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WELCOME TO foodism A TRIP THROUGH THE LATEST GLOBAL EATING TRENDS AND DESTINATIONS. IT’S THE WORLD ON A PLATE

84 FOODIE VANCOUVER 92 TASTE OF LONDON 94 EAT THE WORLD 96 REVIEWS


BLAME CANADA Your trousers will feel snugger in Vancouver, which makes the most of Pacific Coast produce. Sensational flavours abound at both ends of the spending spectrum, finds Rosie Birkett

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foodism

Patti Photograph McConville /byAlamy ###

The Burger Bus offers organic meaty treats on the streets of BC

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CLOCKWISE: Vancouver is one of the world’s most naturally good-looking cities; the pizzas and Vespas at Giovane, a temple to good taste in the Fairmont; and brews from Brassneck

on its beaches. It’s up to you whether you risk a crafty beer – many of the locals hide them in socks and slurp surreptitiously – but if you get caught by one of the city’s eagle-eyed, quad-biking cops, you’ll be faced with a hefty fine. Whether or not these uptight alcohol laws have anything to do with Vancouver’s apparent obsession with the intoxicating stuff, as witnessed by its wealth of newfound craft breweries, superb cocktail bars, urban wineries and now even its own craft gin distillery (longtabledistillery.com), is up for debate, but it sure goes some way towards making up for them. You might be limited in terms of where you can drink here, but you’ll never be short of very good options. Perhaps park your bike up somewhere safe, before heading to new brewery Brassneck (brassneck.ca) on hip Main Street and checking out some of its quirky local sups (try the ‘No Brainer’ pre-prohibition style corn lager), then stroll down the road to The Narrow Lounge (narrowlounge.com) – a lively, subterranean speakeasy located behind an unremarkable door around the corner on 3rd Avenue – for a slightly stiffer snifter.

>> THERE IS NOW A REAL WEALTH OF NEW CRAFT BREWERIES AND URBAN WINERIES, AND EVEN ITS OWN CRAFT GIN DISTILLERY

PHOTOGRAPHS by Stefano Politi Markovina/Alamy; Craig Samuel Photography Inc; Lucas Finlay Photography

here’s no denying it: a sunset picnic on Third Beach, Stanley Park, in the company of various posturing herons, lolling seals and, if you’re lucky, some wandering raccoons, is one hell of a way to absorb the bountiful beauty of Vancouver – a city prized for its natural good looks. And it’s the best way to end a bicycle ride around this famous, sprawling urban park, where age-old Douglas firs, stately cedars, shimmering lakes and hordes of geese greet you along with totem poles, peerless views of the magnificent Lions Gate Bridge, and the surrounding ocean. You can rest up against one of the beach’s many logs and settle in for an evening – stay until 9pm and hear the rumble of the Stanley Park cannon, fired at this time daily. And it’s best to soak up the sunset colours and soaring mountain views with some food – the Fairmont Pacific Rim’s Giovane ‘the market’ deli sells an unrivalled selection of Italian-inspired picnic options, including house-cured meats and cheeses, all curated by executive chef Darren Brown, whose passion for fresh, well-sourced produce is clear in the range of single origin olive oils also on offer here. But if you fancy tucking into all this grub with a glass of prosecco, or a nice bottle of local pinot noir from Darren Brown has the nearby Okanagan also cooked at Alain Valley (Canada’s Ducasse’s miX answer to Napa), you’ll have to think again. Because one of the few downsides to this gorgeous city are the archaic licensing laws, which – though currently lobbied for updating – forbid the consumption of alcohol in its parks and


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You’re going to need some decent scran to soak up all this local liquor, and the good news is that Vancouver is a greedy traveller’s hog heaven. If you’re feeling fancy, there are countless fine dining options to please your palate (and deplete your wallet): local uber-chef David Hawksworth trained with some of the UK’s most respected chefs, including Philip Howard at The Square and Raymond Blanc, and his eponymous restaurant (hawksworthrestaurant.com) at the swanky Rosewood Hotel Georgia is the place to taste cracking contemporary Canadian cuisine. Dedicated to showcasing the most pristine Pacific Coast produce, he creates refined, intricately crafted plates, such as smoked sablefish with Jerusalem artichoke, apple kimchi, bacon, and a citrus mustard emulsion. Over in West Vancouver,

chef Quang Dang – a one-time colleague of Hawksworth – is also flying the flag for the finest Pacific Coast produce at the aptly named West restaurant (westrestaurant.com). His menus give you the option of dining from ‘land’ or ‘sea’, Dang began his with dishes that career as a junior name-check local and sous chef at West regional specialities: think line-caught ling cod with chorizo, Helmers’ potatoes, and Dungeness crab vinaigrette, or braised bison short ribs, >> cous cous, Swiss chard and sweet

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ABOVE: The city’s Asian communities are responsible for some of the cheapest and tastiest food in town. INSET: Japanese tuna tataki. BELOW: A long line at a food truck

PHOTOGRAPHS by David Buzzard/

Photograph by ###

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relaxed in 2009. Like Vancouver’s brick-andmortar restaurants, these gourmet street eats are defined by the wealth of wonderful local produce provided by the surrounding Pacific, and nearby agricultural hubs the Fraser and Okanagan Valleys. Fresh Local Wild (Burrard and West Hastings; freshlocalwild.com) makes the most of the aforementioned bountiful >>

Alamy; SoFood/Alamy; Xinhua/Alamy

>> PART OF THE CITY’S AMPLE CHARM IS GOOD, CHEAP FOOD AT EVERY CORNER

>> chilli emulsion. Whatever you do, don’t miss the West Coast oysters, which will delight with their vital, mineral, sea-washed slurpability, punchy hit of horseradish and a subtle, floral elderflower mignonette. But to think Vancouver’s food scene is all about the glam dining spots would be to massively underestimate it. Part of its ample charm is that there’s good, affordable food at every corner. Thanks to its thriving Asian communities, decent sushi, ramen, Vietnamese, Korean, Japanese tapas and dim sum are commonplace, and – particularly in the case of sushi – surprisingly cheap. Try the tuna tataki with ponzu and crispy fried garlic chips at funky Guu Izakaya (guu-izakaya.com/gastown) in cool, cobbled, former industrial Gastown. Street kitchens have popped up all over town in vans, trucks and carts, since tight limitations on what food vendors could sell (popcorn, hotdogs and ice cream) were


Nespresso. The origin of it all.

The coffees you love have as their foundation an excellent espresso. Our Nespresso experts select from the finest coffee beans around the world to create our rich and complex blends. Explore the essence of quality coffee at nespresso.com


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>> seafood, and offers local fish and chips with a conscience. The carbon-neutral truck powers its electrics with waste biomass and sources ingredients from local fishermen, ethical farms and sustainable wild forages. Try the BC fish shawarma – a mix of halibut, ling cod and steelhead with hummus, tabbouleh, pita and spice for $10. Japadog (Burrard and Smithe, and other locations in Downtown Vancouver; japadog.com; @japadog) is one street food purveyor you’ll notice more than any other because it has so many sites – though likely you’ll smell its sizzling onions before you see it. These fusion dogs are among the tastiest food you’ll find for under $10, and it doesn’t really matter whether you order the smoky Terimayo with teriyaki sauce and seaweed, or the Kobe Beef with Japanese ketchup and maple leaf-shaped bean curd – a bit like the

Fresh Local Wild re-uses the oil from its fryers for power

city itself, it’s all delicious.

Follow Rosie’s updates on @rosiefoodie and her blog at alotonherplate.com. Rosie’s debut cookbook, Fresh: 100 Delicious Recipes from Market to Table will be published by Hardie Grant in spring 2015. A return flight from London to Vancouver costs from £870 this April with Air Canada, including taxes (aircanada.com). f

PHOTOGRAPHS by Christopher Kober/Alamy; Albert Normandin

>> JAPADOG OFFERS SOME OF THE BEST FOOD THAT YOU WILL FIND FOR UNDER $10 WHERE TO STAY Budget: A recent refurbishment to mid-century motel The Burrard has kept all of the 1956-established property’s retro charm, while adding updated creature comforts, such as in-room Nespresso machines. The Burrard also offers free bike rentals. theburrard.com Boutique: With work from local artists forming the basis for each room’s ‘personality’, kooky boutique Opus is the digs of choice for the cool-hunters. Its Italian restaurant La Pentola della Quercia is worth a visit in its own right: generous, familystyle dining with pristine produce and an award-winning wine list. vancouver.opushotel.com

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Photograph by ###

Blow-out: The city’s tallest building is an elegant confluence of sleek glass and antique Asian fixtures, and is home to Vancouver’s ShangriLa. Treat yourself to dinner in three-Michelin-starred chef Jean Georges Vongerichten’s Market restaurant – the soy-glazed short ribs with apple-jalapeno purée and rosemary crumbs is a must-order. shangri-la.com/vancouver


foodism

Michel Roux Jr. gives a demonstration at Taste of London 2013

WEAPONS OF CHOICE

WEIGHING IN Typhoon Vintage Kitchen Scales, £27

A MATTER OF TASTE We’ve partnered up with London foodie fest Taste of London, which brings the very best of the capital’s cuisine to Regent’s Park this June

H

ere at foodism, we rather like sampling as much of London’s food scene as we can, but we’re also rather hamstrung by time. That’s why a festival that compiles dishes from London’s best and brightest restaurants and chefs across a single weekend seemed like the perfect idea

THE DETAILS Taste of London is held in London’s Regent’s Park from 19-22 June. To see the list of exhibitors or to book tickets, visit london.tastefestivals.com.

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to get on board with. Since it was launched in 2004, Taste of London has become the capital’s go-to food festival, and with 40 London restaurants, more than 200 artisanal producers and a whole host of top chefs in attendance, this year’s line up could well be the best one yet. Taste’s strong suit is merging big and small. World-class chefs such as Francesco Mazzei and Raymond Blanc will be cooking and hosting masterclasses, and headline restaurants including Le Gavroche and House of Ho will be creating dishes to be sold at stands. But there’ll also be hidden gems from London’s burgeoning street food scene and craft producers if you feel like keeping it real. Demand is high, so be sure to book quickly – and bon appétit. f

Whether your electric scales have finally tested your patience enough by inexplicably turning off mid-weigh, or you just fancy a bit of throwback 1950s cool in your kitchen, these scales from Typhoon are for you. redcandy.co.uk

KEEP YOUR COOL Smeg FAB28 refrigerator, £950 A fancy fridge with an ice maker and water chiller might save you a threemetre walk to the freezer – or maybe you just like the contemporary look – but we prefer this bold design classic from Smeg’s 1950s Retro Style collection. smeguk.com

POPPING UP Prezzybox Retro Popcorn Maker, £29.95 If you’ve never made popcorn, you might be surprised to know it’s as simple as, er, popping corn. Just pour the kernels into this 1950s-style popcorn maker and wait. Fresh popcorn whenever you fancy it. prezzybox.com


ETS K C I T ALE S N O ! NOW

The World’s Greatest Restaurant Festival 18 - 22 June 2014 Regent’s Park

Also featuring...

40 Top Restaurants

Masterclasses

Boutique Food Market

Worldclass Chefs

Book tickets at tastefestivals.com/london or call 0871 230 7132


1 2 EAT THE WORLD

SNACKS ON THE WATER

3 HAPPY HOUR Bring the bar into your home with four cocktails for sophisticates. Or, if you’re lazy, get the pros to mix them for you…

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...and fire in the sky? No, but here are three fantastic floating restaurants

1. LATITUDE 37

Lake Powell, AZ, USA

Moored on the shores of Lake Powell, Latitude 37 serves the likes of smoked brisket nachos and a black and blue chicken burger. lakepowell.com

2. DIM IL L O’S ON T HE WAT E R Portland, ME, USA

A huge ship in Portland’s harbour, DiMillo’s is well-known for its friendly atmosphere and attentive service, and serves traditional Maine seafood and Italian meat and pasta. dimillos.com

3. JUMBO KINGDOM Hong Kong, Asia

It may sound like a soft play area, but Jumbo Kingdom’s actually a huge ‘theme park on the water’, with abounding dining options serving contemporary Chinese. jumbo.com.hk

▼ Celtic Elixir, Caorunn Gin

▼ Breakfast Martini, Salvatore’s

• 50ml Caorunn gin • 35ml fresh clementine juice • 25ml Stag’s Breath Liqueur or Old Pulteney 12yo • 15ml sugar syrup

• • • •

Put all of the ingredients into a mixing glass, shake well and double strain into a martini glass. Garnish with a daffodil flower. caorunngin.com

Shake the ingredients with ice and strain into a cocktail glass. Squeeze a thin twist of orange on top, and garnish with a spiral of orange. playboyclublondon.com

50ml gin 15ml Cointreau 15ml fresh lemon juice 1 teaspoon medium-slice orange marmalade


foodism

1 2 EAT THE WORLD

1. LONE EAGLE GRILLE Lake Tahoe, NV, USA

A PISTE OF CAKE

The Lone Eagle Grille’s food matches its surroundings on Lake Tahoe, with seasonal and creative game and meat dishes aplenty. loneeaglegrille.com

2. ICEQ

Sölden, Ötztal Alps, Austria At 3,048 metres above sea level and with a majestic view over the Ötztal Alps, new restaurant IceQ is pretty cool. It serves gourmet Alpine cuisine and pasta. soelden.com/iceq

3. SLOPE FOOD

Alta Badia, Dolomites, Italy As well as some amazing restaurants, Alta Badia is home to ‘Slope Food’ – street food created by Michelin-starred chefs and served out of 14 huts dotted across the piste. powderbyrne.com

Amazing dining right on the slopes is easier than you might think

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▼ Rye Me to the Moon, Callooh Callay

▼ Kirei on the Way, Shoryu Ramen

• • • • •

• 40ml Kirei Umeshu Japanese plum wine (with added collagen) • 10ml Cointreau • 10ml Peachtree liqueur • 10ml lemon juice

35ml Bulleit Rye 35ml Amontillado sherry 10ml bay leaf syrup 2 dashes Abbott’s bitters 2 dashes Angostura bitters

Mix the Bulleit Rye, Amontillado sherry and bay leaf syrup in an old fashioned glass with ice, add the bitters and stir. Garnish with orange zest and a bay leaf. calloohcallaybar.com

Combine all the ingredients with ice in a cocktail shaker and shake vigorously. Pour into a tumbler and garnish with a fresh strawberry. shoryuramen.com

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BRAVAS St. Katharine Docks, E1W 1AT; bravastapas.co.uk

REVIEWS Who passed our taste test of London’s best new bites this month?

The seafood biryani at Trishna in Marylebone Village

There’s a stirring in the water at St. Katharine Docks, and it’s got nothing to do with the yachts. New concept restaurant Bravas, hidden away in a corner, serves elegant, modern Spanish cuisine, flitting between simple but perfectly cooked dishes and complex, artfully presented chef’s creations. Highlights come in the form of Cantabrian anchovies (£5), served in a kitsch tin but fresh and superbly textured, and Moorish spiced lamb chops alongside a light, whipped rosemary aioli (£9). With the patatas bravas that lend the restaurant its name the only ‘staple’ dish on the menu, it’s contemporary Spanish dining that definitely pushes the boat out. – Mike Gibson

TRISHNA 15-17 Blandford Street, W1U 3DG; trishnalondon.com Not many restaurants inspire a Proustian-style flashback the moment you step into them. But Marylebone Village’s Michelinstarred Trishna manages just that – the smell wafting from the kitchen immediately whisks me back to the plates of daal and spicy prawn curries I inhaled in beachfront shacks in Goa. Thankfully, the recently relaunched Trishna, which zones in on south-west Indian cuisine, easily eclipses anything that arrives on a paper plate, not least because there’s a dedicated sommelier to match world wines with the food. The starter plates of baby squid with fennel and mango (£8.50) were beautifully presented, as was our delicate salmon tikka (£13). Order the Kerala Jheenga signature tiger prawn curry (£17) at all costs, and book onto the next flight to Goa while you’re at it. – Cathy Adams

Cold, sushi-style tapas from Bravas’ impressive fish menu

NUMBER 90 90 Wallis Road, London, E9 5LN; 90mainyard.co.uk

A restaurant and bar in the middle of a canalside multi-use arts space on an industrial estate in Hackney Wick, Number 90 sounds suspiciously like a Portlandia-style East London in-joke. But it’s very much real, and even worth checking out. Chef Leon Borja packs his dishes with passion and flavour, and

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when it all comes together – as in melt-in-themouth braised ox cheek with lightly charred celeriac and a caper jus (£14), and sticky, unctuous lamb ribs with soy beans (£6.50) – it’s stonking great comfort food, if hardly subtle. But then, with electrofunk coming out of the speakers, street art on the walls and soaring ceilings, nor is Number 90. Here’s hoping it stays that way. – Jon Hawkins


/graffignawines

IS FOR MALBEC

Drink Graffigna responsibly


SIPSMITH VJOP

foodism

England

London-based distiller Sipsmith has come up with VJOP, or Very Junipery Over Proof. It’s just that – extra juniper is added and the proof is ramped up to 57.7%. 70cl, £39.95. sipsmith.com

CAORUNN

Scotland

Caorunn is distilled entirely in Scotland, infused with five Celtic botanicals – rowan berry, coul blush apple, heather, dandelion and bog myrtle. Serve with a slice of red apple. 70cl, £26.75. caorunngin.com

JAPANESE GIN

England

Created in Cambridge, Japanese Gin may not be quite so Japanese as the name suggests, but with ingredients including yuzu peel and sansho pepper, its taste is pure Japan. 70cl, £64.99. selfridges.com

DÀ MHÌLE SEAWEED GIN

Wales

Photograph Photograph by David Harrison by ###

GINNED UP Small batch distilleries are proving there’s room to experiment with this revived old-school spirit

Welsh indie brand Dà Mhìle’s Seaweed Gin is an instant classic. Made with botanicals chosen to complement seafood, the spirit is then infused with seaweed, producing a fresh taste. 70cl, £30. damhile.co.uk

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Foodism Section - 5  

Escapism Magazine, Issue 8

Foodism Section - 5  

Escapism Magazine, Issue 8