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WELCOME TO foodism A TRIP THROUGH THE LATEST GLOBAL EATING TRENDS AND DESTINATIONS. IT’S THE WORLD ON A PLATE

76 BELLA ITALIA 81 REVIEWS 82 EAT THE WORLD 86 WEAPONS OF CHOICE


THE HEEL THING Puglia – at the heel of Italy’s boot – has risen from humble roots to become a culinary powerhouse. Sophie McLean finds heaven on a plate, and in a beautiful old farmhouse

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Puglia’s distinctive pasta is hand made on wooden boards

Photograph by ###

Orecchiette is so called because it looks like a tiny ear

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ranted, it is not the prettiest of drives from Bari airport towards Fasano. Indeed, Puglia, or Apulia as the locals call it, is often tarnished with the reputation of being northern Italy’s poor agricultural cousin. It is my first time this far south, and I’m not quite sure what to expect. Winding our way on small roads along the Adriatic coast we scan row upon row of olive trees – a sea of green and blue punctuated by the odd whitewashed building. Finally, our car turns up a neat, bush-lined avenue and we arrive at our destination. Masseria San Domenico is a farmhouse transformed into a five-star boutique hotel, set deep in the heart of 100 hectares of century-old olive groves and pomegranate trees. The Masseria is drenched in history: the main building dates back to the 15th

GARGANO Aphrodisiac oysters Not only does Gargano, on the spur of Italy’s boot, have ludicrous natural beauty to spare, but it’s prodigiously productive on the culinary front, too. Oil made from the area’s Ogliarola Gargano (labelled DOP Dauno) is legendary, while the local seafood – as you might expect – is out of this world. The distinctively flavoured oysters, in particular, are unmissable.

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ABOVE: Puglian restaurants source seafood dishes straight from the Adriatic Sea

century and was originally used as a watch tower by the knights of Malta. Since then, it has been family owned for 30 years and still functions as a family home. The furniture that decorates the bar and the 47 bedrooms is the same that was in the original house: canine motif cushions adorn upholstered antique chairs, and there’s an old record player, along with dark wood panelling. Outside is an old frantoio, or olive mill – the hotel uses its own oil in the kitchens, in its bath products, and even in its spa. Being covered head to toe in olive oil and smelling of oranges, lemons and sea salt, the aromatics used in the spa treatments are gentle reminders of Puglia’s local industry. The region is home to a staggering 60 million olive trees, a sight to behold from high ground.

BRINDISI Seafood mecca Meat barely gets a look-in in Brindisi, where seafood – including swordfish, sea urchin and prawn – dominates kitchens and menus, backed up by fruit and vegetables from the fertile, sun-drenched land. If you’ve got a sweet tooth, try mandorla riccia (or curly almonds) from the town of Francavilla Fontana – roasted almonds with a knobbly sugar, vanilla and lemon coating.


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BARI Local flavour

THINK PUGLIA Brush up on your cooking skills

THE TRABUCCHI OF PUGLIA Fresh catches galore Dotted along the coast in Puglia, in particular the stretch between the towns of Peschici and Vieste in Foggia, you’ll find Trabucchi – elaborate-looking wooden trebuchets that extend out over the sea, originally built and used by fishermen to catch fish without the need for a boat. Today, some have been restored and exist as restaurants where you can eat catch fresh from the nets.

Photograph (far left) by Carlos Solito, (above) by Tips Images/Alamy

Apulia stems from the Latin apluvia – ‘land without rain’ – and 70% of the land is limestone based. This makes it ideal for growing olives, but also cherries, prickly pears and figs. It is also the perfect climate and soil for producing grapes – as shown by the vines that we pass on our way. The villages here are like something out of one of Grimms’ Fairy Tales. Trulli houses adorn the narrow streets in nearby Alberobello – a place that means ‘tree of war’ (and not in fact ‘beautiful tree’, as one might imagine). This was Italy’s first illegal village – run under a feudal system before being set free by the King of Naples in 1797. Among other things local delicatessens will offer you prickly pear-based sweet liqueurs and cacio sopressata – an unusual cheese that, once cut, reveals salami hidden inside it. Locals tell me it has been made this

If you’re lucky enough to be holed up in a Think Puglia (thethinkingtraveller.com) villa, take advantage of the cooking lessons from resident chef Anna Maria Chirone Arno. Available in-villa or at her school in Lecce, the classes are bespoke, but will probably include making orecchiette, Puglia’s signature pasta.

way to fool the customs authorities in years gone by. Wine bars in turn will offer you Nero di Troia, Negroamaro, Susumaniello and Verdeca – glasses brim full of local Puglian sunshine. We walk back down to Alberbello’s main street, clutching olive-infused foccacia. In Ostuni, known as la città bianca (the white town), the Greek influences are difficult to ignore. Bright blues and white decorate the pretty streets and you could easily wander around for hours with a well-thumbed guidebook for company. The city was rebuilt by the ancient Greeks after Hannibal destroyed it between the first and second century AD. Of course, it was the ancient Greeks who first brought the olive trees to this region – dubbed ‘the patriarchs’, here to guard the region’s staunchly proud people. We meet Antonello, whose family has been growing olives for seven generations. He takes us out to see some of his trees – what he calls ‘natural monuments’, like ethereal sculptures rising out of the ground. He shows us the knotted, gnarly humped mamellone (‘big breasts’) on those that are almost ready for harvest. We are also led underground to the caves where his family once milled them and reflect on an industry relatively unchanged

You won’t struggle for chances to try orecchiette – Puglia’s tiny, ear-shaped pasta – anywhere in the region, but in Bari Vecchia, the city’s old town, you’ll find streets filled with women making the shapes by hand on wooden boards and stuffing them with the freshest ingredients they can find. Seek out orecchiette alla Barese (Bari style), which is traditionally made with a local type of broccoli called rapini.

in centuries. Indeed, some of Antonello’s trees here date back as far as 3,000 years – meaning that we are still eating fruit from the same trees that fed the Romans. This is living history at its most incredible – one that blends the rural landscape into its warm and authentic personality. And it remains a haven largely undiscovered by many. Go now before Puglia’s secret is out. Masseria San Domenico costs from €300 per night, including breakfast but excluding taxes. masseriasandomenico.com

>> PUGLIA IS HOME TO SIXTY MILLION OLIVE TREES 79


Lamia Bianca, near Fasano

The most desirable villas in Puglia 40 hand-picked properties including charming Trulli, luxurious Masserie, palatial townhouses and panoramic seafront villas.

020 7377 8518 | www.TheThinkingTraveller.com At the CondÊ Nast Traveller Readers’ Travel Awards 2007-2013:

Best villa rental company | Best on the ground service | Best range of villas and facilities | Best presentation of villas


foodism Five’s the magic number – if you’ve got a hefty appetite

REVIEWS We unleash our hungry hounds on London’s latest restaurant openings

FIVE GUYS 1-3 Long Acre, WC2E; fiveguys.co.uk Danish style meets Japanese substance at Sticks’n’Sushi

STICKS’N’SUSHI 11 Henrietta St, WC2E; sticksnsushi.com

What have the Danes ever done for us? Pastries, a Shakespearean prince and a red-conked goalie apart, not a lot – but things are looking up. After opening in Wimbledon in 2012, Japanese-influenced Danish restaurant Sticks’n’Sushi now has a second London home near Covent Garden. Inside you’ll find bare brick and dark tones, and raw fish and yakitori-style skewers. The uramaki rolls (from £6.50 for eight) taste as delicate as they look, while the spicy chicken bites (£6.50) are sticky-fingered fun to fight over. – Jon Hawkins

THE GAL L I VANT, CAMB ER

THE EDIBLE ESCAPE

Photograph by ###

With an all-American aesthetic and a bistro drawing ingredients from the local area, the Gallivant offers the best of both worlds. It’s well worth gallivanting off to, says Jon Hawkins

If there’s an unmistakably American flavour to the Gallivant – from its roadside motel roots and East Coast-style exterior, to the ‘locavore’ approach to food-sourcing – it comes with the unmistakable imprint of the British coast. A short step from the eerie beauty of Camber Sands, the hotel does a neat line in relaxed, understated luxury, with gleaming white walls and driftwoodeffect tables steering mercifully clear of that whitewashed wood and seashells-in-a-bowl aesthetic beloved of seaside B&Bs in the ‘90s.

Five unknown American guys have a lot to answer for: snaking queues, burger comas, and seasoning that’ll keep you licking your fingers for hours. We’re talking about US burger joint Five Guys, which landed in Covent Garden last year. It’s upmarket drunk food: juicy patties with cheese, smoky bacon cheese hot dogs and chips smothered in Five Guys spices – so good they should patent it. Wash it down with 150 (150!) types of Coke from the drinks machine, and you’re good to go. Hangover, what hangover? – Cathy Adams

At its heart is the Beach Bistro, which serves unpretentious but achingly delicious food, most of it made with ingredients from the local area. Rye Bay scallops with a celeriac purée were sweet and plump, while the local sole in a bacon and balsamic reduction was as good a piece of fish as you’ll find anywhere. If you still have room for the chocolate doughnuts with a cream dip, you’re a better man than me – or an American. In which case you’ll feel right at home. Doubles from £115 per night, bed and breakfast; Camber, East Sussex, TN31 7RB; thegallivanthotel.com

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1 2 EAT THE WORLD

3 HAPPY HOUR Bring the bar into your home with four cocktails for sophisticates. Or, if you’re lazy, get the pros to mix them for you…

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FOOD ON FILM Three great films, three iconic restaurants that actually exist – we’ll have what she’s having

1. NEW YORK BAR

Tokyo, Japan

This bar does indeed exist outside the misanthropic world of Lost in Translation, serving, as you’d expect, New York food with Japanese twists thrown in. tokyo.park.hyatt.com

2. CA FÉ DE S DE UX M OUL INS Paris, France

A quiet little bistro serving coffee and cocktails in the off-season, this café turns into a throng of hipsters looking to live out the plot of Amélie in the summer months.

3. K ATZ’S DE L I New York, USA

When Harry Met Sally raised Katz’s Deli’s profile, but in truth it has been NYC’s go-to sandwich shop since 1888. katzsdelicatessen.com

▼ Celtic Elixir, Caorunn Gin

▼ Spicy Fifty, Salvatore’s Bar

• 50ml Caorunn gin • 35ml fresh clementine juice • 25ml Stag Breath Liqueur or Old Pulteney 12yo • 15ml sugar syrup

• • • • •

Shake all the ingredients into a mixing glass and double strain into a martini glass. Finish it off by garnishing with a daffodil flower. caorunngin.com

Place all the ingredients into a shaker filled with ice and shake well. Strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a red eye chilli. playboyclublondon.com

50ml Stolichnaya vanilla vodka 15ml elderflower cordial 15ml fresh lime juice 10ml honey syrup 2 thin slices of red chilli


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1 2 EAT THE WORLD

1. T HE OBERO I Dubai, UAE

This pan-Asian-style hotel boasts three fine dining restaurants: Umai, Ananta and the modernist Nine7One. oberoihotels.com

HOTEL DINING

No longer an afterthought, hotel restaurants are more and more for the gourmand

2. T HE H I LTO N Park Lane, London, UK

As well as Michelin-starred Galvin at Windows, the Hilton’s home to French-Polynesian Trader Vic’s and the aristocratic Podium Restaurant & Bar. hilton.com

3. ART’OT EL A MST ERDAM

Amsterdam, Netherlands Packed with arresting art and sculpture, the real string to Art’otel’s bow is its restaurant, 5&33, which serves spectacular Italian sharing plates. artotelamsterdam.com

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▼ Flowery Godmother, The Fable

▼ Plata Fuego, Las Iguanas

• • • • • •

• • • • • •

40ml Brockman’s gin 50ml Montrose rosé wine 25ml lime juice 25ml gomme syrup 5ml rose water 6 rose petals

Slice the rose petals and add them to a wine glass full of crushed ice with the other ingredients. Churn, and garnish with mint and more rose petals. thefablebar.co.uk

35ml Olmeca Blanco tequila 20ml brandy 35ml lemon juice 2 teaspoons sugar syrup 25ml mango juice 25ml pineapple juice

Shake all the ingredients and pour into a chilled cocktail glass dipped in Tajin. Garnish with a drizzle of chilli sauce. iguanas.co.uk

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SUNTORY HIBIKI 12

BULLEIT BOURBON

Japan

USA

Suntory is a modern giant of the liquor world, but the heritage of its whiskies has never been in question – it’s been at the forefront of Japan’s burgeoning whisky tradition for 90 years. The Japanese concept of hibiki loosely translates as the sublety of nature, and the Hibiki 12 reflects this: a blend of pure single malts, it’s fruity on the nose and palate with a complex, sweet and sour finish. 50cl, £35.95

Created by Augustus Bulleit in 1830s Kentucky, Bulleit’s recipe was almost lost to the sands of time – until his great-greatgrandson reprised it on his farm in 1987. The brand’s flagship bottle, now a firm favourite with bourbon drinkers, is sweet and spicy, with a characteristic aroma owing to its high rye content. 70cl, £27.95

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CHIVAS 12

Scotland

A blended Scotch with all the heritage of a single malt is hard to find, but Chivas Regal has been distilled in one form or another since the early 1800s. Already a stalwart in Britain, its Regal 12 blend took off in Manhattan just after the end of US Prohibition, becoming popular with Frank Sinatra and the Rat Pack. It’s known for its particularly refined taste – especially for a blend. 70cl, £27.43

Photograph Photograph by David Harrison by ###

THE HOLY SPIRIT Three times as much Scotch is sold globally as whisky from any other country. Which isn’t to say the rest of the world has given up the chase…

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foodism Squeeze the sides to control the size of the blade

WEAPONS OF CHOICE Things getting fruity in the kitchen? Fear not, we’ve got the tools to tame those rogue apples and oranges

A SHARP IDEA Chef’n Scoop’n Slice fruit tool, £12 The ominous looking spike cuts straight through the peel

BOWLED OVER

Excuse the gratuitous apostrophising – Chef’n’ Scoop’n Slice tool does the jobs of a knife and a spoon, making short work of all kinds of tropical fruit. Scoop the seeds out, then score the flesh with blades that pop out of the end, drag the curved blade across and you’re done. johnlewis.com

Black + Blum Fruit Loop, £28 Anglo-Swiss homeware brand Black + Blum is all about playing with form, so it’s pretty unsurprising that its fruit bowl – the cleverly named Fruit Loop – isn’t really a bowl at all, more an Art Deco collection of metal strands which securely encase your fruit in a slick, contemporary-looking cage. redcandy.com

A PIECE OF PITH Alessi Apostrophe orange peeler, £15.50 If we’re getting technical, Alessi’s orange peeler is more of an opening speech mark than an apostrophe, but that doesn’t really have the same ring to it. Just rake it down the orange and easily peel off the skin for a largely unnecessary but quite cool solution to all those peeling problems. alessi.com

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Fruit bowl or astronomy diagram? You decide


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COMPETITION

STAR GRAZING

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Win a year’s supply of Michelinstarred dinners for you and a friend. We know, we’re spoiling you…

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ou didn’t read it wrong – we’ve teamed up with 12 Michelin-starred London restaurants to give one lucky Foodism reader a year’s supply of fine dining. The winner and a guest will be treated to 12 meals at a dozen of London’s finest restaurants, spanning cuisine from India, France, Spain, Britain and more…

Lemon sole, crab and asparagus at Outlaw’s – it prides itself on fresh seafood from the Cornish coast

1. OUT L AW’S

4. T EXT U R E

2. STO RY

5. S EVEN PAR K P L ACE

Overseen by charismatic fish expert Nathan Outlaw, and helmed by head chef Pete Biggs, the team at Outlaw’s at the Capital Hotel in Knightsbridge only source seafood from fishermen they know personally on the Cornwall coast. 22-24 Basil St, Knightsbridge SW3 1AT; capitalhotel.co.uk

Story, which opened last year, is a love letter to British cooking, with a menu bursting with seasonal meat and fish dishes made with local produce. Diners are encouraged to bring a book. 201 Tooley Street, SE1 2UE; restaurantstory.co.uk

3. ALY N WI L L I AMS

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Since 2012, Alyn Williams has won the Craft Guild of Chefs’ National Chef Of The Year title, his first Michelin Star and three AA rosettes. Impressive, non? The Westbury Hotel, Bond Street, W1S 2YF; alynwilliams.com

Possibly the most eclectic restaurant on the list, Texture is a Scandinavian-influenced, pan-European restaurant and champagne bar. Indeed, the folk at Texture claim to have the most extensive list of bubbles in the whole capital. 34 Portman Street, W1H 7BY; texture-restaurant.co.uk

A small, intimate restaurant, William Drabble’s Seven Park Place serves French-influenced seasonal British cuisine at the exquisitely elegant five-star St James’s Hotel. 7-8 Park Place, St James’s, SW1A 1LS; stjameshotelandclub.com

6. HAK K AS AN MAY FAI R

Chinese restaurants aren’t always synonymous with fine dining, but Hakkasan was awarded its Michelin star less than a year after opening. With dishes like steamed New Zealand mini lobster, black truffle roast duck, and sliced blue abalone in Hakka sauce, it’s unsurprising it’s such a hit. 17 Bruton Street, W1J 6Q; hakkasan.com

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3 7. AME TS A WITH AR ZAK IN ST RU C TIO N

10. BR AS S ER I E CHAVOT

8. CLU B GASC ON

11. TR ISHNA

Located in the heart of Belgravia, Ametsa serves up ‘New Basque Cuisine’, which combines rich, earthy flavours with a contemporary aesthetic (including 7,000 pots of spice on the ceiling). The Halkin by COMO, Halkin Street, SW1X 7DJ; comohotels.com

If the name didn’t give it away, this Smithfields institution has a menu filled with plates from Gascony in south-west France. The food is classic French fine dining, with meat and seafood dishes lovingly made with local ingredients. 57 West Smithfield, EC1A 9DS; clubgascon.com

9. B ENA RES

Head chef Atul Kochhar cooks modern Indian food with influences from throughout the subcontinent, but with a recognisably British twist. The vegetarian dishes are among the best in London, and the desserts are pretty spectacular too. 12a Berkeley Square House, W1J 6BS; benaresrestaurant.com

Photograph by ###

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A classic French brasserie based in the opulent Westbury hotel, Brasserie Chavot’s menu is French cuisine with British ingredients. The soft shell crab is a favourite. 41 Conduit Street, W1S 2YF; brasseriechavot.com

An informal, ‘semi-alfresco’ restaurant, Trishna serves south-west Indian food in Marylebone Village and won a Michelin star in 2012. The seafood dishes are a particular highlight, served up in a convivial, sociable environment. 15-17 Blandford Street, W1U 3DG; trishnalondon.com

12. ANGL ER

Situated in the City of London’s South Place Hotel, Angler serves a simple, modern seafood menu with a big emphasis on using the best and freshest ingredients available – and its meat dishes and excellent wine list aren’t to be ignored, either. South Place Hotel, 3 South Place, EC2M 2AF; anglerrestaurant.com

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Texture’s cold smoked Scottish salmon, horseradish, apple, pickled vegetables and sorrel

5 HOW TO WIN To be in with a chance of winning this amazing prize, go to foodism.co.uk and answer one simple question…

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Foodism Section from Escapism Issue 7 - Mini Breaks Special

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Foodism Section from Escapism Issue 7 - Mini Breaks Special