no time…

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OR MANY OF us, the Christmas break is one of the few times in the year that we get to kick back, relax, and devote serious time to simply enjoying ourselves. One of the best bits is the food and drink and – for the most part – the time we spend around the table with family and friends. That said, Christmas entertaining has its own stresses – you want everything to be perfect, you want everyone to enjoy themselves, and you want everyone to like your meal more than your sister-in-law’s last year. That’s why we asked a few of our favourite people for their top tips. From matching wine with food, to creating a perfectly balanced cheeseboard – from the outré to the traditional – here’s how to get the most out of festive feasting.

DO FESTIVE ENTERTAINING RIGHT Alex Head, founder, Social Pantry

Photograph by Aboli

Christmas definitely gives me more creative license to come up with exciting additions and simple touches which make food look even more impressive. When it comes to Christmas parties, first impressions really count. Get the party started properly with a selection of canapés or nibbles to welcome your guests on their arrival. A simple soft-boiled quail egg with flavoured salt (think black lava salt for impact or asmoked salt for a more sophisticated flavour combination) will make everyone feel suitably welcomed. At Social Pantry, we love to coat the eggs in an edible gold dust to add a touch of glamour to the evening. To complement your chosen canapés, every Christmas Party needs some fizz. Adding some cassis or sloe gin to your prosecco is an all-time favourite but you can take it one step further with violet crystals, which turns glasses of fizz an eyecatching purple. The finer details of entertaining are always something that, if executed well, are remembered. Take time to pick out a few classic servingware items that complement one another and show off your food. Here’s where I like to get a little creative – use a vintage tea cup to hold your quail eggs, or serve a stack of golden brownies on a mirror. A fun festive twist can always be a nice touch. Our Social Pantry sherry fudge has been a seasonal favourite this year and I like to think we’re helping bring sherry back into fashion. A melt-inthe-mouth fudge paired with a golden oldie tipple will not disappoint. It’s definitely a Dad favourite! Remember, entertaining should be as enjoyable for the host as it is for guests. Plan your menu, presentation and drinks well in advance and you’ll have plenty of time to enjoy the run up to Christmas and, more importantly, the party. To see the recipes for the dishes mentioned above visit foodism.co.uk/recipes; for more tips, visit alexhead.co.uk.

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RAISE YOUR CHRISTMAS SPIRITS Dawn Davies, buyer, The Whisky Exchange

MAKE A VEGETARIAN STATEMENT Sarah Wasserman, development chef at Mildreds Soho The great thing about a traditional roast is that there are often enough vegetable side dishes to sustain vegetarians but at Christmas you really need the king at the table – a centrepiece that makes everyone say “wow”. If you’re cooking a meal for both vegetarians and carnivores, there are lots of ways to keep everyone happy. Delicious vegetarian stuffing combining pear, thyme and chestnut, or pumpkin, cranberry and pecan can be used for the meat dishes as well as a side. Likewise, if catering for just one or two vegetarians you could make Yorkshire pudding and then buy some goodquality vegetarian sausages to make individual, meat-free toads in the hole. Or try turning a traditional side dish like cauliflower cheese into a showstopper. Season a purple or romanesco cauliflower with herbs and garlic, then wholeroast it before topping with a rich cheese sauce. A good meat-free gravy is a great way to make a festive meal extra special. Create a stock with a caramelised onion base, then add fennel, parsnips or similar. Then, as with any good gravy, use a quality (vegetarian) wine or port (reduced) as the base and add the stock. Because you don’t have the gelatine from the bones, as you do with meat stock, you have to add a little emulsifier (cornflour or flour) to thicken. Over the years at Mildreds we’ve made a number of great centrepiece dishes. This year, we’re excited about our latest Christmas main; a beautiful butternut squash and tofu terrine with roasted squash, hazelnut and redcurrant stuffing and orange maple glaze, and our starter – warm goats cheese and thyme custard, topped with pecan gratin and served with fresh figs. It is so rich and creamy I can’t imagine anyone would feel they were being short-changed. mildreds.co.uk; to see Sarah’s vegetarian Christmas recipes, visit foodism.co.uk/recipes

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FOR A DIGESTIF THAT’S DIFFERENT, SWEET AND FRESH, WHY NOT GO FOR A YUZU SAKE?

– DAWN DAVIES

Big Christmas affairs are much less about pairing the food and the drink and more about keeping all the relatives happy. If you are having a big party stick with some classic choices to please everyone, for example a good fruity sauvignon blanc, a juicy malbec, and champagne or prosecco. If you want a cocktail, do one that you can make before and serve easily – punches and mulled wine are good choices. It’s the smaller affairs that present an opportunity to branch out have some fun! Pick an English sparkling wine instead of champagne and don’t do port with your blue cheese but try a sweet red wine like a maury. With the Christmas pud, an Aussie sparkling shiraz will have your guests talking for months. There are so many digestif options that it is almost impossible to know where to start. One of my favourite post-dinner drinks is Vieille Prune – this tasty eau-de-vie, from producers like Louis Roque, is the perfect match for Christmas cake. You could replace port or sherry with Pineau des Charentes from the Cognac region – it’s made from grape juice and cognac, so it’s a little nutty but has a great fruit character. For coffee lovers, a snifter of Mr Black’s coffee liqueur offers an alternative to a post-dinner espresso. But if you really want to go left field and do something very different that is sweet but fresh why not go for a yuzu sake, a delectably moreish digestif that will revitalise the taste buds. For the Christmas Day nightcap, I find madeira or marsala a nice way to finish the evening as they are packed with flavour but not sickly sweet. Elsewhere, a good Italian amaro will help aid digestion, but be warned: the bitter herbal flavour isn’t for everyone! When it comes down to it, Christmas is all about treating yourself, and what better way to finish the day than with a simple cocktail like a manhattan or a negroni, both classics that everyone will love. The Whisky Exchange; thewhiskyexchange.com


AN ALTERNATIVE FESTIVE WINE LIST Laure Patry, executive head sommelier, Social Wine & Tapas

WITH TURKEY, TRY A WINE FROM GREECE, LIKE A FULLBODIED ASSYRTIKO FROM SANTORINI

– LAURE PATRY

For an aperitif on Christmas Day to go with canapes, try a pétillant naturel – a naturally slightly sparkling wine that’s refreshing, fun and (as it happens) much cheaper than champagne. You can find some interesting varietals from Loire or Italy. If you want an alternative to sparkling wine, a liqueur can also make a delicious start, like the Liqueur de Tomates from Domaine des Cazottes – it’s made from 72 different types of tomato and is a very artisanal product. It works beautifully with black olive and anchovy toasts. With turkey, look for wines from different countries like Greece, such as a full-bodied assyrtiko from Santorini. Or you could try an orange wine – they have more richness and body than a white. At Social Wine & Tapas we have the Georgian rkatsiteli mtsvane from Nikoloz Antadze – the local grape, Rkatsiteli, is left on the skins and stems for three to six months in qvevri (amphora-like vessels). It has structure and is very perfumed with floral and apricot notes, savoury on the palate with a dry finish. If you prefer a red, look for a Loire Valley red from the pinot d’aunis grape: it’s a very light, fresh, juicy and easy drinking grape. I’d recommend the producer La Grapperie, who make one with lots of aromatic herb and wild strawberry aromas. To go with cheese, a must for me would be a vin jaune (yellow wine) from Chateau Chalon – if you have a large table it’s a very special wine that can be enjoyed on a special occasion and is best with cheese. You could also try a macvin du jura if you like a complex wine with some sweetness. It’s actually grape juice fortified directly and aged in oak. We serve Domaine Macle at Social Wine & Tapas, with typical aromas of Christmas pudding, spices and smokiness. Another option is a palo cortado sherry: it has the structure, dried fruits and a dry finish to cut through the richness of the cheese. Fernando de Castilla is a good example. To accompany your Christmas pudding, try a deep and rich cognac. I recommend the Frapin Chateau de Fontpinot XO. Social Wine & Tapas, a tapas bar and wine shop in Marylebone, is part of Jason Atherton’s Social Company. This Christmas, Laure is offering personal shopping appointments in the wine shop; socialwineandtapas.com.

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SURVIVING THE DAY AFTER Dan Doherty, chefdirector, Duck & Waffle

ENJOY A

SOUTHERN WELCOME THIS CHRISTMAS

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For me, Boxing Day breakfast is dictated by both what’s been cooked and what’s happened the day before. Overdone it? There’s nothing more rewarding than turning Christmas Day leftovers into a decadent, hangover-curing brunch. The easiest, and most indulgent, is a good old hash. Sauté leftover roast ingredients together with a good knob of butter. I’d suggest using about 50% roasties and 50% anything else, including chopped turkey, halved sprouts, crushed carrots and even a spoonful of cranberry sauce. Crumble in some black pudding for good measure and cook it all down for a solid 10-15 minutes so the potatoes get a decent crisp to them and all the flavours have a chance to fall into one another. In the meantime, reduce any leftover gravy with a generous spoonful of HP sauce until it’s a thick consistency, and use this to drizzle over the hash that’s been crowned with a couple of fried eggs. If you’re feeling a bit over all the Christmas indulgence and fancy something lighter, try a healthy combination of some of my favourite Middle Eastern ingredients. Try a few softboiled eggs, peeled and halved, with some hummus, baby spinach, avocado, cherry tomatoes, a drizzle of harissa let down with some olive oil, toasted sunflower and sesame seeds and a touch of yogurt spiced with sumac. about “ N O You’ll N E Ghave E N Uforgotten INE BU T Mthe I N effects E”™ of yesterday’s feast in no time. Duck & Waffle is the restaurant on the 40th floor of the Heron Tower. duckandwaffle.com

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LEAVE NOTHING BEHIND Tom Hunt, Foodism columnist and eco chef At Christmas, leftovers are inevitable. But rather than leftovers being something to feel sad about they can become gold dust, a free meal, or the start of an inspirational dinner made up of what would otherwise go to waste. When our time is so precious, this makes leftovers a luxury. It’s worth noting that all cooked food keeps perfectly well for four to five days in the fridge. It can be eaten cold or reheated thoroughly until it’s hot right through. On boxing day my family have a tradition – like many others I’m sure – of eating all the leftovers over a late boozy lunch; and it’s my favourite meal of the whole week. My tip to impress the family on boxing day with your culinary ingenuity is to get creative. Magic leftover roast meat into a pilaf by combining it with leftover roast vegetables and aromatic spices, boiling it up with rice and serving with dried fruits and yoghurt, Moroccan-style. Stir fry brussels sprouts with soya sauce, sunflower seeds, ginger and garlic for a punchy lunch dish. And if you’re lucky enough to have roast potatoes leftover, heat them up with paprika and serve with mayonnaise spiked with chili powder for a quick tapas. Buen provecho! The Natural Cook by Tom Hunt is available now (Quadrille, £20). For more on Tom and his restaurants: tomsfeast.com; @tomsfeast

ENJOY A

SOUTHERN WELCOME

THIS DON’T FORGET CHRISTMAS CHRISTMAS EVE Massimo Bottura, chef-patron, Osteria Francescana in Italy

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Christmas and Christmas Eve are the only two days when I’m nostalgic. On Christmas Eve we always eat fish. We set up a big buffet table with salted cod and a long slice of wild salmon, lightly smoked at a low temperature, because my mum loves salmon. We have burrata that’s sent that day from Puglia, with anchovies. People go to the buffet to eat and to chat – it’s very friendly. Then I keep everything very simple. Everyone in my family loves a good risotto. I make a fish soup and use the broth to cook the risotto. We have a big sea bass that’s cooked in the oven under salt, and then we break the salt – the kids love that. Next we’ll have soufflé of panettone. We make panettone, then we simmer everything and add the yolk, some whipped egg white and crunchy almonds, then we put it in the oven at 180°C and it comes out not only as panettone, but also as a soufflé. For us, an Italian Christmas means staying around the table and spending time there. In a life like ours – full of obsession and craziness and travelling – staying in and relaxing with my family is something amazing for me. That’s the inspiration for the soup kitchens I’ve opened around the world. My one real piece of advice would be to be nostalgic. Don’t lose your traditions. It’s very important to keep them alive. In art, even the most contemporary artists break all the rules, but they have to know who they are and where they come from. Massimo Bottura is chef patron of Osteria SOUTHERNCOMFORTUK Francescana, in Modena, currently ranked as number 1 in the World’s 50 Best Restaurants; #SOUTHERNWELCOME osteriafrancescana.it.

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LE GRAND FROMAGE Ian Wellens, managing director, The Cheese Shed The first thing to do is try to create a cheeseboard with plenty of variety, and when doing this there are a couple of rules to bear in mind. The first thing is to try and start with a hard cow’s cheese, a blue and a brie. The second rule is that if you add cheeses to the basic three, make sure you add cheeses from different families. For your hard cheese, the most obvious and popular category is a cheddar. Try to choose a pretty one, like a Cornish Smuggler, which has a tracery of orange veins. For your blue cheese, go for something mild like a Cornish Blue. For your brie choice – these are sometimes known as a mould-ripen cheeses, because they have a downy, white, moulden rind on them, which adds to the flavour – I would recommend a Bath Soft, a fantastic, organic unpasteurised brie. And that’s the simple, classic cheeseboard. If you would like to add a fourth cheese to your cheeseboard, try to remember the second rule, which is to choose from different families. There are lots so it can get complicated, but there are some dead easy ones which we can all remember, like smoked cheese, goats cheese or cheeses which have flavour added to them. A Sharp and Rustic with garlic and herbs is always a good addition. Contrast is a good rule for accompaniments too. A floury, soft biscuit like an Oval Albert is great with a tangy cheddar, but add a snappy, brittle oat biscuit – or something like a Peter’s Yard Crispbread – to go with the softer cheeses. With chutneys, a good rule is to go with one that’s mainstream and fruit-based and another that’s a little more exotic. That might be the Old Bakehouse Chutney by Clare’s Preserves and something like Hillside’s Piccalilli Relish – a spicy tweak on an old favourite. And find a place on your cheeseboard for a set, sliceable fruit preserve. Traditionally, the Spanish membrillo uses quinces for this, but Dorset-based Global Harvests make some gorgeous versions with pears, damsons, figs and apples. The Cheese Shed is a mail-order cheese service specialising in West Country produce, including chutneys, charcuterie and drinks; thecheeseshed.com

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SWEET THINGS Chantelle Nicholson, chef-patron, Tredwells Menus should be about balance, so if you’re having something very rich then balance it with something that is slightly cleaner on the palate. Citrus works well, and trifle is always a must on my Christmas day list – with loads of sherry! Other festive flavours to highlight are ginger, cloves – in moderation as they’re so strong – mulled wine, pine, nutmeg and clementine. When planning what I’m going to make, I generally balance something fruity, something warm and something chocolatey if you have a large number of guests. This means everyone can have a taste and not over indulge too much. I particularly like my frangipane mince pies and my treacle tart, which is pure indulgence. I make it with a delicious soft shortcrust pastry base. Shortcrust pastry serves with a soft, crumbly texture, making it the best option for pies, quiches or tarts. To make the perfect shortcrust pastry at home, keep all ingredients and surface area cool, which helps to keep the pastry light and crumbly. Do not over-handle the pastry or roll out with too much flour – you’ll find this will develop the gluten and make your pastry harder and tougher. Always rest the pastry between making and after rolling out, as this will reduce shrinkage and keep it ‘short’. To see Chantelle’s Christmas recipes, head to foodism.co.uk/recipes f


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NO ACT OF KINDNESS IS EVER WASTED You don’t need to be a wealthy philanthropist or a creative genius to do a bit of good. All you have to do, in fact, is follow our handy guide to turning junk into gems – just like these beautiful vases

I Photograph by ###

F YOU CAUGHT foodism’s recent sustainability special, you’ll know that taking a responsible approach to what we eat and drink is important to us. With that in mind, we’ve teamed up with brandnew non-profit organisation Kindness.org to create an initiative designed to turn food and drink waste into something good. We’ve come up with a number of ways to transform a few of the items that regularly end up in the bin – from a tin can reimagined as a garden tea-light holder, to a drinks bottle-vase with a Scandi design twist. All you have to do is go to fdsm.co/kindness, follow the link to our Kindness.org initiative and sign yourself up. Worried you lack the necessary skills to turn junk into design classics? No need – our designers have created detailed instructions, along with a cool stop-motion video, that’ll enable anyone to knock up a masterpiece (or a whole collection to fill your house with). You’ll find them by heading to fdsm.co/kindness.

In the meantime, if you’re eager to get cracking now, turn the page to find out how to turn some old bottles and a ball of string (if you’re anything like us you’ll have one in the back of a cupboard somewhere) into a great-looking vase. All you need is some junk, some spray paint, a bit of time and a steady hand. Now get making… f

KINDNESS.ORG Want to spread a bit of kindness? Head to Kindness.org – a non-profit organisation that facilitates initiatives aimed at creating a better, friendlier world. You can join a Kindness initiative – it could be anything from committing to pick up some litter, to having a conversation with a homeless person – then carry out your act of kindness and share it with others. Go forth and be kind…

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CLICK

FOODISM.CO.UK

MATERIALS ◆◆ Glass bottle ◆◆ PVA glue ◆◆ Small craft brush ◆◆ Ball of string (natural or white) ◆◆ Masking tape ◆◆ Scissors ◆◆ Spray paint ◆◆ Protective spray mask ◆◆ Cardboard box (to use as a

spray booth)

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PROCESS 1 Soak the label off. 2 Starting with the neck, coat the bottle with about 50mm of PVA glue. 3 Place the end of the string on the neck (just under the rim) and use your thumb and finger to hold it in place. Slowly rotate the bottle, ensuring the string is following one edge and not overlapping. Gradually increase the amount of PVA when the string begins to reach the end of each section, until you reach the end of the bottle. 4 Once the string has been left to dry, you can then mask off a pattern or design with strips of masking tape. 5 Spray the bottle, coating all the way around (remember to use a spray booth and protective mask). 6 Leave to dry then remove the tape. 7 You did it! Now share some pics…

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TIP: When removing the label, don’t worry about any glue marks left behind – this will be covered up by the string.

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TIP: Leave a spare length of string when you’ve finished covering the whole bottle. It’s easier to cut closer to the end when it’s completely dry.


SPRAYING TIPS

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When creating the spray booth, secure the bottom edge with tape so there are no gaps. Turn the box on its side so the bottle is enclosed on three sides. Several coats may be needed for an even coverage. Always follow instructions on the spray can for drying times and safety advice.

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Peter’s Yard award-winning sourdough crispbread. The natural choice when entertaining.

Available in specialist food shops, Waitrose, Ocado, Whole Foods Market, Fortnum & Mason, Selfridges and John Lewis Food Halls.

Visit www.petersyard.com to buy online and to find your local stockist.


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RIGHT: The Copas family is one of the leading producers of turkeys in the UK – they’ve enlisted alpacas to help avoid fox attacks

Photograph by ###

DREAM TEAM

In a green field 40 miles west of London, a team of alpacas are helping to protect some very special turkeys. Jon Hawkins joins the Copas family to find out more 73


Boggis and Bunce both stared at Bean. Bean took another swig of cider, then put the flask back into his pocket without offering it to the others. “Listen,” he said angrily, “I want that fox! I’m going to get that fox! I’m not giving in till I’ve strung him up over my front porch, dead as a dumpling!” FROM ‘FANTASTIC MR FOX’ BY ROALD DAHL

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ITHOUT WANTING TO ruin one of the greatest stories of our times, I think I could have saved every character in Fantastic Mr Fox – from Mr and Mrs Fox and the kids to those creatively evil poultry farmers – a whole lot of hassle with one quick piece of advice. Farmers: get yourselves some alpacas. If they had, the whole thing would have been wrapped up by page 10, because foxes really, really don’t like the goofy-looking South American camelids.

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IT WAS A BIT OF A MEXICAN STANDOFF AT FIRST, BUT THESE DAYS THEY ALL GET ALONG FINE

I don’t see any real evidence of this as I skirt fields dotted with babbling, ambling turkeys (and the odd alpaca) at the Copas family’s Berkshire turkey farm – which, I suppose, is the point. Director Tom Copas, whose father (also Tom) founded the Copas brand, introduced a pair of alpacas (called Sage and Onion) to one of the turkey ranges in 2015 in an attempt to reduce the number of fox attacks. The results were immediate. “We had one more attack in that pen and that was it,” he tells me, as we clamber over a waist-high electric fence and into one of the pens. “We could see the fox had changed its route and was avoiding that pen completely, and once we knew where it was coming from we could defend against it.” Following two more fox attacks at the beginning of this season, Copas bought another eight alpacas (Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet,


DEDICATION TO THE CAUSE As Tom Copas and I sit chatting over lunch (a turkey roll, naturally), I ask him if anyone’s ever broached the subject of serving, say, a goose for the Copas family Christmas. “They wouldn’t dare,” he says, laughing. “We wouldn’t have it any other way.” In fact, it isn’t unusual for him and his siblings to turn up at their parents’ house on Christmas Eve only to be given a scorecard and several competitors’ turkeys to asses: “You���ve just finished and packed up for the year and you’re confronted with a table full of turkeys.”

Cupid, Dunder and Blitzen) as a deterrent. Trying to get a closer look at a couple of alpacas is trickier than you might think. While the turkeys immediately head towards us, gathering to gobble and peck inquisitively at my wellies, the alpacas are much warier, preferring to stay partially hidden behind clumps of cover crops. Even so, they and the turkeys don’t seem particularly fussed about one another. “It was a bit of a Mexican standoff at first,” says Copas. “They stared at each other as if to say ‘Who are you?’ ‘No, who are you?’, but these days the turkeys don’t seem bothered by the alpacas at all.” Being pretty low maintenance, and living mostly off grass, they don’t cause the humans on the farm much trouble, either, which is one of the reasons Copas has been so happy with the alpacas – all of whom are castrated mature adult males (“Grumpy old men,

basically,” jokes Copas). Unlike the turkeys, which arrive in May and leave in December, they’re on the farm all year round, and this, as Copas explains to me, is crucial in preventing the foxes setting up home when there are no turkeys on the farm. “When you’re only using the ranges for six months of the year, anything can happen. The cover crops become established and the foxes, which are very territorial, can live in them.” With ten alpacas now on-site permanently, this shouldn’t prove a problem. The Copas family have been in the Thames-side village of Cookham for about 350 years, and they’ve been farmers for the last century. He represents the fourth generation of Copas farmers, though it was his father who founded the turkey business in 1957 after his own pig-farmer father bought him 153 turkey poults (that’s babies) to keep him out of trouble. He raised the birds, sold them by going from door to door in Cookham, and so began a business that would evolve into a leading producer of artisan seasonal turkeys (Copas Very Very Special Turkeys), not to mention a sustainable chicken farmer (The Thoughtful Producer), an events company and a property division. Diversifying into festivals and bricks and mortar may seem like a radical departure, but it makes sense – Copas Very Very Special Turkeys is an inherently seasonal business, with a laser-guided focus on Christmas. I visit the Copas turkey farm at the end of October, arriving in Maidenhead by train on a morning that’s misty and unseasonably warm. This, Tom Copas tells me on the short car journey between the station and the farm, is a problem. The prolonged warm spell means his turkeys, carefully selected to fit into specific weight bands come December, risk growing too big and “nudging up into a different weight category”. There’s only one flock of Copas turkeys reared each year, and with good reason. As Copas puts it, “We’re producing a top-end product and the market’s really only there for it in any kind of scale at Christmas.” The team (of around 20 year-round staff, plus another 120 in the four weeks before Christmas) starts calling butchers to take orders in February, and this is used to inform the number of hatchlings they take on in May. No wonder they’ve enlisted a team of alpacas to help safeguard their annual incomings. More than 30,000 day-old poults arrive, and all are of the bronze variety – a native breed that, by the middle of the 20th century, had been largely replaced by white turkeys →

TURKEY PRODUCTION IS A VERY SEASONAL BUSINESS, WITH A FOCUS ON CHRISTMAS HAY GUYS: Turkeys roam free in the Berkshire fields of the Copas family farm, with a team of fox-deterring alpacas as company, of course

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→ for commercial turkey production, until a small band of farmers decided to start breeding them again in the 1980s. While all of Copas’ turkeys are now freerange-reared bronze, 12 different sub-breeds are used, each growing to a different size and therefore resulting in 12 target weight categories when the turkeys are slaughtered at 26 weeks. This in itself is really important, Copas explains to me, because it means every turkey reaches maturity. This is in contrast to much of the large-scale commercial turkey production, where birds are slaughtered at different ages to hit target weights, which results in inconsistent (and often less desirable) proportions of bone structure, meat and fat. The new arrivals are kept in a shed under brooding rings for a week to ten days, then, once they’re strong enough they’re let loose inside the shed, where they stay for six weeks. At this point they’re moved to the growing sheds. “We give them a further week here, now on straw bedding, just to get their bearings and figure out where the food and water is, then we let them out to range,” Copas tells me. The farm actually uses

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FREE STYLING: The turkeys at the Copas farm enjoy a high quality of life, which in turn produces some of the tastiest turkeys in the business

COPAS RAISES 12 DIFFERENT SUB-BREEDS, WHICH MEANS THE BIRDS FALL INTO 12 WEIGHT CATEGORIES

two models – perma-housing (big sheds, basically) that backs onto open fields, and into which the birds are herded each night; and big, open perma-tunnels with access to range day and night. At 26 weeks, once the turkeys are fully developed, the process of production – slaughter, through to the packaged product being sent out or picked up – begins. Copas and I wander from the farm’s central office to the large sheds in which all of this happens. Though hardly as enjoyable a setting as the rolling fields we’d been wandering around in earlier, what goes on in here plays a hugely important role in defining the ‘Very Very Special’ component of the Copas brand. All Copas turkeys are dry plucked and then game hung – a niche process that Tom Copas senior, among others, fought to save from being outlawed in the 1980s. Wet plucking is the norm – once killed, the birds are immersed in a hot water bath to loosen the feathers, which are then pulled out by machine. But that, as Copas explains as we walk through the eerily quiet facility – which will become a hive of noise, activity and intensity as Christmas approaches – presents a problem if you’re trying to make the besttasting product possible. “You can’t wet pluck and then hang because it’ll go off. In order to mature the meat you have to do things in a particular way. To hang beef for long enough to develop flavour, you need to have enough fat in it, and it’s the same with turkey.” To have developed that fat – so the turkey effectively bastes itself when you roast it, too – it needs to be sufficiently mature, which also means the skin is thick enough to resist dry plucking. “We’ve tried plucking them younger but they’re like porcupines,” says Copas. Once the slaughtered birds have been plucked (by dipping them in molten wax, which is then chilled and pulled off when hardened, taking most of the feathers with it), they’re hung on large racks for two weeks. They’re eviscerated (that’s the removal of the ‘pack’ of innards, and other associated tasks) after hanging – a process referred to as ‘delayed eviscerated’ or ‘New York dressed’ – before being packaged up, ready to be sold. The end result is an artisan product that, from the point the hatchlings arrive at the farm, is created entirely within an eightmile radius of the shed I’m standing in. It’s a finely-tuned and delicately balanced process that requires meticulous planning and a skilled, dedicated team. A team that now includes ten curly-haired, four-legged bodyguards with a vendetta against foxes. f copasturkeys.co.uk


Save 40p Bisto Best Gravy Range 200g

TERMS AND CONDITIONS TO THE CUSTOMER: This coupon may be used for £0.40 off Bisto Best Gravy Range (200g). This coupon shall remain the property of Premier Foods and is not for re-sale or publication and redeemable for any other product. One coupon per product, and this coupon has no cash value and no change will be given. Copied or damaged coupons will not be accepted. This coupon cannot be used in conjunction with any other in-store promotion. Coupon valid at Morrisons, Tesco, Asda, Sainsbury’s stores subject to availability. TO THE RETAILER: This coupon will be redeemed to a maximum value of £0.40 ONLY that it has been accepted for the purchase of a can of Bisto Best Gravy Range (200g). Premier Foods reserves the right to require proof of purchase, or to refuse redemption of defaced or damaged coupons, or those that have not been correctly redeemed as instructed to the consumer. This coupon cannot be used in conjunction with any other in-store promotion. Send your coupons to:Valassis Ltd, PO BOX 6199, Nuneaton. CV11 9HQ within 13 weeks of the expiry date of the coupon. COUPON CODE: 0003-00168 VALID FROM: 05.12.2016 VALID UNTIL: 05.01.2017


AWARD WINNING GIN FROM THE SILENT POOL IN SURREY Now available at Waitrose stores nationwide. www.silentpooldistillers.com


SEASON S EATINGS It may not seem like it but planning for Christmas should be fun. We also know it can be stressful – so we’ve put together a selection of our favourite festive food and drink. Get shopping…

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In association with

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STOCKING FILLERS

GEAR

FILL YOUR BOOTS

Treats and trinkets for your food-loving friends and family – or just for you. We won’t tell...

TO T HE POINT Knife set, Paxton & Whitfield, £45 Did you know different cheeses require different blades? Neither did we… paxtonandwhitfield.co.uk

DAILY G R IND ECF01 espresso maker, Smeg, £280

EASY CHEESY Italian trio cheese-making kit, £25

With retro styling that comes in four colours, this gadget would look great on any worktop. smeguk.com

This kit provides everything you need to make your own ricotta, mozzarella or mascarpone – just add cow’s milk. tabl.com

BOOK ’EM Knife by Tim Hayward, £20 Probably one of the sexiest food-related books to come out this year, and a must for anyone passionate about cooking. amazon.co.uk

CHERRY ON TOP Villa Manodori dark cherry vinegar, £24.95 Villa Manodori is owned by Massimo Bottura, chef-patron of Osteria Francescana – ranked number one in the World’s 50 Best Restaurants. harveynichols.com

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G L ASS AC T Carafe set, LSA, £50 This set of mouth-blown glass carafes on an oak base is as functional as it is stylish. lsa-international.com


HAMPERS

T H E N EW O NE

T HE T E A ONE

T HE OR GANIC ON E

Belazu, £45

The East India Tea Company, £35

Waitrose Duchy Organic, £100

Featuring Belazu’s much-loved olive oils, cooking pastes and specialist ingredients, this hamper will keep enthusiastic home cooks in stock for months. belazu.com

The East India Tea Company’s ‘The Adventure Begins’ hamper comes complete with Earl Grey tea, biscuits and a tea strainer for one. theeastindiacompany.com

Holds 16 foodie favourites, including classic teas, preserves, biscuits, Christmas pudding, and ales, all produced in association with HRH’s Cornish farm. waitrose.com

THE F RE NCH O NE Paul, £35 Live out your French fantasies with this hamper from the artisanal baker, which contains an apron, a bread bag, jams and coffee cups. paul-uk.com

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CHEESE

DEVIL ISHLY G O O D Waitrose 1 beer cheese, £28.99/kg This cheese is made with Duvel, which is Belgian for ‘devil’ – a name it earned for its headache-inducing qualities. Cheese hangover coming your way. waitrose.com

THE BOARD IDENTITY

The cheeseboard is undoubtedly one of the best parts of Christmas. Waitrose cheese buyer Chris Dawson shares his tips for success “A Christmas cheeseboard is a musthave after tucking into the traditional turkey, but with such a variety of cheese available at Christmas, sometimes it can be a bit overwhelming to choose just a few. The Waitrose 1 range offers cheese lovers a wide selection to impress their guests, including both homemade British cheeses and a selection of the best that the French, Swiss, Dutch and Italians have to offer. The Badoz Vacherin du Haut-Doubs A.O.P (£9.49) is a seasonal cheese, available only from September to March. It’s traditionally bound with spruce bark, which infuses the cheese with a unique flavour. It’s delicious served hot, with bread or seasonal vegetables. Waitrose 1 goat’s milk gouda (£4.49) is made by the Klaver Kaas brothers, who rear all their own goats. The cheese is handmade on the farm in North Holland, in the traditional way, with wheels being

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hand-turned daily during the cheese’s ten-month maturation. Looking to Switzerland, the iconic Waitrose 1 Le Cret gruyere (£24.99/kg) is made by a village dairy with milk from cows grazed on mountain pastures. Its complex, nutty, spicy flavour makes it a perfect choice for a cheeseboard. Elsewhere, the Waitrose 1 La Retorta (£6.49) is a small soft-scooping Spanish sheep’s cheese with amazing flavour. Christmas wouldn’t be complete without a blue cheese. Waitrose 1 Colston Bassett dairy blue stilton, (£18.99/kg) is full of flavour and is an essential cheeseboard centrepiece For some more adventurous additions to the Christmas table, serve up the Waitrose 1 Belgian beer cheese (£28.99/ kg) or the Waitrose baking goat’s cheese with black cherry and port compote 2s, (£4.00). Simply pop in the oven and pour over the compote to serve.”


GET YOUR GOAT

TOAST OF T HE TOW N

T RUE B L UE

Waitrose 1 goat’s milk gouda, £4.49

Cherry and almond toast for cheese, The Fine Cheese Co, £3.35

Waitrose 1 Colston Bassett Dairy Blue Stilton, £18.99/kg

Light, thin and crisp, these ‘toasts’ are at least 60% fruit, nuts and seeds. Time to learn how to pair cheese with biscuits. finecheese.co.uk

No Christmas cheeseboard is complete without a smelly blue cheese. This one, made in Nottinghamshire, is particularly creamy. waitrose.com

Handmade in northern Holland by the Klaver brothers, this cheese is smooth and sweet with a caramel aroma – a unique take on a cheeseboard favourite. waitrose.com

WAST E NOT Pear, fig and port chutney, Rubies in the Rubble, £5 Perfect with stilton, this chutney is made with food that would otherwise go to waste – each jar saves at least one whole pear. rubiesintherubble.com

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ON THE DAY

ST EP UP TO THE PLAT TE R Waitrose 1 deli platter, £15.99 A selection of cured meats, cheeses and olives? A sure-fire crowd-pleaser. waitrose.com

G ET SAUCE D Cranberry sauce, Rosebud Preserves, £3.60 This one-size-fits-all condiment goes with turkey, game and ham. rosebudpreserves.com

T HE T RU F F L E SHU F F L E Heston By Waitrose Ultimate Chocolate Truffle Cake, £15

SOFT LY SO F TLY Soft drinks, Karma Cola, £1.59 each Not drinking? Try Karma Cola’s range – it’s all made with organic, Fairtrade ingredients. waitrose.com

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What do we need to say, other than this is essentially a giant truffle? And it’s all ours… waitrose.com


TREATS

PI E CE O F CA K E Panettone, Harvey Nichols, £8.95 The light-as-air Italian Christmas cake is the perfect pairing with an espresso or a glass of dessert wine. harveynichols.com

T HROW A WO B B LY

BE ANS M E ANS...

Biscuit tins, Walkers, £8

Costa Rica San Isidro coffee beans, Volcano Coffee Works, £8.40

These fun biscuit tins have a rounded bottom so they wobble gently. Oh, and they contain 18 Walkers shortbread biscuits. walkershortbread.com

This coffee blend, with brown sugar, pear, nut and chocolate notes, is made in Brixton. tabl.com

C HOC OL AT E B OX Ginger Thins, Divine Chocolate, £3.50 Dark chocolate thins with a soft and spicy centre, which make a delicious alternative to after-dinner mints. divinechocolate.com

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WINE

BOTTLE SERVICE

A feast as important as the one on Christmas Day needs a selection of wines to match – here are Waitrose wine expert Anne Jones’s picks STARTE R Festive fizz “If you’re starting your festive three courses with a traditional smoked salmon starter, do it in style with bubbles. Champagne boasts a citrussy brightness that cuts through the richness of salmon – a perfect pairing would be the Waitrose Blanc des Blancs (£22.99) or the Waitrose Brut NV (£18.99). If you’re looking for an alternative to champagne, try a fantastic English sparkling wine such as Nyetimber, (£32.99), which boasts notes of sweet brioche with a refreshing citrus twist.”

MAIN COURSE D ES SE RT Sweet treats “A traditional Christmas meal isn’t complete without a sweet treat, and this is the perfect time to break out the dessert wine. I’d recommend Campbells Rutherglen Muscat (£12.49), as it has a deep flavour to complement the rich dried fruit ingredients (not to mention the potential of brandy butter!).”

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“Choosing a wine for the main event doesn’t have to be complicated – it’s your Christmas, so have what you like best! However to make the best of both food and wine, it’s worth considering what you are serving alongside your turkey. While poultry is often best with white wines or very light reds, at Christmas there are often rich vegetable dishes and intense sauces. A red that’s fruity and smooth, with a freshness to balance all the rich

food, is indulgent yet not too heavy. Try the Luigi Bosca Single Vineyard malbec (£17.99), which has aromas of cherries and ripe plum and is perfect as a treat at Christmas. Alternatively, the Anda tempranillo/ syrah is the first wine from Andalucia for Waitrose. At £7.99 it’s amazing value, velvety smooth and full of juicy fruit.” All wines mentioned are available at waitrose.com f


Laurent-Perrier chosen by

The Dorchester

Illustrated by Quentin Blake

Photo credit: Iris Velghe / Illustrator credit: Quentin Blake

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092 GEORGIAN WINE | 096 BOTTLE SERVICE | 106 THE DIGEST 108 INSIDER: BRIGHTON | 112 THE SELECTOR | 130 DECONSTRUCT

— PART 3 —

EXCESS “TO GET THE FEAST GOING, IT’S NECESSARY FOR EACH MAN TO DRINK TWO LITRES OF WINE” ROB CROSSAN HEADS TO GEORGIA, 092


ABOVE: Grapes in Kakheti in eastern Georgia. The country’s wine-making history dates back 8,000 years

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REAL OLD WORLD GEORGIA Why are Stalin’s favourite wines on the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage List? Rob Crossan heads to Georgia’s vineyards to find out

Photograph by EcoFilms Georgia/Shutterstock Photograph by ###

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T

WO LITRES OF wine. In one gulp. From out of something that looks a lot like a horn transported from deep in the Austrian Alps. “Yes, it happens,” says my guide, Eka. “Sometimes to really get the feast going, it’s considered necessary for each man to drink this much. That’s before the party really gets started, of course.” This is the kind of wine consumption that would put lesser men (and women) into the nearest accident and emergency unit. But for a genuine supra – the Georgian word for an endless all day feast of food and wine – this kind of heroic (or suicidal) quantity of quaffing from a horn-shaped vessel is judged as the quickest and most efficient way possible to get a proper Georgian bacchanalia (aka drunken celebration) underway. Luckily, the wine produced in this littleknown corner of the Caucasus is a cut above what you might expect from a country on the fringes of the former Soviet Union. Back in the days of the hammer and sickle, Georgia, a remote part of the USSR hemmed in by the Black Sea and the Caucasus Mountains, had a reputation among Russians similar to how Amsterdam is viewed by 21st century backpackers; a boho love-in of a place where wine, women and song flow freely compared to neighbouring states. If you were a higher-ranking apparatchik in Moscow there was a strong chance that any state function you attended would have been fuelled by Georgian wine. A favourite of Joseph Stalin (himself a native of Georgia), the wine’s zest and freshness was adored by anyone who was lucky enough to have afforded a bottle in those frugal days. Come 2016, and Georgian wine, now barely available in Russia due to import bans put in place by Putin, is looking west to find a whole new audience of followers. “It’s true that Georgians are nothing

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THE WINE PRODUCED IN THIS LITTLEKNOWN CORNER OF THE CAUCASUS IS A CUT ABOVE WHAT YOU MIGHT EXPECT like Russians in our nature,” explains Eka, a 28-year-old native of Tbilisi, the nation’s languorously charming capital, who takes me into the wine region of Kakheti to explore the vineyards and villages of a country at the most extreme eastern edge of Europe. “We may have been part of Russia for decades but Georgians have different personalities,” Eka continues as we sit in the cobbled courtyard of the Pheasant’s Tears winemakers in the village of Sighnaghi. “We love to dance and sing and we’re very open with our emotions. I think it’s something that Russians always admired about us – the USSR never changed the way we live our lives in that sense.” Said to be the birthplace of the grape,

GRAPE WHITE HOPE: (above) One of Georgia’s 500 grape varieties; [below left] Pheasant’s Tears winery; [below right] cellars in the Kakheti Valley

Georgia has a wine tradition dating back 8,000 years and is home to over 500 grape varieties – incredible considering there are only 2,000 known to exist on the planet. The age-old way still continues; namely fermenting the grapes in colossal clay vessels (known as kvevri), which are coated in beeswax. The ‘European way’ of making wine, ie letting it ferment in oak barrels, is considered rather lightweight by most Georgians. Handed my first glass of rkatsiteli, an amber-hued wine made by fermenting white grapes with their skins, the taste is an utterly unique explosion of intense tannins and lemon. It simply tastes very different to any other wine I’ve ever sampled. Two reds I try, known as shavkarito and saperavi are as black as tar and have a big, punchy taste; this is a vampire’s nocturnal elixir, redolent of boudoirs and moonless nights. The quotation written in chalk on a blackboard on the door of the tasting room is


Photographs by (grapes) Ekaterina Iatcenko(Pheasant’s Tears) kpzfoto/Alamy; (Chavchavadze) Leisa Tyler/Getty

TWO REDS I TRY ARE AS BLACK AS TAR AND HAVE A BIG, PUNCHY TASTE; THIS IS A VAMPIRE’S NOCTURNAL ELIXIR

fully appropriate. Penned by British writer Sir Robert Caywood, it reads: ‘compromise is for relationships, not for wine.’ It soon becomes obvious that merely sitting down in a chair anywhere in this region for any longer than five minutes is more than enough time for somebody to offer a stranger in town a drink. Though the surprisingly slimline frames and enquiring personalities of most Georgians attest to the fact that the wine here, with its age-old natural processes, doesn’t tend to produce hangovers in the style of wines from other parts of the world. Plus, drinking on an empty stomach is considered to be a

bizarre quirk that only applies to foreigners. This is a land that adores concomitant food and conversation perhaps more than anywhere else in Europe. A strong shout, but it’s difficult to think of anywhere that sets such high, and all but compulsory, store on long meals, fine wine and ebullient discourse. Vineyards are plentiful in these parts. But none are more beautiful than Tsinandali. An estate that looks like the palazzo of a wealthy Italian merchant, this was the home of the eponymous Georgian military leader and poet who, in the 19th century, brought European-style landscaping to his grounds, brought →

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TSOLOKAURI IS A KEEN, YOUNG WINE, PERFECT FOR LANGUID AFTERNOONS. THE KATE MOSS CIRCA 1993 OF WINES

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Just one afternoon spent here, amid the walnut trees and vast lawns, is more than enough to make you wonder why, despite receiving over six million visitors last year, Georgia is still such a little-known destination outside of the former USSR. From the stone houses and overgrown pomegranate trees of Kakheti, we drive past semi-ruined monasteries, oxes and carts, and unherded pigs and cows idly jay-walking on our way back to Tbilisi. An amber-hued shadow lies over the city at sunset. The Old Town, a jumble of alleyways and crooked, cobbled streets is slowly awakening from its afternoon slumber. Sleeping cats yawn on pavements, the air is thick with the smell of coffee and barbecued meats and the sound of hammers being clanged on rooftops by construction workers. Together it all creates an atmosphere of mildly chaotic conviviality. Evening is no different to any other time of the day or night in Georgia, namely, this is a time to eat food. I head to a spot opened by eight of Georgia’s leading natural winemakers. The subterranean Vino Underground boasts low, arched stone ceilings and serves a huge range of local wines all but unknown outside of Georgia. The food comes in portions vast enough to sate Aramis. Huge slabs of khachapuri

cheese bread, unctuous beef soup known as chashushuli, gargantuan fresh salads and, best of all, broth-filled dumplings stuffed with beef, veal and mushrooms called khinkali, little parcels of Georgian goodness that require piercing with a small bite and then slurping up the contents. As the night draws late and the conversation turns to folk songs, which turns to more toasting which turns to more singing which turns to hugs which turn to back slaps which turn to, yes, some more toasts, a beaming Georgian man in shirt braces turns to me, with a glass in hand. “One thing you should know,” he tells me. “Georgia can do many things, you know. But we can’t do anything without wine”. f

ESSENTIAL INFORMATION Regent Holidays (regent-holidays.co.uk) organise group and tailor-made trips to Georgia which include Tbilisi as well as the wine region of Kakheti. They can also provide flights – although there are no direct flights from the UK, UIA (Ukraine Airlines) flies from London Gatwick to Tbilisi via Kiev. Regent can also arrange train travel from neighbouring Yerevan in Armenia. The sleeper train takes eight hours and a first class one-way berth is £28.

Photographs by (Kakheti) SJ Travel Photo/Shutterstock; (Adjara) Anastasia Sholkova/Shutterstock (grapes) Nickolay Vinokurov/Shutterstock

→ the first grand piano Georgia had ever seen to his residence, and created a hub for visiting luminaries including Pushkin and Alexander Dumas, who called the retreat a ‘garden of Eden’. A true polymath of his age, it was Tsinandali who first began to revive the ancient Georgian methods of wine making. His mansion hosts tasting sessions to this day. Underneath the searing sun, I sipped on a few lunchtime glasses of tsolikauri, a keen, young and impressionable wine that’s perfect for languid afternoons; the Kate Moss circa 1993 of wines.

GEORGIA ON MY MIND: (clockwise) The Kakheti region; mountain vineyards in Adjara; traditional wine-making techniques are still used in Georgia


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WHAT’S NEW

THE DIGEST Winter’s here, but don’t worry – warm your heart (and stomach) with the latest food news, including a must-see cookery show with attitude

BITE-SIZED

FOODISM.CO.UK/ NEWSLETTER

PRAISE THE ROOF Winter can be a time when food markets and outdoor spaces might have a little cause for concern. Not in the case of market and community space Pop Brixton, though, which has slapped a big old roof on its formerly outdoor venue to make it all toasty and warm. As well as a haven for street food, you’ll find cool shops to do some Christmas shopping in, too. 49 Brixton Station Road, SW9 8PQ; popbrixton.org

WHITES, CAMERA, ACTION See the guy above, chowing down on a wrap with eyes pink and barely open? That’s Action Bronson – former New York flame chef and superstar rapper, who’s sold out arenas and been on tracks with Chance the Rapper, Mac Miller, Joey Bada$$ and a host of your (OK, our) other favourite artists. If you haven’t caught his excellent web series with VICE’s Munchies, don’t worry – the launch of the punk publisher’s TV channel VICELAND on our shores has brought with it the UK premiere of his F*ck, That’s Delicious TV series. Bronsolini goes around getting very high and visiting amazing restaurants and traders with his touring buddies Big Body Bes and Meyhem Lauren, on a massive food-inspired trip across the US and beyond. Don’t miss it. F*ck That’s Delicious is on VICELAND now, on Sky Channel 153 and Now TV; viceland.com

THE CLASSICS

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Photograph (Pop) by Camille Mack

As the rise and rise of cocktail culture continues, it’s got more and more people upping their game at home, and learning more about the history and practice of mixed drinks. That’s what Balthazar’s Brian Silva is banking on, anyway – the Covent Garden restaurant’s bar manager has just released a mixology handbook called Mixing in the Right Circles. The book focuses on classic cocktail recipes, but also goes into detail about equipment, measures and culture. Pick it up from Balthazar or at Selfridges for £20. balthazarlondon.com


DINE AND WINE What do you do when you’re London’s most renowned restaurant group for Argentinian wine? Open a wine store, of course. Gaucho’s new online shop focuses on quality over quantity, with a curated selection of some of the steakhouse group’s best bottles, all sourced from its South American heartland. gauchorestaurants.com/wine-shop

BOOK PEOPLE

MIX IT UP How much do bartenders really know about the spirits that go into the drinks they’re crafting? Scotch whisky brand Auchentoshan is banking on ‘a lot’, as it introduces the ‘New Malt Order’ – 12 specially selected bartenders from around the world who will each year have input into a limited-edition bottling of Auchentoshan, made for mixing. auchentoshan.com

You’ve probably come across the #CookForSyria initiative, which encouraged restaurants all over London to create special dishes and events. All profits went to Unicef UK through NEXTGen London, helping to raise crucial funds for humanitarian efforts in the wartorn country. After the campaign was picked up by philanthropic movements around the world, the UK is getting its own dedicated cookbook, curated by two of the minds behind the campaign: Instagrammer Clerkenwell Boy and Suitcase editor Serena Guen. Design and photography was all donated for free, and there are more than 100 recipes from home cooks and professional chefs alike. All profits from sales of the book will go towards the initiative. cookforsyria.com; #CookForSyria

’TIS THE SEASON You know seasonality is a hot topic in food and drink when the humble pizza gets involved. That’s right: Franco Manca’s new range of seasonal pizzas is here, which make use of classic autumnal flavours and textures – think butternut squash with roasted pine kernels and Colston Bassett stilton. The menu will be regularly rotated to showcase the best produce available. francomanca.co.uk

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GETTING THERE Getting to Brighton is easy. It’s just under an hour by train from London Victoria, with trains also running from St Pancras International and London Bridge. National Express coaches also regularly service the city. For more information, go to visitbrighton.com

SILO

UK TRAVEL

INSIDER

This month, Mike Gibson heads to Brighton to check out the city's exciting crop of new-school restaurants Drakes Hotel There’s an idea you might have about the Sussex beachfront hotel. Quaint rooms with peeling wallpaper, maybe, or fried white bread as part of the breakfast. Brighton’s Drakes Hotel is not one of these. Far from it – inside the slender entrance you’ll find a bar with a glass-fronted bookcase full of craft spirits from far-flung places, which serves as a hint of what’s to come. Dinner is served in a cosy basement space that the room’s design does extremely well to get the best out of. It’s refreshing to escape a London restaurant scene that increasingly leans towards tasting menus or small plates and find starter-main-dessert. There are flourishes in the form of appetisers and palate-cleansers between them, but the magic’s in the courses, whose attention to locality and seasonality is evident. I start with an earthy,

BRIGHTON ◆◆ County: East Sussex ◆◆ Population: 281,076 ◆◆ Area: 82.67 km²

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lip-smackingly tasty smoked beetroot and goat’s cheese raviolo with beurre noisette, while my guest tries a peppery, woody pigeon breast. The presence of ‘Sussex pancetta’ steers me towards a saddle of rabbit, comforting in its gamey, sausage-like flavour. There’s Sussex cheese in the cheese board and, I’m guessing, local eggs in the expertly executed rose-petal soufflé, too. Rooms are compact, comfortable, and anything but quaint. Mine faces town rather than sea, with a beautiful bath and two chairs that have somehow been squeezed in without making it feel crowded, and there’s a rain shower in a tiny wet room. That sense of opulence, created without the luxury of airy spaciousness, sums the hotel up: inside the tiny facade, there are a lot of good things going on. f 43-44 Marine Parade, BN2 1PE; drakesofbrighton.com

Brighton’s in many ways a quintessential seaside town, but it’s known for its food culture, as well as its vibrant LGBTQ scene and party atmosphere.

That Silo is a restaurant with a very clear raison d’être is evident from the outset. Go through the main door and you’re greeted by upcycled, er, everything – from the chairs and the tables to the bar that wraps its way around the restaurant’s open kitchen. Silo, you see, is a venue that puts sustainability at the very top of the agenda, aiming to run on a completely no-waste basis and produce delicious food that showcases the benefits of a closed loop. Traditionally wasted food is either used in dishes, or put (along with all the other degradable waste created during prep and service) into an anaerobic digester for compost. There’s a deft touch to the menu – three or four courses, mixed and matched if desired from a vegetable, fish or meat menu – where the food waste element informs without intruding on the dishes. Case in point: my first dish is a piece of poached celeriac topped with mildly aromatic melted cheese, under which hides a bed of intricately cut parsley stalks. Beetroot is served warm with a comforting fried quenelle of potato purée in pungent Worksop blue cheese sauce. And for dessert, ‘pirate chocolate’ made simply as a sorbet with almond milk. How did the cocoa get to Brighton? Via a continuous series of lift-shares from the Caribbean. 39 Upper Gardner Street, North Laine, BN1 4AN; silobrighton.com


THE CHILLI PICKLE In a part of town mostly dominated by decent but largely well-known restaurant chains, The Chilli Pickle is a welcome bit of ingenuity and the kind of independent success story Brighton’s renowned for. It’s modern Indian, built largely around the thali – a tray with rice, a small naan, a main curry, and loads of bite-size nibbles and chutneys to go with it. The food is lively, vibrant, and a step away from tried-and-tested – we had a chilli methi keemar, a gently spiced curry made with minced mutton shoulder, which came with a comforting daal, a pakora, a samosa, and more. Also on the menu is dosa – a giant Indian pancake filled with a spiced potato and pea curry, which provided some more diversity of flavour and texture. You can also buy the restaurant’s range of home-made chutneys and pickles, too. 17 Jubilee Street, Brighton BN1 1GE; thechillipickle.com

THE SET The Set, the resident restaurant at the Artist Residence boutique, hostel-style hideaway, is underpinned by the menu that gives it its name – a choice of three four-course set menus, each just above £30, with optional drinks pairings at £24. It’s a mini tasting menu, really, made with an ethos so focused on seasonality that even the cocktail list changes according to the time of year. After a couple of appetisers (among them a tasty confit chicken nugget, which later reappears made with partridge for my main), I start with carrot in a variety of styles – dehydrated, sliced thinly as a ‘tartare’, and puréed – before moving on to tender plaice served with parsnip purée and melted cheddar, matched with a floral dry riesling from Australia. The star of the show is partridge breast cooked in a quinoa and chocolate crust, with dark, earthy red cabbage and smoked beetroot that serves as a reminder of the tastiness this time of year brings with it. My dessert is the only ever-present on the menu since the restaurant’s opening. Cereal-bowl milk (yes, really) is turned into a panna cotta served with home-made, crunchy ‘cereal’, milk ice cream and dehydrated milk foam. It’s not just creative for creativity’s sake – it’s a fitting finisher by a restaurant that’s drawing plaudits for its approach to food as entertainment and curio. 33 Regency Square, BN1 2GG; thesetrestaurant.com

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Brought to you by Chef Abdul Yaseen, Darbaar offers the best of Modern Indian cuisine built around the shared feasting ethos of the Royal Court. Fresh, fast and delicious lunches, luxurious dinners and a unique cocktail bar in regally relaxed surroundings, Darbaar is a minute from Liverpool Street in buzzing Broadgate

www.darbaarrestaurants.com

@DarbaarbyAbdul

@darbaarbyabdul

@DarbaarbyAbdul


SEASON’S EATINGS: Tobacco Dock played host to a raft of pop-up restaurants and bars, masterclasses and events from our favourite chefs and brands, including the likes of Tom Kerridge and Big Green Egg.

Photographs by Justine Trickett; Jenna Foxton

IN GOOD TASTE

Taste of London: The Festive Edition took over East London’s Tobacco Dock for four days of food, drink and general merriment last month. Here’s what went down... 111


THE SELECTOR

‘Tis the season to dive headfirst into all the food and drink you can get your hands on. This month, we bring you Christmas menus, hotel bars, theatre restaurants, Basque exports, and sustainably minded establishments 112

THE SELECTOR

XMAS SPECIAL

These London restaurants have put their own spin on the festive meal – with utterly delicious results  1  Dishoom Various locations

You’ve had the bacon naan, now sample the cult modern Indian restaurant’s take on a traditional Christmas dinner, inspired by the flavours of Bombay. Fusing British and Indian cuisine, there’ll be turkey raan, a whole turkey leg prepared in traditional Indian raan style – marinated, braised overnight and then flame-grilled – served

 1

with warming Bombay potatoes, masala winter greens and spiced cranberry chutney, rounded up with a Baileys chai. Oh, and there’s a brand-new cocktail menu from bar manager Carl Brown, too, with delights including chai eggnog and warming winter Pimm’s. Designed to be a feast made for sharing, we bet your meal here will be very merry indeed. @dishoom; dishoom.com


BEST OF THE REST

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Photograph (Coppa) by Allan Stone

 2  Osteria at the Barbican Centre Silk Street, EC2Y 8DS

The brutalist architecture of the Barbican might not put you in the most festive of moods, but that’ll change when you sample Anthony Demetre’s Christmas menu at Osteria, his restaurant on the second floor of the arts centre. The star of the show will be baked salt-crusted wild sea bream – and if that’s not enough to make you salivate, there’ll be an entire seasonal menu to feast on, which will include handmade pumpkin, sage and grilled broccoli tortellini; suckling pig; and whole roasted lemon sole served with raisins, capers and pine nuts. 020 7588 3008; osterialondon.co.uk

 3  Andina 1 Redchurch Street, E2 7DJ

We’ll hedge our bets that most of you probably have no idea what a Peruvian Christmas entails. Well, now’s the time to find out. Martin Morales’ modern picanteria in Shoreditch will be serving two sharing

menus, including dishes like chilli-braised pork cheeks, cassava roots mash and tamarillo salsa, and aguadito de mariscos (seared king prawns, squid and mussels, brawn bisque, squash and coriander rice). If that weren’t enough, you can also order whole roasted piglet, marinated in pisco and goldenberry. Talk about going the whole hog. 020 7920 6499; andinalondon.com

 4  Morito 195 Hackney Road, E2 8JL

Morito shows that Christmas is about way more than turkey by putting its North African stamp on festive dishes this year, with punchy arak-marinated salmon, served with labneh, beetroot and dukkah; pigeon breast, pumpkin and goat’s curd with pistachio sauce; and Spanish cheese with quince jelly, among other lip-smacking flavours.

enogastronomia (that’s food-forward café to you and us) that sits under railway arches in Hackney. As such, you can expect to find oodles of really delicious meat and cheese – think a charcuterie and cheese board to die for, saffron risotto, and melty, tender and flavoursome ossobucco; all rounded off with a choice between tiramisu and panettone with mascarpone cream. 07479 611 124; ilcudega.com

 6  Coppa Club 3 Three Quays Walk, Lower Thames Street, EC3R 6AH

Railway Arch 358, Westgate Street, E8 3RN

Want to know what makes a Christmas meal even better? Eating it in an igloo on a riverside terrace overlooking Tower Bridge. Yep, you read that right. It’s like being inside, but you’re actually outside – making it the perfect setting for digging into hearty winter warmers like roast turkey, roast sea bass, slow-cooked duck leg, and wild mushroom caramelle. The igloos are currently only available on a first-come, first-served basis, so you don’t have to book, either.

Milan’s the word at this Lombardian

020 7993 3872; coppaclub.co.uk

020 7613 0754; morito.co.uk

 5  Il Cudega

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1  Dandelyan Mondrian, 20 Upper Ground, SE1 9PD

Dandelyan clinched third place in this year’s World’s 50 Best Bars list, which means it’s also the best bar in London – and with a drinks scene as dynamic as ours, that should give you some idea of the quality of Mr Lyan’s bar at Southbank’s Mondrian hotel. It serves up both modern interpretations of the classics and innovative new drinks – the current menu is split into four sections: Hunter, Gatherer, Shaman and Explorer, and is inspired by human interaction with plants and the botanical wilds of the British countryside. Sounds weird, but it tastes good, we promise. 020 3747 1063; morganshotelgroup.com

THE SELECTOR

PRAISING THE BAR

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A decent hotel bar is a beautiful thing indeed, and these London drinking dens are some of the best around 2

BEST OF THE REST  2  Beaufort Bar

 4  ZTH Cocktail Lounge

The Savoy, The Strand, WC2R 0EU

The Zetter Townhouse, 49-50 St John’s Square, EC1V 4JJ

The American Bar is the one that usually turns heads, but The Savoy’s second drinking destination, The Beaufort Bar, is no less excellent. Set in art deco surrounds, opulence is the name of the game here. On the menu are ‘character cocktails’, paying tribute to some of the Beaufort’s most famous patrons. Theatricality is this bar’s strong point; its most famous cocktail, The Impressionist, arrives complete with a smoking rose.

With a menu created by cocktail maestro Tony Conigliaro (whose Soho-based Bar Termini made its debut in the World’s 50 Best Bars list this year), the Zetter Townhouse’s flagship bar pays homage to Clerkenwell’s distilling heritage. Old recipes for tinctures, bitters and herbal remedies have inspired the cocktails, as well as the homemade cordials and infusions that the bar team deploy to create their excellent drinks.

020 3747 1063; fairmont.com/savoy-london

020 7324 4444; thezettertownhouse.com

 3  Dukes

 5  Scarfes Bar

Dukes Hotel, 35 St James’s Place, SW1A 1NY

Rosewood London, 252 High Holborn, WC1V 7EN

Dukes Bar counts Bond author Ian Fleming among its patrons, and apparently inspired the classic line, “shaken, not stirred.” Every martini lover worth their salt knows that’s not how to make the classic drink, but don’t let that put you off: this Mayfair haunt is said to make some of the world’s best martinis.

The Rosewood’s bar is named after Gerald Scarfe, the renowned British artist and caricaturist, so it makes sense that his paintings and drawings adorn the walls. There’s more reason to visit than art ,though – it boasts a cocktail list that’ll pique the interest of any drinks enthusiast.

020 7491 4840; dukeshotel.com

020 3747 8611; scarfesbar.com

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BEST OF THE REST  2  Finborough Arms

 4  The Latchmere

118 Finborough Road, SW10 9ED

503 Battersea Park Road, SW11 3BW

The Finborough Arms boasts eight keg lines, eight cask lines and 50 different bottles sourced from around the world – don’t get too sauced, though, as this West Brompton drinking den offers a whole host of cultural delights. There’s the theatre, obviously, known for pinpointing emerging talent, and The Cellar, which hosts music events.

Here you’ll find real ales and good pub grub, with meat sourced from Hampshire farms and fish sustainably caught on the south coast. Theatre 503, located just above it, offers more opportunities to new writers than many other theatres in the UK.

020 3417 0490; finborougharms.co.uk

 3  The Landor

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020 7223 3549; thelatchmere.co.uk

 5  Rosemary Branch 2 Shepperton Road, N1 3DT

This long-standing neighbourhood favourite’s kitchens serve up a menu of modern Mediterranean dishes, inspired by the chef’s time in Europe, supported by traditional British classics like a knock-out Sunday roast. The pub’s theatre has long been at the forefront of dramatic fringe productions, and it benefits from the famous Italia Conti Academy that’s handily located just next door.

Located on the border of Hackney and Islington, it’s no surprise that the Rosemary Branch Theatre (affectionately known as the Rosie) offers an eclectic array of theatrical works – it was once a Victorian music hall. The resident theatre company is Unattended Items, a transatlantic duo focusing on interactive performance and design. What is (slightly) surprising, though, is the excellent food and drink served in the pub, which recently won awards as a local favourite.

020 7737 3419; thelandorpub.com

020 7704 6665; rosemarybranchtheatre.co.uk

70 Landor Road, SW9 9PH

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Photographs by (Finborough) Matt Freestone; (Mondrian and Savoy) Niall Clutton(Zetter) Addie Chinn; 9Scarfes Bar) Durston Saylor

THE SELECTOR

PLAY ON, PLAY ON

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Come for an award-winning play and stay for excellent food and drink at these pub and restaurant theatres  1  Almeida 30 Almeida Street, N1 1AD

Being considered one of the best restaurants in Islington is no mean feat, but the Almeida, attached to London’s Theatre of the Year 2016, has managed it. It’s headed up by Tommy Boland, who brings a wealth of experience to the kitchen that belies his young years: he’s racked up experience at The Square, Le Cinq in Paris and was also head chef at Tom Aikens’ restaurant, all of which shines through in his elegant, Frenchinspired menu. Sample Almeida’s frankly excellent pre- and post-theatre menus for a wallet-friendly dining treat. 020 7354 4777; almeida-restaurant.co.uk

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BITE-SIZED

FOODISM.CO.UK/ NEWSLETTER

BEST OF THE REST

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 2  Donostia Social Club

 4  Sagardi

POP Brixton, 49 Brixton Station Road, SW9 8PQ

95 Curtain Road, EC2A 3BS

As much as the autonomous SpanishFrench region is known for its high-end restaurants, it does casual dining pretty well, too. Donostia Social Club, located in Pop Brixton and named after the Basque word for San Sebastián, is a great example, serving up quality, well-sourced Basque tapas out of a converted shipping container.

Txuletón, zapiain, buey and txakoli – while a handful of excellent Basque restaurants have opened in the last couple of years, the autonomous Spanish region’s acclaimed food culture can be hard to pin down. Sagardi restaurant, from a big, comfy room on Curtain Road, manages to cover pretty much all the bases without painting in overly broad strokes, with most of the classics on the menu. The txuletón is a must, but it’s served at a 400g minimum – the buey (a similar cut from an ox) is a good alternative.

donostiasocialclub.co.uk

 3  Lurra

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9 Seymour Place, W1H 5BA

020 3802 0478; sagardi.co.uk

020 7724 4545; lurra.co.uk

020 7300 1000; onealdwych.com

 5  Eneko at One Aldwych One Aldwych hotel, 1 Aldwych, WC2B 4BZ

With a restaurant ranked at 19 on the Word’s 50 Best Restaurants, Eneko Atza is one of quite a few trailblazing chefs to come out of the Basque Country, so the news that he’s setting up shop in Covent Garden should make you pretty excited. His new place at One Aldwych hotel will offer modern takes on classic, rustic Basque dishes.

Photograph by (5) Nick Rochowski

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A giant grill is one of the key components of a Basque restaurant, and that’s what you’ll find at the excellent Lurra, the second restaurant from the owners of Donostia (not to be confused with Donostia Social Club). If you order one thing here, make it the old beef. There’s something of a craze going on for this style of bovine, prevalent in Galicia, which makes use of former dairy cows (some can be up to 14 years old) and then takes it further by dry-ageing until it develops a tangy, umamiladen, almost hard-cheese-esque taste.

THE SELECTOR

SEXY BASQUE Can’t quite make it to the Basque Country? Sample the region’s vaunted cuisine at these restaurants instead  1  1  Ametsa with Arzak Instruction The Halkin by Como, Halkin Street, SW1X 7DJ

020 7333 1234; comohotels.com

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Photograph by ###

Basque cuisine might be having a moment, but Michelin-starred Ametsa’s been there since before it was cool, serving exciting, inventive takes on Basque flavours, with influence from the iconic Arzak restaurant in San Sebastián. Showstoppers include scallops with plankton and passion fruit purée; tuna tempered with fiery cinnamon and apple sauce; and pork with ‘embers’ – a dense gravel of coarsely textured coconut. Those three should give you an idea of the kind of relentlessly inventive food you’re in for.


BEST OF THE REST  2  The Shed

 4   The Duke of Cambridge

22 Palace Gardens Terrace, W8 4RT

30 St Peter’s Street, London N1 8JT

The first site from the Gladwin brothers came about when they realised that their jobs – in farming, cheffing and hospitality – were perfect for setting up a farm-to-table restaurant. They’re working towards making it completely carbon-neutral and currently use energy exclusively from renewable sources.

The Duke of Cambridge still remains top of the list when it comes to sustainable, ethical food. It joined forces with top-notch organic veg box suppliers Riverford a few years ago to become Riverford at The Duke of Cambridge. The pub is also heavily involved with its local community, working with local schools and hosting charity dinner events.

020 7229 4024; theshed-restaurant.com

 3   Wahaca Various locations

There’s now even more reason to visit Wahaca: it’s the first restaurant group to go carbon neutral – which is no mean feat, given that it’s got 23 sites around the UK. It’s inventive with its energy consumption without compromising on the quality, using heat given off from its fridges to heat water and building with sustainable materials. 020 3002 8784; wahaca.co.uk

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020 7359 3066; dukeorganic.co.uk

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 5  Grain Store 1-3 Stable Street, N1C 4AB

An award-winning sustainable restaurant from an award-winning hotel group? It’s a double win for Bruno Loubet’s Zetter Hotel site by the canal in King’s Cross. The Bordeaux-born chef has long been praised for his green ethics – his cooking may be veg-forward, but he doesn’t shy away from meat that’s properly sourced.

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020 7324 4466; grainstore.com

THE SELECTOR

BREAKING EVEN

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These great restaurants run their operations as sustainably and close to carbon-neutral as possible  1

 1  Water House 10 Orsman Road, N1 5QJ

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Photographs by (Duke of Cambridge) Tricia de Courcy Ling; (Grain Store) Jonathan Lovekin

London’s first carbon-neutral restaurant sits alongside the canal in Shoreditch, giving diners picturesque views of the water as they tuck into seasonal, ethical fare like buttermilk chicken and vegetable moussaka. It’s more than just environmentally friendly – it’s a community hub, too, having been set up by the Shoreditch Trust and playing host to the Blue Marble Training Programme, which provides support for vulnerable young people looking to begin careers in food. It also serves as a local gallery and is home to the Water House Cookery School, where you can learn all about cooking sustainably at home. 020 7033 0123; waterhouserestaurant.co.uk


COMPETITION

CREAM OF THE CROP

Coffee made with high-quality beans and delicious milk is a match made in heaven. That's why Yeo Valley and Cupsmith have teamed up to offer the ultimate hamper

T

O BUILD THE best cup of coffee, first you need to break it down to the best ingredients. Put simply, that means the most flavoursome blend of 100% Arabica beans, and milk that gives your coffee that wholesome, creamy body. With that in mind, family-owned Somerset dairy Yeo Valley has teamed up with award-winning coffee roasters Cupsmith to create a unique hamper that will give you this recipe for success time and time again. With milk from organic British family farms and coffee roasted slowly, in small batches, you can rest assured that you're getting great taste the right way.

The hamper includes enough coffee to make approximately 60 cups, plus a coffee grinder, cafetière and milk jug. It even includes two beautifully designed mugs, firm favourites with guests down at the Yeo Valley Organic Garden Café in Somerset, for those shared coffee breaks. The only aspect that we haven’t covered is the time and place to sit down, relax and savour the simple delight of the best coffee, but we’ll leave that bit up to you… ● To find out more about Yeo Valley, head to yeovalley.co.uk

WIN A YEO VALLEY & CUPSMITH HAMPER We've teamed up with Yeo Valley and Cupsmith to give away five of these fantastic hampers, worth £100. Each contains a cafetière, a manual coffee grinder, two coffee cups, a Yeo Valley milk jug, a supply of Yeo Valley whole milk, and a Cupsmith coffee selection. To be in with a chance of winning one, all you have to do is answer one easy question. To enter, and for full T&Cs, go to fdsm.co/yeovalley

WIN

WIN

WIN 119


020 3837 3102 | reservations@tonicandremedy.co.uk | tonicandremedy.co.uk

the festive season Available until 30th December 2016 2 courses, £25 per person | 3 courses, £30 per person both include a Merry cocktail and cracker

christmas day Sunday 25th December 2016, 12.00pm – 9.00pm £65.00 per person 4 courses with a ‘Mrs. Marmalade’ cocktail and cracker

new year’s eve feast Saturday 31st December 2016, 12.00pm – 10.30pm | £65.00 per person 4 sharing courses with a ‘Mrs. Marmalade’ cocktail Restaurant & Bar will be open until late @tonicandremedy


PROMOTION

A FAIRER TREAT Choose Divine’s luxury Fairtrade chocolate range this Christmas for high-quality, ethically conscious gifts, as well as an advent calendar with an international twist

C Photograph of Ama Kade, Kuapa farmer by Pete Pattisson

HOCOLATE AND CHRISTMAS go hand in hand, and as it’s likely you’ll be treating yourself, sharing and gifting lots of the sweet stuff over the next month or so, make sure it’s not only the tastiest and highest quality that you can buy, but also the kindest. Divine is the only chocolate company in the world that’s 100% Fairtrade and co-owned by cocoa farmers. As a result, the products not only taste great, but the thoughtful production process ensures that farmers get a guaranteed price for their cocoa, and receive a share of the profits to support their families, communities and farms. When it comes to buying Divine chocolate as a present, the high-quality range is suitable for everyone. Choose from the tasting set of classics featuring 12 little bars in flavours ranging from milk with toffee and sea salt to dark

chocolate with raspberry, to the bestselling 100g sharing bars that may (or may not!) last a little bit longer. Also great for giving – or serving to guests after dinner on the big day – are the Dark Thins: soft centres of refreshing mint or spicy ginger coated in deliciously rich dark chocolate. Alternatively, one of the sophisticated Belgian chocolate collections makes for a great gift, while the bags of milk or dark coins are the perfect stocking filler for younger chocolate lovers. Whatever you choose, Divine chocolate is a gift that’s thoughtful in more ways than one. ● Find Divine chocolates this Christmas in Tesco, Waitrose, Booths, Oxfam, Ocado, Liberty, Wholefoods and independent shops. The full range is stocked at

#DIVINEADVENT Make the run-up to Christmas as sweet as can be with the Divine milk chocolate advent calendar. The design of the calendar depicts the nativity, but new for 2016 is a clever and educational touch: behind every heart-shaped chocolate are the words 'Merry Christmas' in a different language each day. Search for #DivineAdvent or visit divinechocolate.com to learn ways to extend your festive greetings in new languages.

divinechocolate.com

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EXCLUSIVE TICKET OFFER – SAVE 10% ENTER CODE – FOOD – WHEN BOOKING ONLINE

EXPERIENCE UNLIMITED TASTINGS OF OVER 200 OF THE WORLD’S FINEST SPIRITS THE ULTIMATE PREMIUM SPIRITS TASTING EVENT IS COMING TO LONDON ON THE 9TH & 10TH DECEMBER. Sample everything from artisan Vodka, craft Whisky, micro distillery Gin & small batch Rum, as well as a range of other world spirits such as Armagnac, Cachaça & Mezcal. What better way to start the festivities than a chance to indulge yourself in the wonderful world of spirits. Tickets start from just £40 and include unlimited tastings, a delicious meal from the Street Food Village, a limited edition Glencairn tasting glass and free download of the show app with tasting notes.

EXCLUSIVE TICKET OFFER

SAVE 10% Enter code FOOD when booking online STANDARD from £36 PREMIUM £58.50

TICKET PACKAGES STANDARD FROM £40 • Unlimited Tastings • Delicious dish from the Street Food Village • Limited Edition Glencairn Tasting Glass • Free Download of the Show App

PREMIUM £65 All of the above plus: • Fast Track Entry • Access to VIP Speakeasy • Mixology Class • Complimentary Cocktail • Personal Shopping Service • Private Cloakroom • ‘Shop & Drop’ Facility

BOOK ONLINE NOW WWW.THESPIRITSHOW.CO.UK SPONSORS AND PARTNERS

PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY


PROMOTION

FESTIVE DELIGHTS

Walkers Shortbread has honed its craft over a century of family ownership, and now the brand has brought out a chocolate collection just in time for the festive season

T

HE FESTIVE SEASON is a time to celebrate what you’re eating. And, with more than 100 years of heritage and ranges of snacks created especially for this time of year, Walkers Shortbread has plenty to shout about. The brand was set up more than a century ago in Speyside, and is still a family-owned and operated company. Since then, Walkers has branched out

FROM SHORTBREAD TO MINCE PIES, WALKERS HAS SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE THIS CHRISTMAS

into much more than just crafting The World’s Finest Shortbread, receiving a Royal Warrant for its oatcakes and becoming a four-time winner of the Queen’s Award for Export Achievement for the impression its products have made worldwide. It’s no stranger to innovation, either: even after so much achievement, its creators are still thinking of new and delicious possibilities like the new Chocolate Shortbread range, which marks the first time the brand has launched a chocolate collection. Make your festive celebrations extra special with Glenfiddich whiskyinfused mincemeat tarts, or spiced orange and cranberry mince pies. Other treats include traditional Scottish tarts inspired by the town of Ecclefechan, mini shortbread Christmas trees, and the simple shortbread you know and love. From mincemeat tarts with a boozy twist to colourful festive tins, Walkers has something for everyone this Christmas. ●

DID SOMEONE SAY “CHOCOLATE”? Whether you’re buying for Christmas or just for your next tea break, there’s something in Walkers’ new Chocolate Shortbread range for you. All of the range incorporates luxurious Belgian chocolate alongside the brand’s famous shortbread, and you can choose from chocolate and raspberry, chocolate and toffee, with ginger or orange shortbread, and more. There’s sure to be a flavour that takes your fancy.

For the full range, go to walkersshortbread.com

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PROMOTION

PERU: A CULINARY ADVENTURE FROM £2,945 Including a saving of up to £250 when booked by 18 Dec 2016 Private Tour – 9 Days & 7 Nights

LAND OF PLENTY When it comes to fusion food, Peru knows a thing or two: the country’s unique blend of cultures has resulted in an array of dishes as delicious as they are diverse…

I

F YOUR FIRST thought about Peru is the Andes, the Inca trail and Machu Picchu, it’s time to think again. Beyond the rich ancient history of this alluring and majestic South American country lies vibrant cultural diversity that gives you one more reason to visit – fantastic food. Thanks to hundreds of years of fusion between Spanish, African, Italian and Oriental settlers, Peruvian cuisine has developed into a subtle blend of distinctive flavours that varies elegantly and broadly throughout the nation. Lima is not only the country’s bustling capital, but also the Culinary Capital of Latin America. During your visit, you'll enjoy Peru’s iconic fish dishes like ceviche and tiradito, as well as causa, ají de gallina and lomo saltado,

among many others. Whether you're dining in a five-star hotel, sampling the famous Peru pisco sour or enjoying a meal in a polleria (chicken restaurant) you're sure to find something to suit your palate. Peru is now closer than ever. With direct flights from London to Lima with British Airways, there's never been a better time to discover a world of flavours and live unforgettable experiences. ●

Discover why Peru is now at the forefront of the international food scene. Cook with a renowned chef in Lima, browse vibrant local markets and sample traditional cuisine in the Sacred Valley. Journey by mountain railway to Machu Picchu, experience the magnificent Andean landscape and explore breathtaking Incan archaeological sites.

Highlights ◆◆ Introductory tours of Lima and

Cuzco ◆◆ Market visit, cooking lesson and

lunch with renowned Peruvian chef ◆◆ Cooking lesson and lunch in the

Sacred Valley ◆◆ Visit to the Inca fortress at

Ollantaytambo ◆◆ Overnight stay at Machu Picchu ◆◆ Take part in a Pisco sour tasting

and a chocolate workshop ◆◆ Direct international flights with

British Airways Go to www.coxandkings.co.uk/peru or call 020 3432 7079 to book

WIN A TRIP TO PERU

WIN

We've teamed up with luxury tour and tailor-made travel experts Cox & Kings to offer one lucky reader and a guest the chance to win a culinary holiday to Peru. This amazing prize is inclusive of international flights, transfers, most meals, guided excursions, entrance costs and fourstar and character accommodation based on two sharing a twin room. For your chance to win, visit taste.peru.travel

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WIN

WIN


CHOCOLATE WORTH YOUR TIME

Mozart Distillerie bring you the world’s most acclaimed chocolate liqueur by sourcing and combining only the finest natural cocoa, fragrant vanilla, velvet cream and pure alcohol. Expertly blended together by dedicated chocolatiers with over 60 years’ experience, we offer you a luxurious sip of Salzburg.

mozart-spirits.com mangroveuk.com ©2016 Mozart Distillerie GmbH

● To advertise in this section please call 020 7819 9999


20% OFF THIS DECEMBER

â—? To advertise in this section please call 020 7819 9999


ESSENTIALS

LOOKING FOR EXTRA FOOD AND DRINK INSPIRATION? HERE ARE A FEW OF OUR FAVOURITE BRANDS...

BOOJA-BOOJA

MAUDE COFFEE

With an abundance of nutty caramel sauces, fruity ripples and swoons of truffley swirls, Booja-Booja takes Dairy Free Ice Cream to a whole new level. Discover the six awardwinning flavours, each made with only a handful of organic ingredients. They’re dairy, gluten and soya free, made without refined sugar and lusciously delicious!

Maude Coffee is a progressive coffee roastery based in Leeds and dedicated to bringing the highest quality coffee to the UK market. We source only directly traceable beans and pay a fairer price to farmers, whilst focusing on each coffee and every roast batch with the care and attention it deserves.

W: boojabooja.com

W: maudecoffee.co.uk : @maudecoffee

THE RED BEETLE

DEVON DISTILLERY

On a quest for excellence, the Red Beetle locates and sources the most authentic and delicious Italian products, delivering them straight to your front door. Whether you’re looking for the perfect gift or to simply indulge yourself, this online shop has you covered. Use code FOODISM16 to get 10% off every order. W: theredbeetle.com

Authentic Italian grappa distilled in Devon, Dappa is internationally award winning. The only grappa produced in the U.K. Dappa has young yet complex flavours and pairs well with espresso coffee and dark chocolate. Dappa makes an ideal gift for those looking for something new and especially made in Britain! W: devondistillery.com T: 01803 812 509

ROCK ROSE GIN

GREENSAND RIDGE

Flavourful and fresh, zesty yet berryful with a long smooth finish. Multi award winning Rock Rose gin gets its wonderful flavour from a carefully selected and put together creation of local and traditional botanicals. Each one meticulously chosen for their flavour properties to create the perfect taste, including the hero botanical Rhodiola rosea! W: dunnetbaydistillers.co.uk

This sustainable distillery's releases include an incredible London Dry Gin and a unique Raspberry Ghost eaux-de-vie. Using 100% renewable power and turning surplus produce into limited editions makes this a name to get behind. Not least because of the Apple Brandy and Rum ageing away! Use code FOODISM to get 10% off until Christmas. W: www.greensanddistillery.com T: 07971 164 688

CHILTERN NATURAL FOODS

TOMAHAWK MAPLE CREAM

Looking for a special gift? Chiltern Natural Foods specialises in making hand roasted healthy flavoured nuts and seeds, and a great range of healthy whole grain, no salt, no wheat, low sugar and gluten free cereals. Great for your health conscious friends and family. Available now at chilternnaturalfoods.com 01494 449 638

A Canadian produced Rum and Maple Syrup Cream Liquor, TOMAHAWK is the perfect Christmas tipple. This Cream liquor is best served on ice, and is extremely smooth and tasty thanks to the 3yr aged white rum and 10% Maple Syrup. Made in Canada and only released last year to the UK market, it is available online at Amazon and other online spirit retailers. Also check www.jbeimports.co.uk for stockists.

BOROUGH BROTH CO

THIS IS GOOD

Borough Broth Co's Organic Grass-Fed Beef Bone Broth and Organic Free-Range Chicken Bone Broths are delicious as a warming winter drink or as a rich cooking stock. It's the perfect nourishing snack to fight away those winter bugs and adds great flavour to any Christmas gravy or winter stew!

This delicately flavoured, versatile oil has 75% less Saturated fat than coconut oil, is rich in monounsaturated fats, has no cholesterol, no trans fats, is a source of omega 9 and palmitoleic acid. Use code "FOOD20" for 20% off.

W: boroughbroth.co.uk

W: thisisgoodoil.com

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CHRISTMAS NUT: “Chestnuts roasting on an open fire…” Nat King Cole’s classic Christmas song makes reference to the tradition of toasting the nuts over coals during the festive period. We don’t know why it’s tradition, but we don’t care, because – THAT SMELL.

HISTORY NUT: The UK has an abundance of sweet chestnut trees thanks to the Romans, who rated chestnuts highly as a cooking ingredient.

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HEALTH NUT: Unusually for something that’s a: popular at Christmas, and b: tastes so nice, chestnuts are not actually bad for you. They’re low in fat, and contain way fewer calories than both almonds and walnuts.

Photograph by Lauri Patterson/Getty Images

This time of year is the chestnut’s time to shine. Whether roasted over flames or minced up into the Christmas stuffing, we can’t get enough of their sweet, smoky flavour


GET UP AND GLOW

Absorb the full power of turmeric with Pukka’s unique Wholistic™ formulas & Turmeric Gold tea

Discover more at pukkaherbs.com/turmeric


Eat ME

e l o h o h o wh E

with these F EST IV Christmas recipes

Tenderstem® with Christmas butter

Griddled Tenderstem® with blue cheese, pecan s and maple syrup

Tenderstem® with Christmas tahini dressing

For delicious festive recipes visit, tenderstem.co.uk/christmas


Foodism - 15 - London, food and drink