Page 1

3 CALENDAR 4 OPINION

Volume 9, Number 7

6 PUZZLES

8 SPORTS

11 TV GUIDE

13 LEGALS

Thursday, January 5, 2017

16 pages/75 cents

Colby Covington, Springfield’s hometown hero a unique stance in the division, which is otherwise populated with other fighting styles. He said he picked up wrestling when he was 7 Colby Covington hobbles up the stairs in the years old. He started wrestling at the McKenzie River Mat Club and then with Thurston High Thurston High School gym. “No pain, no gain,” he said after climbing the School. His name can be found on the walls of the final stairs. Thurston High School wrestling room for each He said he tore his medial collateral ligament during training for his fight against Bryan Bar- of his high school years—except his freshman year. At Thurston, he lettered berena at his Ultimate Fighting four years and set the school Championship bout in SacraWhen I’m tired and record for most takedowns mento, California. He still won despite the innot wanting to do one in a season—with 228 takedowns. jury. The unanimous decision more round, I think about He finished his collegiate gave him an 11-1 record within the Ultimate Fighting Champithe 541 and the people wrestling with Oregon State, he was a Pac-10 wresonship. here who genuinely want where tling champion and a twoCovington is on his way to me to succeed. time NCAA All-American. moving up the ranks within the Covington is a bit of a ceWelterweight Division. He’s -Colby Covington lebrity to the Thurston wressuffered only one loss so far. tlers. As they wrestle in their While suffering from a fractured rib, he lost to Warlley Alves in submis- scrimmages during practice before heading off to Albany for a dual meet, they take their eyes sion. “He comes out and throws a kick right at my off their opponent and look up to Covington for rib,” he said. “My body was in shock. I just approval. He gives it occasionally, telling one, “See put my head down and he got the choke real what happens when you listen?” quick.” He still gives back to the community where That loss was a gift for Covington, however. “Honestly, it’s the best thing that’s happened he learned began his passion of wrestling. “Growing up, that was the biggest thing my to me,” he said. “Get it out of the way. No one’s mom instilled into me,” he said. “I want to give perfect, and I’ve learned from my mistake.” Covington said he learned about not going back to the community because I wouldn’t be into a fight unless you’re at 100 percent. It there without their help. It’s my responsibility was a rule he ended up breaking when he paid to be a good person and give back. I not only $1,200 in injection treatments for his knee be- share my journey with them and tell them, ‘you fore his most recent fight. Colby: Continued on page 2 Covington’s reliance on wrestling gives him By Henry Houston Editor

Photo courtesy of MMA by Buda Mendes/Zuffa LLC/Zuffa LLC via Getty Images Colby Covington of Springfield raises his hand in victory after a bout in Brazil.

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Thursday, January 5, 2017

Torch Lighting Ceremony 225 Fifth Street • 541-726-3766

Upcoming events Thursday, Jan. 5

• Sensory story time is 10:30 to 11 a.m. Intended for children on the autism spectrum or sensory overload, this story time will provide a structured, fun environment for children up to 6 years old. • Springfield presents “The General,” a film made in Oregon. Starring Buster Keaton, the silent film is considered by critics to be one of the greatest films ever made.

Friday, Jan. 6 • Make and Take Art meets at 1 until 3 p.m. It’s an opportunity to make your own buttons with the materials provided.

Tuesday, Jan. 10 • Baby and Me Story Time is 10 to 10:20 a.m. • Teens can meet at 4:30 until 5:30 p.m. make something with 3-D pens, button makers, and a sticker maker. The program is intended for teenagers.

Wednesday, Jan. 11 • Lapsit Story time is 10 to 10:25 a.m. • Preschool Story time is 10 to 10:30 a.m.

Thursday, Jan. 12 • Preschool Art and Science Story Time meets from 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. Preschoolers learn about science and art’s harmonious relationship. The program is intended for children up to 6 years old. • Teen Book Club meets from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. to discuss “One Realm Beyond” by Donita Paul. Those who attend can ask for a free copy of the book while they last.

Big Mystery Book Sale! January 3 to January 26. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sale of donated nearly-new hardcover and trade paperback mystery books - only $2 each. Beat the winter blues and help the Springfield Library, too! Sale is inside the Library at 225 Fifth Street, Springfield. Cash only, please, no cards or checks.

Photo by Henry Houston The official Springfield Torch Lighting Ceremony was held on Dec 28.

Colby: Continued from front can do it too if you don’t give up on your dreams and work hard,’ but any way I can help like donate so they can get gear or go to camp.” He shows off the 541 area code every time before a fight. His mouth guard also shows off the area code. “Every fight I let them know,” he said. “This city, this area code, they drive me. When I’m tired and not wanting to do one more round, I think about the 541 and the people here who genuinely want me to succeed.” Springfield maintains a possible location for Covington when he finishes with Ultimate Fighting Championship. He hopes to maybe create a wrestling club in the area or maybe work as a

coach. “I want to give back,” he said. “Best way to give back is to give back the skills and knowledge I’ve gained throughout the years through martial arts and wrestling.” The near future, on the other hand is clear for Covington. As Thurston High School finished up their wrestling

practice, Thurston High School wrestling coach Mike Simons told his team about Covington. “Hopefully in a year or two he’ll get to bring the belt and show you guys,” Simons said. Covington stopped him. “Not hopefully,” he said. “I’m bringing that belt back to this club.”


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Thursday, January 5, 2017

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Community Calendar Thursday, Jan. 5 • Springfiilm presents “The General” at 6:30 until 9 p.m. at Wildish Theater. Free admission.

Friday, Jan. 6 • Sprout! Marketplace, located at 418 A St., has their weekly farmer’s market from 3 to 7 p.m. • Women on the Wall is a women’s only clinic about basic climbing from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Adult Activity Center. Cost to attend is $8. • Learn how hypnotherapy can make you become a nonsmoker form 1:30 to 3 p.m. at the Adult Activity Center.

Saturday, Jan. 7 • Teach your children how to climb at the Bob Keefer Center. For $35, you’ll have access to kidfriendly instructors. The program is intended for ages 3 to 5. 10 to 11 a.m. until Jan. 28 and parent participation is required.

Sunday, Jan. 8 • Celebrate the New Year with free recreational crabbing along the Oregon Coast. That means no license or tags.

Monday, Jan. 9 • Springfield Forum, former titled Senior Forum, presents Matt Reu-

ker of the City of Springfield to talk about Springfield building codes. The forum has no admission costs and runs from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. • Free introductory class to Filipino Martial Arts for Fitness for ages 14 and up. Turn self-defense into a workout. Class begins at 5 p.m. at the Bob Keefer Center.

Tuesday, Jan. 10 • Join the Mossback Volkssport Club of Eugene Springfield for a fitness walk in Eugene. Meet at 9 a.m. at the Valley River Inn, 1000 Valley River Way, in Eugene. Walk an easy 5-kilometer (3.1 mile) or moderate 10-kilometer (6.2 mile) route in Eugene along and over the Willamette River to Owen Rose Garden then to the Shelton-McMurphy House then go up the steps to the summit of Skinner’s Butte before walking to the Campbell Senior Center then return through River Play and by Eugene Skinner’ cabin. For details visit www.mossbacks.org, email mossbacksclub@comcast.net or call 541-726-7169. • Take ODTI Driver’s Education classes at Bob Keefer Center Tuesdays until March 21 from 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Cost is $325.

Wednesday, Jan. 11

• Willamalane Adult Activity Center will present “Once Upon a Time in the West” at 1 p.m. The month of January is focused on the composer Ennio Morricone. • Learn about using the Hero’s Journey in marketing writing. Mary-Kate Mackey presents the 10-step progression for marketers from 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Valley River Inn in Eugene. Student and Springfield Area Chamber of Commerce admission is $20. Nonmember admission is $40. • Bingo and Wacky Wednesday is at the River Stop Restaurant and Sports Bar, located at 88226 Chita Lp. from 6 to 8 p.m.

Upcoming • If you would like to find out more about what will be happening at the former site of Civic Stadium, come to the American Association of University Women meeting on Jan. 14, 2017. Bev Smith, who is the executive director of KIDSPORTS will be speaking about what we can expect to see there. Her talk will be at 10:30 a.m. after the 10 a.m. business meeting. A social hour begins at 9:30 a.m. at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 777 Coburg Rd. in Eugene. Please enter the parking area off of Harlow Rd. This event is free and

open to the public. For more information, please contact Carol at 541-344-4267. • The Mill Race Path will have its grand opening on Jan. 19. Willamalane Park and Recreation will introduce its three-mile walking and bike path along the historic millrace. • Darren Morgan from Shonnard’s Nursery, Corvallis will demonstrate various techniques for extending the gardening season on Jan. 17 from 7 to 8:30 p.m. OSU Extension Office 996 Jefferson Street, Eugene (Enter on West 10th Avenue at the ramp). Darren is a lifelong resident of the Willamette Valley and has worked in the nursery industry for more than 25 years. This event is part of their monthly Lane County Master Gardener seminars at the Lane County OSU Extension Service, which are free and open to the public. • Join The Book Nest for Author Lunch on Jan. 19 at noon. Cidney Swanson, author of the “Saving Mars” series, will present her newest young adult book. Annette Cone, author of “With God…”, will present her book. N.J. Mahayni, author of “Ask the Cat,” will talk about the middle grade novel set in the old town of Damascus, Syria.

Ongoing • Inspiration Sounds, a non-profit community based choir that sings African-American Gospel, rehearses Mondays from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Northwood Christian Church, located at 2425 Harvest Lane. The

choir begins its 2016-2017 season and has openings for new members. • Springfield Forum – a discussion group with featured guest speakers rotating each week, meets 9:30 a.m. Mondays at the Deport building on 2nd and South A. • CAHOOTS (Crisis Assistance Helping Out On The Streets) has an expansion service in the Springfield metro area. They can be dispatched through the Springfield non-emergency number, 541726-3714. • Take Off Pounds Sensibly (TOPS) invites people to join the group meeting every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. at First Baptist Church 1175 G St. Weigh-ins at 8:45 a.m., meeting starts at 10 a.m. Call Vickie Hale at 541-746-3757 or drop by a meeting. • Springfield Discussion, Al-Anon Family Group meets at Hope Lutheran Church, 1369 B St. from 12:30 p.m. every Tuesday. Springfield Discussion is a free support meeting for family or friends who are concerned about or have been affected by someone else’s drinking. • Open Studio at Emerald Art Center, 500 Main St., is 11 a.m. until 4 p.m. • Would you like to submit an event for our calendar? Email the date, name, and information of the event you’d like to publicize to editor@springfieldtimes.net.

Would you like to submit an event for our calendar? Email info to editor@springfieldtimes.net.


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LetterS to the editor Cell Towers Dear Editor: I came to Springfield in 1953 to teach 4th grade at Brattain Elementary School. Four children, two husbands, and 60 years later, I’m living in a sweet manufactured home that came with all the bells and whistles needed for an ailing husband. Now, the city announced a hearing concerning the erection of a cell tower less than two blocks from my home. I became involved and found the hearing to be quite worthless as the planning commission must use the “criteria” provided by our own U.S. government. Criteria in this case talks about height, how it must not fall on things, and zone. This is a mixed-use zone. The important point, however, is that nowhere is the health of people or animals mentioned. Cell phone towers emit strong radiation that harms humans and their pets. Checking Google, you can find research from other countries telling of the effects. It’s hard to find anything about our country because it is all negated by the FCC. We are so kept in the dark in this country. Within 300 meters of a cell tower, babies are born with defects, normal working people get new health problems involv-

Thursday, January 5, 2017

Opinion ing mood, sleep, and immune system function plus hormone problems. The rate of cancer goes up for all. The elderly become more ill than usual, with more cancer. I am so sad there is nothing I can do. I thought the city would have our welfare at heart. No it doesn’t. Someone will be getting a nice monthly stipend for allowing that tower to be on their land, though. Wouldn’t you know it? Money again. Suzanne Fenner Springfield

American History Curriculum Dear Editor: When today’s generation sees older Americans get a tear in their eye when they hear a patriotic song, or place their hand over their heart as the National Anthem is played, or when they see them salute the flag when it passes by in a parade. When the younger generation witnesses older Americans expressing these acts of love, respect, and reverence for our country, they wonder why older folks would do that. But what frame of reference do younger Americans possibly have? The miracle of America’s founding has been stripped from public education, civic courses are no longer offered. Patriotism, nationalism—even American citizenship is no longer taught in the home and has

become taboo in public education and in today’s culture. Globalism, diversity, and political correctness trump America’s Judeo-Christian heritage. It’s no wonder the genius of the Founders in crafting the Electoral College is being questioned and suggested by the uninformed populous to replace by Popular Vote. It’s the Electoral College that allows all Americans to have a voice in the election of our president instead of just high-populated areas of the country leaving rural areas and smaller states left out of the process. The omission of teaching America’s birthright and the consistent reference that America is a democracy by the media, political leaders, and others, has resulted in a majority of Americans not knowing the difference between a republic form of government and a democracy. Most Americans have been persuaded that our nation’s governmental system is a democracy not a republic. The Founders did everything they could to keep us from becoming a democracy. James Madison, the father of the Constitution, wrote in the 10th essay of the Federalist Papers, “… democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security and the rights of property and having in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths.” Samuel

Adams, signer of the Declaration of Independence, said “Democracy never last long, it will soon waste, exhaust and murder itself.” Betsy DeVos, who has been appointed Secretary of Education by President-elect Donald J. Trump, will serve in the new administration. Let’s hope she will be able to restore truth in the American History curriculum that is taught to this and future generations. Robert Barber Springfield

Pesticides Dear Editor: There have been a number of op-eds lately about how safe and well regulated the spraying of Pesticides and Herbicides is in Oregon. I see industry flacks using both Pesticide and Herbicide interchangeably, which continues to confuse the public about what is really going on in our forests. I believe that is deliberate. The real issue that should be debated is how “safe and well-regulated” these poisons are. Whatever you call them, they are designed to kill. Both federal and state forests here have not used aerial spray for years. All work is done by hand directly where it’s needed, providing forest jobs. How can they grow trees this way, but not private companies? And, if it’s all so well regu-

Letters to the Editor Policy

• Letters to the Editor from all points of view are welcomed by the Springfield Times. Please limit letters to 300 words or less, sign it and include contact information. Letters will not be printed unless the author can be verified. Letters run as space permits. Letters become property of the Springfield Times and maybe edited and republished in any format. Letters are printed at the discretion of the Springfield Times. Letters can be submitted via e-mail to editor@springfieldtimes.net.

lated and safe, then why can’t we find out what exactly was in that “proprietary” spray? People and animals are sickened by drift, but without knowing the chemicals involved, doctors are helpless. Some people say, leave the area when you know there will be spraying. There is no advance notification except vague notices that there might be a spray event in future… maybe! More corporate harm inflicted on citizens, with absolutely no redress. State regulators do nothing, and state legislators do even less, because most of them receive campaign money from timber interests. It’s hard to buck the system when your livelihood depends on it! Demand changes in Salem about how these poisons are regulated! Also, sign the Charter Amendment to Ban Aerial Spraying of Herbicides in Lane County at http://communityrightslanecounty.org/campaigns/ Robin Bloomgarden Eugene

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Thursday, January 5, 2017

Coffee anyone?

There are so many great organizations in Springfield that provide opportunities to serve others and to learn. A few months ago, I learned about the Springfield Forum. They meet at 9:30 a.m. on Mondays at the Chamber of Commerce. The group isn’t technically an “organization” as there’s no official membership, no elected positions, just a great group of people who informally discuss Springfield. There’s no membership dues. I wasn’t required to go through any strange initiation rituals, nor swear allegiance. And they have coffee. They often have speakers.

The topics are just based on things we’re curious about and we find someone to speak. On January 9, Matt Reuker from the city’s building department will come talk about building codes, and on January 23, we’ll be learning about levels of crime and how the court and judges apply judgements. For me, being new to the area, getting to spend time with this group has been so valuable. I consider it time well spent and the only thing that could make it better is if there were more people. Moving forward, the Springfield Times will have the scheduled speaker listed

Springfield Times

Comments

Amber Deyo Publisher in the community calendar, so if you see a speaker that interests you, you can show up. No commitment. I’m willing to bet if you show up once, you’re probably going to want to come back. This is a truly welcoming group. And they have coffee. Free.

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Puzzles

Solutions on page 13


Thursday, January 5, 2017

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Business

Business Spotlight: Sweetbriar Villa Photo by Henry Houston Jill Maher, executive director at Sweetbriar Villa, takes pride in being close with her staff and residents. Left to right: Art Nichols, Lyndsi Bobst, Rose Smith, Jill Maher, Warren Bussell, Joann Benway, and Etta Martin.

By Henry Houston Editor Jill Maher takes a hands-on approach to geriatric care. She wipes up coffee spills, sings with residents, and has coffee time with residents. “I lead by example. I’m not an executive director who sits behind a desk and dictates the tasks that need to be done,” she said. “It’s not uncommon to find me working the floor. I do like to work the floor.” Maher is the executive director at Sweetbriar Villa, which is a part of the Radiant Senior Living community. She said she’s been working with Radiance for nearly 11 years. She was originally working at Farmington Square in Eugene for 10 years. She joined Sweetbriar Villa in 2015 when Radiance acquired it. “We’re home. We have a really home feel. I can teach anyone the

tasks but what you can’t teach is heart and compassion,” she said. “I exude that love and joy and I try to bring that into my management style.” Sweetbriar Villa is an assisted and memory care community that dedicates itself to creating and sustaining comfortable homes for its residents. The retirement center, which has room for 39, is at 100 percent capacity. Maher said the intention of the center is to provide as much—or as little—assistance with daily activities for its residents. SeniorAdvisor.com recognized Sweetbriar Villa as “One of the Best of Senior Living for 2017.” Being on the list is awarded to less than one percent of providers nationwide. SeniorAdvisor.com awards are awarded after going through more than 130,000 family-created reviews. Sweetbriar Villa had received

consistent high ratings and positive ratings. “In order to have a positive reputation in the community you need to be providing quality care,” Maher said. “I believe the way to provide quality care is to have that heart and soul and do the right things.” To prove that she’s dedicated to quality care, Maher said she makes sure to be accessible to staff, residents, and the families of the residents. “The approachableness and the availability that one has makes those families feel like their loved one really means something,” she said. “They’re not a number, a census, it’s not tallying. They’re an individual who’s part of our family.” The Springfield community is also active with making the residents at Sweetbriar Villa feel comfortable. Maher said Springfield High

School choir students sang carols during the holiday season, “I thought Eugene was a small-knit community, Springfield is as well,” she said. Students from Thurston High School, which is near the retirement community, has conducted demonstrations for Veteran’s Day and attended the Senior Prom at the center. The center offers various activities for its residents, which includes a hairdresser every Tuesday to twicemonthly manicures and pedicures. A resident, who plays piano and leads a group of residents into song, leads one of the activities at the center. Rose Smith, who worked as a teacher’s assistant at Pleasant Hill High School, leads a group of residents into song with her piano in the living room space at the community. “You can sing badly, but just sing. That’s the rule,” Maher said.


Sports Thursday, January 5, 2017

Scenes from the sidelines

Photo by Rick Morgan Thurston forward Brooklyn Gilbert leads the Colts’ fast break against Willamette.

Thurston Girls Take Steps In Right Direction by Don Smalley Reporter It was just a matter of time and if Thurston girls basketball stays patient enough, things should eventually work for them. That’s coach Tammi Brown’s philosophy for individuals games and for the season on the whole and that was very apparent last weekend in the Summit tournament over in Bend. The Colts went 1-2, but that first game, a 52-47 win over Ridgeview, was a prime example of how patience can pay off. “For a while, it seemed like Ridgeview didn’t miss a shot, which made me a bit nervous,” Brown said. “It was just a matter of time before those shots started to

not to fall. Defensively, we played a really good game. The help-side defense was beautiful and we had our rotation down. Brown was correct in assuming the Ravens wouldn’t continue to make nearly every shot they put up. Ridgeview turned as cold in the second half as they were hot in the first half. Thurston outscored the Ravens 16-2 in the third quarter. Ridgeview missed 10 of their 11 field goal attempts coming out of the halftime break and they turned the ball over six times in the third quarter. The Colts built a 45-32 lead and had to hold off a furious rally in the fourth quarter to hold on to the victory. Nancy Regas hit two free throws with just three second left to seal the win. She

led the team with 10 points, six rebounds and four assists. Unfortunately for Thurston, that would be the only victory in the three-day tournament. The Colts just missed the championship game, but North Eugene edged them out 36-35. Thurston was up four with just over a minute left until the Highlanders managed a three-pointer, a defensive stop and then two free throws to win the game. The Summit Tournament ended for the Colts with a 46-23 loss to Bend. The rigors of the tournament and being away from home got to the team, according to Brown. Thurston Girls: Continued on page 16

Now that the holiday break is in the rear view mirror both the Millers and the Colts are set begin Midwestern League play in hoops. With the non-conference schedule offering a mix of 5A and 6A competition it is perilous to draw any meanRick Morgan ingful conclusions quite yet, Managing Editor but if the early going is any indication it should be an entertaining year of basketball for both schools. Springfield’s boys deserve first mention. The Millers have jumped out to a 7-2 non-conference mark are a clear contender in the Midwestern League race. Dropping from the 6A classification has been of benefit to the Colts boys who finish the non-conference slate within striking distance of the Millers, Eagle Point and Churchill – the leagues’ top three teams. For the ladies, at the end of non-conference play, the Miller are at the .500 mark at 4-4 with the Lady Colts just one notch behind at 3-5 in a league with six of the eight team bunched between Crater (10-0) and Eagle Point (0-9) in what appears will be a wide open conference race. After a number of cancelations thanks to the weather, each of the four teams used the break to prepare for the upcoming race to the playoffs.


Thursday, January 5, 2017

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Sports

Miller Girls’ Win Two, Lose Two at Nike Interstate Shootout by Don Smalley Reporter

Photo by Rick Morgan Springfield defenders Aliyah Dade (#22) and Stacy Carlos (#24) combine for the back-court trap against North Medford

The Millers girls’ basketball team went up to Portland over the holiday break and competed in one of the toughest high school tournaments in the country. The Nike Interstate Shootout featured some of the top teams in the Northwest and the Millers made it out with a very respectable 2-2 record. After a narrow loss to Glencoe in the opening round of the “Game Day” bracket 44-42, Springfield rebounded nicely with a 54-50 win over Tualatin in Day 2 of the Shootout. The Millers found themselves down by 11 at halftime and in danger of suffering their second straight defeat when Cielo Gonzalez found the range from the floor. She scored 20 second half

points on her way to 30 for the game to lead the Millers in a big comeback win. But Springfield followed up with a defensive game where Dallas came away with a 3524 win. Although a four-day tournament can be tough mentally and physically for any team, the Millers managed to come home on a high note. They’ll enter Midwestern League action with a 42-31 victory over Barlow as their final memory from the Shootout. La Salle Prep defeated South Salem to win the Swoosh bracket and Sherwood beat West Salem 50-24 to take the Game Day bracket. The Millers opening act in league play will be a difficult one as they will go to No. 2 Crater Jan. 6. They then come home to take on Marist Jan. 10.

Miller Boys Ready for Start of Midwestern League Play by Don Smalley Reporter The Springfield boys’ basketball team had one non-league game over the break and if this was any indication of how 2017 is going to go, the Millers have a lot to look forward to. The team managed a huge third quarter on its way to a 5436 win over Willamette Dec. 27. Springfield held a slim 21-17 lead after two quarters of action, but once the fourth quarter hit, the game was handily in the Millers’ favor. They outscored the Wolverines 18-4 in that important third quarter and it proved to be way too much for the visiting team to overcome. “We played solid in the first half, but we play a lot better in that third quarter,” Springfield coach Eric Orton said. “We play well both offensively and defensively there.” But like all coaches do, Orton saw some things his team can improve on as the rest of the season comes upon them. Miller Boys BB: Continued on page 16

Photo by Rick Morgan Villegas (#0) splits the Willamette defense for a basket.


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Thursday, January 5, 2017

Sports

Millers Finish Northwest Duals On High Note

by Don Smalley Reporter

Springfield found it tough sledding in the Northwest Duals in Salem over the holiday break, but the Millers ended on a high note by defeating Snohomish (Wash.) 42-36. The Millers were on the verge of one more defeat, but they managed to win the final three matches to take the team victory and 13th place. The three-match win streak began when Brayden Rogers (195 lbs) defeated Justin Betz of Snohomish in a minute, 12 seconds. Then at 220 pounds, Springfield’s Cade Wolford beat Matt Currier in 2:50. The match ended when Miller heavyweight Joshua Spaulding defeated Duncan King in a 4-2 decision. Match #1 Round 1: St. Helens defeated Sprngfld 47-36 106 - Juan Ramirez (Sprngfld) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 113 - Joseph Austin (St. Helens) over Dominic Holloway (Sprngfld) Fall 0:42 120 - Jeremy Smith (Sprngfld) over Tyler Neubaum (St. Helens) Fall 1:08 126 - James DiFranco (Sprngfld) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 132 - Haidon Allen (St. Helens) over Isaac McCallister (Sprngfld) Fall 0:52 138 - Ethan Hubbs (St. Helens) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 145 - Dylan Lane (St. Helens) over James Hebert (Sprngfld) Fall 0:46 152 – Chase Nelson (St. Helens) over Ben King (Sprngfld) TF 20-3 160 - Joseph Michelson (Sprngfld) over Nicholas Richardson (St. Helens) Fall 4:32 170 - Zachary Gadbois (St. Helens) over Akaynen Dalton (Sprngfld) Fall 0:44 182 - Alexander Birkby (Sprngfld) over Cody Leanna (St. Helens) Fall 5:31 195 - Colton Beisley (St. Helens) over Brayden Rogers (Sprngfld) Fall 4:42 220 - Cade Wolford (Sprngfld) over Jayden Smith (St. Helens) Fall 0:53 285 - Miguel Olmedo (St. Helens) over Joshua Spaulding (Sprngfld) Fall 0:50 Match #2 Round 2: Newberg defeated Sprngfld 78-6 106 - Max Irving (Newberg) over Juan Ramirez (Sprngfld) Fall 4:00 113 - Max Testa (Newberg) over Dominic Holloway (Sprngfld) Fall 1:04 120 - Christopher Strange (Newberg) over Jeremy Smith (Sprngfld) Fall 1:22 126 - Jonah Worthington (Newberg) over James DiFranco (Sprngfld) Fall 1:59 132 - Joey Moody (Newberg) over Isaac McCallister (Sprngfld) Fall 2:25 138 - Jack Evans (Newberg) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 145 - Quinton Read (Newberg) over James Hebert (Sprngfld) Fall 1:19 152 - Patrick Boulanger (Newberg) over Ben King (Sprngfld) Fall 0:44 160 - Thomas Myers (Newberg) over Joseph Michelson (Sprngfld) Fall 2:34 170 - Wayne Barnett (Newberg) over Akaynen Dalton (Sprngfld) Fall 1:45 182 - Hunter James (Newberg) over Alexander Birkby (Sprngfld) Fall 1:35 195 - Brayden Rogers (Sprngfld) over Branko Frketich (Newberg) Fall 5:38 220 - Tristan Osborn (Newberg) over Cade Wolford (Sprngfld) Fall 3:58 285 - Dallas O`Bryan (Newberg) over Joshua Spaulding (Sprngfld) Fall 0:12 Match #3 Round 3: South Albany defeated Sprngfld 57-22 106 - Logan Bond (South Albany) over Juan Ramirez (Sprngfld) Fall 0:52 113 - Victor Maxfield (South Albany) over Dominic Holloway (Sprngfld) Fall 4:21 120 - Jeremy Smith (Sprngfld) over Anthony Pulido (South Albany) Fall 4:54 126 - James DiFranco (Sprngfld) over Gage Jones (South Albany) Fall 1:45 132 - Mikey Medina (South Albany) over Isaac McCallister (Sprngfld) Fall 0:38 138 - Isacc Ogden (South Albany) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 145 - Matt Roeser (South Albany) over James Hebert (Sprngfld) Fall 1:10 152 - Aaron Reineccius (South Albany) over Ben King (Sprngfld) Fall 1:23 160 - Joseph Michelson (Sprngfld) over Cael Matta (South Albany) Maj 18-6 170 - Akaynen Dalton (Sprngfld) over Jovany Garibay-Perez (South Albany) Fall 2:36 182 - Austin Wimer (South Albany) over Alexander Birkby (Sprngfld) Fall 3:32 195 - James Logan (South Albany) over Brayden Rogers (Sprngfld) Dec 7-1 220 - Angel Huerta-Carrera (South Albany) over Cade Wolford (Sprngfld) Fall 5:14 285 - Lane Hersha (South Albany) over Joshua Spaulding (Sprngfld) Fall 1:16 Match #4 Round 4: North Marion defeated Sprngfld 51-30 106 - Cristian Ramirez (North Marion) over Juan Ramirez (Sprngfld) Fall 0:58 113 - Dominic Holloway (Sprngfld) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 120 - Jeremy Smith (Sprngfld) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit

Photo by Rick Morgan Springfield’s Wrestling Team Competed in the Northwest Dual meet at Salem over the holiday break.

126 - Russel Stigall (North Marion) over James DiFranco (Sprngfld) Fall 1:53 132 - Kyle McConkey (North Marion) over Isaac McCallister (Sprngfld) Fall 0:24 138 - Derek Estrada (North Marion) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 145 - Travis Randall (North Marion) over James Hebert (Sprngfld) Fall 1:10 152 - Lane Stigall (North Marion) over Ben King (Sprngfld) Fall 0:14 160 - Joseph Michelson (Sprngfld) over Ulises Maldonado (North Marion) Fall 4:00 170 - Alec Roberts (North Marion) over Akaynen Dalton (Sprngfld) Fall 1:35 182 - Alexander Birkby (Sprngfld) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 195 - Ramon Organiz (North Marion) over Brayden Rogers (Sprngfld) Dec 11-5 220 - Cade Wolford (Sprngfld) over Kemal Sercan (North Marion) Fall 3:14 285 - Rogelio Meja Ramirez (North Marion) over Joshua Spaulding (Sprngfld) Fall 0:23 Match #5 Round 5: Harrisburg defeated Sprngfld 47-36 106 - Juan Ramirez (Sprngfld) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 113 - Jimmy Holland (Harrisburg) over Dominic Holloway (Sprngfld) Fall 0:51 120 - Chance Hendrickson (Harrisburg) over Jeremy Smith (Sprngfld) Fall 5:43 126 - Riley Suttles (Harrisburg) over James DiFranco (Sprngfld) Fall 1:56 132 - Isaac McCallister (Sprngfld) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 138 - Damion Martin (Harrisburg) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 145 - Brynden Bevins (Harrisburg) over James Hebert (Sprngfld) Fall 1:42 152 - Deven Contreras (Harrisburg) over Ben King (Sprngfld) Fall 4:19 160 - Dax Bennett (Harrisburg) over Joseph Michelson (Sprngfld) TF 20-5 170 - Akaynen Dalton (Sprngfld) over Leithan Briggs (Harrisburg) Fall 2:23 182 - Layton Briggs (Harrisburg) over Alexander Birkby (Sprngfld) Fall 0:40 195 - Brayden Rogers (Sprngfld) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 220 - Cade Wolford (Sprngfld) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 285 - Joshua Spaulding (Sprngfld) over Bryden Biggerstaff (Harrisburg) Fall 0:32 Middle Bracket Match #1 Champ. Round 1: Sunset defeated Sprngfld 42-33 113 - Cameron Folksestad (Sunset) over Dominic Holloway (Sprngfld) Fall 0:33 120 - Jeremy Smith (Sprngfld) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 126 - Gavin Stockwell (Sunset) over James DiFranco (Sprngfld) Fall 0:54 132 - Zachary Morello (Sunset) over Isaac McCallister (Sprngfld) Fall 2:54 138 - Uehara Kaison (Sunset) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 145 - James Hebert (Sprngfld) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 152 - Everett Price (Sunset) over Ben King (Sprngfld) Dec 13-6 160 - Joseph Michelson (Sprngfld) over James Morsberger (Sunset) Dec 16-9 170 - Garrett Lewis (Sunset) over Akaynen Dalton (Sprngfld) Fall 0:56 182 - Isaac Barrager (Sprngfld) over Alexander Suminski (Sunset) Fall 3:59 195 - Brayden Rogers (Sprngfld) over David Cruz (Sunset) Fall 1:26 220 - Scott Boyce (Sunset) over Cade Wolford (Sprngfld) Fall 3:30 285 - Hunter Newcomb (Sunset) over Joshua Spaulding (Sprngfld) Dec 6-3 106 - Juan Ramirez (Sprngfld) over Cameron Keaton (Sunset) Fall 1:41 Match #2 Cons. Round 1: Hillsboro defeated Sprngfld 45-33 120 - Jeremy Smith (Sprngfld) over Joshua Smith (Hillsboro) Fall 0:37 126 - James DiFranco (Sprngfld) over Joshua Smith (Hillsboro) Dec 10-5 132 - Tanner Keffer (Hillsboro) over Isaac McCallister (Sprngfld) Fall 1:10 138 - Ralphy Medina (Hillsboro) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit

Wrestling Results: Continued on page 12


Wrestling Results: Continued from page 10 145 - Caden Smith (Hillsboro) over James Hebert (Sprngfld) Fall 3:07 152 - Loudyn Reese (Hillsboro) over Ben King (Sprngfld) Fall 0:44 160 - Joseph Michelson (Sprngfld) over Wilfredo Peraza-Nava (Hillsboro) Fall 1:51 170 - Trevor Schubmehl (Hillsboro) over Akaynen Dalton (Sprngfld) Dec 4-3 Match #2 Cons. Round 1: Hillsboro defeated Sprngfld 45-33 (cont) 182 - Isaac Barrager (Sprngfld) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 195 - Brayden Rogers (Sprngfld) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 220 - Cade Wolford (Sprngfld) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 285 - Enrique Guerra (Hillsboro) over Joshua Spaulding (Sprngfld) Fall 0:35 106 - Tristin Keffer (Hillsboro) over Juan Ramirez (Sprngfld) Fall 0:27 113 - Cole Siemon (Hillsboro) over Dominic Holloway (Sprngfld) Fall 0:29 Match #3 Cons. Round 2: Central defeated Sprngfld 48-36 106 - Noah Worthington (Central) over Juan Ramirez (Sprngfld) Fall 0:30 113 - Luis Martinez (Central) over Dominic Holloway (Sprngfld) Fall 0:58 120 - Jeremy Smith (Sprngfld) over Nicholas Kunkle (Central) Fall 0:45 126 - Manuel Martinez (Central) over James DiFranco (Sprngfld) Fall 5:22 132 - Isaac McCallister (Sprngfld) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 138 - Lucas Nutt (Central) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 145 - Alan Vargas (Central) over James Hebert (Sprngfld) Fall 5:08 152 - Ben King (Sprngfld) over Gabriel Dodge (Central) Fall 3:39 160 - Joseph Michelson (Sprngfld) over Natra Brunnett (Central) Fall 0:22 170 - Jacob Richardson (Sprngfld) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit

182 - Nikolai Wolfe (Central) over Isaac Barrager (Sprngfld) Fall 0:57 195 - Jerry Fuller (Sprngfld) over Adam Morales (Central) Fall 3:05 220 - David Negrete (Central) over Cade Wolford (Sprngfld) Fall 0:39 285 - Caleb Sedlacek (Central) over Joshua Spaulding (Sprngfld) Fall 2:22 Match #4 13th Place Match: Sprngfld defeated Snohomish 42-36 106 - Juan Ramirez (Sprngfld) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 113 - Dominic Holloway (Sprngfld) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 120 - Jeremy Smith (Sprngfld) over Mathew Miller (Snohomish) Fall 1:52 126 - Dillan Meyer (Snohomish) over James DiFranco (Sprngfld) Fall 1:13 132 - Isaac McCallister (Sprngfld) over Keean Ohlsen (Snohomish) Dec 15-11 138 - Josue Barajas (Snohomish) over Unknown (Unattached) Forfeit 145 - Kyle Carlson (Snohomish) over James Hebert (Sprngfld) Fall 0:55 152 - Ryan Cote (Snohomish) over Ben King (Sprngfld) Fall 3:42 160 - Joseph Michelson (Sprngfld) over Tanner Sweeney (Snohomish) Fall 2:50 170 - Ben Kloes (Snohomish) over Jacob Richardson (Sprngfld) Fall 0:26 182 - Ryan Douglas (Snohomish) over Isaac Barrager (Sprngfld) Fall 1:26 195 - Brayden Rogers (Sprngfld) over Justin Betz (Snohomish) Fall 1:12 220 - Cade Wolford (Sprngfld) over Matt Currier (Snohomish) Fall 2:50 285 - Joshua Spaulding (Sprngfld) over Duncan King (Snohomish) Dec 4-2


Springfield Times

Thursday, January 5, 2017

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Public Notices ADVERTISEMENT OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property under the Oregon Self-Storage Facilities Act. The undersigned will sell by competitive bidding, starting on the 7th day of January, 2017, at 10:00am, on the website: www.storagetreasures.com, said property which has been stored and which is located at 42nd Street Mini Storage (dba; McCabe Properties, LLC and 42nd & Commercial, LLC) 362 42nd Street Springfield, Oregon 97477, Lane County, State of Oregon, the following 6 WHOLE UNITS: Unit #0506 Rick Deck (10x20); Unit #1350 Monica Renee McPheeters (10x5); Unit #1812 Billy Scannell (10x10); Unit #1342 Kelsey & Brittany Gilbert (10x20); Unit #1016 Daniel Mead (10x10); Unit #1033 Dennis Harwell (5x10). Auction will end on January 13th, 2017 at 12:00pm. PURCHASES MUST BE PAID IN CASH. DEBIT OR CREDIT CARD ACCEPTED ON LINE ONLY. Sale subject to cancellation in the event of settlement between owner and obligated party. Publish: 12/29/16, 01/05/17, 01/12/17

Publish: 12/15/16, 12/22/16, 12/29/16, 01/05/17

NOTICE TO POTENTIAL CLAIMANT(S) AND TO ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS READ THIS NOTICE CAREFULLY IN THE MATTER OF THE CIVIL AND/OR CRIMINAL FORFEITURE OF: $1,157.00 US Currency THESE JUDGMENTS WILL VEST ALL RIGHTS, TITLE, AND INTEREST IN PROPERTY TO THE CITY OF SPRINGFIELD. SAID PROPERTY IS DESCRIBED BELOW. THOSE WHO BELIEVE THEY MAY HAVE A VALID OWNERSHIP INTEREST OR SECURITY INTEREST MAY CONTACT THE SEIZING AGENCY. YOU MUST “CLAIM” AN INTEREST IN THE ABOVE DESCRIBED SEIZED PROPERTY OR YOU WILL AUTOMATICALLY LOSE ANY INTEREST YOU MAY HAVE. TO CLAIM YOU MUST CONTACT THE FORFEITURE COUNSEL LISTED BELOW, AND FILE A LEGAL PAPER CALLED A “CLAIM”. A COPY OF THE “CLAIM” MUST BE GIVEN TO AGENCY CONTACT WITHIN 21 DAYS OF THE LAST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. THE CLAIM MUST INCLUDE: 1) YOUR TRUE NAME; 2) YOUR CURRENT AND FUTURE MAILING ADDRESS; 3) A STATEMENT THAT THE CLAIMANT HAS AN INTEREST IN THE SEIZED PROPERTY. THE CLAIM MUST BE IN THE PROPER FORM AND BE SIGNED BY YOU ON OATH UNDER PENALTY OF PERJURY. TO FILE A CLAIM OR FOR MORE INFORMATION: Erik V. Hasselman, Chief Deputy District Attorney and Forfeiture Counsel, 400 Lane County Courthouse, 125 E. 8th Ave., Eugene OR 97401. SEIZING AGENCY: Springfield Police Department, 230 4th Street, Springfield, OR 97477, (541) 726-3721 SUMMARY STATEMENT OF FACTS CASE NO. SPD 16-10882 (DA 294964) On or about 11/16/2016, $1,157.00 US Currency was seized for civil forfeiture by the Springfield Police Department from Duwayne Scott Morris, Jr. The property is subject to forfeiture pursuant to ORS 131A.020 – 131.460. Publish: 12/15/16, 12/22/16, 12/29/16, 1/5/17

NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HERE GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed and has qualified as the personal representative of the Estate of Daniel C. Peterson, deceased, Lane County Circuit Court Case No. 16PB08129. All persons having claims against the estate are hereby required to present their claims, with proper vouchers, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, as stated below, to the personal representative at: c/o Jennifer Reed Klingensmith, P.C., 725 Country Club Rd., Eugene, Oregon 97401, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings in this estate may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the attorney for the personal representative. Dated and first published Dec. 22, 2016. Jerry Drucks, Personal Representative, Jennifer R. Klingensmith, Attorney for Personal Representative, 725 Country Club Rd., Eugene, OR 97401 (541) 687-9001 Publish: 12/22/16, 12/29/16, 01/05/16

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR LANE COUNTY SUMMONS No. 16CV40377, Kimberly Smale, Personal Representative of the Estate of Neva Darlene Humphrey, Plaintiffs, vs. Unknown heirs of Palmer K. Humphrey and All other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title lien, or interest in the property described in the complaint herein, Defendant. TO: Unknown heirs of Palmer K. Humphrey and All other persons or parties unknown claiming any right, title lien, or interest in the property described in the complaint herein: A Complaint has been filed by the above named Plaintiff asking the Court to quiet title to a parcel of real property in which you may claim an interest. NOTICE TO DEFENDANT READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! You must “appear” in this case or the other side will win automatically. To “appear” you must file with the court a legal paper called a “motion” or “reply.” The “motion” or “reply” must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiff’s attorney or, if the plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the plaintiff. If you have questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may contact the Oregon State Bar’s Lawyer Referral Service online at www.oregonstatebar.org or by calling (503)684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800)452-7636. JENNIFER R. KLINGENSMITH, OSB #102026, Attorney for Plaintiff, 725 Country Club Road, Eugene, OR 97401. Date of first publication: Dec. 22, 2016 Publish: 12/22/16, 12/29/16, 01/05/17, 01/12/17

NOTICE TO POTENTIAL CLAIMANT(S) AND TO ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS READ THIS NOTICE CAREFULLY IN THE MATTER OF THE CIVIL AND/OR CRIMINAL FORFEITURE OF: $2,052.00 US Currency THESE JUDGMENTS WILL VEST ALL RIGHTS, TITLE, AND INTEREST IN PROPERTY TO THE CITY OF SPRINGFIELD. SAID PROPERTY IS DESCRIBED BELOW. THOSE WHO BELIEVE THEY MAY HAVE A VALID OWNERSHIP INTEREST OR SECURITY INTEREST MAY CONTACT THE SEIZING AGENCY. YOU MUST “CLAIM” AN INTEREST IN THE ABOVE DESCRIBED SEIZED PROPERTY OR YOU WILL AUTOMATICALLY LOSE ANY INTEREST YOU MAY HAVE. TO CLAIM YOU MUST CONTACT THE FORFEITURE COUNSEL LISTED BELOW, AND FILE A LEGAL PAPER CALLED A “CLAIM”. A COPY OF THE “CLAIM” MUST BE GIVEN TO AGENCY CONTACT WITHIN 21 DAYS OF THE LAST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. THE CLAIM MUST INCLUDE: 1) YOUR TRUE NAME; 2) YOUR CURRENT AND FUTURE MAILING ADDRESS; 3) A STATEMENT THAT THE CLAIMANT HAS AN INTEREST IN THE SEIZED PROPERTY. THE CLAIM MUST BE IN THE PROPER FORM AND BE SIGNED BY YOU ON OATH UNDER PENALTY OF PERJURY. TO FILE A CLAIM OR FOR MORE INFORMATION: Erik V. Hasselman, Chief Deputy District Attorney and Forfeiture Counsel, 400 Lane County Courthouse, 125 E. 8th Ave., Eugene OR 97401 SEIZING AGENCY:Springfield Police Department, 230 4th Street, Springfield, OR 97477, (541) 7263721 SUMMARY STATEMENT OF FACTS, CASE NO. SPD 16-11313 (DA 295327): On or about 12/01/2016, $2,052.00 US Currency was seized for civil forfeiture by the Springfield Police Department from Rosalio Lopez-Uribe. The property is subject to forfeiture pursuant to ORS 131A.020 – 131.460.

ANSWERS PUZZLES ON PAGE 6

Publish: 01/05/17, 01/12/17, 01/19/17, 01/26/17

Cheers to a new year and another chance for us to get it right. - Oprah Winfrey

§

NOTICE OF SEIZURE FOR FORFEITURE Notice to Potential Claimant – Read Carefully ! ! If you have any interest in the seized property described in this notice, you must claim that interest or you will automatically lose that interest. If you do not file a claim for the property, the property may be forfeited even if you are not convicted of any crime. To claim an interest, you must file a written claim with the forfeiture counsel named below. The written claim must be signed by you, sworn to under penalty of perjury before a notary public, and state: (a) Your true name; (b) The address at which you will accept future mailings from the court and forfeiture counsel; and (3) A statement that you have an interest in the seized property. Your deadline for filing the claim document with the forfeiture counsel named below is 21 days from the last publication date of this notice. This notice will be published on four successive weeks, beginning 12-15-2016 and ending 01-05-17. If you have any questions, you should see an attorney immediately. FORFEITURE COUNSEL: Chief Deputy District Attorney, Erik Hasselman, 125 E. 8th Ave, Eugene, OR 97401 Phone: (541) 682-4261 SEIZING AGENCY: Lane County Sheriff’s Office, CASE #: 16-7108 Interagency Narcotics Enforcement Team, 125 E. 8th Ave, Eugene, OR 97401, Phone: (541) 682-6250 NOTICE OF REASON FOR SEIZURE FOR FORFEITURE: The property described in this notice was seized for forfeiture because it: (1) Constitutes the proceeds of the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violate, the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the

manufacture, distribution, or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475); and/or (2) Was used or intended for use in committing or facilitating the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violate the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475). PROPERTY SEIZED FOR FORFEITURE: $3,900 United States Currency. DATE PROPERTY SEIZED: 10/04/16 PERSONS FROM WHOM PROPERTY SEIZED: James Allen Marquardt & Kendal Nicole Watson For further information concerning the seizure and forfeiture of the property described in this notice contact: Lane County Sheriff’s Office, INET 125 E. 8th Ave, Eugene, OR 97401 Phone: (541) 682-6250


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Thursday, January 5, 2017

Springfield Police Blotter Monday, Dec. 26 • 9:16 a.m. – 4100 block of Forsythia St. The subject was described as the missing person out of Lane County Sheriff’s custody. The mother was aware of her location and advised Springfield Police Department. Two were arrested on warrants. One for a failure to appear and was taken to Lane County Jail. The second was arrested on contempt of court and two counts of probation violation. He was taken to Springfield Municipal Jail. • 8:04 p.m. – 2900 block of Gateway St. The store security had observed subjects on the second floor. The security officer alleged that one of the subjects had torn the tag from a pair of gloves and stuffed it in his pocket. The security officer found a tag on the floor. The third subject had left to get his car to pick up the others still in the store. When the subjects left the store to get in the car, police officers were outside and arrested two males. A methamphetamine pipe was in plan view according to the reporting police officer. One male was arrested on a warrant from Benton County on failure to appear on methamphetamine and DUII charges. He was taken to Lane County Jail. The other was arrested on third-degree theft and was taken to Springfield Municipal Jail. • 11:08 p.m. –  500 block of S. 68th St. the caller reported there was a father versus mother physical fight. The father had punched the mother three times in the face. The mother had a chipped tooth and a fat lip from the fight. The father alleged that the mother had taken all of his medication away. Police arrived and arrested

the male. He was resisting while in handcuffs. He was taken to Lane County Jail on fourth degree felony assault and interfering charges. • 11:10 p.m. – 600 block of Kelly Blvd. A female was outside the caller’s residence, kicking over her Christmas ornaments. The caller added that the subject had gone inside her house uninvited and began to yell at the caller and her children. Police arrived and arrested the subject on trespassing charges. She was taken to Lane County Jail.

Tuesday, Dec. 27 • 3:33 p.m. – 1200 block of Main St. The caller’s resident was in the hospital but she had seen five subjects inside the apartment several days ago. They had broken windows and then left the location. Police found a matching group of people at a nearby laundry mat. One was arrested on warrants from Springfield and Eugene Police Department. She was taken to Lane County Jail. • 4:47 p.m. –  42nd Street and Main Street. A male subject was walking in and out of traffic. Several calls reported that he was flipping off drivers. Police found the subject and arrested him on second-degree disorderly conduct. He was taken to Springfield Municipal Jail. • 9:02 p.m. – 2600 block of Olympic St. A female was breaking into the caller’s bus. She was then sitting in the bus and then went back into a nearby store. The caller alleged the subject had stolen prescription sunglasses. The store security found the subject inside their bathroom. Police arrived and arrested the female on outstanding warrants from Eugene Municipal and Florence Municipal. Theft and unlawful entry into a motor

vehicle were added. She was tak- up again and tried to run out into en to Lane County Jail. traffic again. The caller yelled at her to not run into traffic. The callWednesday, Dec. 28 er approached her and found her • 3:11 a.m. – 3300 block of Gate- down on the ground and crying. way St. A male was in the bath- She fled the area and police found room inside the store. He left the her in a shed she lives in. She was bathroom and nodded out in the charged with second-degree disparking lot. The caller said he ap- orderly conduct and was taken to peared high. The caller then went Lane County Jail. inside the bathroom and found a broken pipe and a baggie. Police • 6:41 p.m. – 2700 Gateway St. A arrived and detained the male. An female was in store security cusaccompanying female was report- tody. The store alleged that she edly with the male. Police found had stolen a jacket and had more her and detained her. Both were in her purse but she refused to alarrested on warrants. The male low the security to check it. Police was arrested on warrants from arrived and she was charged with Douglas County and Roseburg third-degree theft and was taken Municipal. He was taken to Lane to Lane County Jail. County Jail. The female was arFriday, Dec. 30 rested on a warrant from Douglas County and Myrtle County. Felony • 12:30 a.m. – 2000 block of 19th possession of restricted weapons, St. The caller could hear a loud and carrying a concealed weapon were added. She was taken to bang from the west side of the building but there weren’t any veLane County Jail. hicles in the parking lot. The caller • 10:46 p.m. – 700 block of 21st was concerned that a burglary St. The caller said her step-dad is intoxicated and is hitting her was in progress. Police arrived and mom. Someone then grabbed three subjects were detained. Two the phone, yelled the address, were advised about illegal campand then gave the phone back. ing and cleaned up their belongThe caller said she was in a room ings. One male was arrested for with her two siblings. Another charges of disorderly conduct. caller reported that he had heard females screaming for help. Police arrived and arrested him on felony assault charges and was taken to Lane County Jail.

Thursday, Dec. 29 • 5:10 a.m. – 2600 block of Olympic St. A female was detained and held at the front of the grocery store. Security reported that she was not being cooperative. Police arrived and she was charged with second-degree theft and was taken to Lane County Jail. • 5:45 p.m. – 6100 block of Main St. Female was trying to run out in the traffic and the caller found her laying on the sidewalk. She got

• 2:52 a.m. – 300 block of C St. A female was heard yelling and screaming and digging through a dumpster. The caller only saw one female. Police arrived and arrested a female for disorderly conduct and was taken to Lane Count Jail. • 5:02 p.m. – 2800 block of Franklin Blvd. A motor home was parked outside in front of a business. The caller observed drug activity and saw exchanges between visitors. Police arrived and there was no response when they knocked on the door. Police arrested three subjects. One for a failure to appear and was taken to Springfield Municipal Jail. Another was arrested on probation violation and was taken to Lane County Jail. A third was arrested for parole violation and was taken to Lane County Jail. • 11:05 p.m. – 4500 block of Aster St. The caller heard yelling at a nearby apartment. He said it’s an ongoing issue. Police arrived and arrested one subject on possession of methamphetamine.

Saturday, Dec. 31 • 5:58 a.m. – 500 block of S. 5th St. The ex-friend of the caller’s Blotter: Continued on page 15


Thursday, January 5, 2017

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Blotter & Records garage in the backyard. The male was arrested on fourth-degree assault charges and interfering. He daughter was climbing on top of their shed. He was was taken to Lane County Jail. then banging on windows. Police arrived and ar- • 5:10 p.m. – 2300 block of Olympic St. A car rested him on second-degree trespassing charges. pulled in and hopped the curb. The driver got out of the car and several beer cans fell out. The car was He was taken to Springfield Municipal Jail. • 4:23 p.m. – 600 block of Centennial Blvd. The pulling a trailer full of cement cutting tools. The owner of the location reported that a male, who driver picked up the beer cans and put them back had recently been arrested for talking about “rap- in his car and left it playing loud music. The car ing and decapitating people,” returned. The caller was taking up four spaces and when the driver resaid he felt uncomfortable approaching the sub- turned, the caller approached him to not litter the ject. Police arrived and arrested the subject on out- beer cans. Police arrived and a field sobriety test standing warrants, which included two warrants was conducted, which tested positive for alcohol. from Eugene and one from Benton County. He was The male was arrested for DUII and reckless driving charges. He paid bail after arriving at Springfield taken to Lane County Jail. Municipal Jail. • 10:54 p.m. – F Street and Pioneer Parkway West. The caller saw a male slap a female. The caller • 10:49 p.m. – 400 block of Lindale Dr. The caller added that they were yelling at each other. The fe- received a Facebook message from her boyfriend male left the scene and police arrived and arrested that said their house had been broken into. The a male for menacing and assault. He was taken to caller tried to call him back but he didn’t reply. Lane County Jail. After the call had already been made, the subject said he was just joking. The caller hung up but Sunday, Jan. 1 • 1:26 a.m. – 200 block of 37th St. Friend had sent had already told the dispatch he had a drug addica text message to the caller that said her boyfriend tion and wasn’t sure if he was in “his right state of had thrown her into a wall and to call 911. Police mind.” Police found the subject and advised him on arrived and found the subjects inside a converted making false claims. Blotter: Continued from page 14

BIRTHS Born at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center – RiverBend To Sarah and Corey Stephens of Marcola, a daughter, born December 12, 2016. To tiffany Cloud and James Porter of Springfield, a son, born December 17, 2016. To Michele Taylor and Michael LeeRoy Scott of Springfield, a daughter, born December 13, 2016. To Rebecca and Christopher Keown of Springfield, a son, born December 15, 2016. To Heather Carmichael and Hakeim Pearson of Springfield, a son, born December 11, 2016. To Lateesha Emra of Springfield, a daughter, born December 13, 2016. To Diana Hernandez and Luis Joaquin of Springfield, a daughter, born December 19, 2016. To Tishina Aragon and Johnthon Wansitler of Springfield, a son, born December 19, 2016. To Lisa and Clint Benninger of Marcola, a daughter, born December 19, 2016.

obit Lesley Wayne, “Les” Sanders March 7, 1978 to Dec. 25, 2016 Lesley Wayne Sanders was born in Lake Charles, Louisiana on March 7, 1978 to Albert D. Sanders and Violet Roach-Sanders. Les passed away in Springfield on Dec. 25, 2016 at 8:11 a.m. of a heart attack. Les was a roll-with-theflow kind of person. He would help anyone, even give away his last dollar. He served his church as much as he could. Helping with landscaping or anything else for God. Les loved to laugh and play jokes on friends and family. He is survived by many of us as his wife Chey and the apple of his eye, his only child Leslie Marie. His mother Violet F. Sanders of Rosenberg, Texas, his grandmother Fay Roach of Orange, Texas, and many aunts, uncles, and cousins and many loving friends. He is preceded in death by his father, Albert D. Sanders Sr. and his sister, Fay Sanders-Lawson.


Springfield Times

16 Thurston Girls: Continued from page 8 “We definitely learned a lot and I wish our record would have come out a little bit better than it did,” she said. “We competed for a good portion of the trip. We played two solid basketball games and in the third game we showed we were tired both mentally and physically. We were a little out of it, so that third game was tough for us. But before that, I thought the girls got after it and did some good things.” With the non-league portion of the schedule in the rear view mirror,

Thurston can focus on competing in the Midwestern League for the first time in a lot of years. The Colts begin league action Friday, Jan. 6 with a home date with Marist. Brown says that it’s solely up to the team on what kind of league season they’re going to have in 2017. “We had a conversation in practice to where the non-league season is over and it’s up to them on what the season is going to be like and how our season lasts,” she said. “Will our season be over when the last regular season game is over or are you guys going to represent in the state playoffs and po-

tentially in the state tournament?” The non-league record of 3-5 won’t make anyone look twice at the Colts, but Brown believes her team has all the tools to be successful in the next two months of intense basketball action. “We have the players. We have everything we need in order to be successful,” she said. “It’s just whether or not we choose to do it. As long as we execute and give it everything we got, every team, even Crater who is ranked No. 2 in state, any team in high school girls basketball is beatable on any given night.

Thursday, January 5, 2017 Miller Boys BB: Continued from page 9 “In the fourth quarter, we didn’t play great. We tied them 15-15, which is way too many points to give up,” he said. “But overall we did some good things.” Springfield had balanced scoring against Willamette. Levi Kinkade’s 16 points and seven rebounds to go with Nick Ah Sam’s 15 points and five assists was a huge positive in the Millers’ attack. Zach Brown also added 11 points and seven rebounds. “Levi played really well. He was 7-of-11 from the field,” Orton said. “Nick didn’t shoot the ball great, but he found other ways to score. We have some good pieces going on right now.” At 7-2 with the contest results against Sheldon unavailable at press time, Springfield looks to be primed for another run at the Midwestern League title. “Those two losses were really close (two-point losses) and they were on the road, which is something we’re going to have to do in league play,” Orton said. “We feel like we should have won those games, so we’ll see how it goes. The Sheldon game will be a good test for us before the league starts.” Springfield will open league competition Jan. 6 at Crater and then Jan. 10 at Marist. “We could be more efficient both offensively and defensively,” Orton said. “Our defense will dictate everything else. As long as we don’t worry about the offense and get better defensively, it will definitely dictate on how the games go.”

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