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ISSUE #002

FEATURED ARTIST

GAGE FORESTER

(A MAGAZINE SHOT EXCLUSIVELY ON FILM WITH LOVE)


CONTENTS

3 4 13 15 21

NOTE TO READER

GALLERY

ARTIST FEATURE(GAGE FORESTER)

PHOTO SUBMISSIONS

FILM PHOTO HOW TO


A QUICK NOTE TO THE READER Sprockets is an online publication about photography and the interesting topics that photography provides a lens and voice for. All images are shot on film and the people featured and pictured are our friends and family. We hope you enjoy what we enjoy.


GALLERY


Photo By Mike Liu


Photo By Mike Liu


Photo By Mike Liu


Photo By Mike Liu


Photo By Charlie Cerrone


Photo By Charlie Cerrone


Photo By Charlie Cerrone


Photo By Charlie Cerrone


GAGE FORESTER


I love traveling. I hate when people say “travel when you’re young” because it implies that travel can only be done in early life. My passion is to capture people doing what they’re passionate about. Photography is me being able to share a moment with people through my perspective. I love shooting film because there’s something really special about an image starting and ending with the click of a shutter.


SUBMISSIONS


Photo By Meghan Marin


Photo By Dana Scheffler


Photo By William Pippin


Photo By Abbie Foley


Photo By Jack Warren


FILM HOW-TO

getting into street photography (hardest part is starting)

Street photography can be intimidating for anyone starting out. It naturally feels wrong to take a photo of a stranger. The main way to become better at street photography is just to practice and do it a bunch. Start bringing a camera everywhere and when something catches your eye try to get close and capture it. With time you’ll become comfortable doing it. When most people start taking “street” photos they keep at a distance to maintain a comfortable feeling. Becoming accustomed to taking photos close takes time, practice, and courage. There’s two ways of getting close to a subject, one being a zoom lens and two is physically getting closer. I would recommend physically getting closer in most cases. Getting physically closer will make the photo have depth, you will also be able to make quick adjustments to the angle and framing of the photo.

TECHNIQUES TO TRY The Setup

Find a nice patch of light or a corner to stand behind. Then just take photos of people as they pass by. This technique is nice becuase it’s not very confrontational.

The Pretend Photo

Bring your camera up to your eye and aim at the subject and take the photo then after you’ve taken the photo continue to look through the camera and pretend like you’re trying to take a photo of something behind them.

The Don’t Smile

There’s nothing wrong with walking up to someone and asking if you can take their portrait. Some might say no but some will say yes. when you ask to take their photo try asking them to not smile. Smiling looks cheesy a lot of the time. A blank face or stare into the lens can be very emotional and interesting.

A WARNING Street photography is one hundred percent legal in the United States... with that being said it’s not worth a black eye over a photo. Just becuase it’s legal doesnt mean people will respond positivly. I recommend if you’re ever threatened to delete a photo you either be a fast runner, a good liar, or be willing to sacrifice your roll. Asking the subject to take their photo is a good way to get around any arguments or confrontation and is also more ethical.


SUBMIT YOUR FILM PHOTOS TO SPROCKETSMAG@GMAIL.COM

FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM SPROCKETS.MAG

CHECK OUT THE ARTISTS ON INSTAGRAM

gage_forester meghanmarin will_pippin guccigails jack_warren27


THAT’S ALL FOR THIS ISSUE SEE YOU NEXT TIME :)

Profile for Sprockets Magazine

Sprockets Issue #002  

Gage Forester, The Elderly, Submissions from Meghan Marin, Dana Scheffler, William Pippin, Abbie Foley, and Jack Warren

Sprockets Issue #002  

Gage Forester, The Elderly, Submissions from Meghan Marin, Dana Scheffler, William Pippin, Abbie Foley, and Jack Warren

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