Page 1

L O N D O N , O N E B I T E AT A T I M E


Villeret Collection

BLANCPAIN BOUTIQUE www.blancpain.com

11 NEW BOND ST 路 W1S 3SR 路 LONDON 路 TEL. 0845 273 2500


NOT MANY PEOPLE G E T A DV I C E F RO M

T H E I R G R E AT, G R E AT, G R A N D FAT H E R Having the wisdom and knowledge of a parent to guide you in a business is one thing. But imagine the invaluable advice you’d get from a grandparent, or even a great, great grandparent? Since 1853, we’ve learnt from our forefathers and have constantly built on their successes. Something you can appreciate in every glass of Hardys wine.

H A R DYS FIV E G EN ER ATI O N S O F D E VOTI O N


CONTENTS GRAZE

017 EDITOR’S LETTER | 023 OUR LOCAL HEROES | 027 STREET FOOD 030 GIFT GUIDE | 039 RECIPES

FEAST

050 FOOD AND PHOTOGRAPHY | 056 NEW TRENDS | 066 CHEFS AND TATTOOS 076 THE LONDON LARDER | 082 INSIDE THE NIGHTJAR

EXCESS

092 FOODIE EMILIA-ROMAGNA | 098 MEMPHIS BBQ GUIDE 115 LONDON’S HOTTEST EATING SPOTS


Good ThingS happeN we whEn Get tOgetheR

Š 2014 Starbucks Coffee Company. All rights reserved.

Warm up with our festive favourites. #redcups

Meet mE at starBucks


14


FOOD IS A RELIGION. foodism IS ITS TEMPLE. Welcome to the first ever issue of foodism. It’s your new best friend as you navigate the food scene in London and beyond. If you love eating, drinking and cooking, you’re in the right place. Now tuck in…

Photograph by ### PHotograph by David Harrison

15


EDITOR

Jon Hawkins Blueberry ART DIRECTOR

Matthew Hasteley Apple ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Cathy Adams Pineapple SUB EDITORS

Kim Harding Helen Nianias DEPUTY ART DIRECTOR

Lucy Phillips Strawberry DESIGNER

Abigail Robinson Broccoli JUNIOR DESIGNER

Bianca Stewart Aubergine

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Mike Gibson Tomato

CONTRIBUTORS

Neil Davey, Stephanie Diani, Zoey Goto, David Harrison, Sarah Illenberger, Tyler Shields EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Mark Hedley Banana

SALES DIRECTORS

Mike Berrett Alex Watson

COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR

Mike Gluckman

SALES MANAGER

Will Preston

PRINT ADVERTISING

Richard Baker, Chloe Downing, Freddie Dunbar, Charlotte Gibbs, Jason Lyon, Mark Sloyan, Sophie Spencer COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER

Krista Faist

COMMUNICATIONS EXECUTIVE

Emily Buck ACCOUNTS

Steve Cole, Caroline Walker CEO

Tim Slee Carrot CHAIRMAN

Tom Kelly OBE

foodism uses paper from sustainable sources

EDITOR’S WORD

Consider the burger. Or, at least, consider how far the burger has come – and us Londoners with it. We care about brioche buns and the provenance of the fat they’re slathered with; we take patties made with dry-aged beef and smash them so they brown better. For a population whose knowledge of food used to hover somewhere between ‘Harvester’ and ‘?’, that’s one giant leap. For the burger, it’s an intergalactic voyage, and today’s bear about as much relation to their beef-andbap forebears as an iPad does to an Etch A Sketch. I’m not going to suggest the burger is a gastronomic high-water mark – god, no. But just think, if we’ve made a slab of meat in a bun so exciting, then imagine what we can do with a whole larder of ingredients. And that’s what we want to champion and celebrate in foodism, in this first issue and beyond: the sheer depth of quality that runs through London’s food scene, from the kerb to the kitchen, and the passion and talent driving it. Like I said, we’ve come a long way – and we’re not even close to being done. f

L O N D O N , O N E B I T E AT A T I M E

FRONT COVER: Photography by David Harrison. Kasumi 24cm chef's knife, £170; Fissler magic peeler, £17.50; fork from 16-piece cutlery set by Studio William, £102. All available from selfridges.com

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© Square Up Media Limited 2014. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. All information contained in this magazine is, as far as we are aware, correct at the time of going to press. Square Up Media cannot accept responsibility for errors or inaccuracies in such information. If you submit unsolicited material to us, you automatically grant Square Up Media a licence to publish your submission in whole or in part in all editions of the magazine. All material is sent at your own risk and although every care is taken, neither Square Up Media nor its employees, agents or subcontractors shall be held liable resulting for loss or damage. Square Up Media endeavours to respect the intellectual property of the owners of copyrighted material reproduced herein. If you identify yourself as the copyright holder of material we have wrongly attributed, please contact the office.

17


Taking a break to Florida together certainly has its benefits

Enjoy great savings when booking your flight and car together to one of our three gateways in Florida.

Florida Flights + 7 days Avis car hire from

ÂŁ479

pp

Book by 14 December at ba.com/avis

Availability may be extremely limited, particularly during peak periods. Price is in GBP per person based on two adults sharing Avis car hire in lowest car group with insurance with return flights from London Gatwick to Orlando or Tampa for selected travel between 01/01/15 – 15/03/15. Price correct as of 23/10/14. Bookings must be made by midnight 14/12/14. Some payment methods attract a handling fee. Holidays are ATOL protected (number ATOL5985). For full terms and conditions, visit ba.com.


023 LOCAL HEROES | 027 STREET FOOD FIGHT 030 WEAPONS OF CHOICE | 039 RECIPES | 047 BISTROPOP

— PART I —

GRAZE “WE’RE IN THE MIDDLE OF THE BIGGEST FOOD EXPLOSION SINCE A PUDDING LANE BAKERY IN 1666” LOCAL HEROES, 023


Discover just how amazing your kitchen can be You could have a regular kitchen, or you can have a truly unique space in which to unleash your imagination. You could make food, or you can create culinary art that fuses taste and innovation. You could choose normal appliances, or you can choose Gorenje+ to make more out of your kitchen.

Call us on 0208 247 3980 for more details

www.gorenjeplus.com

A line of exclusive built-in appliances


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LOCAL HEROES Stuck for inspiration finding a new favourite haunt? We’ve done the hard work for you – all you have to do is eat, drink and be merry

W

HERE ARE YOU eating tonight? In the middle of the biggest food explosion since a Pudding Lane bakery in 1666, and with options numbering in the thousands, it can be hard to pin down what you want to eat in London, let alone where you want to eat it. That, my friends, is where we come in. If you’re indecisive, overwhelmed or just plain confused about London’s abundance of foodie riches, and you need a discerning voice to narrow down the endless options, foodism is your go-to. We run the rule over the capital’s hottest restaurants, cafés, popups, breweries, distilleries and everything in between to make sure you know exactly where you should be, and what you should be eating when you’re there. London’s food scene is no longer just about the big-hitters. It’s dynamic, it’s explosive, it’s fast-paced, and it often cannot be missed. Whether you want new openings and reopenings, pop-up projects, residencies, roof terraces or just really great restaurants, we guarantee we’ve got you covered. So next time you’re mourning that greatsounding pop-up you found out about too late, or eating solemnly in a chain restaurant, think of us. Sign up to our newsletter and you’ll always be up to date with the latest places to go, before they’ve been and gone. f

+ CO FF E E INST IT UT IONS

1

HOLBORN GRIND High Holborn, WC1V

Here’s a tongue-twister for you: the Holborn Grind at the Hoxton Hotel in High Holborn. Yes, the team behind Old Street favourite Shoreditch Grind are adding one more to their roster in late September, serving light bites and sandwiches at the new Hoxton Hotel until the wee hours, not to mention the excellent coffee for which the group is so renowned. holborngrind.com

G R OW T H

Photograph by Adam Weatherley

The UK coffee market grew by 6.4% in 2013, even though we drink less coffee than in 2006 – and less per capita than many European countries.

6.4%

SPAIN 4.1

Antipodean coffee cartel AllPress (or ‘Allpress Espresso Coffee Roasters’, to give it its full title) landed on these shores in 2010, when the Shoreditch wave was just breaking and independent was becoming the new popular. As well as characteristically killer coffee, you can see its mammoth roaster at work during the week. You little ripper. allpressespresso.com

CLIMPSON & SONS

Slap-bang in hipster territory, Climpson serves up some of the finest coffee you’ll find in east London (known for great coffee anyway). A proper, old-school coffee community, the team brew their own blends, and even use their roastery HQ for music events and barbecue cook-offs. climpsonandsons.com

SWEDEN 7.1

UK 2.8

BELGIUM 5.1 NETHERLANDS 3.5

Redchurch Street, E2

Broadway Market, E8

POLAND 3.2

FRANCE 5.5

ALLPRESS

3

To get your weekly dose of foodism, go to foodism.co.uk/newsletter. With more than 80,000 subscribers, it’s London, one bite at a time.

FULL OF BEANS

2

GERMANY 7

KG PER CAPITA

SHROOM SERVICE More than £1m worth of fresh mushrooms, the majority of which are grown in the UK and Ireland, are sold in Britain every day.

23


LOCAL HEROES + WI NT ER POP-UPS

1

2

LE CHALET Selfridges, W1A, until late February

If you were to ask us to suggest somewhere to relax with a glass of mulled wine, have a bite to eat and generally take a load off during the Christmas rush this year, “Selfridges” may not be the answer you’re expecting. Up on the rooftop, though, things are considerably less manic, with alpine pop-up Le Chalet providing a crash course in how to eat and drink like a king this festive season. lechalet@q-grill.co.uk

FOLLOW US @FOODISMUK

FOODISMUK

CHEESE ON THE TERRACE

Babylon at Roof Gardens, W8, until March If you’re looking for the kind of grub you’ve become accustomed to after a hard day on the slopes, Babylon at Roof Gardens, Kensington, is here to sit you down and ply you with enough hot cocktails, wine, fresh bread and baked cheese to put a bull elephant to sleep. Plus, seeing as it’s in a rather nice part of town, the view’s not half bad either. You’ll have to put up with skyscrapers instead of mountains, but we’re sure you’ll cope. roofgardens.virgin.com

3

SOHO SKI AND RUM CHALET

Floridita, W1F, until March Mixing an alpine-style ski lodge theme with a Patagonian-inspired restaurant plays havoc with our already terrible grasp of geography, but when the results are as loud and vibrant as Floridita’s Soho Ski and Rum Chalet, we can’t really complain. Furs and fabrics, live music, an Argentine tapas menu, twists on classic winter cocktails and even a genuine chairlift (OK, maybe just the ‘chair’ part) combine to create one of the most all-action of the capital’s winter pop-ups. floriditalondon.com

Photographs by Jonathan Cosh of Visual Eye

DRINKING THROUGH NEW YORK

THE BRONX

MANHATTAN

At one time, all five New York boroughs QUEENS had their own BROOKLYN cocktail. Today, the Manhattan (whisky, STATEN ISLAND vermouth and bitters) survives as the best known.

24

STATEN ISLAND FERRY: malibu rum, pineapple juice. BRONX: gin, red vermouth, dry vermouth, orange juice. QUEENS: gin, red vermouth, sweet vermouth, pineapple juice. BROOKLYN: rye whisky, dry vermouth, Maraschino liqueur, bitters.

LATINO LASAGNE LOVERS

G.I. JOE

ITALY

Venezuelans are the second-highest consumers of pasta in the world, after VENEZUELA Italians. They eat 12.6kg per person each year compared with 28kg for Italians. Brits are way behind – 40th in the global standings – with just 2.5kg per capita.

BRITAIN

The ‘Americano’ serve actually comes from World War II. US soldiers in wartime Europe who were unused to drinking espressos would ask for extra hot water in their coffee to dilute the flavour.


STREET FOOD FIGHT

Put up your dukes! It’s the first in our series of duels between the big players on London’s streetfood scene, and right now gua bao’s got beef with, er, beef

MOTHER TRUCKING GOOD

THE BURGER

Ground meat in a bap, but better

2008 – the year Kogi BBQ taco trucks launched in LA, arguably kicking off the world food truck trend. There are now five Kogi trucks serving KoreanMexican fusion food.

Does a burger count as street food? If a brioche bun meets a beef patty in the woods but no one’s there to eat it, is it still a burger? Yes and yes. Case closed. The ubiquity of the burger is both its greatest strength and its greatest weakness – more burgers means more choice, but more choice breeds the risk of burger fatigue. We’re not tired of shovelling carbo-meat-bombs down our gullets yet, but don’t test us…

Photograph by Paul Winch-Furness

◆ Patty & Bun; James

St and Liverpool St. Burgerphiles won’t need to be told about P&B. Simply the top of London’s burger tree (which, sadly, doesn’t physically exist). pattyandbun.co.uk

◆ Mother Flipper;

Brockley market, KERB, Wapping. Top quality burger with a droolinducing lineup of fillings. Try the breakfast muffin. motherflipper burgers.com

VS

THE GUA BAO

Dinky Taiwanese steamed buns Also known as hirata (though not by us, we’re enlightened), these fluffy little buns are traditionally crammed with pork belly, caramelised peanuts and pickled greens, though the list of things you can stuff in a bao is limited only by size, imagination and your ability to digest the item in question.

◆ Yum Bun; KERB,

Night Tales. Insanely popular gua bao, made with feather-light buns and flavour-packed fillings – pork belly’s our favourite. yumbun.com

T HE W INNE R IS

“HAMBURGER STEAK IS CARRION, AND QUITE UNFIT FOR FOOD EXCEPT BY A TURKEY BUZZARD, A HYENA, OR SOME OTHER SCAVENGER” JOHN HARVEY KELLOGG, New Dietetics: What to Eat and How (1921)

◆ Flesh & Buns; 41

Earlham Street, WC2H 9LX. They call it ‘Japanese drinking food’, we call it brilliant DIY steamed buns. fleshandbuns.com

T HE B U R G E R

MINCE IT One hamburger bought from a fast food chain could contain beef from up to 100 different cows.

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27


STREET FOOD FIGHT THE TACO

Mexico’s filled, folded tortilla legend There’s a good argument (which, this being a fight, we’re all over) that the taco was the catalyst for street food domination. Hence the evolution from us eating sitting down using cutlery to today – when all food is consumed with bare hands and served from vintage French vans in car parks.

◆ Breddos; Swingers

VS

THE WRAP

Rolled flatbread = happy humans Pitting wrap vs taco is, we admit, a little unfair. After all, the taco’s constrained by national responsibility, while you can stick anything in a wrap and get on with your life without worrying about a visit from the pedant police. That should free up plenty of time to scour the streets of London for the hundreds of big players in the wrap game. Tell ‘em we sent you.

◆ Mike & Ollie; Brockley

market (Saturday). Meat, fish and veggie wraps, made with seasonal, sustainable ingredients. mikeandollie.co.uk

◆ Luardos; KERB

Whitecross and Brockley. Traditional tacos with standout ‘special’ guacamole. luardos.co.uk

◆ Falafel Al-hooriya;

KERB (various dates and locations). Authentic Palestinian wraps from a husbandand-wife team. @FalafelHooriya

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THE WINNE R IS

T HE TAC O

A RAMEN MASTER ON THE ART OF EATING NOODLES, from cult Japanese movie Tampopo (1985)

ROLL OUT THE BARRELS There are now nearly five million barrels of whiskey ageing in Kentucky, up from half a million ten years ago.

NOW: 5M BARRELS 10 YRS AGO: 0.5M BARRELS

Photographs by Toby Allen, Manuel Vazquez

CARESS IT WITH THE CHOPSTICK TIPS. GENTLY PICK IT UP AND DIP IT INTO THE SOUP ON THE RIGHT OF THE BOWL. WHAT’S IMPORTANT HERE IS TO APOLOGISE TO THE PORK BY SAYING: “SEE YOU SOON”. 28

(3-20 December). Worthy winners of this year’s Taco Wars London, with amazing tacos and great sliders, too. breddostacos.com


Savour every moment Introducing the new Kenwood CHEF Sense kitchen machine. Over 65 years of innovation and our most intuitive kitchen machine to date. It’s so easy to use it’s a pleasure; with Kenwood quality and reliability for unforgettable results. Exceptional food, delicious memories – every time. Create your own moment at kenwood.co.uk


WEAPONS OF CHOICE Dedicated bakers, wine buffs and coffee snobs take note – here’s the gear you need PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID HARRISON

30


K E NWOOD C HE F SE NSE £449.99; kenwoodworld.com Short of having the entire cast of Bake Off helping out in your kitchen, Kenwood’s spookily clever Chef Sense is the best thing you can arm yourself with to help you attain baking perfection. The intelligent control dial lets you build up speed without plastering your walls with dough.

31


DELONGHI LAT T I S SI MA + £249; nespresso.com Handsome, clever and easy to use, the Lattissima + makes it easier than ever to enjoy your favourite coffee. Fill the container with milk, insert a Nespresso capsule and press a button. Then tell everyone you’re an expert barista.

L A CAFET IÈRE GRINDE R

LAVA Z Z A E SPR E SSG O

AE R OB IE AE R OPR E S S

£41.95; lacafetiere.com

£79; lavazza.com

£27.99; aeropress.co.uk

Because you’re not a true coffee connoisseur until you’re grinding your own beans. Grab this electric burr mill and do just that.

Can’t wait till the next service station for a coffee? Use the Espressgo and brew a shot in your car. Obviously.

The increasingly popular AeroPress takes the cafetière and flips it on its head – literally. Extra pressure = better flavour.

32


C ORAVIN £269; coravin.com Ever fancy cracking open a special bottle but don’t want to glug the lot? The Coravin’s the answer. A medical-grade needle penetrates the cork to access and pour the wine, pressurises the bottle with inert argon, and the cork reseals when the needle is removed. Vinous genius.

WINE CRAFT SET

ME NU CHAM PAG NE SAB R E

SAGAF OR M CARAFE

£11.95; red5.co.uk

£119; johnlewis.com

£25; johnlewis.com

If James Bond was a wino, this is the kit he’d use. It’s got everything you need, and it’ll store incognito in the wine rack.

Descending from the ‘oo-er missus’ mold of drinks accessories, this is apparently a device for opening champagne bottles. Yeah, right.

As well as dimensions tailored to release a white wine’s aroma, this carafe has an oak stopper that sits satisfyingly in its neck.

34


www.stuartmitchellknives.co.uk

Centenary Steak Knife


T EFAL I N F INY P RES S REVOLUTIO N £149.95; tefal.co.uk Three, two, one – juice off! Tefal can’t launch you into orbit, but it can slow-press fruit and veg to preserve as many vitamins and antioxidants as possible. Which is more or less the same thing, right?

KOZIOL WINDMILL GRINDER

F LA RE 24cm STOC K POT

J OSE PH J OSE PH T W I ST

£28; koziol-shop.co.uk

£84.99; lakeland.co.uk

£12.50; josephjoseph.com

This spice grinder will handle anything you can throw at it. Just remove the sails, fill her up, and grind till your heart’s content.

Created in conjunction with an actual rocket scientist, this Flare pan uses thermo-dynamic ‘fins’ to heat faster and more evenly.

This flat whisk from ergonomic homeware expert Joseph Joseph turns into a balloon whisk with a simple turn of the handle.

36


Make

STARTER EMMA POWER’S CHINESE BHEL

H

INFO Preparation time

◆ 10 mins

Cooking time

◆ 20 mins

Serves

◆ 2

EAT THE OIL in a wok until it smokes, add the garlic paste and ginger, mix well and fry on a medium heat for 1 minute until the flavours release. Add the tomato puree, mix well and cook on a medium heat for 4–5 minutes, stirring continuously. Add the red chilli paste, salt and 4 tbsp of water, mix well and simmer for a couple of minutes while you keep stirring. Add the vinegar and sugar and continue to cook for another 2-3 minutes. Remove from the heat and allow to cool. Cook the noodles according to packet instructions, drain and leave to cool. Once cooled these need to be deep-fried in vegetable oil until very crispy. In a large mixing bowl, add the crispy noodles, all the prepared vegetables, tomato ketchup and Szechuan sauce. Toss all the ingredients together until the noodles are evenly coated with the sauce. Add the coriander leaves just before serving Serve and eat straight away, while the noodles are still crispy, with a wedge of lime. By Emma Power

INGREDIENTS ◆ 2 tbsp vegetable oil ◆ 4 large cloves of garlic paste ◆ 2-in piece finely chopped ginger ◆ 4 tbsp tomato puree ◆ 4 tbsp red chili paste ◆ Salt ◆ 3 tsp white vinegar

EAT MY WORDS NYC rapper Action Bronson is a former chef who squeezes food references into his lyrics, as we’re sure you know. Here are some of his best.

◆ 2 tsp sugar ◆ 200g fried hakka noodles ◆ 3 chopped spring onions ◆ 100g shredded cabbage ◆ 100g shredded or coarsely grated

carrots ◆ 100g shredded or finely sliced

capsicum ◆ 2 tbsp tomato ketchup ◆ 4 tbsp Szechuan sauce ◆ handful of fresh coriander leaves ◆ Salt to taste

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Just let me sharpen my knives, thrown on the apron Xs mark the steak and the salad crumbled with bacon BRUNCH, 2011 Serve like Ivan Lendl up in the rental The cheese been assembled

Photograph by Mark Hedley, Gonzales Photo/Kenneth Photograph Nguye/REX by ###

They receiving health benefits and dental The lamb was laced with fennel Left hand then shift the right foot touched the pedal THE SYMBOL, 2012 The scent of dollars like some crispy garlic golden brown Addicted but ain’t nothing prescripted Baby clams from Montauk, mix it up with the linguistics Bitch, I’m high THE ROCKERS, 2013

39


Make

FISH COURSE

INF O Preparation time

◆ 10 mins (plus 1-2

hours in fridge)

Cooking time ◆ 30 mins

Makes

◆ 6 cakes

I CLICK

FOODISM.CO.UK

From Christopher’s; christophersgrill.com

HOP FLOP In 1814, a 388,000gallon wave of beer flooded London after a vat ruptured.

CHRISTOPHER’S MARYLAND CRAB CAKES N A BOWL, pick through the crab meat to make sure that all the pieces of small shell have been removed. Combine the remaining ingredients, mix together thoroughly and check the seasoning. Divide the crab mix into six and shape into small cakes. Leave to rest in the fridge for an hour or two to firm up. Place a little butter or oil into a shallow pan or griddle plate, bring to a moderate heat, place cakes into pan and cook for about 6-7 minutes on each side until they have lovely golden colour. Place on a plate and serve with tomato jam, red-pepper mayo and rocket.

388,000

INGREDIENTS ◆ 500g white handpicked best

fresh crabmeat ◆ 1 small egg ◆ 4 tablespoons of mayonnaise ◆ 1 teaspoon of Dijon mustard ◆ 50g white fresh breadcrumbs ◆ 1 tbsp chopped parsley ◆ 1 tsp chopped tarragon ◆ Dash of Tabasco ◆ Salt ◆ Clarified butter or sunflower oil

for cooking

I’VE NEVER NOT WITNESSED A FOOD ORGASM WHEN SOMEONE TRIES THE SPICY CUCUMBERS ROOTS DRUMMER QUESTLOVE ON HIS FAVOURITE CHINESE TAKEAWAY, Han Dynasty in NYC ADULTS

16-TO-24 YR OLDS

GROW UP

Mature and meat-free It’s not just teenagers who are vegetarian – one in eight British adults is now vegetarian or vegan (12%) rising to 20% of 16-to-24-year-olds.

40


Make sure you have a jar or two of Peppadew in your cupboard this Christmas!

Peppadew, crab and avocado crostini

Cheese stuffed Peppadew wrapped in crispy bacon

Peppadew, grilled courgette and ricotta crostini

Roasted squash salad with mozzarella, rocket and Peppadew dressing

Open faced ham and cheese melt with Peppadew coleslaw

Pan-fried halloumi with Peppadew, caper and lemon dressing

Peppadew Piquanté Peppers. A tongue twisting sweet heat taste sensation!

Try tantalisingly, tempting, totally tasty recipes at www.peppadew.com Mild and Hot available at Tesco, Waitrose, Sainsbury’s, Asda, Morrisons, Co-op, Ocado, Wholefoods, Booths and Costco. Cheese Stuffed available at Tesco, Waitrose, Sainsbury’s, Ocado, Wholefoods and Booths. Tuna Stuffed available at Waitrose. Roasted Red Peppers available at Co-op.


Make

MEAT COURSE

INFO

Preparation time ◆ 10 mins (plus 1

hour to marinate)

Cooking time ◆ 15 mins

Serves ◆ 4

CAROM’S TANDOORI BABY CHICKEN

FOLLOW US @FOODISMUK

FOODISMUK

C

UT THE POUSSINS in half and remove the skin. Mix all your marinade ingredients together and apply it over the poussin, cover and leave in the fridge for an hour. Pre-heat your oven to 180oC, place the poussin in the centre and cook for approximately 15 minutes. Baste the poussin, applying butter or oil regularly while cooking. Check the thickest part towards the bone is fully cooked before you serve. Once cooked, remove the chicken from the oven, apply a knob of butter and finish with a generous squeeze of lime. From Carom; caromsoho.com

42

INGREDIENTS ◆ 300g baby chicken poussin ◆ 1 lime (plus extra to serve) ◆ ½g saffron ◆ 200g greek yoghurt ◆ 10g cumin ◆ 15g garam masala ◆ 30g ginger and garlic paste ◆ 3 chopped green chillies ◆ 15g vegetable oil ◆ Salt (to taste) ◆ butter

“IT’S JUST FOOD. EAT IT” DAVID CHANG, the chef behind cult NYC restaurant Momofuku, talking in 2008 about banning photography from one of his restaurants, Momofuku Ko. He temporarily lifted his strict ban for just one night in 2013.

BIG SOBRIETY The speakeasy, the colloquial name for a secret bar in Prohibition-era America, was so-called because in order to gain entrance, punters had to whisper a code-word through the door.


What Sundays were made for.

New Bisto Rich Gravy Paste is made with real meat juices for that delicious homemade taste. It’s perfect for those big Sunday roasts that get the whole family together.


A TASTE OF CHRISTMAS...

Wookey Hole Cave Aged Cheddar is a PDO traditional West Countr y Farmhouse Cheddar handmade in Dorset and aged in Somerset’s famous Wookey Hole Caves. It is rich, tangy and mature in flavour and will make an adventurous addition to the Christmas cheeseboard.

OF ORIGI

N

OTECTED PR

SIGNATIO

N

DE

INTERNATIONAL

CHEESE AWARDS

NANTWICH 2013 EST.1897

GOLD AWARD

w w w.fordfarm.com w w w.caveagedcheddar.co.uk

@WookeyCaveAged

WookeyHoleCaveAgedCheddar


Make

CHINA US

◆ 60 mins ◆ 4

12,800

Serves

BRAZIL

24,186

PORKY’S CHOCOLATE PECAN PIE

◆ 45 mins

Cooking time

44,201

DESSERT

INF O Preparation time

RUSSIA

MEXICO

GERMANY 6,890

8,630

10,560 JAPAN

POLAND UK 3,790

4,319

5,547

THE WORLD’S BIGGEST BEER MARKETS

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REEZE THE FLOUR, butter and sugar for ten minutes, then blend until it resembles breadcrumbs. Add the egg yolks. Refrigerate for 30 minutes. Roll out the pastry and put into a pie dish, prick the base and coat with egg yolk. Blind bake, weighing down with baking beans, for 15 minutes at 180oC. Remove the beans and bake for 5-10 minutes more. Melt the chocolate and butter in a bowl over simmering water, and melt the sugar and honey in a pan. Beat the eggs and add the chocolate mix, then the remaining ingredients. Fill the pastry base and bake for 25 minutes until the pastry is golden and the mix is slightly set. Serve with whipped cream.

From Porky’s; porkys.co.uk

The Chinese are the world’s biggest consumers of beer (more than 44,201 thousand kilolitres in 2012, according to a report by the Kirin Beer University) and Chinese beer Snow is the most popular by volume (10.3bn litres).

INGREDIENTS BASE ◆ 200g flour ◆ 100g butter ◆ 100g sugar ◆ 3 egg yolks

FILLING ◆ 100g dark chocolate ◆ 50g butter ◆ 110g sugar ◆ 250ml honey ◆ 3 eggs ◆ 1 cap vanilla extract ◆ 225g chopped pecans

49 BILLION The number of chickens eaten worldwide per year is estimated to exceed 49 billion.

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The Artis professional emporium Everything in one place, for the table and bar y on the Chefs alread p include eu lin op Bistrop of UNA si Martín Mile p cook to d an on Lond ise W e lin Jacque

AT YOUR SERVICE

Don’t fancy trekking into town for a slap-up dinner? Then let the chefs – and the food – come to you instead with this new at-home supper service

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ET’S FACE IT, sometimes you don’t want to go out, you can’t face cooking and your pile of local takeaway menus make for grim reading. Which doesn’t leave you with many options – or at least it didn’t, until Bistropop arrived on the scene. The concept is simple. Instead of you going to the chef, the chef – picked from a wide selection on its website – comes to you. They arrive with all the ingredients, cook and serve a menu of your choice, clean up and leave, at prices that start from sort of money you’d pay for a decent but not bank-breaking meal out in the capital. Bistropop is the brainchild of serial entrepreneur Diego Lijtmaer, co-founder of pioneering dayclub Bacanal. He describes it as “an online marketplace where chefs connect with consumers who want to have in-home dining experiences”. Think of it as a culinary Uber and you’re not far off. “We want to democratise the privatechef marketplace,” says Lijtmaer, and change people’s behaviour towards entertaining and socialising at home.” f

THE CHEF ARRIVES WITH ALL THE INGREDIENTS, COOKS AND SERVES A MENU OF YOUR CHOICE, CLEANS UP AND LEAVES, FOR THE SORT OF MONEY YOU’D PAY FOR A GOOD MEAL OUT

Cutlery Tableware Glassware Barware

POP WILL EAT ITSELF Bistropop launches this month, with a variety of chefs spanning different styles of cuisine, price points and locations. For more information, or to book a chef, visit bistropop.com.

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050 FOOD AS ART | 056 THE FOODISM RADAR | 066 CHEFS AND TATTOOS 076 THE LONDON LARDER | 082 MIXOLOGY

— PART II —

FEAST “IN 2014, CHEFS ARE THE NEW ROCK STARS” CHEFS AND TATTOOS, 066


THE ARTIST: Californian photographer Tyler Shields and his posse of rising stars continue to push the boundaries of modern taste, with edgy collections that play with female sensuality, sexual liberation and empowerment. This arresting shot – entitled TongueTied, from his 2012 collection Mouthful – is typical of his work, taking seemingly ordinary subject matter and using it to make a striking and subversive statement. It does also make us really want a strawberry lace…

THE ART: Tongue Tied; Tyler Shields is represented by both Imitate Modern (imitatemodern. com) and A Gallery (agallery.co.uk)

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IN GOOD TASTE The relationship between food and photography far exceeds those neon snaps in the window of your local kebab shop‌

Photograph by ###

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THE ARTIST: Long before Lady Gaga slapped on a load of steaks and called it fashion, another LA-based artist had already explored the idea of meat couture. Stephanie Diani’s ingeniously titled Offal Taste had relatively humble beginnings: “The idea occurred to me in the market,” she explains. “There were gizzards on display and my first response was to be grossed out, but then I saw and loved the delicate color palette of the pieces.” Still, we’re pretty sure this particular range won’t be coming to M&S any time soon.

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Photograph by ###

THE ART: (left) Matt Brown, actor; (right) Rachael Biggs, actress; for more information on the artist see: stephaniediani.com

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THE ARTIST: When Sarah Illenberger looks at food, she doesn’t see it in the same way most people do (under their nose and on the way into their mouths). She views it as full of artistic potential, which she fully mines to create striking images that merge the edible with the inedible. From a pomegranate grenade [pictured] to a pair of cupcake headphones, Sarah’s humorous yet thoughtful work is some of the tastiest art in the world.

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Photograph by ###

THE ART: (left) Salatkleid, â‚Ź400, 90x130 cm fine art print on litho paper; edition of 25; (right) Granate, â‚Ź160, fine art print on 240gsm litho paper, edition of 50; sarahillenberger.com

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Dining

G O BA C K TO BAS IC S

NUNO MENDES, EXECUTIVE CHEF AT CHILTERN FIREHOUSE This year has been a big year for the return to traditional and more ancient methods of cooking. All over the world we have seen chefs focus more on using natural elements for cooking such as open flame, preserving, fermenting and curing rather than more scientific and less interventional cooking, such as sous-vide. This has been a positive shift, and one in line with championing local produce and having a much closer relationship with the product on the plate. I believe this trend will continue into next year and we will see even more chefs touching and caring for their ingredients, rather than just setting a timer and relying on modern technology to do all the work. chilternfirehouse.com

THE FOODISM RADAR From locally produced chocolate to the new spirit landing on our shores, here’s everything you need to keep an eye out for in 2015. This just got real

DRINKING DINING GRAZING TRENDING COOKING

Trending

REJOICE IN THE LAMB

STEFAN PORTER, FOUNDER OF MEATPORTER.COM

Dining

Photograph by ###

I FEEL PEOPLE WANT TO EAT NATURALLY, WITHOUT THE SCIENTIFIC FUSS. IT’S TIME TO GO BACK TO CLASSIC, ECLECTIC, OLD-SCHOOL METHODS.

Arnaud Stevens, head chef at Sixty One. sixtyonerestaurant.co.uk

Lamb is starting to creep its way back onto London menus, and I think in 2015 we’ll see this young king of meats compete with sirloin steaks and pork chops, at home and in restaurants across town. I’m not counsel for the defence, but I think lamb gets a bad rap. It’s either too fatty, too expensive, too pink or just too lamby. Then there’s the usual argument about lamb versus hogget versus mutton – “it’s just so tough”. But lamb is without doubt my favourite meat; I find it so fantastically versatile. Because it’s naturally sweet, it works so well with spices, but also with acidity, and it features from culture to culture. From tagines in Morocco, to British Sunday roasts with mint; from seared chops with garam masala, to flame-grilled BBQs with rosemary and honey. And the fat crisps up so well, too. The sheep, in its humble forms as old and young, provides a fantastically wide-reaching meat. At Meat Porter, we sell the Agnus Dei of lamb cuts: the bone-in chop. Tender, sweet and great all year round. Our lamb chops are sourced from the hills and meadows of Lancashire, Yorkshire and Wales, and in the new spring season we’ll roll out more cuts of this great meat. meatporter.com

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Cooking

J OIN T HE ST E AM T E AM

CLARE EDWARDS, CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE MANAGER, SMEG UK

Steam ovens are set to take the kitchen by storm in 2015. Apart from offering the well-known benefits of healthy, nutritious, tasty and colourful food, they have more versatility than most people imagine. Steam ovens cook fish and vegetables fantastically, but they are also great for cooking rice, pasta and pulses, as well as curries and soups. You can even boil, poach and scramble eggs in one. The steam oven also takes on many of the same roles as a microwave, including defrosting, reheating and cooking – often with enhanced results. For more information on cooking with steam ovens and other kitchen innovations, visit smeguk.com

Grazing

C OF F E E C U LT U R E TOM HAIGH, CLIMPSON & SONS COFFEE ROASTERS

If 2014 is anything to go by, the coffee scene in 2015 is set to be even more innovative. The new batch of independent roasteries and coffee shops are transparent, accessible and they want to educate the customer. The industry is now armed with fresh ideas, equipment, theories and passion, along with simplified offerings and better service. And expect to see an increase in alternative brewing techniques such as V60 filter, Aeropress and siphons, in conjunction with lighter roasted, directly traded microlots and single-estate coffees. As farming and harvesting techniques continue to advance overseas, our knowledge and appreciation of coffee improves. Hopefully, this will mean the chasm that has emerged between coffee experts and the general consumer will continue to decline, with more and more availability of great coffees at home and on the high street. With increased learning and new awareness of excellent coffee, will the 16oz extra-hot cappuccino be resigned to the bookshelf? Only time will tell. For now, however, 2015 is sure to be the year for growth and expansion of the specialty coffee scene, and perhaps the demise of the highstreet brand. Vive la Révolution! climpsonandsons.com

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE HOPS DRINKING: Wine sommeliers are well versed in the origin of grape varieties and we are seeing a growing interest in the provenance of hops in craft beers. In the past 10 years the abundance and variety of hops used in the brewing industry has taken off and this trend certainly shows no sign of abating. Andreas Fält, ambassador for the US Brewers Association. brewers association.org

FORTIFICATION FOR THE NATION DRINKING: For centuries, vermouth has been served in bars the world over. Only now, however, is this versatile and sometimes misunderstood drink really coming to the fore as a standalone tipple. Ed Scothern, head sommelier at Soho vermouth bar Mele e Pere. meleepere.co.uk

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Dining

KOREAN FOOD, WITH ITS BOLD, PUNCHY, MOREISH FLAVOURS, SHINES VIBRANTLY IN THE SPOTLIGHT FOR 2015. THE KOREAN WAVE HAS BEEN STEADILY SPREADING AROUND THE WORLD, CARRYING WITH IT THE DRAMA OF THE MUCHLOVED KOREAN SOAP OPERAS, THE HAPPY SOUNDS OF KPOP, AND THE UNDENIABLE SAVOURY TASTE OF KOREAN CUISINE. LONDONERS ARE SET AND READY FOR THE RIDE!

JUDY WOO, CHEF AT JINJUU (OPENING IN JANUARY)

Drinking

M AK E M INE AN IR IS H

OLIVER CHILTON, THE WHISKY EXCHANGE Single pot still whiskey has seen a real revival over the past five years. The style – created by distilling wash created from both malted and unmalted barley – dates to 1800s Ireland, as a way of combating escalating taxes on malt imposed by the British government. The resultant spirit has a creamy and full texture, rich citrus fruit and tangy spice. Despite this wonderful character, the category has until recently remained hidden in the background compared with the big blended names of Irish whiskey such as Jameson, Paddy and Powers. With the additions of a 12-year-old caskstrength, a 15-year-old and a 21-year-old to the sought-after 12-year-old Redbreast – as well as an updating of Green Spot, the relaunch of Yellow Spot as a 12-year-old and the introduction of Powers John’s Lane 12-year-old – the range has been hugely increased. Quality is superb, with the different variations of malted barley versus unmalted barley creating a wonderful range of flavours and textures. Single pot still whiskey is creating a true premium Irish alternative to Scotch single malt for the first time in decades. thewhiskyexchange.com

Grazing Drinking

H EALT H Y C OC KTA ILS

JOE BELSON, HEAD BARTENDER, DRAKE & MORGAN Last year we saw a huge surge in healthy food as people have become more conscious about what they’re putting into their bodies. Ingredients such as kale, quinoa and chia seeds have cropped up on menus across the country and I think 2015 will see this trend seep into bars. Cocktails will be packed full of superfoods and cleansing juices made from ingredients such as acai berries, coconut water, fresh ginger and even kale. There’s never been a better excuse to sip on a cocktail with a guilt-free conscience. drakeandmorgan.co.uk

TAKING AN HOUR FOR LUNCH IS OFTEN UNTHINKABLE AND IF YOU ONLY HAVE 20 MINUTES, WHY SPEND IT QUEUING IN TESCO?

ECCIE NEWTON, FOUNDER OF KARMA CANS On why delivery services are set to change the way we eat lunch in 2015. karmacans.co.uk

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Trending

Trending

ON T HE VEG OF GLO RY

GUY WATSON, RIVERFORD

I expect to see a greater focus on what grows well in our climate and a quest for robust flavours from kales and flavoursome cabbage varieties as vegetables increasingly muscle their way towards the centre of the plate. We’ll also see the rise of the potato connoisseur, demanding Pink Fir Apples or Desiree rather than Cara. Riverford Organic delivers veg boxes to homes around the UK. riverford.co.uk

DOWN UNDER DOG RISES DINING: If 2014 was all about US eating, 2015 could be Australia’s turn. Shindig, the new evening menu at Lantana Café in Fitzrovia and Shoreditch, is bringing Melbourne’s dining scene to London, while Spring at Somerset House, helmed by Oz-born Skye Gyngell (previously of Petersham Nurseries), features interior design by her Sydney-based sister Briony Fitzgerald.

PREVIOUSLY ALMOST UNHEARD OF IN THE UK, BAIJIU, A DISTILLED WHITE SPIRIT ORIGINATING FROM CHINA, IS SET TO TAKE THE LONDON COCKTAIL SCENE BY STORM. ITS UNIQUE, AROMATIC FLAVOUR AND NOSE MAKE IT THE PERFECT COCKTAIL INGREDIENT WITH A DIFFERENCE. INTEREST IN BAIJIU COCKTAIL WEEK 2015, COINCIDING WITH CHINESE NEW YEAR, IS ALREADY CREATING A STIR. IT’S CERTAIN TO WAKEN EVEN THE MOST SLEEPY TASTE BUDS.

LUCY MITCHELL, SEEWOO ORIENTAL FOOD SPECIALISTS seewoo.com

Grazing

CH O COLAT E: HOT

SPENCER HYMAN, COCOA RUNNERS When we started Cocoa Runners in 2013, there were just three makers crafting bars from beans sourced in the UK. In the past few months another four have arrived in Wales (Pablo Spaull, Forever Cacao), Suffolk (Chris Brennan, Pump Street Brewery), Cornwall (Chocolarder) and Cheltenham (Doble and Bignall). In the US we are now in direct contact with more than 100, and some are even opening operations here in the UK, including Mast Brothers and Bertil Akesson. We now have makers from Woodstock to Warsaw and Brooklyn to Budapest. Though it’s not just Europe and the US – the Caribbean and South America are now knocking on the door and next year we’re launching bars crafted in Australia and New Zealand. cocoarunners.com

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Drinking

T HE STAT E OF PL AY

KARINA ELIAS, BOURBON BAR AT GROSVENOR HOUSE HOTEL Kentucky’s Bourbon industry is in the middle of its biggest expansion since Prohibition, with hundreds of new distilleries and warehouses opening. From 2015, small craft distilleries will outnumber the big ones. marriott.co.uk


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Drinking

T H E D EAT H OF B IG B O T T LE S ERVI CE

NICK SAVAGE, INNERPLACE

Shed a tear for Jordan Belfort. It looks like the days of dancing dwarfs and bottle service are numbered. That may be an overstatement, but one of the most prominent trends we’ve noticed over recent years is the migration from magnums and tables to more of a cocktail-focused service in nightclubs. We have the hipsters to thank (or decry) for this. It all started in the heady days of 2000, when Sasha Petraske opened Milk & Honey behind an unmarked door in the Lower East Side of New York with the caveat ’no namedropping’, serving inventive cocktails that cost more than most people’s dinner. Fast forward 15 years and the neo-speakeasy trend is still going strong to this day, with London bartenders such as Tony Conigliaro, Ryan Chetiyawardana [pictured above right] and Alex Kratena advancing the art past the point of recognition. What we’re seeing now in clubs is supply and demand. While consumers were once wooed by sparklers and beautiful people pouring orange juice into their premium vodka, they’ve now tasted better at a more reasonable price, and want more of it. On the other side of the card, many clubs are focused on getting the right people in, and to do so promote a classier cocktail culture. This has been spearheaded by luxury hotels such as Chiltern Firehouse, The London EDITION and the recently opened Mondrian. The London EDITION runs a nightclub, BASEMENT, with pre-batched cocktails whitelabelled from Stuart Bale of Strange Hill, while Rumpus Room at The Mondrian employs Chetiyawardana as its ’resident mixologist’. Though for those still wed to ’models and bottles’, have no fear, the spirit of The Wolf of Wall Street lives on in London. For more, visit: innerplace.co.uk

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Drinking

W I NE S TO WATC H IN 2015

WINECHAP The vintage releases

Bordeaux 2014 is unlikely to generate much interest unless prices are brutally slashed, Burgundy 2013 more so – the dramatically reduced quantities of many of the wines around Beaune mean most will be at a premium. On the back of two good years, English sparkling wines will be back in business (current cuvées based on the disastrous 2012 wines are not producers’ finest efforts).

The region

China has become a significant wine country (half a million hectares under vine – three times more than Australia) but winemaker Mark Haisma is convinced Romania is the next big thing. Great terroirs and terraced slopes built during the communist era, recent investment and indigenous grapes Feteasca Alba and Neagra could make Bucharest the new Bordeaux…

The lists

We will continue to see shorter, more dynamic wine lists that change seasonally: fresher whites, lighter reds and more rosé in the summer; richer whites, warmer reds in autumn. As specific produce comes in, wines will be highlighted to partner, making the wine an extension of the ingredients.

The market

More producers will look to sell direct to customers, cutting out négociants and the bigger importers. Social media is increasingly connecting growers and drinkers – its only a matter of time before the commercial opportunities this affords are realised.

The launches

Stevie Parle (Dock Kitchen, Rotorino) and designer Tom Dixon are opening Craft London in North Greenwich in Spring 2015, concentrating on in-house, small-batch production. Alongside their own butter and vinegar will be digestivos and vermouths, collaborations with niche UK distillers and craft breweries. The wine list will favour artisan over commercial and growers over brands, with a juicy ’off-list’ list of rarer vintages. Tom Harrow is wine director of Honest Grapes, the farmers’ market for wine, and founder of WineChap; honestgrapes.co.uk; winechap.com

SCANDINAVIAN INSPIRATION TRENDING: Seaweed is a fantastic flavour-enhancer, packed with nutrients. Its main claim to nutritional fame is as a source of iodine, vitamins A and C and calcium. Add the dried varieties to salads or pesto and use smoked kelp in a range of dishes, from lamb shanks to cod. Jonas Aurell, founder of cafe and grocery store Scandinavian Kitchen, Great Titchfield St. scandikitchen.co.uk

Drinking

DR INK ING IS NO L ONG E R E NOU G H

TIM HOMEWOOD, AMBASSADOR, TANQUERAY GIN

The way we eat and drink nowadays has changed considerably. Our expectations are much higher and we demand more bang for our buck – they demand an experience as well as great food and drink. Fortunately, London’s bartenders are stepping up their game and delivering cocktails that don’t just tingle our taste buds but delight the senses through multi-sensory offerings, too. If you’ve ever been to the much-acclaimed Artesian Bar at the Langham Hotel, you’ll have noticed they’ve been serving their signature cocktails with a certain razzmatazz for a while now, using smoke and mirrors to enhance the guests’ enjoyment, but the team over at the Worship Street Whistling Shop have taken this to a new level with Tanqueray presents: Gin in 3D. Hour-long sessions transport guests to different periods in gin’s history by using distinctive sights, sounds and smells, and all of it backed up by some truly delicious cocktails. Gin in 3D takes place every Thursday, Friday and Saturday at The Worship Street Whistling Shop, 63 Worship Street, EC2A 2DU until May 2015.Tickets £35. tanqueray.com

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Drinking

A C RAF T Y B U SINE SS

MATT LANE, FOUNDER, BEERBODS New kids on the block

The gap between home-brewing and making beer on a more commercial scale has never been smaller. We’re expecting to see even more new breweries in 2015. Check out your nearby railway arches, industrial estates and even your old local. Brew pubs (the best ones are where you can see the beer itself being brewed) are back in vogue.

Cans to conquer

Dining

B U R GERED S ENSE LE SS?

HANNAH SUMMERS, BURGERHOLIC

If you’re struggling to keep track of London’s burger options, don’t worry – so am I, and my diet consists pretty much solely of beef, cheese and bread. The past few years have been topped with gimmicky ramen lids and donut buns, while burgers have been tarted up with luxe ingredients from duck confit to béarnaise sauce. Londoners have gathered in droves to celebrate ’National Burger Day’ – a congregation of the capital’s most respected burger outlets serving pimpedout specials. Think we’ve reached saturation point? Think again. In 2015, expect to see a new direction for the burger world. It’s a refreshing year of collaborations, as London’s best burger chefs, pubs and breweries pool their expertise to create one epic final result. Ahead of the curve is Stokey Bears, a combined effort from top street vendor Burger Bear and East Dulwich Bear Hug Brewing, bringing lovingly prepped bacon jam burgers, craft beer and disco beats to a permanent home in Stoke Newington. Over in Marylebone, Burgershack is upping the standard of the humble pub burger in a partnership with the newly reopened Royal Oak. The meticulously crafted but unfussy menu is paired with a laid-back local boozer vibe and a core group of DJs spinning eclectic tunes. Enough of the gimmicks, let’s hit the pub. Hannah Summers obsesses about food and, er, Bruce Springsteen at burgersandbruce.com

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DON’T TELL THE COLONEL DINING: Fusion might be a dirty 1980s word for many, but some of the most exciting stuff to happen recently in the UK food scene is just that – European, South American or Asian, by way of New York or LA, with a British twist. Fried chicken is no exception, with Asian influences in particular offering a different kind of experience, with more amazing ‘crunch’ and more spicy heat. It’s only a matter of time before the UK starts to give American fried chicken a run for its money. Paul Hemings is founder of Bird restaurant in Shoreditch. birdrestaurants.com

Expect to see more of your favourite brews in cans next year. Forward-thinking British brewers such as Beavertown, Camden Town and Fourpure took the lead this year by canning the majority of their range and others will follow suit. The arguments for putting beer in cans are strong – they protect the beer from light, are better for the environment and look good. Can art is going to be big; you heard it here first.

Big brewers play catch-up

The big boys can see change is afoot and want a piece of the craft-beer pie. It’s going to get hard to tell who and what is really ’craft’ as big brewers jump on the bandwagon. Ultimately the truth will be in the taste and it will be the drinkers who decide whether they buy into what the large brewers have to offer.

Small is beautiful

A pint of the usual is the kind of macho expression you just don’t hear often nowadays. We want variety. We want smaller measures. We want higher strength (sometimes). We want bigger flavours, barrel-aged beers and experimental brews. We also want beer we can pair with food and so we’ll see beer start to feature prominently on restaurant menus. The pint isn’t dead but it won’t be the dominant measure in which good beer is served. Here’s to even better beer in 2015. BeerBods is an online beer club and subscription service. beerbods.co.uk


COOK SKIN SIDE UP There was a time when skin art was forbidden, but these days there’s more ink in London kitchens than blood. Mike Gibson meets four very different tattooed chefs PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID HARRISON

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FISTS OF FUN: Leon Borja’s whole body is a canvas, even down to the four-letter words on his knuckles. Now that’s what you call some punchy tattoos.

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H

OW’S THIS FOR a philosophical dilemma – the chef who thinks of himself as a piece of meat? “I was about to go around the world,” Leon Borja tells me, “and it was kind of like I was being exported.” To clarify, Leon Borja doesn’t spend the few hours he’s out of the kitchen practising sautéing himself. The Brazilian-born chef is referring to the giant tattoo – a raw steak with a knife and fork either side of it – that’s planted on the centre of his chest, emblazoned with the words ‘salted in Brazil’. Borja – who left his home country as a young cook, and who has worked in kitchens ranging from the Copacabana Hotel to Gordon Ramsay’s Maze and Hawksmoor along the way – is inked. Very inked. And we’re talking about a few ship’s anchors and a the name of his favourite football team. But rather, it’s cutlery, sauces, fruit, vegetables, meat grinders and other kitchen miscellanea. “My favourite one is the Tabasco bottle,” he tells me. Why? “I just really like Tabasco.”

“I WAS GOING ROUND THE WORLD – IT FELT A BIT LIKE I WAS BEING EXPORTED”

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INSET: From the tattoos down to the heavy boots, Borja is part chef, part rock star. His favourite tattoo, the Tabasco bottle, is on his left forearm, while his right bears fruit.

Photograph by ###

Not all tattoos have to mean something, I suppose. But most of Borja’s do – none more so than the Brazil-shaped steak on his chest. Speaking of which, if you haven’t noticed, we are by now thoroughly into the meat of the 2010s. A lot can change in a decade – and, as tends to happen, what was once a minor trend has becoming something approaching the mainstream: gone are the days when all →


RIGHT: Magnus Reid has tattooed more food on others than he has on himself; he prefers to keep his body art and day job very much separate.

→ chefs wore identical whites, cut their hair close and kept their skin ink-free. In 2014, a lot of the chefs cooking in our capital look more like Leon than Heston. In 2014, chefs are the new rock stars. When I’m chatting with Borja, my first impression is that he’s exactly the kind of person I’d expect to be covered in tattoos. He’s emotionally-led, creative, impulsive and unafraid to take risks. But compare that to Tom Sellers, founder of Bermondsey’s Michelin-starred Restaurant Story – and the situation becomes a bit more difficult to psychoanalyse. He’s a quieter, more introspective character – in many ways the yin to Borja’s yang. So if it’s not a personality thing, what is it? “It’s a very expressive form of art, when

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you cook with food,” Sellers tells me, “and I think tattoos are very similar in that respect. “It’s an expression of something – whether it’s a feeling, an emotion, or a time in your life. For me, my life is food – day and night. I’m a restaurateur. I think the tattoos are very much a separate thing.” He has a point. After all, if the only thing you see for 18 hours a day in the kitchen is food, why would you want to be reminded of it every time you look in the mirror? Borja’s view is different: “People sometimes think: ‘What if you change your profession?’, but I’m probably going to die on top of a stove,” he says. “Chef friends like my tattoos; other people say: ‘What the f*ck are you doing?’; and my dad doesn’t know about 90% of them. The

next time I get home to Brazil he’s probably going to send me straight back here.” The thought of Borja’s father being unaware of his son having a mane of shoulder-length hair and a body covered with ink is an amusing one but, clearly, not all fathers feel the same. Take Magnus Reid, for example, the young chef and founder of The Rooftop Café (and, more recently, Tuck Shop in Shoreditch): “My dad tattooed my leg when he came to visit,” Reid recalls. “I remember my mum saying that he wasn’t allowed to have any tattoos, so he did mine instead. It’s fucking horrible, but it’s up there with my favourites.” As an Australian-born emigré, a tattooed model-turned-chef and an occasional tattoo artist himself, Reid describes himself as →


Live Magnificently. Drink Responsibly.

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here’s to the vodka less ordinary Grasp your glass. In with a shovel of ice. Then the Finlandia Grapefruit. Top with tonic. “Kippis!”


→ having had something of a “stereotypical east London career”, so what does he make of the ink insurgence? “I suppose now people are noticing tattooed chefs because being a chef’s trendy. I think back in the day chefs and cooks weren’t necessarily the nice people in society. You’ve got nice chefs now, and that wasn’t around when I first started cooking. They were sailors – that same kind of camaraderie you’d have in a situation as tense as running a service. I think tattoos came with being a risk-taker, and that want to be a bit edgy, because chefs were a bit more rough and ready.” Now, though, things are different. Where once you had to cover up tattoos in the

“COOKING IS A VERY EXPRESSIVE FORM OF ART”

RIGHT: He may have a Michelin star, but Tom Sellers is no stranger to the needle. He says every tattoo has a meaning, all of them highly personal.

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kitchen, they’re much more encouraged. At 30, Borja is the oldest chef in our inked fraternity, and he remembers having to hide his shame. “I’ve worked on a cruise ship twice, and had to cover up,” he says. “It was ridiculous. So, just to prove a point, I tattooed my knuckles. It’s a bit of a revolt and a criticism to the part of the industry that still has something against chefs with tattoos – I was thinking of four-letter words to go across them, and it’s like ‘love/hate’ but foodrelated, so I went with ‘pork’ and ‘beef’.” You can probably imagine a couple of four-letter words that might have been worse. If there was a stigma, it’s gone the other way now. Tam Storrar, head chef at Soho’s Blanchette, feels like it, anyway. He’s only got what he calls “one piece”, but it happens to stretch all the way up his arm, incorporating a pig’s head and a garden of botanicals. “Maybe ten years ago it would have been a problem,” Storrar says. “But it’s almost the opposite now. If you’re working in Soho, or somewhere, it’s almost a bonus. I almost wish that wasn’t so, because it makes it something →


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INSET: The sneakylooking pig on Tam Storrar’s right arm is symbolic of nose-totail cooking, and is inspired by St John’s Fergus Henderson.

of food,” he says, “so I guess it’s probably a similar love, and why a lot of chefs get tattoos. There’s a huge craft element involved both with food and with being a tattoo artist.” Reid echoes his point, too. “At the root of it, cooking’s a craft. It’s the same as metalwork; it’s the same as being a florist – it’s a physical practice that you’ve had to learn. And the finished dish you might call a piece of art, if you’re that way inclined, but it’s the same as tattooing – it’s method and procedure, and then a finished product.” It might be an unglamorous way of looking at it, but I can’t help but agree with him. Nothing’s a piece of art until it’s finished – until then it’s just a process. A fruit bowl isn’t

“AS LONG AS I DON’T HAVE GUNS AND DAGGERS, I’LL STILL BE ABLE TO GET ON SATURDAY KITCHEN” → you’re almost pushed to do. But as long as I’m careful not to have guns and daggers, I’ll still be able to get on Saturday Kitchen.” Tom Sellers agrees. And he’d know, given that his CV lists jobs at pub kitchens and hotels to stints at legendary LA restaurant The French Laundry and Noma. “I think a kitchen is one of the few places you’re not judged on your appearance,” he says. “You wouldn’t see a broker with tattoos all over their hands. But I think that’s a reflection of our industry. “It’s an industry where everyone can express themselves. It’s an expression – food, cooking, restaurateuring – a massively visual

industry, so I was never judged for my tattoos. “But I think now, more than ever, it’s a generational thing. If you look at the chefs before us, a lot of them don’t have tattoos. I think the level of the tattoo has definitely stepped up in the last five, ten years.” There’s not much that’s similar about cooking and tattooing. Not unless you consider that they both involve working closely with meat, anyway. But I wonder if there’s something deeper at work here, and Sellers does, too: “As a chef you can appreciate the detail and the creation that’ll go into a tattoo in the way you would a plate

a piece of art until someone paints it or cooks it. A tattoo isn’t a piece of art until the last of the ink’s dried and the skin’s healed. We shouldn’t get too tied up in discussing whether chefs and tattooists are two sides of the same coin. Instead we should be thankful that we’re living in a city and in a time where both professions are riding a swirling wave of creative expression. Their personalities are not only allowed but encouraged to flourish, and their work is no longer behind the BITE-SIZED scenes; it’s there for all to FOODISM.CO.UK/ NEWSLETTER see. I’ll ink to that. f

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THE LONDON LARDER The capital may hardly be considered a cornucopia of food production. But Neil Davey speaks to artisans around the city who are changing that impression, bringing love and local pride to their London produce

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OU OFTEN READ how the likes of Scotland or Cornwall or California have an enviable ‘larder’ – a collective term for a region’s plentiful produce – but you might think it can’t possibly apply to anywhere within the M25. Your cynicism is understandable. Oxford Street is famous for many things, but sustainable organic farming isn’t one of them. But things are shifting – so much so, in fact, that the best thing about this feature is how much abuse it’s going to generate. In around 1,200 words’ time, many of you will declare I’m an idiot and announce “I can’t believe they didn’t mention so-and-so”. And that’s rather splendid, don’t you think? Behind doors and inside assorted sheds and industrial units, London has a wealth of artisan producers of all sizes who are doing tremendous things in the name of food and drink, for a rapidly growing audience. “I think it’s because there’s a sense of personality in artisan production,” says Pete Thomas, head brewer at Islington’s Brewhouse & Kitchen. “And there’s an everincreasing interest in locally made produce.” That’s certainly true at Brewhouse, where the brewing equipment sits at the far end of the bar and, five days a week, drinkers can watch Thomas making his six regular ales and two seasonal beers. More to the point, they can go and chat to him. And they do. “In some places, the brewer is like a zoo animal you watch through glass,” laughs Thomas. “We wanted it open, and the instant feedback is great. There’s a lot of knowledge out there; we get a lot of home brewers in.” This is a group with whom he has a lot in common. “Before Brewhouse, I was in construction, and just brewing at home. The money in construction was much better,” he adds, laughing. “But now I love what I do.” The notion of love – along with enthusiasm and pride – is one that occurs frequently during the research for this story, whether from those who have been in the artisan food world for just a few months, or those who have been at it for more than 100 years. Some of you may be surprised to see H Forman & Son – founded in 1905 – featured rather than, say, Chris Box of Little Greenwich Smokery. Trust me, it’s nothing personal: Chris's products are stunning (do track him down via @smokingsalmon on Twitter). LEFT: Did you know Scottish smoked salmon originated in London? Jewish immigrants in the East End used to smoke fish to preserve it and helped smoked salmon become a delicacy

It’s just that we had a point to make that artisan refers to the method, not the scale. “We have a viewing gallery into the factory,” Lance Forman – H Forman’s greatgrandson – tells me. “People often ask why we show visitors what we’re doing, but we have no trade secrets.” Indeed, the process is a classic one – salt cure, smoke, slice – but here it’s all done by hand, with the freshest fish imaginable, by some 30 skilled staff. “It’s one thing to learn how we do it,” says Forman, “it’s a different thing to replicate it.” As Forman points out, H Forman & Son wasn’t the first smokehouse but it is now the longest surviving one. “Jewish immigrants in the East End smoked fish as a way of preserving it. Then they discovered Scottish salmon – the end product was fantastic and it took off as a gourmet food, perhaps Britain’s first ever. Caviar, foie gras and truffles all came in from other parts of the world – but Scottish smoked salmon started in London.” One area where the newer wave of artisan producers is especially active is online. Pact Coffee is a case in point. It’s an online subscription service “on a mission to get the UK drinking better, freshly roasted coffee”, as their head of PR Ed Grattan explains. To do this they send Will Corby, their head of coffee, around the world to buy world-class beans from dedicated farmers. These are then roasted in the UK in small batches, ground →

BEHIND DOORS AND INSIDE ASSORTED SHEDS AND UNITS, LONDON HAS A WEALTH OF ARTISANS 77


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Salmon smoking in the East End at H Forman & Son – where they’ve been at it since 1905; the Brewhouse & Kitchen in Islington; Pact Coffee, the idea for which was born in Stephen Rapoport’s kitchen in Balham

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“THEY SAY YOU SHOULD DO SOMETHING YOU LOVE – AND I LOVE TO DRINK AND EAT”

Photograph (Pact) by Dan Ross

→ at the last possible moment and dispatched overnight to the consumer. “Customers can choose five levels of grind, depending on how they brew their coffee at home,” says Grattan. The idea came from serial entrepreneur Stephen Rapoport, and was founded in his kitchen in Balham. “Stephen woke up one weekend, found the coffee jar empty, and was frustrated at only being able to find substandard coffee locally,” explains Grattan. “So he came up with the idea of receiving freshly roasted coffee when you need it on a flexible subscription basis.” Refreshingly, as well as making it easy to get hold of good coffee – “we’ve got customers in the Outer Hebrides,” adds Corby

– Pact is also trying to get past the snobbery, hence accessible tasting notes on the packs such as ‘Earl Grey Tea and Garibaldi Biscuits’ or ‘Chocolate Digestives’. “We go into more detail online,” adds Grattan. “‘A tea-like mouthfeel, a light citrus acidity, a biscuit sweetness’ but ‘Earl Grey tea and garibaldi biscuits’ is something people can relate to.” The attitude seems to be working. They may still have Stephen’s original domestic grinder on display but that’s for sentimental reasons. The Balham kitchen has been replaced by a large industrial unit in Bermondsey, where it’s dispatching up to 3,000 bags of coffee a day from a range of six coffees that change regularly, but are all treated with respect and different levels of roast to allow the natural flavours to shine. “Anyone can make coffee with roast flavours,” says Will. “You could take the best sourdough in the world and burn it, then take the worst white bread in the world and burn it, and they’ll taste identical. However, →


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“IF IT WERE JUST ABOUT SMOKE, THEN KIPPERS WOULD HAVE TAKEN OVER THE WORLD” → toast the sourdough perfectly and you’ll get something really amazing.” It’s a point that echoes something Lance Forman told me earlier – that it’s all about the quality of what you start with and then striving to get the most out of it. “If it was just about smoke,” he says, “then kippers would have taken over the world.” That subject of pure enthusiasm comes up again when talking to Philip Wilton, of Wildes Cheese in Tottenham. “They say you should do something you love,” says Philip, “and I love to drink and eat.” Wilton was a management consultant before taking to cheesemaking. “Can’t you say I’m an ex-porn star? It has less of a stigma,” he quips. He had been learning about cheesemaking as a hobby when the recession started to hit. “Redundancy was in the air and

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honey bee colonies cover large parts of south London. If you’re a hayfever sufferer, try eating honey from your area – it helps build up resistance to local pollens. capitalbee.co.uk ◆ BREAD BREAD Bridget Hugo’s

enthusiasm for sourdough led her to found Franco Manca pizzeria with Giuseppe Mascoli. She continues her passion for fermentation from her bakery in Herne Hill. breadbread.co.uk ◆ THE URBAN WINE COMPANY

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The craze for artisinal gin has been let down by the average quality of the accompanying tonic water. Until now. The UK’s first smallbatch tonic water is handcrafted to a Victorian recipe, and the flavour allows it to play a balanced supporting role. btw-drinks.com

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ABOVE: Philip Wilton wanted to be made redundant so he could start his cheese business BELOW LEFT: Hanging with salt is one of the elements of the Forman fish-curing process

I wanted to ensure I was one who got it – so I spent a year learning how to make cheese and a year tormenting my boss.” Armed with his redundancy payout in 2011, he founded Wildes Cheese, which is now available at many of the capital’s farmers’ markets, including a stall at Borough Market. Like many of the producers mentioned here, there is a flexibility and accessibility to Wildes’ range that you don’t get from supermarkets and larger producers, with experimental efforts often joining their regular cheeses, just to see what customers think. As well as great instant feedback, for Philip, it’s an indicator that people are more interested in food as a whole. “I think there’s been a move away from the bland. With so much mass-produced food, cost is the overriding factor. It doesn’t offend anybody, but nobody’s excited by it either. “But I think we’re reacting against that and the recent scandals – horsemeat, for example – that remind the consumer that the big boys can’t be trusted. You need to enjoy what you’re eating. We’ve looked at other countries who haven’t quite sold their souls to the supermarkets and there’s been a shift back towards that,” concludes Wilton. There certainly has. And, to feed the enthusiasm of gourmet shoppers everywhere, let’s hope that London’s many artisan food producers CLICK FOODISM.CO.UK continue to thrive. f


By appointment to Her Majesty The Queen Champagne Supplier Pol Roger & Cie

h a n d c r a f t e d

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1 8 4 9

HISTORY It’s in the making.


SHAKE IT UP How did an unassuming speakeasy revolutionise London’s nightlife and become one of the world’s most respected bars? We find out what goes on behind closed doors at the Nightjar…

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T’S AMAZING WHAT can happen when you ban alcohol. Don’t get us wrong – we’re not calling for a return to the dark days. But without Prohibition in 1920s America, the golden age of the cocktail may never have occurred; alcoholic drinks may not have become revered; and, more to the point, London’s contemporary bar scene would be significantly worse off. Whether or not the capital’s speakeasy trend is on its last legs is up for debate, but there’s no doubting that Shoreditch’s Nightjar is staying just where it is. You might have seen it, or you might not – it’s accessible only by an unmarked wooden door on City Road. Established in 2011, it quickly found that →

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Photograph by David Harrison

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→ Holy Grail combination of popularity and critical acclaim in equal measure, before winning Difford’s Guides’ Class Award for Best New Bar in 2011. “We were still rookies at the time,” explains co-founder Edmund Weil, who founded the bar with wife Rosie Stimpson. “I remember going to get drinks as they were calling out the winner, because I had so little expectation of winning. It was a great feeling.” If the Class Award felt great, spending the last three years in the top three of Drinks International’s fêted 50 Best Bars must be a kind of bourbon-drenched euphoria. That kind of award speaks volumes. It may be a trendy place, but what it’s categorically not is a flash in the pan. Nor is it superficial. The bar’s speakeasy model wasn’t the product of late-night PR brainstorms or comprehensive market studies. “It actually came from the style and the music angle before the drinks,” Weil explains. “My wife sings jazz, swing and blues, and we wanted somewhere that would do justice to the music. The speakeasy trend has almost run its →

TORONTO This take on the classic old fashioned is short, smoky and bittersweet. Stir thoroughly and serve it on the rocks in a tumbler, garnished with the smoked candy floss.

ING R E DIE NTS ◆ 50ml Labrot & Graham

◆ ◆

◆ ◆

Woodford Reserve bourbon 10ml Fernet Branca 15ml maple syrup with coffee and roasted pecan nuts Orange blossom smoke Candy floss and chocolate mini-egg garnish

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→ course now, but I’d like to think that we came at it very much from a purist angle. We love art deco design; we came to love the cocktails – the pre-Prohibition era in particular – and, obviously, we love the music, too. “I’m a lover of vintage style, and if someone opened a speakeasy bar I’d drink there over most other places because, well, what does it stand for? Good music, vintage style, drinks that have been made with care and attention, good service, and intimate spaces – and I like all of those things.” Having what – in bartending terms – is considered an A-list work force doesn’t hurt, either. They’ve cut their teeth at some of the capital’s finest drinking establishments. In Weil’s own words, being introduced to Marian Beke and hiring him as their bar manager was a turning point in its success story. “Marian was working at Pearl at the time. He’d worked at the Langham before, and at Montgomery Place as bar manager; and he’d been mentored by people such as Ago Perrone from the Connaught and Alex Kratena from Artesian, so he had a pretty

INGRE DIE NTS ◆ 50ml Woodford

Reserve ◆ Ontario icewine

tea leaves (muddled) ◆ Bar spoon of yumberry

powder ◆ 20ml sugar syrup ◆ Dash of lemon ◆ 3 dashes of

absinthe bitters ◆ 50ml Mercier Brut

Champagne

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CHAMPAGNE JULEP A longer, julep-style pour, this drink combines bourbon flavours, fresh berry taste from the Asian yumberry superfood powder, and an aroma of absinthe. Serve it in an absinthe glass with a julep strainer and mint garnish.


BURNT AMBER Made with fourmillion-year-old amber, pine liqueur and frankincense, this is a serious cocktail. Serve it straight up in a coupe glass and garnish with a burning frankincense pine cone. No, really.

ING R E DIE NTS ◆ 50ml Absolut

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◆ ◆ ◆

Elyx Vodka infused with amber 25ml La Quintinye Vermouth Royal 12.5ml Mastiha spirit 15ml Krucefix Mountain Pine liquer Frankincense Lemon peel Pine cone

Photograph by ###

good pedigree,” says Weil. “But his vision and his style is unique. Marian showed us some of his ideas and drinks and the moment we saw them we knew we had to make it happen. He also has a fantastic eye for staff, and a lot of people would give their eye teeth to work for him. “There are a lot of different kinds of bartenders, and ours are all serious guys. They’re all dedicated; see what they’re doing as a craft, something that requires constant work and practice. Without that dedication we’d be nowhere.” So what next for the Nightjar? Having pioneered a city-wide trend and pretty much conquered London’s bar scene single-handedly, questions of expansion are inevitable. Weil, though, remains tight-lipped. A simple “watch this space” is sadly all we get. You can’t blame him for being cautious – you could get arrested for that sort of thing; it is the 1920s, after all. Or at least, sitting in the Nightjar, swing music roaring, sipping the best julep in London, it certainly feels like it. f

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092 FOODIE EMILIA-ROMAGNA | 098 SOUL FOOD IN MEMPHIS 104 HOLY SPIRITS | 115 THE SELECTOR | 130 DECONSTRUCTING THE EGG

— PART III —

EXCESS “IT’S ABOUT GRIT AND GRIME, FLAMBOYANCE AND SPICE” SOUL FOOD IN MEMPHIS, 098


MAIN COURSE

WHEAT TOOTH Emilia-Romagna’s food culture has survived untouched for centuries. Mike Gibson visits the region of Italy where the lasagne is green and you don’t mess with tradition

MAIN: Tagliatelle is one of the more common types of pasta eaten in the region. When it’s ready to cut, the sheet of pasta should be translucent

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S

ITTING IN A tiny trattoria on the Via delle Bella Arti in Bologna, as I’m eagerly munching on mortadella and home-made bread with olive oil, a 75-yearold Italian woman tells me that I look like I can put away a bowl of pasta. I hesitate – I mean, she’s got me bang to rights, but were this said by another customer eating at a nearby table, or a waitress, I might think about being mildly offended. It isn’t, though – it comes (via a slightly apprehensive translator) from the mouth of Anna Maria, the hard-nosed but incredibly talented and passionate matron of the restaurant; the very same one that’s been serving the Bolognese the food they adore and revere for 30 years and counting. Ah, yes – the ‘B’ word. I knew this would come up. What image does it call to mind, I wonder? I’ll hazard a guess at a steaming plate of spaghetti bolognese, just like mum (or, indeed, mama) used to make. When I say this, I don’t say it lightly: banish that thought immediately, and never again mention, or cook, ‘spaghetti bolognese’. again. Not only are you propagating a myth; you’re arguably insulting an entire region of Italy while you’re doing it. Shame on you. But seriously, since I’ve been in EmiliaRomagna – quite possibly the most foodie of all Italian food destinations, home to Parma, Bologna and Modena, to name a few – I’ve been set straight. Spaghetti bolognese is a lie. It doesn’t exist; at least not in Bologna. And they should know. I try to start a conversation with Anna Maria about it, to see what a Bolognese matron makes of the bolognese misnomer, and the mere mention of it gets her so obviously riled that I’m worried I’ll be

TRATTORIA ANNA MARIA

Photograph byPhotograph Bon Appetit/Alamy by ###

Opened in 1985, Trattoria Anna Maria is as close as you’ll find to an archetypal trattoria Bolognese. It’s the best kind of peasant food – simple, rustic, and cooked exactly as it would have been a century ago. As well as classics like tagliatelle al ragu and lasagne, try friggione – sticky, sweet fried onions and tomatoes – and signature, homemade desserts. Via Belle Arti, 17, 40126 Bologna; trattoriannamaria.com

I’M WORRIED I’LL HAVE BEEN THROWN OUT BEFORE I FINISH MY PRIMO PIATTO thrown out before I finish my primo piatto. After some fiery gesticulation, she explains that real Bolognese pasta is tagliatelle al ragu; it’s tortelloni (made with a slightly different filling than the one 20km down the Via Emilia in Modena); or it’s lasagne, made only (and I mean only) with pasta verde – make it with white pasta and you may find yourself on the wrong end of a wooden spoon. If you hadn’t quite gathered, the people of this culturally and gastronomically wealthy region are a little particular about their food. But it’s with good reason. Ever tried proper mortadella? That comes from Bologna, and only Bologna. Parmigiano-Reggiano? That’s from Parma, parts of Reggio Emilia, and Modena – the area known as the ‘Treasure →

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→ Island’, where cheese is sourced and made. Parma ham? You get the gist. But you can’t buy Parmigiano-Reggiano from Sicily, Florence or Rome. Well, unless it’s been imported from here – and there’s such strict regulation involved in getting it from the farm to the shop window that even then it has to have been made with exactly the right milk, from exactly the right cows, with exactly zero additives and preservatives, and aged for a minimum of 24 months. If not, it’s Grana Padano, or it’s ‘parmesan’ – the name given to miscellaneous Italian-style hard cheese on these shores. If you didn’t know the difference, it’s probably just because they don’t shout about it. And they don’t need to; they let the food do it for them. My Emilia-Romagna culinary education continues when I visit Acetaia Villa Bianca, a vinegar house in Modena. Balsamic vinegar may be a familiar sight on supermarket aisles, but there’s more to it than you might think. For the liquid to be considered aceto balsamico tradizionale di Modena, or traditional balsamic vinegar, it has to jump through the same hoops as the ParmigianoReggiano. It has to be aged in exactly the right way for a minimum of 12 years (or 25 if it’s extra vecchio, or extra old), and then regulated by a consortium to ensure its taste

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MEAT OF THE MOMENT: Simoni, a tiny but bustling butcher in Bologna, is famous for its mortadella. As you can see, it’s a dab hand at other produce, too

and provenance. Only then can it garner the elusive tradizionale tag it needs if it’s going to be sold for what some might consider a pretty lofty price-tag. But you’re not just paying for great taste. You’re paying for centuries of craft, and products that have been carefully and lovingly perfected over the course of time; and you’re buying into an identity and a tradition that’s impossible to fake, no matter how hard large-scale industrial producers try. That’s why tradizionale means so much. It’s that sense of tradition that means in some parts of Bologna and Modena it looks like barely any time has passed since its most esteemed restaurants and shops were founded. Case in point: Bologna’s oldest bakery has been open since 1881. In some cases, food history is literally built into its cities. In Modena, there are two small, unremarkable dimples in one of the cathedral walls, barely noticeable until my tour guide points them out. Their function? They were →

BALSAMIC VINEGAR MAY BE FAMILIAR, BUT THERE’S MORE TO IT THAN YOU’D THINK CARPIGIANI

Did you know you could get a degree in gelato? Us neither, until we completed an honorary course at the Carpigiani gelato factory in Bologna. Alongside manufacturing gelato machines, the brand has an adjoining museum – celebrating the artisanal ice cream’s rich history and heritage across the region, the country and now the world – as well as the aforementioned university, where it teaches over 6,000 students a year the secrets of gelato making. Interested in learning? Carpigiani also runs gelato courses right here in the UK. For more information and pricing, head to carpigiani.it.


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ACETAIA VILLA BIANCA If you can afford the couple of hours it’ll take you to drive to Modena and take a tour at this acetaia, you should. Based in a gorgeous white house (hence the name) that overlooks its own vineyard, the operation is overseen by Dr Emilio Biancardi, who personally ages every single barrel produced. Tours include lunch and tastings of the vinegar. Strada Scartazza, 115, 41126 San Damaso MO, acetaiavillabianca.com LIQUID GOLD: Few things showcase the region’s commitment to provenance more than traditional balsamic vinegar, aged in barrels over decades

IF LONDON IS A FOOD THEME PARK, EMILIA ROMAGNA’S CITIES ARE TEMPLES → built to help its citizens measure portions of ricotta, apparently. Enough said. There are a few places I’ve been in my life that make me a little embarrassed of my home country’s food heritage. There might be no better city in the world to eat in than London in 2014, but what exactly is it we’re eating? Pretty much any cuisine other than our own, for the most part. And how much importance do our counties and regions attach to their own food heritage? I don’t really know. And that’s the problem. The amazing thing about London as a food destination is its unparalleled diversity and

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HOTEL TRE VECCHI

level of competition. But if London is a food theme park – brightly-coloured signs, swathes of tourists, queues out the door – EmiliaRomagna’s cities are temples: considered, humble and committed to tradition in a way that I’ve rarely, if ever, encountered before. Not that I’m complaining – I’m a sucker for a food trend; and I’m British, so I’m excellent at queuing. But despite the love I have for British food, I can’t help but feel it’s going through something of an identity crisis. Go to the beach anywhere in England and you’ll eat the same fish and chips. Yorkshire pudding is as ubiquitous in Sussex as it is oop North. We could learn a hell of a lot from Italy in that regard. Not the trivialised, caricatured Italy, where enormous families get together to wildly gesticulate over ‘spaghetti bolognese’ – the real one, wherein food identity isn’t only known, but fiercely and proudly protected, and the makeup of a dish can tell you as much about the city that created it as a 15-minute lecture. I am, of course, not particularly optimistic that after hundreds of years of sub-par food, we’re suddenly going to up our game on a national level. But we could at least meet them in the middle – after all, a little tradizione goes a long way. f Mike Gibson travelled to Emilia-Romagna as a guest of the Emilia-Romagna Tourist Board. For more info, go to emiliaromagnaturismo.com

Looking for a place to stay while you eat your own way around EmiliaRomagna? Four-star Zanhotel Tre Vecchi is right in the centre of Bologna on the Via dell’Indipendenza – a stone’s throw from its huge stone streets filled with shops and cafés. As you’d expect, its breakfast bar serves a mean cappuccino, too. Prices at Hotel Tre Vecchi in Bologna start from approx. €75 (£60) per night, based on two people sharing a double room. For more info, go to zanhotel.it/ zanhoteltrevecchi.

HOW TO GET THERE Bologna is the major airport in Emilia-Romagna, and with regular flights there with easyJet and British Airways from London Gatwick, and Ryanair from Stansted, Manchester, Bristol, Edinburgh and Dublin, there’s no better time to explore its unique food culture for yourself. easyJet flies direct to Bologna from London Gatwick, from £36.49 per person, one way. For more information, go to easyjet.com.

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You probably know all about Elvis’s love of old-fashioned Southern home-cooking, but what’s behind the new buzz for barbecue? Zoey Goto visited Tennessee’s largest city to sample its famous slow-cooked barbecue ribs but ended up having an encounter with the legendary Al Green over spaghetti

EMPHIS IS ABOUT grit and grime, flamboyance and spice – you can see that all around us, from the music to the food,” Lance Silkes shouts over his shoulder as we speed past the neon lights of Beale Street, the throbbing centre of blues city. “Most American cities have become homogeneous, but Memphis is an exception to that rule,” he states, as we enter our fifth barbecue restaurant of the afternoon. We are on the so-called Tastin’ ‘Round Town tour of the best barbecue joints in the city, led by Silkes, who moonlights as a professional barbecue judge – not the worst part-time job. Barbecue was originally introduced to the Southern States alongside the slave trade. While the slave owners ate “high on the hog” – meaning the choice cuts of meat from the back and upper leg of a pig – the slaves had to find a way to make their scraps of meat edible. They developed a process of curing the meat with a spicy, dry rub and smoking it, and the American love of barbecue was born. Contemporary Memphis barbecue still favours pork, which is slow-cooked in a pit and served either with a dry rub, or smothered in a tangy, thick sauce. The city now boasts 130 barbecue restaurants, each offering their own unique slant on this process. In much the same way as a fine whisky is created, there are many factors at play when creating the perfect barbecue – from the type of wood used to the length of time the meat is cooked, which can range from one to 24 hours. A visit to Memphis also confirms that there is very little that can’t be given a barbecue twist, from egg rolls to nachos, from spaghetti to Elvis Presley’s favorite – barbecue pizza. No visit to Memphis would be complete without trying Charles Vergo’s Rendezvous restaurant. Over the years it has attracted American presidents and, more recently, Prince William and Harry, all stopping by to sample its famous charcoal ribs. It is also located just across the street from The Peabody, a grand hotel that has become a tourist attraction in its own right, with a flock of ducks that parade twice daily through the lobby along a red carpet. If you want to eat like a local, though, head over to Cozy Corner. It may look like a shack from the outside, but once inside you’ll discover ribs, beans and →

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WHERE TO STAY IN MEMPHIS

River Inn of Harbor Town

The hotel offers a slice of Southern elegance, within the peaceful surroundings of the Mud Island area. The restaurant and bar also overlook the mighty Mississippi River, making it the perfect place to enjoy a sundowner as the traditional paddle-wheeler boats float past. riverinnmemphis.com

Residence Inn Downtown

A great location for exploring the Downtown area, with art deco-inspired interiors and generously sized rooms. marriott.com

The Peabody Memphis

“If you stand near its fountain in the middle of the lobby… ultimately you will see everybody who is anybody in the Delta,” said the writer David L Cohn of the Peabody hotel. It still rings true, as the great and the good gather in the iconic Peabody lobby

Westin Memphis Beale Street

A high-end business hotel overlooking the nightlife of Beale Street. It is also within walking distance of attractions such as the Rock and Soul Museum and the National Civil Rights Museum. westinmemphisbealestreet.com

Photograph by Krause & Johansen

→ even small Cornish hens smothered in its delicious house sauce. If you need a quick break from BBQ then try the fantastically retro Arcade restaurant in the South Main Historic Arts District. Visitors can enjoy a fried peanut butter and banana sandwich in the booth that Elvis used to sit at, located next to the back door in case he needed to make a dash from his over-enthusiastic fans. The restaurant has since been immortalized in films such as Mystery Train, The Firm and Joaquin Phoenix’s Walk the Line. Southern-style cooking is now big business for the Memphis tourist industry, according to Karl Friedrich, manager of the luxurious River Inn hotel. “Memphis features more restaurants honouring the famous pig than any other city in the US, attracting tourists from all over the globe,” he says. “BBQ travellers come asking for tours of the famous Rendezvous Restaurant, Corky’s, or any hole-in-the-wall restaurant that serves pulled-pork sandwiches and dry-rub ribs.” →

to enjoy cocktails and watch the ducks waddling past at 11am and 5pm daily. peabodymemphis.com


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→ To truly immerse yourself in the world of barbecue, visit Memphis in May when the city hosts one of the largest barbecue competitions in America. Karl recommends booking early as many of the Downtown hotels can sell out a year in advance. Of all the memorable meals that Memphis offered, the one I shared with the Reverend Al Green was champion. Perhaps better known as a 1970s soul sensation, Al Green went on to become an ordained pastor of Memphis’s Full Gospel Tabernacle church, which welcomes both local worshipers and curious tourists to his Pentecostal sermons. The Grammy award-winning singer can still be found here on Sunday mornings, preaching and singing rousing gospel, backed by a full band and choir. Visitors are then often invited to eat with the congregation, where Reverend Green blesses the meal of meatloaf, greens and barbecue spaghetti. Having enjoyed the generous meal, I thanked Reverend Green, who in turn clutched my hand, looked me in the eye and said: “I love you”. This wonderfully surreal moment perfectly highlighted why the city of Memphis – built on struggles, faith, music and good old-fashioned Southern hospitality – is well worth a visit. f

STREET VIEW: Come for the barbecue and stay for the gaudy, classic Americana of Beale Street’s illuminated signs. They’ll make your Instagram feed look incredible

THE BEST BARBECUE SPOTS IN MEMPHIS

Central BBQ, Downtown, 147 E Butler Ave, Memphis, TN

The owners met while competing on the barbecue circuit and now have three restaurants in Memphis. Their meats are marinated for 24 hours, then slow-cooked over hickory and pecan woods.

Cozy Corner, 745 North Pkwy, Memphis, TN 38105

This Memphis institution has been serving first-class barbecue since 1977 and you will find the original owner’s widow, Desiree, still behind the counter making sure her late husband’s high standards are being met. It is so popular that at peak times you can find queues snaking right around the block. cozycornerbbq.com

The signature dish on its menu is barbecue spaghetti. The secret to its success is that the spaghetti itself spends time in the smoker, perfectly balancing out the sweetness of the barbecue sauce. Buy bottles of the sauce and its special seasonings to relive your holiday at home. dancingpigs.com

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Corky’s now has nine locations across Tennessee and Mississippi and is known for its fall-off-the-bone smoked ribs and pulled-pork sandwiches. corkysmemphis.com

Charles Vergos’ Rendezvous, 52 S 2nd St, Memphis, TN 38103

This basement restaurant is all about the dry ribs, which come covered in a thick crust of spiced rub. Rendezvous broils the ribs on a rack over hot charcoal – a method called charbroiling. It was started in 1948 and is still going strong. hogsfly.com

Germantown Commissary, 2290 South Germantown Road, TN 38138

Housed in an old country store, this restaurant is famed for its barbecue ribs, shrimp and chicken. The deviled eggs and hot tamales are also popular. commissarybbq.com

Tastin’ ‘Round Town Barbecue Tours tastinroundtown.com

Photograph (Beale St) by NiKreative / Alamy

Bar-B-Q Shop, 1782 Madison Ave, Memphis, TN 38104

Corky’s, 5259 Poplar Ave, Memphis, TN 38119


A DRAM OF ICE AND FIRE APERITIF

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID HARRISON

Booze, glorious booze – we’ve rounded up all the liquor you need for Christmas, and then some…

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1 Bulleit Rye Frontier Whiskey, 45%. 70cl, £31.95; 31dover.com 2 Glenfarclas 15 Year Old, 46%. 70cl, £45.45; thewhiskyexchange.com 3 Suntory Hibiki 17 Year Old, 43%. 70cl, £88.95; thewhiskyexchange.com 4 Johnnie Walker Gold Label Bullion Bottle, 40%. 70cl, £42.65; thewhiskyexchange.com 5 Chivas Regal 18 Year Old, 40%. 70cl, £50.95; thewhiskyexchange.com 6 Woodford Reserve Double Oaked, 45.2%. 70cl, £50; harveynichols.com 7 Haig Club, 40%. 70cl, £44.95; 31dover.com

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1 Bellavista Franciacorta Alma Cuvée Brut, 12.5%. 75cl, £28.40; slurp.co.uk 2 Luc Belaire Rare Rosé, 11.5%. 70cl, £29.99; selfridges.com 3 Pol Roger 2004 Champagne Brut, 12.5%. 75cl, £58; bbr.com 4 Nyetimber 2009 Classic Cuvée, 12%. 75cl, £29.95; bbr.com

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1 Dodd’s Gin, 49.9%. 50cl, £39.50; harveynichols.com 2 King of Soho, 42%. 70cl, £31.64; masterofmalt.com 3 Martin Miller’s Gin, 40%. 70cl, £23.95. 31dover.com 4 Tanqueray, 43.1%. 70cl, £22; 31dover.com


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1 1 Teme Valley Brewery Bods Green Hop, 4.1%. 500ml. 2 Kirkstall Dissolution IPA, 6%. 500ml. 3 Thornbridge Jaipur, 5.9%. 500ml. 4 Firebird Brewing Pacific Gem, 4.2%. 500ml. 5 Beavertown Brewery 8 Ball Rye IPA, 6.2%. 330ml. 6 Williams Bros Brewing Co. Seven Giraffes, 5.1%. 500ml 7 Harbour Brewing Pale Ale, 6%. 500ml. 8 Dark Star Brewing Co. Imperial Stout, 10.5%. 330ml. 9 Runaway Brewery American Brown Ale, 5.7%. 330ml. 10 BrewDog Dogma, 7.4%. 330ml. Buy these and many more craft beers at beerbods.co.uk. Prices dependent on availability.

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HAT ARE YOU drinking this Christmas? If your answer to that particular question is “Whatever I can find at the supermarket late on Christmas Eve,” then we’re talking to you when we say this: you could, and should, be drinking better. And if you were looking for a service that points you in the direction of great beers, wines and spirits, provides tasting notes and recommendations and has great gifting options, listen up: we’ve found the website for you. 31DOVER.com is that website, and best of all, it’ll not only help change your spirits cabinet and your wine rack for the better – it’ll do it while saving you money, and it’ll get it to you the

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31DOVER.COM WILL NOT ONLY HELP CHANGE YOUR SPIRITS CABINET AND YOUR WINE RACK FOR THE BETTER – IT’LL GET IT TO YOU THE NEXT DAY, TOO

next day. As well as offering a simple ordering system, it includes the most competitive pricing of any alcohol website, with a price-match guarantee. By now you might be wondering how best to make use of this in the run-up to Christmas. Simple: go to the site and browse a range of fantastic gifting ideas. If you’re buying for business, there’s a range of sleek boxes to make sure the gift you buy makes an impression before it’s opened, as well as after. We’ve even given you some ideas to get you started. So, whether you’re looking for a gift for a friend, a family member or your favourite client – or if you’re just stocking up for yourself – there’s no better place to go than 31DOVER.com. f For your chance to win £500 to spend at 31DOVER.com, see overleaf.


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There are two constants in this world: the Earth revolves around the Sun; and everyone’s mum likes gin. This year, though, is the year for gin with a difference. Namely Jinzu (£33.45) – an award-winning blend of gin and sake. With all the delicate flavour of the former – infused with Japanese botanicals – and a creamy texture provided by the sake, it’s an unlikely match made in heaven.

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Whether it’s your best mate, your boyfriend, your brother or your boss, we all know someone who’s impossible to buy for. But what they don’t have is a crystal skull full of excellent quality vodka. Go on, check. See – we told you. The Crystal Head gift set (£52.95) also comes with two shot glasses. Because no one likes drinking out of a skull alone...

If someone’s spent a lot of money with your company this year, someone’s opened a lot of doors for your business, or you’ve got a client you, er, actually like, there’s no better guarantee of repeat business than a great, unexpected (and liquid) Christmas present. The Remy Martin Coeur de Cognac (£40) pretty much guarantees a great 2015.

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WIN £500 TO SPEND AT 31DOVER.COM Your Christmas could be about to become very merry indeed. We’ve partnered up with 31DOVER.com to offer one lucky reader £500 to spend on its website. Choose from beer, wine, spirits, gift boxes and pretty much anything else your heart desires. To enter, go to foodism.co.uk and answer a simple question.

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‘TIS THE SEASON TO BE JOLLY NOW TAKING CHRISTMAS BOOKINGS AT LONDON’S HOTTEST STEAKHOUSE

336-337 THE STRAND, WC2R 1HA | 020 7395 3450 | STKHouse.com STKLondon

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eatSTK


THE SELECTOR

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When there are hundreds of world-leading bars and restaurants at your disposal, where do you begin with finding the right one? These pages, that’s where. Here is our pick of the best bars, pubs and restaurants within the M25

1 Barrafina 54 Frith Street, Soho, W1D 4SL

It’s been a good year for Soho tapas joint Barrafina. Not only has it opened its second restaurant – on Adelaide Street – but the Frith Street original won its first Michelin star in September. Fortunately, this means you’ll impress anybody you take there, but unfortunately, it also means the wait for the few seats at the bar will only get longer (top tip: order cava in the queue). Dishes come to share – think tender chicken thighs with Romanesque sauce, gooey ham and cheese croquetas, and gambas al ajíllo – and their dining etiquette should help you quickly ascertain whether you should bother with a second date. If you run out of conversation, you can always chat to the hot bar staff. 020 7440 1456; barrafina.co.uk THE SELECTOR

GET A DATE NIGHT RIGHT

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BEST OF THE REST 2 Zucca

4 Eight Moorgate

184 Bermondsey Street, London Bridge, SE1 3TQ

1 Dysart St, City, EC2A 2BX

Zucca – ‘pumpkin’ in Italian – does a neat line in simplicity, from its coolly sleek design to the simple twist on classic Italian dishes. The wine list is the length of a novella, which is usually, but not always, a good sign.

Breathtaking views, 5 exclusivity and great food and drink? Check, check and check at members’ club Eight Moorgate, which makes some tables in its Quartier restaurant available to the public. There’s no need for your date to know that, of course… 020 7392 9410; eightclub.co.uk/EC2

0207 378 6809; zuccalondon.com

3 Zoilo 9 Duke Street, Marylebone, W1U 3EG

Grab a couple of stools at the bar of this intimate Argentinian joint, watch each dish you order being cooked and follow your perfect-baked provolone, caramelised pork belly or juicy fillet steak with one of the dreamy desserts – such as salted caramel ice cream with dulce de leche. 020 7486 9699; zoilo.co.uk

5 The Angler South Place Hotel, 3 South Place, EC2M 2AF

Who says you need to go to the coast to experience good seafood? This Michelinstarred City restaurant has a varied menu and a romantic ambiance. Plus, you know what they say about oysters… 020 3215 1260; anglerrestaurant.com

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1 Alain Ducasse at The Dorchester The Dorchester, 53 Park Lane, Mayfair, W1K 1QA

Brace yourselves. At Alain Ducasse at The Dorchester, a seven-course ‘Couture’ seasonal menu matched with super premium wines – including a glass of Château d'Yquem – will set you back £375 per person. OK, you can unclench now. There’s no doubting this is blow-the-lightsout territory, but boy, is it worth it. Three Michelin stars are not to be shrugged at and – with signature dishes so good they’ll make you well up, and experimental additions so ingenious they’ll will make you reconsider food as you thought you knew it – this really is dining at its very finest. 020 7629 8866; alainducasse-dorchester.com

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BEST OF THE REST 2 HKK

THE SELECTOR

BLOW THE BUDGET 3 Fera at Claridge's

88 Worship St, City, EC2A 2BE

49 Brook St, Mayfair, W1K 4HR

HKK is a restaurant that not only shouldn’t be rushed, it can’t be. For dinner, it only offers tasting menus – and with good reason: once you’ve had one course, you’ll want them to keep coming. You do have one choice to make: eight (£48), 10 (£78) or 15 courses (£98). This is Cantonese cooking at its best – bearing the imprint of a variety of influences. The Jasmine tea-smoked Wagyu beef and roasted Peking duck are worth a visit alone.

Few restaurants are healthy and indulgent, but Simon Rogan’s Fera manages it. The name comes from the Latin for ‘wild’ – relating to Rogan’s obsession with natural produce, and a seven-course tasting menu costs £95.

020 3535 1888; hkklondon.com

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020 7107 8888; feraatclaridges.co.uk

4 Galvin La Chapelle 35 Spital Square, Spitalfields, E1 6DY

With its red marble columns, 100fthigh vaulted ceiling and giant circular

chandeliers, Galvin LaChapelle is a cross between Hogwarts’ dining room and the Red Keep’s Great Hall in Game of Thrones. Most importantly, the food matches the grandeur. 020 7299 0400; galvinrestaurants.com

5 Dinner by Heston Blumenthal Mandarin Oriental, 66 Knightsbridge, SW1X 7LA

Try the much-Instagrammed menu for yourself – the meat fruit is as good as it looks. Plus, it’s Heston’s world-class cooking without having to drive through Slough. Nuff said. 020 7201 3833; dinnerbyheston.com


BEST OF THE REST 2 Blanchette 9 D’Arblay St, Soho, W1F 8DR

big draws are its location next to the station and the proper charcoal BBQs at each table.

It launched in 2013 and, being in Soho, it’s not exactly in anyone’s actual ’hood, but it feels like the best local French bistro ever.

020 8346 1239; @Yijo_Restaurant

020 7439 8100; blanchettesoho.co.uk

10 Arcola St, Dalston, E8 2DJ

3 Yijo 1 Station Rd, Finchley Central, N3 2SB

Korean food’s a big deal right now, but you don’t need to be in central London to track down great kimbap, bulgogi and kimchi. Yijo’s

4 Mangal 1 Ocakbasi This east London institution has been going for a quarter of a century, and it’s not hard to see why – Mangal 1 is one of the best Turkish ocakbasi restaurants you’ll find in the capital. Walk in to see the chefs slaving over a mammoth grill, then enjoy the brilliant

kebabs – try the cop sis (marinated cubes of lamb). Be warned, Mangal 1 has no-nonsense service and a suitably no-frills aesthetic. 020 7275 8981; mangal1.com

5 Santa Maria 15 St Mary’s Rd, Ealing, W5 5RA

Santa Maria (on St Mary’s Road – geddit?) serves pizza in the grand old Neopolitan tradition, and its devotees reckon it’s tough to beat – way out west (London) and beyond. 020 8579 1462; santamariapizzeria.com

THE SELECTOR

Photograph by © Copyright John Arandhara-Blackwell. All Rights Reserved 2014, Pedro P D’Almeida, Moses Kim

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1 Babur 119 Brockley Rise, Honor Oak Park, SE23 1JP

Not so long ago, south-east London was somewhere most of us knew existed – and that was quite enough detail, thanks. Not so much these days, thanks to a growing food and drink scene that includes the thriving Brockley farmers’ market and Street Feast’s Model Market pop-up, housed throughout the summer in a grim, disused Lewisham market. And that’s not to mention New Cross’s role in the birth of MEATLiquor. But well before all that – in the mid-1980s, in fact – came Babur; a neighbourhood Indian restaurant that rises above that dreary description with consistently innovative cooking, an eclectic approach to food and drink pairing and smart design. Look out for the frequent guest menus, and regular fixtures such as the clove-smoked buffalo lal maas or spice-crusted lamb, marinated for 100 hours. Oh, and there’s a giant model tiger on the roof if the food hasn’t sold it to you. 020 8291 2400; babur.info

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THE SELECTOR

GET BANG FOR YOUR BUCK

1 Pizza Pilgrims 11 Kingly Street, Soho, W1B 5PW

From a Piaggio van to two restaurants in little over two years, the guys spearheading the pizza revolution bring their doughy wares to a second Soho location. Drink craft beers from London and Italy, as well as the restaurant’s signature ‘Sohocello’, co-created with Chase Distillery. Food-wise, it’s all about pizza (obviously) – stretchy, airy dough with toppings that pack a punch. Grab some deepfried mac ’n’ cheese balls, too, and – if you’re feeling particularly ambitious – the saltysweet Nutella and ricotta pizza ring to finish. 020 7287 8964; pizzapilgrims.co.uk

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BEST OF THE REST 2 Ape & Bird 142 Shaftesbury Avenue, Soho, WC2H 8HJ

Recently given a bàcaro-style makeover by the team at Polpo, this laid-back pub in the heart of Soho serves great pizza and cicchetti at thoroughly reasonable prices. 020 7836 3119; apeandbird.com

street café group Pho has restaurants across London, and its St Paul’s restaurant is exactly what you’re looking for in an easy east-Asian joint: no frills, no fuss, serious flavour. 020 3058 0875; phocafe.co.uk

4 Bird 42-44 Kingsland Road, Shoreditch, E2 8DA

3 Pho St Paul’s One New Change, City, EC2V 6AG

We don’t stand for average pan-Asian food – and neither should you. Vietnamese

A great exponent of the fried chicken revolution we’re expecting to hit London full in the face next year, Bird offers up homestyle fried chicken with different spicy-sweet

glazes, US- and Asian-influenced sides and decadent desserts. Just like mama made. 020 7613 5168; birdrestaurants.com

5 The Joint 87 Brixton Village Market, Brixton, SW9 8PS

Hidden away in lively Brixton Village Market, the Joint, which began as a pop-up in 2012, serves up simple, fast US soul food made with love. Not keen on venturing south of the river? There’s also one in Marylebone. 07717 642 812; the-joint.co

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1 The Jazz Café 5 Parkway, Camden, NW1 7PG

Camden’s Jazz Café is something of a relic – the kind of venue you go to for great music, great atmosphere and great food, and if someone you like happens to be playing there, that’s even better. Its stage has hosted iconic artists such as Bobby Womack, and the venue has a new head chef and a real emphasis on food (you can watch a show from its upstairs restaurant), plus a new Christmas menu, which makes it one of the only places in London you can watch your favourite artists while eating like an emperor. 020 7485 6834; mamacolive.com/thejazzcafe

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THE SELECTOR

EAT WELL & LISTEN GOOD

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2 69 Colebrooke Row

4 Hoxton Square Bar & Kitchen

69 Colebrooke Row, Islington, N1 8AA

2-4 Hoxton Square, Hoxton, N1 6NU

The excellent 69 Colebrooke Row is not only famous for its cocktails – the bar’s food menu is matched in quality by its in-house entertainment: maestro pianist Maurice Horhut takes to the keys on Thursdays and Fridays, with slots from up-and-coming guest artists on Sunday nights.

As locations go, only Soho can go toe-to-toe with Hoxton Square for undiscovered artists and great food just around the corner. The Hoxton Square Bar & Kitchen, though, has gone one better: both at once. A creative Mexican menu, build-your-own burgers and a stocked bar accompany DJ sets, interspersed with the occasional performance from the Doritos Mariachi band. Yes, really.

020 7684 7192; 69colebrookerow.com

3 The Blues Kitchen Shoreditch 134-146 Curtain Road, Shoreditch, EC2A 3AR

Soul food and blues music are a match made in heaven, and the Blues Kitchen will transport you straight to the banks of the Mississippi, with raucous, rough’n’ready blues jams, bourbon and burgers aplenty. 020 7729 7216; theblueskitchen.com

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020 7613 0709; mamacolive.com/hoxton

5 606 Club 90 Lots Road, Chelsea, SW10 0QD

The 606 Club is an upmarket night out in waiting: posh food meets excellent billings from the capital’s finest jazz musicians. 020 7352 5953; 606club.co.uk

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Photograph by Colebrooke Row, Paul Winch-Furness, Naresh Kaushal 2011, Gary Wolff

BEST OF THE REST


CELEBRATE THIS WINTER AT BABYLON

Enjoy great value set lunch menus, relax on the heated terrace with a hot cocktail, kick back with live jazz every Tuesday and make the most of some fantastic Christmas offers! t 0207 368 3993 e babylon@roofgardens.virgin.com www.roofgardens.virgin.com @Babylon_London

7th Floor, 99 Kensington High Street (Entrance on Derry Street) London W8 5SA


CITY

...AND THE

FOOD IS GREAT TOO PROUD CABARET CITY NO.1 MARK LANE LONDON EC3R 7AH PROUDCABARETCITY.COM 0207 283 1940 CITYSALES@PROUD.CO.UK


BEST OF THE REST 2 Artesian The Langham, Portland Pl,Marylebone, W1B 1JA

You don’t get voted the world’s best bar three times without knowing a thing or two about cocktails. As it happens, the bartenders here know pretty much everything about them. 020 7636 1000; artesian-bar.co.uk

3 The Whisky Bar, Boisdale Boisdale, Cabot Place, Canary Wharf, E14 4QT

Yes – there is one good reason to go to Canary Wharf. In fact, make that 1,000. For that’s the

number of malts behind the bar at the Cabot Place outpost of the Boisdale trio. The food is pretty spectacular, too – not that you’ll care after you’ve worked through the whisky. 020 7715 5818; boisdale.co.uk

comprehensive cocktail menu that offers a drink to suit every palate. 020 7071 5025; searcys.co.uk

5 The Nightjar 129 City Rd, Old Street, EC1V 1JB

4 Searcys | The Gherkin 30 St Mary Axe, City, EC3A 8EP

So often a venue with a view offers little more than just that. No such issues at Searcys, the members’ club atop the Gherkin. The views are spectacular but there’s also a

What the Nightjar lacks in glitz in it more than makes up for with cocktail glamour. Try pre-Prohibition, Prohibition and post-war cocktails, which are all expertly mixed and presented with imagination and flair. 020 7253 4101; barnightjar.com

THE SELECTOR

Photograph by © Christian Trampenau, Jerome Courtial

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DRINK LIKE ROYALTY 1 1 Connaught Bar & Coburg Bar The Connaught, Carlos Place, Mayfair, W1K 2AL

OK – we’ve cheated a bit here. Our number one spot actually goes to two bars, both in the same hotel, the Connaught. Unless your blood is bluer than ours, being treated like a member of royalty and feeling as though you’re in your own living room are two very different experiences. Yet the best bars in the world somehow manage to fuse the two – and none more so than the Coburg Bar. If we could live there, we would. One very good reason for this is because your next-door neighbour would be the Connaught Bar. The service here is also impeccable, the cocktails are faultless, and the atmosphere is a heady mix of warmth plus buzz with an extra measure of style. The interior is unmistakably art deco, a fitting tribute to the golden age of cocktails. No era is as cool as the 1920s, and few bars are as cool as the Connaught’s. 020 7499 7070; the-connaught.co.uk

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1 Anchor & Hope 36 The Cut, Waterloo, SE1 8LP

Anchor & Hope is a pub of two halves. To the right, an old-school boozer with proper ales, decent wines and mismatched furniture. To the left, a cosy dining room, hidden by a heavy red velvet drape, serving up some re-imagined pub classics. Dishes tend toward the esoteric – offal features heavily – and Sunday lunchtime is the time to come, with a heavy weekend buzz (and mercifully, you can now book – just the one sitting at 2pm) and it’s the kind of place you sit all afternoon, reading the papers. It’s down the road from the Young Vic if you want to bolt on a show after scarfing plates of deep-fried pig’s head or a steaming pot of whole duck. 020 7928 9898; anchorandhopepub.co.uk

1 THE SELECTOR

SINK A PROPER PINT

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BEST OF THE REST 2 Princess Louise 208 High Holborn, Holborn, WC1V 7EP

Once you’re in this old-school Victorian boozer you might not find your way out, thanks to the tiny doors, hatches and wooden rooms bisecting the interior. But when the beer’s so cheap (it’s owned by Sam Smith Brewery), do you really care? 020 7405 8816; princesslouisepub.co.uk

3 The Alma 59 Newington Green Road, Canonbury, N1 4QU

A local gem of a pub sandwiched between the

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hinterlands of Highbury and Dalston, with wide wooden tables, squashy leather sofas, a cute terrace and a real fire on colder days. Plus, there’s live music at the weekend and a pub quiz on Tuesday nights. 020 3620 7516; thealmapubn1.com

4 St John’s Tavern 91 Junction Road, Archway, N19 5QU

The St John’s Tavern is the kind of place you head with a raging hangover on a Saturday afternoon. It does unfussy (and sometimes fussy – jellied pig’s head, anyone?) seasonal

British pub grub in a cosy setting, with mismatched pictures on the walls and a good choice of gins and ales. 020 7272 1587; stjohnstavern.com

5 Cat & Mutton 76 Broadway Market, London Fields, E8 4QJ

Recently revamped with a no-reservations policy (groan), the Cat & Mutton has been transformed from old-school east London boozer to fashionable gastropub, with a bar downstairs and dining room above. 020 7249 6555; catandmutton.com


Love the pub? Then don’t leave.

The Grazing Goat and The Orange offer a total of 12 beautiful hotel rooms with oak floors, king size beds, marble en-suites and complimentary Wi-Fi. To make a reservation call 020 7730 0070 or visit cubitthouse.co.uk


Here at 22 North Street we are dedicated to serving the highest quality food and drinks

22 North Street is a new addition to the collection of eateries in Clapham Old Town. There is a resounding agreement amongst locals that No.22 is exactly what North Street has been waiting for. Our style is elegant yet relaxed, the seaonsal menu promises to please all taste buds and our cocktail list is designed to start, and end, an evening out in style.

020 3583 3702 | www.22northstreet.co.uk


THE SELECTOR

AND NOW FOR SOMETHING COMPLETELY DIFFERENT 1 Circus 27-29 Endell St, Covent Garden, WC2H 9BA

You know how it is – you’ve just polished off a plate of food and you’re sitting back, chatting to your neighbour when an acrobat suddenly appears in the middle of your table and starts pirouetting above your head. Oh, that hasn’t happened to you? Then you obviously haven’t been to Circus, the Covent Garden bar and restaurant where food and spontaneous entertainment go hand in hand (while upside-down and suspended from the ceiling). A little bit mad; a lot of fun. 020 7420 9300; circus-london.co.uk

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BEST OF THE REST 2 The Heron

4 Smack Lobster Roll Deli

1 Norfolk Crescent, Paddington, W2 2DN

26-28 Binney Street, Mayfair, W1K 5BN

Pubs serving Thai food aren’t new, but the Heron moves the genre on via the everpopular medium of karaoke. Tucked away in a pub, it serves some of the most authentic (and spicy) Thai food in the capital. Singing optional. 020 7706 9567

Until recently, lobster was the go-to steak alternative for the bourgeoisie. Smack, though, represents the new breed of lobster joint: quick, easy and served deli-style. Don’t actually smack them, mind. @smacklobster

3 The Underground Supper Club

5 Restaurant Story 199 Tooley Street, London Bridge, SE1 2JX

Eating on the Tube is unacceptable, with one exception – this supper club held in an old underground carriage in Walthamstow’s Pumphouse Museum. Dishes are seasonal, inventive and, unlike the Tube, arrive on time.

The clue’s in the name: chef Tom Sellers’ London Bridge project is all about telling tales through food, and it does so with culinary eloquence. You can even bring in an old book and swap it for one from the restaurant’s library shelves.

eventbrite.co.uk; basementgalley.com

020 7183 2117; restaurantstory.co.uk

10 South Access Road, Walthamstow, E17 8AX

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Photograph by ###

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Almond Apricot Apple Banana Blackcurrant Blueberry Bubble gum Butterscotch Candy floss Caramel Champagne Cherry Chocolate Coconut Cola Cranberry Cream soda Creamy buttery caramel Custard Dulce de Leche Espresso Fruits of the forest Hazelnut Honey Irish cream Lavender Lemon Lime Mango Maple Mixed spice Mulled wine Orange Panettone Passion fruit Peach Pecan Raspberry

Made with love Natural flavouring for all you make and bake

www.foodieflavours.com #foodieflavours


COMPETITION

TIMED TO PERFECTION As the only Scotch distillery to exclusively release vintage whisky, Balblair occupies a special place in the whisky pantheon – and you could win an experience showcasing it

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N PARTNERSHIP WITH Balblair single malt Scotch whisky, the only Scotch whisky released exclusively as vintages, foodism is offering you and up to 11 guests the chance to win the ultimate tasting experience for a single malt lover. Hosted in a dedicated private dining room in any one of 50 UK cities, the evening will commence with a dram

from Balblair’s highly acclaimed collection of vintage whiskies, paired perfectly with a selection of canapés. Balblair’s whisky ambassador will then take centre stage as you’re guided through the five stages of appreciating fine single malt Scotch whisky: colour, body, nose, palate and finish. During the masterclass, you and your guests will enjoy samples from a suite of vintage whiskies taken from Balblair’s collection, including the multi-awardwinning Balblair Vintage 1983. The evening can be tailored to your level of whisky knowledge, so whether you’re a whisky connoisseur or simply enjoy the odd glass, the night is sure to offer a unique and personal tasting experience. What’s more, on departure all guests will each receive an exclusive Balblair goodie bag. Of course, a prize this good doesn’t come without a bit of work, but we’ve made it nice and simple for you – just answer one question [right] correctly and you could be in with a chance of winning. We’ll drink to that. balblair.com

WIN

HOW TO ENTER To win a unique 12-person WIN tasting experience with Balblair, all you need to do is answer this: which is the only Scottish distillery to exclusively release vintage single malts? a) Old Pulteney; b) Speyburn; c) Balblair. To enter, and for full T&Cs: foodism.co.uk/competition/balblair

WIN

ENJOY A SUITE OF VINTAGE WHISKIES INCLUDING THE AWARD-WINNING BALBLAIR VINTAGE 1983 129


COLOUR ME BAD: Until the 1970s, most British eggs were white, but demand for more desirable brown eggs grew. Today, almost all UK-laid eggs are brown.

SHELL COMPANY: in 2013, 11.5 billion eggs were eaten in the UK. Of these, 46% were free range and 3% were home-produced (by chickens not humans, sadly).

YOLK’S ON US: The colour of egg yolk can be manipulated with different feed types – when hens eat red annatto seeds, the yolk can take on a pink or even red hue.

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LEG OVA: According to a 2012 survey that compared people’s lifestyles with their egg-eating preferences, fried egg eaters have a higher sex drive.

Photograph by Marko Milanovic

DE CO NS TR UC T.

Brits cannot get enough of them. We produced 6.9 million cases of the things in the last 12 months. The type you put in your shopping basket is a political statement – caged, free-range, woodland, organic. Think eggs is eggs? Think again…


Foodism - 1 - London, food and drink  

Foodism Magazine - Issue 1 - London, food and drink