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Hueco Tanks

Waco Mammoth Site

The Devil’s Sinkhole

Devil’s Sinkhole State Natural Area Rocksprings, Texas, 78880 A registered National Natural Landmark since 1985, the Sinkhole plunges a remarkable 400 feet and has a 40x60 opening. It is the largest single-chambered cavern and third deepest in the state. This is archeological evidence that the sinkhole was once considered sacred by Native Americans, as locals have found stalactites, arrowheads and other treasures from the area. Today the Sinkhole is a summer home to one to four million Mexican Free-Tailed Bats. At sundown visitors can begin to see a few bats emerge from the sinkhole, until they become a black swirling mass of millions of bats flying into the evening sky.

ing to as early as 6000-3000 BCE. These particular pictographs are in the Early Archaic Style, and are the oldest of the many different styles present on the tanks. There are over 3000 rock drawings on these natural catch-basins, hundreds of which are mask designs reminiscent of the still active Pueblan Katchina Cult, a religious belief in a group of powerful beings often represented by elaborate masks or in doll form. The Hueco Tanks are the only place in North America with such a large concentration of painted-mask designs. Some drawings were made by early agriculturalists known as the Jornada Mogollon, others from Mescalero Apache Plains warriors. There are countless images of hunts and adventures had near the tanks, from up to 8000 years of various Native American cultures.

Stonehenge II

McKittrick Canyon

FM 1340 Ingram, Texas, 78025 This 60% scale replica is built by, and on the farmland of, the late Alfred Shepperd along with the help of his friend and neighbor Doug Hill, and represents what Stonehenge would look like before weather and erosion toppled some of the original. Two years after Stonehenge II was built, a pair of Easter Island moai figures were added to the site.

Waco Mammoth Site

6220 Steinbeck Bend Waco, Texas, 76708 The site is the largest known concentration of Columbian mammoths to have died from one catastrophic event. 16 of the mammoths were removed and are held in storage at Baylor to protect them from deterioration, but a crowd of fossils is still at the site. In a climate-controlled pavilion opened in 2009, visitors can walk above the fossils of the giant-tusked creatures, which are still embedded in the dirt.

Hueco Tanks

Culberson County, Texas, 79847 Nestled in the Guadalupe Mountains and described as the “prettiest spot in Texas,” autumn comes to McKittrick Canyon in late October and early November. A trail leads from the McKittrick Canyon Visitors Center to the Pratt Cabin, and from there to the Grotto, a small cave with some stalagtites and stalagmites. Along the trail, the plants transition from the normal Chihuahuan Desert flora of yucca and prickly pears, to a wide variety of trees, including ponderosa pine, velvet ash, big tooth maple, and the Texas mandrone, along with a wide variety of wildflowers. There is even a small stream in the heart of the canyon, truly making this an oasis. Hikers may also want to keep on the steepening trail past Hunter Cabin to The Notch on McKittrick Ridge.

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Article provided by: www.atlasobscura.com Photos:

6900 Hueco Tanks Road No 1 El Paso, Texas, 79938 Pictographs from several distinct tribes and peoples can be found all over the Hueco Tanks, some dat-

Hamilton Pool: Trey Perry Cadillac Ranch: Ralf Kiepert Hueco Tanks: Rafael Sustersick Waco Mammoth Site: Larry D. Moore

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Summer 2016

SPRING•KLEIN Magazine 29

Profile for Spring Klein Magazine (Neighborhood Publications)

Spring Klein Magazine: Summer 2016 Vol.5 No.3  

Easy Living (May/ June 2016)

Spring Klein Magazine: Summer 2016 Vol.5 No.3  

Easy Living (May/ June 2016)

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