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129 Fulham Road, London, SW3 6RT. Tel: 0207 581 3239 www.thewatchgallery.co.uk


H A U T E

H O R L O G E R I E

A U T H E N T I Q U E

l a collec tion

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Main Partner of

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www.parmigiani.com


squaremile THE BEST OF THE CITY

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FINE JEWELLERY & L U X U R Y WAT C H E S


patek philippe

Philippe, and take over at the helm. He was always passionate about watches, he says, remembering playing in his father’s office on the Rue du Rhône, when he was five, opening drawers and finding his collection of pocket watches, now in the Patek Philippe Museum. He enrolled in an accelerated programme at the Watchmaking School of Geneva, then worked his way up through Patek: with retailers in Germany and the US, at the case and bracelet workshops, as market manager in the Benelux countries, and as the head of product development and creation. It taught him, first, “the human side”, he says: how to talk and deal with all the different people who make and sell the watches – “what they think, why they are here, what motivates them”. It also taught him the manufacturing process: “If I make a decision, I know where it will have an impact. The big difference between me and CEOs of other watch companies, is they don’t understand the product, and frankly they don’t care. They only look at the figures. That’s important, but it’s also important to learn the whole process, and the problems you will face by doing something new.” Particularly in the current market, no doubt. So how is business? “Up until now, it’s been good,” he says. “It has dropped a bit, but that’s no surprise. People will always want to buy a luxury item. What’s important now is knowhow, real value. Lasting value.” He rails against what he calls the “gimmicks” of other watchmakers. “People have had enough of all these launches in recent years: technical stuff, big sizes, weird stuff. This is the end of it. People aren’t looking for pieces that, while being perhaps unique, have no past. They might buy a watch for €1m and realise the value isn’t there. People are very conscious of that today. They’re coming back to a company where they know what they will buy will still be valuable ten or 20 years from now.”

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And perhaps even an investment too? “We don’t like to say that it’s an investment – but look at the auction prices.” The company has a string of world records for multi-million dollar prices realised for watches at auction. “Patek is always in a good position – not just because it’s a nice watch, but it’s a lot of work, and we can always fix them, of course.” It’s an important point: Patek has kept an unbroken record of every watch ever sold dating back to its foundation in 1839, and it can repair any model, however old. But what of innovation, then? Patek does, after all, have more than 70 patents to its name. He and his father are involved in the development of every new Patek design and movement. How do they strike the right balance between the new and old? “We always go ahead and find new things. But it’s a narrow line. To be innovative, you have to look at the possibilities to use new materials, new machinery, and so on. But does it fit into our tradition? You need to be very sharp. The world is going very fast – but not every innovation is good. It has to improve the accuracy or the aesthetic.” The flipside risk, of course, is that Patek can seem ponderous, a little staid. Is it conservative, I ask. “Not really,” he says, bristling ever so slightly. “We’re always pushing our design, but we will never be a design factory. We have our own way. We choose it like this. But without innovation you die.” Patek does adapt, he insists, but only when it’s appropriate. “The last big change ▶

●● People aren’t looking for pieces that have no past squaremile 19


patek philippe

guide

▶ we had was sizes. Lots of customers have said, your watches are beautiful, but too small. A child at 12 is huge – people are starting to get bigger so we have to adapt – but within limits: 38mm, 39mm, even 40mm case sizes, it’s OK. But 41mm to 44mm is fashion.” Stern says the word ‘fashion’ with evident distaste. Later, after the interview, I’m shown around the Patek Philippe Museum in Geneva – the second half of my Patek education. It has an extraordinary range of timepieces, tracing the history of horology over centuries: the march of technology and accuracy, the shifting aesthetics, alternating between luxury and functionality and back to luxury again, until the foundation of Patek Philippe – after which it only includes Patek products. There seems to be an irresistible underlying message here, that horology found its natural champion in Patek. There are other firms, other ways, but Patek’s is the true path, the museum seems to say. It’s instructive to see the firm in this context, picking and choosing on the basis of what is right for watchmaking as a whole, according to their lights, and incorporating what they see as genuinely historic developments. Indeed, Stern insists that he doesn’t care what other watchmakers do. “I barely look at other watches. It’s not that I don’t like them, but I don’t want to be influenced by them. If you start to look, without really wanting to, you are memorising the shape and so on, and I want to avoid that. Mistakes follow fashion. I’m not interested in the opposite either, creating a fashion – I don’t care about that. I care about what is right for Patek.” And what about the marketplace? What’s the mood like out there? “For the retailers, they are a bit afraid – the young ones, that is. They have to learn. You can’t imagine that the watch industry will be successful year after year. It also has to stop. For the older

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ones, this is not the first crisis. My father has been through four. When you have been through them before, you have a better idea of what you have to do.” So what do you have to do? “For us, not much very different. Focus on the product. Everything revolves around that. We have to prepare for the end of the crisis. You cannot start again without new products.” It’s a frustrating, if understandable, rule that Patek never, ever discusses any future product until its launch. But there is just a hint that something special might be coming… “We’re pushing harder

●● I barely look at other watches. I don’t want to be influenced

to find the big, outstanding hit. 2009 is done. I’m thinking more about 2010. I hope that will be the turning point.” Stern says they are also being careful with supply. “We’re going to stick to what we did last year and a little less,” he says. They may also stockpile watches for a year or so, to keep pressure from the retailers. “If they can’t sell them, then you have a grey market. We need to control and also to help them,” he says. He’s thankful that Patek today has global reach. “If you’re only in one market, and it stops, you’re dead. So we’ve always tried to be equal with our markets.” America is still number one, he says, even in the crisis, then Europe, then Asia. Downturn or not, demand continues to grow in the east, he says. “Demand is growing in Asia. And that’s without China – that’s a different market again. Demand is high there, but we have only two outlets – we don’t have enough merchandise for more. And I prefer to learn the market first and to teach them what Patek means. We are still not in India – I think we’re the only brand in the industry who is not.” Why? “Find me the pieces!” he says. “I don’t have them – and I cannot increase quantity just like that.” As for Europe, Patek has finally bought the space in London (on Bond St) where it had been operating for years; a third Patek boutique to add to Geneva and Paris. “From when I was very young, my father always wanted to buy this place – for 25 years I have heard that. And now we finally have.” Meanwhile, the workshops are expanding; there is a new extension being built. “Not to expand the number of watches,” he says, “but the parts. The number of watches is the same. But demand today is not for a simple mechanical watch. It is for a perpetual calendar, an annual calendar, chronograph… All those pieces have 30 to 50 per cent more parts inside.” So why does he think people are so interested in complications now? ▶

squaremile 21


patek philippe

guide

▶ “We’re living in a world surrounded by computers,” he says. “But it’s exciting to see a high-end complicated mechanical movement. Many collectors come from IT companies. They work on the virtual side, but want to buy something concrete that they don’t need to plug into the wall to make it work. This is something without power; a tiny piece that will work 24 hours a day for 50 or 100 years. It’s attractive.” Indeed, for many, it’s so attractive it becomes a bug; a disease, almost. Does everyone become a collector? “Good question! Maybe everyone could become a collector. It’s a matter of money, of course. It’s not easy. Everyone would enjoy to have a minute repeater, but not everyone can buy one.” In fact, it’s almost impossible to get hold of one, even if you have the money. Supply is notoriously tight, and the distributors have to choose carefully who they allow to buy the rarest watches. “He may only receive one for his whole market for the year. At the high end, those kind of watches should not be sold to someone who has never bought a Patek, who might resell it in a week at a profit. They should always choose the client who is a true collector. It’s difficult because there’s not only one client who deserves it.” He says that the watches most in demand are “all the complications”, notably tourbillons and minute repeaters, and the ones that incorporate new technology, such as silicon components. “They are the rarest ones and the most difficult to realise. You can’t trick someone with the sound of a minute repeater – it’s either good or bad, and it’s not easy to do. As for tourbillons…” He can’t resist another swipe at the rest of the market. “There are too many others out there but look at them. They should be more accurate than a regular watch – but 80 per cent of them are not. It’s just so that people can say I have a tourbillon – but why?”

22 Squaremile

masters at work: Patek is rightly proud of its 140-year heritage of craftsmanship

He describes his own work life as “busy but interesting”. He is deeply aware of the importance of Patek being a family business. “We do what we think is right. We do not have to answer to anyone else. We have all the tools in our hands to choose our own destiny. That’s quite rare. So in this crisis, I can reduce production, otherwise there are too many watches. I can take that decision.” No group would do that, he says. “It also allows us to take a decision in five minutes – right or wrong. In another company, it might take six months. And the people working here know who they are working for. We’re in this together, to make the best watches in the world.” Patek is now run by the ‘directoire’, a triumvirate of himself, his father

●● You can’t trick someone with the sound of a minute repeater

and the CEO, Claude Peny, which he describes as “very efficient”. “We all have different skills: we try to mix them to maintain the stability of the company, and it works well. We’re now preparing for my father’s retirement. He will still be there for the long-term strategy: that’s something that he’s very good at. I will take over with Mr Peny on the operational side.” That is the future. So what is he most proud of? “In private, my kids. For Patek, working with my father. Other firms don’t find it so easy. There are lots of fights between fathers and sons, and different ways of looking at the future. We work so well together. Only one or two arguments in our time. That’s it.” Has he ever regretted not doing something else. “I don’t regret anything,” he says. This is always what he has wanted to do. “To create something that is real and concrete that will still live for 100 years. I will be dead but what I have done will still be there. Compare that with a banker. I have many good friends who are bankers, but I always say: what will you leave when you will be dead? Money, but what else? No answer. I will leave something that will give joy to people.” ■ patek.com

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Captive in Time

The Vintage Tourbillon MK2

The Eternal Phoenix

The Serpent Piccadilly

T H E

A R T

O F

T I M E

www.speake-marin.com


guide

British invasion

QP magazine’s maria doultoN meets the brothers who are English by both name and nature

Nick ENglish is at the controls, wearing a battered flying jacket. His curly ginger hair rises almost vertically between his headphones as he carefully explains the antiquated control panel with the knowledge of someone who has been flying since a teenager. On his wrist is a handsome, generously proportioned pilot’s chronograph with a clean black dial – the first from Nick and brother Giles’ fledgling British brand. “There are two things my brother and I know about: planes and watches. So it was destiny that we were going to bring the two together.” I have to admit that before turning up at the appointed rendezvous – a small airfield west of London – I was somewhat sceptical. With recent 24 Squaremile

news of two niche watch companies, Villemont and Amundsen Oslo joining forces and the Richemont Group acquiring 20 per cent in the microbrand Greubel Forsey, the question of how small brands can survive in an industry dominated by a handful of Titans is never far from the mind.

●● We look scruffy, but we put a lot of work into these watches

Over the noise of the propeller I learn about the brothers’ Norfolk childhood tinkering with their pilot father Euan in the garage, repairing planes, making clocks, models, musical instruments and fixing anything mechanical they could lay their hands on. After leaving the RAF, Euan found fame as a WWII aerobatic display pilot and the young boys used to sit in the back of the plane in their own little flying suits while Daddy was doing his barrel rolls and loops. Tragically, Euan’s passion for flying took his life when in 1995, his plane, an American Harvard, plummeted to the ground. Following their father’s death, both brothers left their jobs in the City and set up a business to develop and

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guide

watchman Fabian Krone, head of reborn German watchmaking legend A Lange & SÜhne, tells jon hawkins that it’s all about the movement and the detail

26 Squaremile

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A lAnge & sohne

If any sIngle detail sums up A Lange & Söhne’s brand philosophy, then it is this: having assembled each movement and ensured that it works, the watchmaker then takes it apart again, polishes and refines every component and pieces it together again with brand new screws. Most watchmakers would baulk at such a time-consuming (and therefore expensive) step, but then Lange is emphatically not most watchmakers. Re-born in 1990 following a 40year hiatus, the company’s factory was appropriated by the state in 1948 when East Germany fell under socialist rule (see box on p28) – A Lange & Söhne released its first new watches in 1994, with the range spearheaded by the now iconic Lange 1. The Lange 1 was a calling card for the revived watchmaker; its offset dial, oversized date numerals and prominent power reserve gauge all pointing towards a bold stylistic direction, albeit one with a healthy nod to the past. But even then, as now, the defining feature of any A Lange & Söhne watch was its movement. Painstakingly produced to exacting specifications and miniscule manufacturing tolerances, every Lange movement is itself a work of art, and this is no more evident than when wandering around the company’s workshops. Located in the tiny city of Glashütte in Germany’s historic Saxon region, Lange occupies two premises: the larger having been built recently to house the majority of the company’s employers, and the other the company’s original home, built in 1873 and now restored to its former glory. Donning a white lab coat, I’m led through the bowels of the premises, where precision CNC milling machines sit next to Lange employees hunched over tiny fragments of untreated German silver that they are polishing and finishing to within an inch of their lives. Behind them are what look like miniature Ferris wheels (they are, in squaremileclub.com

fact, motion simulators), each studded with several hundred thousand euros’ worth of watches completing countless rotations over the course of several weeks until absolute precision can be guaranteed. In another room, balance cocks are engraved by hand, each featuring the same floral motif that adorned the pocket watches made by founder Ferdinand A Lange. Most impressive of all though is a movement destined for a Datograph, placed under a microscope, in which the magnified hairspring and balance wheel – which together regulate the rate of the timepiece – can be seen to oscillate like a tiny mechanical heart. The watchmakers, sitting at their clinical stations wielding precision tools and dressed in the same white lab coats as me, could easily be surgeons. Some 15 years have passed since the first watches left the factory, and A Lange & Söhne has brought a steady stream of technically accomplished and stylish timepieces to the market. A fanatical dedication to producing uniquely intricate complications – the 2006 Tourbograph, for example, united a tourbillon with a fusée-andchain transmission and a rattrapante chronograph – has generated respect and awe in equal measure from the watch cognoscenti. Fabian Krone, the company’s CEO, says such boundary pushing is an integral part of the brand’s philosophy. “Lange’s mission has always been to interpret things

●● Watchmakers, with precision tools and white lab coats, could be surgeons

The precision of science: for A Lange & söhne the devil has always been in the detail

differently: not to be content with the obvious, but to try to go beyond it.” It is with this in mind that A Lange & Söhne’s latest piece, the Lange Zeitwerk, has come into existence. The Zeitwerk, with its astonishing mechanical digital time display, makes the company’s boldest visual statement since the launch of the Lange 1. “Although in past years, of course, we have always made a technical statement,” Krone explains, “I think the time now has come to make the next step with the brand. With the Zeitwerk we’re not only making a technical statement, but a design statement too.” The face is at once customarily elegant and thoroughly modern, with the hour and minute numerals – visible through windows in the exposed ▶

squaremile 27


A lAnge & sohne

guide

Brand History

the man behind the movements: Fabian Krone, Ceo of a Lange & söhne

▶ silver bridge – flanking a traditional seconds dial and a power reserve. Uncluttered and shorn of extraneous decoration, it is an uncompromising instrument for measuring time. The movement, too, is something of a technical tour de force, not least because the torque necessary to power the progression of the numerals (a seamless flick from one to the next, referred to by Lange as a “jumping numeral display”) is that much greater than in a traditional mechanism. The Zeitwerk seems to have all the ingredients to become a horological legend, but Krone refutes the idea that Lange’s designers set out purely with this intention. “We don’t wake up in the morning and say ‘Let’s make an icon’,” he says. “Things happen because our employees always strive

28 Squaremile

for a different way – a better way – to exceed their expectations. I think this way of working led our watchmakers to develop a timepiece like the Zeitwerk.” Intentionally or otherwise, then, the Zeitwerk is a truly defining watch from a watchmaker not afraid to do things differently, and much the better for it. ■

●● We don’t wake up in the morning and say ‘Let’s make an icon’…

Glashütte is the unassuming hub of the German precision watchmaking industry, with a population of 5,000 people, 1,000 of whom are employed by the nine watchmaking firms that call the city home. Yet none of it – at least not in its modern guise as a horological mecca – would exist without the influence of Ferdinand a Lange. a dresden-based clock- and watchmaker, Lange moved his operations to the impoverished city of Glashütte in 1845, and before long he was producing simple but exceptionally reliable pocket watches bearing the name a Lange (‘& söhne’ was added when Ferdinand’s son, Richard Lange, joined his father’s business). Under the management of Richard, and his brother emil, a Lange & söhne’s watches became progressively more intricate and complex as both the brand’s renown and the skill of its watchmakers increased, before it, and the other watch brands that had sprung up in Glashütte as a result of Lange’s trailblazing, were appropriated by the state during the formation of the GdR in the late 1940s. Watches continued to be made in Glashütte until reunification in 1990 under the people’s-owned Glashutte Uhrenbetrieben (GUb; now privatised as Glashütte original), but a Lange & söhne had already dissolved in 1948 when the family fled to West Germany, their factory having been virtually obliterated by soviet bombing raids on the town. Rather than ending there, however, the story picks up again in 1990. With the help of iWC, Walter Lange, Ferdinand’s great grandson, founded the firm once again, launching the first collection of a Lange & söhne watches in almost 50 years in 1994.

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After close consideration it’s also a safe. The Bel-Air No. 25 — High Security Luxury Safe. Patented plating, hardness grade 9 out of 10. Finest calf leather, metal fittings in chrome finish, interior constructed from a highly polished burr walnut. Döttling dual electronic locking system with integrated silent alarm. Optionally with “Touch & Move,” Döttling’s unique watch control system. Each The Bel-Air is designed according to your individual requirements. Starting from 112,000 euros. Doettling.com


guide

Directory

Details

BeLL & roSS

chopArd

eBeL

☎ 0800 011 2704

☎ 020 7439 3304

W jurawatches.co.uk

W chopard.com

☎ 020 7225 5908

tel. no.

★ Jura, 3 Burlington

★ David M. Robinson,

W

Website

Gardens, W1S 3EP

4 Jubilee Place, 45 Bank St, London, E14 5NY

Stockist

BLAncpAin

A LAnge & SÖhne

☎ +49 891 4818 5050

corum

★ Harrods, SW1X 7X

W thewatchgallery.co.uk

☎ 020 7581 3239

★ 129 Fulham Rd, SW3 6RT

W alange-soehne.com

BLu

★ Wempe, 43-44 New

☎ 020 7235 0025

cuervo y SoBrinoS

★ Chronometrie Kunz,

W cuervoysobrinos.com

Bond St, W1S 2SA

Anonimo

☎ 0800 011 2704

W jurawatches.co.uk

★ Jura, 3 Burlington Gardens, W1S 3EP

W blu.ch

☎ 020 8746 7991

W arnoldandson.com

★ William & Son, 10 Mount Street, W1K2TY

☎ 020 7290 6500

W marcuswatches.co.uk

★ Marcus, 170 New Bond Street, London, W1

☎ 020 7839 8709

W backesandstrauss.com

★ Theo Fennell, Royal Exchange, 4 The Courtyard, London, EC3V 3LQ

☎ 0800 011 2704

eternA

★ Cuervo y Sobrinos, Via

W eterna.ch

dAnieL roth

☎ 020 7872 9969

Fp Journe

★ Wonder Room,

★ Aéroport de Genève,

W fpjourne.com

Selfridges, W1A 1AB

1215, Geneva

Bremont

de Bethune

☎ 0800 011 2704

☎ +41 24 454 22 81

FortiS

★ Jura, 3 Burlington

★ William & Son,

W jurawatches.co.uk

Gardens, W1S 3EP

10 Mount St, W1K 2TY

BvLgAri

de griSogono

☎ 020 7872 9969

☎ 020 7290 6500

W marcuswatches.co.uk

FrAnck muLLer

★ Unit 15, The Courtyard,

★ Marcus, 170 New Bond

☎ 020 7290 6500

Royal Exchange, EC3V 3LQ

Street, London, W1

W danielroth.com

W debethune.ch

cArtier

de Witt

☎ 020 7408 5700

W dewitt.ch

W cartier.com

★ Kronometry 1999, 60-62 rue Francois 1er, 75008 Paris

☎ 020 7734 7966

chAneL

deLAcour

★ Charles Fish, 320 Cabot

☎ 020 7929 7077 W chanel.com

☎ 020 7554 4111

★ Wonder Room (Ground Floor), 400 Oxford St, W1

★ Kutchinsky, 73 Brompton Rd, Knightsbridge

☎ 0845 676 1111

chAumet

dior

★ David Morris Internation-

☎ 020 7495 6303 W chaumet.com

☎ 020 7245 1330

★ 174 New Bond St, London, W1S

★ Christian Dior, 30-31 Sloane St, SW1X 9NE

BAume et mercier

Place, London, E14 4QT

W delacour.ch

BedAt & co. W bedat.com

al, Selfridges, 400 Oxford St, London, W1A 1AB

30 Squaremile

☎ +41 22 717 8414

☎ 0800 123 400

★ 175-177 New Bond St

W baume-et-mercier.com

★ Classic Time, 70 Albert Rd, Caversham, Reading, RG4 7PF

BreitLing

W bulgari.com

BAckeS & StrAuSS

W eberhard-co-watches.ch

Greina, 2, CH-6900 Lugano

W jurawatches.co.uk

AudemArS piguet

☎ 01189 482 674

Quai du Mont Blanc, Geneva, Switzerland

W breitling.com

ArnoLd & Son

★ David M Robinson, 4 Jubilee Place, E14 5NY eBerhArd & co.

☎ +41 217 963 636 W blancpain.ch

W ebel.com

W dior.com

★ Skala Franz, Kramgasse 14, 3011 Berne

☎ 020 7493 8385 ★ William & Son, 10 Mount St, W1K 2TY

☎ 0800 011 2704

★ Jura, 3 Burlington Gardens, Mayfair, London, W1S 3EP

W marcuswatches.co.uk

★ Marcus, 170 New Bond Street, London, W1 Frédérique conStAnt

☎ 01324 717 515

W frederiqueconstant.com

★ Ernest Jones, Unit 1, 4 Paternoster Square, London, EC4M 7DX

gerALd gentA

☎ 020 7872 9969

W geraldgenta.com

★ Air Watch Centre, Aeroport de Geneve, Salle de transit, 1215 Geneve Switzerland squaremileclub.com


watch directory

Girard-PerreGaux

hublot

louis Vuitton

PiaGet

taG heuer

☎ 020 7581 3239

☎ 020 7290 6500

☎ 020 7399 4050

☎ 020 7290 6500

☎ 020 8735 4070

★ 129 Fulham Rd, SW3 6RT

★ Marcus, 170 New Bond

★ 6 Royal Exchange, EC3V

★ Marcus, 170 New Bond Street, London, W1

★ Westfield London, Ariel Way, London, W12 7GB

☎ 0800 011 2704

Porsche desiGn

technomarine

☎ 0800 011 2704

W jurawatches.co.uk

☎ 0800 011 2704

★ Jura, 3 Burlington Gardens, Mayfair, London, W1S 3EPP

★ Jura, 3 Burlington Gardens, Mayfair, London, W1S 3EP

W thewatchgallery.co.uk

W marcuswatches.co.uk

W louisvuitton.com

Street, London, W1

Glashütte ikePod

★ Wempe, 43-44, New

W marcuswatches.co.uk

★ Jura, 3 Burlington

★ Marcus, 170 New Bond

Gardens, W1S 3EP

Bond St, W1S 2SA

W tagheuer.com

maurice lacroix

☎ 020 7493 2299

W glashuette-original.com

W marcuswatches.co.uk

☎ 020 7290 6500

W jurawatches.co.uk

Street, London, W1

Glycine

mb&F

W jurawatches.co.uk

☎ 0800 011 2704

iWc

W mbandf.com

rado

ulysse nardin

★ Jura, 3 Burlington

W iwc.com

★ Chronopassion, 271 rue

★ David M Robinson,

☎ 08452 723 200

☎ 01483 243 588

Saint-Honore, 75001 Paris

★ David Morris Stores Ltd,

★ Ulysse Nardin SA, 3, Rue du Jardin, 2400 Le Locle, Switzerland

W jurawatches.co.uk

Gardens, W1S 3EP

Graham

☎ 0800 011 2704

☎ 020 7493 6767 Jubilee Place, Canary Wharf, E14 5NY

W jurawatches.co.uk

JaeGer-lecoultre

★ Jura, 3 Burlington

☎ 020 7581 3239

Gardens, W1S 3EP

Greubel Forsey

☎ 020 7290 6500

W thewatchgallery.co.uk

★ 129 Fulham Rd, London, SW3 6RT

W marcuswatches.co.uk

Jean dunard

★ Marcus, 170 New Bond

☎ +41 022 706 1960

Street, London, W1

W jeandunand.com

☎ +33 1 42 60 50 72

oFFicine Panerai

☎ 020 7312 6894 W panerai.com

★ Jura Watches, 3 Burlington Gardens, W1S 3EP

Gucci

☎ 020 7629 2716 W gucci.com

★ 34 Old Bond St, W1S hamilton

☎ 02380 646 815

W hamiltonwatch.com

★ The Barnes Jewellery Co Ltd, 19 Barnes High St, SW13 9LW

harry Winston

☎ 020 7290 6500

W harry-winston.com

kobold

☎ +1 412 7221 277

omeGa

☎ 020 7491 8113 W omega.ch

★ Somlo Antiques, 35-36 Burlington Arcade, W1J

1801 Parkway View Drive, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15205, USA

richard mille

oris

☎ 0800 011 2704

W jurawatches.co.uk

★ Jura, 3 Burlington Gardens, W1S 3EP

Vacheron constantin

★ Marcus, 170 New Bond

W marcuswatches.co.uk

Street, London, W1

☎ 020 7722 2438

Van cleeF & arPels

★ Moussaieff, 172 New

W vancleef.com

Bond St, W1S 4RE

rolex

☎ 020 7024 7300

W thewatchgallery.co.uk

romaine Jerome

★ 129 Fulham Rd, SW3 6RT

☎ 020 7581 3239

★ Marcus, 170 New Bond Street, London, W1

☎ 020 7581 3239

W thewatchgallery.co.uk

★ 129 Fulham Rd, SW3 6RT

Patek PhiliPPe

★ Jura, 3 Burlington

W patek.com

seiko

★ Patek Philippe, 15 New

☎ 01628 770 988

☎ 020 7580 0707

lonGines

PhiliP stein

☎ 020 7495 2512

☎ 0870 241 8140

W hermes.com

★ Watches of Switzerland,

★ Around Wine, 38-40 New

sPeake-marin

★ 12-13 Royal Exchange,

16 New Bond St, London, W1Y 9PF

Cavendish St, London, W1G 8UD

W speake-marin.com

London, EC3V 3LP

squaremileclub.com

W longines.com

Regent St, London, SW1Y 4PH

☎ 020 7290 6500

ParmiGiani Fleurier

★ Goldsmiths, Unit 23, Canada Place, London, E14 5AH

☎ 020 7499 8856

★ Mitsukoshi, 14/20

VoGard

W seiko.co.uk

hermÈs

☎ 020 7493 0400

★ 19 St James’s Sq, SW1Y

Bond St, W1S 3ST

★ 171 New Bond St, London, W1S 4RD

★ Marcus, 170 New Bond Street, London, W1

roGer dubuis

☎ 0800 011 2704

Gardens, Mayfair, London, W1S 3EP

☎ 020 7290 6500

W rolex.com

linde Werdelin W jurawatches.co.uk

W ulysse-nardin.com

☎ 020 7290 6500

W rogerdubuis.com

W koboldwatch.com

★ Kobold Watch Co.,

4th Floor, 50 Marshall St, London, W1F 9BQ

W marcuswatches.co.uk

★ L’Heure Asch, 19, rue de la Cité, 1204, Geneva, Switzerland

W rado.com

W philipstein.com

☎ +41 21 825 5069

W marcuswatches.co.uk

Vulcain

☎ +41 32 930 80 10

W vulcain-watches.com

★ Manufacture Vulcain, Chemin des Tourelles 4, 2400 Le Locle, Switzerland Zenith

☎ 020 7290 6500

W marcuswatches.co.uk

★ Marcus, 170 New Bond Street, London, W1 squaremile 31


RACE THE WORLD.*

Jura Watches 3 Burlington Gardens, Mayfair, London, W1S 3EP Tel: 0800 011 2704 www.jurawatches.co.uk

The Watch Gallery 129 Fulham Road, London, SW3 6RT Tel: 0207 581 3239 www.thewatchgallery.co.uk InnovatIve automatIc chronograph wIth second tImezone (gmt) and bIg date at 12.

OVERSIZE GMT BIG DATE BRG * CHRONOFIGHTER HAND-CRAFTED IN SWITZERLAND www.graham-london.com

Ref. 2OVGS.B12A.K10B

Square Mile Guides - Watches - 2009  

Square Mile Magazine, The Best of the City Watch Guide 2009 (Issue 40)

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