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Spencer Bates Portfolio of Works Spring 2014


“An invisible landscape conditions the visible one; everything that moves in the sunlight is driven by the lapping wave enclosed beneath the rock’s calcareous sky.” Italo Calvino “Invisible Cities”

[ONE]

[IN]ARCH BERKELEY SUMMER Architectural Inquiry

[TWO]

U.C. BERKELEY M.ARCH: YEAR ONE Studio Work

[THREE]

FUNCTIONAL REALITIES

Personal Exploration in Function

[FOUR]

FINE ART

Writing, Drawing & Painting


Spencer Bates 6449 Colby Street Oakland, CA 94618 310.221.1997 spencertbates@berkeley.edu


“There is one knows not what sweet mystery about this sea, whose gently awful stirrings seem to speak of some hidden soul beneath.” Herman Melville “Moby Dick”

[01]

2

[IN]Arch Berkeley Summer

[02]

[03]


[ONE]

[IN]ARCH BERKELEY SUMMER Architectural Inquiry

Interested in design for some time, I enrolled in the U.C. Berkeley [IN]Arch Summer program to experience the studio environment and to affirm my interests in pursuing graduate studies in architecture. Under the guidance of Professor Keith Plymale, I honed old skills and learned new ones to apply toward each of our projects. The main basis for our formal inquiry involved the examination of the phenomenal and the real, their co-dependency upon one another, and our ability to express these connections by employing a variety of media skills.

[IN]Arch Berkeley Summer


[01]

MECHANICAL ARTIFACT 1:1 Analog Drawing

3 sections, 2 elevations, and 2 plans were arranged compositionally to display the function of this balsa cleaver on 18” x 36” Mylar.

3

[IN]Arch Berkeley Summer


PATTERNING SKIN [02]

2D Lines and 3D Implications A 2D “pattern” was lifted from construction lines in the mechanical drawing, repeated, and superimposed, yielding a set of lines to guide the construction of 3D form.

“The drawing as artifact is unimportant. It is a set of instructions for realizing another artifact.”

a

b

c

d

Stan Allen “Mapping the Unmappable”

a, c. Adobe Illustrator Pattern b, d. Paper Study Model

[IN]Arch Berkeley Summer


a

b

4

[IN]Arch Berkeley Summer

c

d

e


Construction lines project from the repeated pattern and are assigned one of three rules. Tensions in the paper guide the key signature, resulting in a spontaneous form that equalizes the paper’s stresses.

f

Fold Up Fold Down Cut Construction Line

g

h

a, f. Paper Skins 18” x 36” b, g. Hand Drawn Pattern c-e. Model Contrast Details h. Hand Drawn Section

[IN]Arch Berkeley Summer


[03]

PARASITIC FORM

Reinterpreting Structure The existing staircase’s form is morphed to compose a structural skin that incorporates humans and site into a series of apertures that focus attention on the sweeping bay vistas and allow for a variety of programs to take place.

b

a

a. Axonometric Joinery b-d. Study Models e. North Elevation f. Site Plan g. Site Map

5

[IN]Arch Berkeley Summer

d

Model b investigates slotting dowels through corrugation, while models c and d translate stair tread dimensions as building blocks for receiving dowels that knit the structure together. Diagram a digitally displays the finalized joinery process.


g 400’

East

e

Filbert Street

f

10’

[IN]Arch Berkeley Summer


a


Descend

Encounter

Interact

a

b

a. Action/Reaction b-d. 1/8” Scale Model Details opp. Northwest Perspective pre. Aperture Framing the Bay

7

[IN]Arch Berkeley Summer

c

d

“Architecture ceases to be a backdrop for actions, becoming the action itself.” Bernard Tschumi, “Spaces and Events”


5’

[IN]Arch Berkeley Summer


“Our eyes do not divide us from the world, but unite us

with it. Let this be known to be true. Let us then abandon the simplicity of separation and give unity its due.� Ian McHarg

[04]

8

U.C. Berkeley M.Arch: Year One

[05]

[06]

[07]


[TWO]

U.C. BERKELEY M.ARCH: YEAR ONE Studio Work

Under the guidance of professors Kyle Steinfeld, Raveevarn Choksombatchai, Jay Atherton, and Danelle Guthrie my introduction to U.C. Berkeley’s three year M.Arch program began with abstract projects that built our representational skills and introduced us to the methods of architectural production. Hand drafting, physical model building, and digital modeling techniques were stressed with equal importance as we moved very rapidly from one project to the next. Instead of dedicating large amounts of time to one project, we have focused on rapid design development in order to learn how to move from concept to production quickly while exposing us to a variety of methods and techniques more quickly than lingering on one project for the majority of the semester. As a result, I have not only sharpened my representational techniques, but I have learned how to multitask and move through project development and production very rapidly.

U.C. Berkeley M.Arch: Year One


[04]

Modeling Translations Variation Through Translation

Plaster is cast and punctuated by balloons in order to produce irregular and spontaneous voids. The physical block was analytically measured and drawn at 1:1 scale. The analog orthographics are translated into a digital model, operated upon, and ultimately a new model whose geometry is sympathetic to the original is produced.

a

b

a. Original Plaster Block b. Translation One c. Translation Two d. 1:1 Elevations of Block e. 1:1 Sections of Block

9

U.C. Berkeley M.Arch: Year One

c

Plaster block a is carved out by the insertion of balloons. After measuring this block and translating it into a digital model curves are altered and then reconstructed as model b before repeating the process to form model c.


d

e

U.C. Berkeley M.Arch: Year One


[05]

Modeling to Space

Rethinking the Wire Frame Reimagining methods of wire model production resulted in hammering and drilling through piano wire to build up topography and define a representational technique that informed an architectural proposal. Rhythmic and repetitive use of line in the model led to a building whose spaces were described by repetitive ribs whose deformations produced distinct spaces.

a. 1/8” = 1’ Plan and Section b. Site and Architectural Model c. Study Tectonic d. Architecture Detail e. Model Detail

1/8” = 1’ 2’

10’

10

U.C. Berkeley M.Arch: Year One

UP

UP

a


b

c

d

e

U.C. Berkeley M.Arch: Year One


[06]

Urban Translation Shifting Scales

In studying overpasses in San Francisco, lines describe structure, orient view, and direct circulation. Employing varied densities of line size, spacing and orientations, I began with an abstract collage that informed a model investigating shifting orientation and its spatial implications. The model then served as a point of departure for an architectural proposal whose language is consistent with the original urban condition.

a

b

c

a. Collage of Line Conditions b-d. Study Model e. 1/8” = 1’ Section

11

U.C. Berkeley M.Arch: Year One

d

e

1/4” = 1’


U.C. Berkeley M.Arch: Year One


[07]

Bonita Cinematheque Performance Architecture

The cinematheque is a place to view art and an environment that forces visitors to engage in performance. Designed as a single bar, the building acts as a positive until it strikes the hill and continues as a negative carved out. The six foot wide interior space creates an environment where spatial expansion and contraction is dramatic, circulation between levels is forced onto an exterior scaffold, and occupants are continuously confronting other visitors and the architecture in unexpected ways.

32nd inch exploded site model

a

a. 32� = 1’ Figure Ground b. Tectonic Axonometric

12

U.C. Berkeley M.Arch: Year One

b


A simple structural system binds the building together: floor joists support interior walkways before piercing the building skin and tieing into bow trusses. Externally, these same joists support external circulation. A thick gabion wall also modulates light levels as occupants pass through each unique space.

U.C. Berkeley M.Arch: Year One


Quarter Inch Sectional Model

a

b

a-b. Interior Perspectives c-d. 1/4” = 1’ Concept Model e. 1/8” = 1’ Plans Following. 1/8” = 1’ Section

13

U.C. Berkeley M.Arch: Year One

c

d


e


5

U.C. Berkeley M.Arch: Year One


U.C. Berkeley M.Arch: Year One


“If any arts have lasting beauty, they must certainly exist in utilitarian objects created by people aware of the materials, forms, colors and surfaces that please the eye and the body.� Sam Maloof

[08]

15

Functional Realities

[09]

[10]

[11]


[THREE]

FUNCTIONAL REALITIES

Personal Exploration in Function An avid builder, I relish every element of the design and fabrication process—from penning concepts on paper to applying a final coat of varnish. Each of the following personal projects sought to explore material and formal constraints, functional demands, and aesthetic choices in a critical way that addressed each of the unseen parameters. What resulted is a collection of works whose outcomes were conditioned by the hidden constraints spanning the project’s development.

Functional Realities


[08]

FORMAL INVERSION Coffee Table Geometry

Interested in the relationships between inverted and scaled forms, I designed and built this piece to explore these geometric juxtapositions. I recycled hardwood flooring panels and relied on traditional wood joinery techniques that eschew metal fasteners.

a

c

b

d

41” x 17” x 12”

e

a-d. Construction Assembly e. Final Piece

16

Functional Realities


a a

b

b

4�

c

Constructed without metal fasteners, I designed and built dado, dowel, and miter joinery with traditional woodworking tools.

c

a, b. Dado Joinery Details c. Dowel and Miter Joinery

Functional Realities


[09]

STRUCTURAL INVERSION Storage in the Round

Beginning with a perfect cube, I explored the creation of symmetrical form through a reductive process. A structural pattern emerged to both support the mass and carve out spaces for use. This pattern was then inverted to complete the piece. 20” x 20” x 20”

a

17

Functional Realities

b


c

d

e

f

g

a. Hand Drawn Concepts b. Rhino 3D Joinery c. Assembly Sequence d. Joinery Sketches e-g. Joinery Details

Functional Realities


[10]

PATTERN ITERATION Creating Pattern Systems

Devising a single pattern block, I implemented a series of procedures acted upon the module — cut, fold, sew, iron, rotate 90° — that were amplified over time to express a larger pattern. 120” x 90”

a

18

b

c

a. Measured Drawing b. Project Tools c, i. Fold d, f. Sew e. Iron

g. Cut h, j. Rotate/Sew k. Rotate: Completed Pinwheel l. Completed Quilt

Functional Realities

d

e

f


l

g

h

i

j

k

Functional Realities


[11]

PADDLEBOARD Hydrodynamic Art

I designed this project with two goals in mind - stability and speed - for use in a 32 mile ocean race. Beginning with a block of foam, I shaped the 12’ paddleboard, laminated the foam with fiberglass and epoxy, and painted the exterior.

b

Expanded Polystyrene Foam (EPS), Fiberglass, Epoxy, Marine Enamel 12’ x 18.5” x 8.5” 16 lbs. c

a

a. Measured Drawing b. 12’6” x 24” x 12” EPS Foam Block c. Drawing Measurements d. Shaped Foam

19

Functional Realities

d


a

b

c

d

a. Cutting Outline Squre b, d. Completed Board c. Me Paddling in Race

Functional Realities


[12]

FOAM CONCAVITIES Function in Water

Interested in hydrodynamics, I designed the fin arrangements, bottom contours, tail shape, and rail edges before I built this surfboard by hand. Polyurethane Foam, Tempera, and Polyester Resin Over Fiberglass 6’6” x 19.25” x 2.75”

20

a

b

a. Fin Placement Drawing, 1/4”: 1” b. 6’6” Quad Fin Pin Tail Top c. Bottom, 4 Fin Set Up

Like the paddleboard, parallel stripes run perpendicular to the board’s length to deemphasize its pronounced linearity.

Functional Realities

c


d

a

e

b c f

The subtle, changing concaves that run through the board direct water between the fin cluster to increase maneuverability. Concave is depicted in blue as the negative space between the board and a wooden straight edge.

a. Single 1/2” Concave b. Slight Double 3/8” Concave c. Double 1/4” Concave d-f. Corresponding Section Cuts

Functional Realities


[13]

RECYCLED INTERIOR New Life in New Orleans

I reclaimed original Pine from the interior of this New Orleans Shotgun before panelling walls, ceilings and cabinetry with the refurbished lumber.

a

a. Kitchen Wall, Cabinets and Counter b. Finger Joint Counter Finished with Resin c. Hallway and Ceiling Paneling

21

Functional Realities

b

c


SLOT & HOLD [14]

Jewelry Box Joinery

I designed this jewelry box to explore the precision and strength of dado joinery in lieu of metal fasteners. Each panel slots into and holds its neighbor in place, establishing its own self-reinforcing matrix. 13” x 9” x 6”

a

b

a. Rhino 3D Joinery Detail b. Completed Piece

Functional Realities


“In the high country of the mind one has to become adjusted to the thinner air of uncertainty...” Robert M. Pirsig “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values”

[15]

22

Fine Art

[16]

[17]


[FOUR]

FINE ART

Writing, Drawing & Painting While the previous sections displayed methodical studies that involved an iterative design phase preceding fabrication, I allowed for relatively little spontaneity compared to the following works. Interested in using a variety of media to express emotion, impressions, movement, and scenes, the following pieces were exploratory by nature and resulted in loose works that were largely informed by hidden conditions affecting my subconscious processes. The first section comprises a piece of writing completed for a classics course that drew many disciplines into the text; the following section represents my interest in hand drawing and watercolor skills, while the final section takes these skills in a recycled and playful direction. Each of the following examples reflects my interest in yielding to the phenomenal and unseen conditions of my subjects in order to direct my creative output in a meaningful way.

Fine Art


[15]

DANTE’S LOST CANTO Original Creative Writing

Written for a classics course, I strictly emulated Dante Alighieri’s terza rima poetic form, while loosely engaging a variety of topics. Terminology of perception and vision are highlighted in blue to call out the theme of phenomena informing the perceived.

Venturing further into Cocytus’ chill, my mind too was caught by the frozen wind, cold and unable to sing rhymes that distill;

a fate where he wishes for anyth I looked into the frozen eyes of t and saw a numbed soul, an etern

the melancholy truths of the sight rescind, until, halted by fear, and in silence fled. Though the cold soon made my blood slow and thin,

Unable to blink, Jacob’s eyes co the sight of devils dishonoring hi by picking away at the flesh of his

together with Virgil our feet still did tread, until we passed into a frightening ring, where souls were frozen half way up the head.

Virgil continued, unable to extol instead speaking gently of the sha “Because of their lies, no being c

O mysterious world, now shall I sing of sights no eyes were meant to see, except those of filial Traitors consigned to this ring.

these men of dishonor and eter In their father’s and the Father’s e for their Traitorous deeds and the

Guided by Virgil, a body he chose, cracked by eternal cold, unable to speak, eyes wide open, alone from the ice arose

Tread carefully lest you trample your exhausted, wretched brother themselves, over those who bore

forever punished, unable to shriek. “For your knowledge and posterity, know this, here before you is the traitor of Isaac,”

Thus spoke my guide as we con over frozen floors encasing these beings who spent all, now bankru

Virgil intoned with gentle love, “heart amiss, and convinced by the mother, he concealed his identity, giving himself to Dis.

Over the tundra of glass, I must the sights did instill hate and fea as shade after shade was ravaged

By bearing the fur and stooping to kneel, he dishonored his brother and blind father; but his spoken lies were what helped to seal

With the help of my guide, my h yet fear of these punishments stil my mind, as souls were tortured i

Bates, Spencer. “Dante’s Forgotten Canto XXXIII1/2.” Journal of the Core Curriculum. Ed. Robyn Fialkow. Boston: Boston University, 2007. 47-50. Print

23

Fine Art


hing better.” the man, nal debtor.

Ahead in the distance, three figures I spied, facing each other in a frozen recess, the shades were gazing, a simple blink denied.

These three do appear honest and just; rather, they are models of something quite different, where each is in sin, equal to the other.

ould not ban is soul, s tan.

Their sins in view, they were forced to witness their treason to the holy Father above, their mouths in the ice, unable to confess.

Just as Jacob, interred in frozen torment, dishonored his father, these three broke the Fifth, the law that no good human can circumvent:

l, ades about, can console

“Here before you are those unfortunates of old, who gave false words to their troubled brother. Eliphaz, the Temanite, who spoke false love;

rnal bout. eyes, ill repute, eir moral drought.

he claimed that Job must have angered the Other, in order to warrant the wrath from Aloft, attempting to say that Job was a bad lover:

these shades, whose dishonor they tried not to stop, have condemned themselves to this appalling fate.” His diatribe concluded, Virgil looked up

e in salute, rs who honor their living fruit.”

‘Can mortals be righteous before God?’ he scoffed. The second is Bildad the Shuhite of old, who told poor Job to become extremely soft,

and dwelled on his father with great mental weight. I shut tight my eyes, blocking out this sad sight, and saw my own parents, trying to relate.

ntinued to saunter e hopeless upt of honor.

‘Seek God and make supplication,’ he thus told, yet sad Job ignored the repentant advice, and, as Eliphaz, Bildad’s soul is now cold.

Now my dreams will be filled with concern tonight. I will dwell on my body’s earthly makers, and pray I find providence for my contrite

t confess, ar of this fate, d in distress.

Lastly is Zophar, the friend believed precise, ‘This is the portion of the wicked from God,’ that Job was punished for evilness and vice.

hate did abate, ll occupied in this cold state.

Understand that these thoughts were each a façade, where honor and faithfulness to the Father was obscured by false words, no man could applaud.

heart, that is given to love for the Taker of souls above and my begetters below, recalling the commandments of our Maker, an honest life we all must lead, I now know.

‘Honor your father and mother,’ goes the myth, thus one’s father on earth and Father atop must be honored; as you can observe herewith,

Fine Art


[16]

LOOSE IMPRESSIONS Drawings & Watercolor

Sketching has always been an important aspect of my creative process. The following pen and watercolor works represent quick sketches to record a scene or feeling.

a

a. Gesture Sketches, Ink 8” x 11” b. La Malinche, Ink 8” x 6” c. 2 & 5 Minute Blind Contour Line Drawings d. Self Portrait Watercolor 5.5” x 8”

24

Fine Art

b


c

d

Fine Art


[17]

GROCERY BAG BOOK

Responding to Existing Conditions I made a 5� x 5� sketchbook from a paper bag in order to incorporate given graphic and material conditions of the recycled paper. Pen, Colored Pencil, Paint Pen

b

a

a. Cover with Tab Lock b-c. Incorporating Pattern d. Line Sketches e. Negative Space and Line Drawing opp. George Clinton, mixed media

25

Fine Art

d

c

e


Fine Art


“You look at where you’re going and where you are and it never makes sense, but then you look back at where you’ve been and a pattern seems to emerge.” Robert M. Pirsig


Spencer Bates Full Portfolio