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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Published by:Documentation Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking andPrevention Improving Social Inclusion Regional Programme on Social Protection and of Human Trafficking Deutsche Gesellschaft f端r Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Bul. Kliment Ohridski br. 43 1/3 1000 Skopje, Macedonia T E I I

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services

+ 389 32 88 770 sppht@giz.de www.giz.de www.htsocialprotection.org

Programme Manager: Ms. Katrin Adams

Preparation: Ms. Natalija Spasovska, Ms. Biljana Dijanisieva Proofreading: Ms. Biljana Dijanisieva

23rd - 27th of September 2013, Layout and Design: Alexandar Prilepchanski Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Place and date of publication: Skopje, Macedonia, February 2014

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Documentation Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Contents

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Introduction Part I: Trafficking Victims Reintegration Programme (TVRP) Annual Partner’s Meeting Working Group 1: Fundraising with the private sector Working Group 2: Mobilising local communities, donors and governments Working Group 3: Social Enterprises

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Part II: Opportunities for Cross-Sector Partnerships

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Possibilities for Cross-Sector Partnerships in the context of anti-trafficking work

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Day 1

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Key Note Speech “Cross-sector Partnerships as a win-win formula for Businesses, NGOs and Governments” Panel 1: “What makes a Good Business Case – Why and when to invest in Social Initiatives” Good practice: Vodafone Foundation, Albania Good practice: Erste Bank a.d. Novi Sad, Serbia Good practice: Sharrcem, Kosovo Good practice: Komercijalna Banka a.d. Skopje, Macedonia Panel 2: “Ideas are Great, but What About the Context?” Municipality of Zenica and NGO Medica NGO Izbor, Macedonia, Mr. Sokrat Mancev National Employment Agency, Serbia, Ms. Koviljka Tisma

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Day 2

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Presentation “Models & Mechanisms for Cross-Sector Partnerships” Working Groups Feedback Next steps ANNEX I ANNEX II – Presentations ANNEX III – Participants

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Introduction In the past years the NGOs which were supported through the “Trafficking Victims Re/integration Programme” (TVRP)1 in the Western Balkans met each year. The meetings were an opportunity to share the latest development in the respective countries and to discuss about challenges faced in the daily work as well as possibilities to overcome these. This year’s meeting was dedicated to the topic of how to find ways to improve and support the financial sustainability of services for potential and identified victims of human trafficking. A commonly shared challenge in a region, where the commitment of bilateral and multilateral donors as well as from international NGOs decreases and state budgets are tight. Having in mind the complexity and the multitude of approaches towards sustainability of social service provision, this year’s meeting differed from previous meetings conceptually: it was meant to serve not only as a platform for reflecting on the latest developments in anti-trafficking, but moreover, to discuss possibilities of how to continue with the work beyond donor support. Therefore, the Sustainability Week was divided in two parts: the first days were exclusively dedicated to a discussion among NGOs, especially on models of social enterprises and of fundraising, which could be used in the work context of the TVRP NGOs. The second part of the week involved also participants from the public and the private sector. Together with the NGOs they explored the potential of cross-sector partnerships in the context of anti-trafficking work. We believe that the commitment and the support of many stakeholders are needed to make social services for victims of human trafficking and other vulnerable groups sustainable. We hope we were able to contribute positively to bringing people from different sectors together, combining efforts and finding solutions. Sincerely, GIZ SPPHT2 & King Baudouin Foundation

Katrin Adams Programme Manager at GIZ SPPHT

Fabrice de Kerchove Project Manager King Baudouin Foundation

1 Trafficking Victims Re/integration Programme (TVRP) is an initiative of the King Baudouin Foundation that aims to support sustainable reintegration of trafficked persons, build NGO capacity in this sector, encourage cooperation and synergies with government agencies and contribute to a systematic approach to monitoring and evaluating reintegration services. Since 2007, funding has been granted to 13 NGOs in 8 countries of Southeastern Europe. Since 2011, this project has been implemented in Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Kosovo, Macedonia and Serbia with the support of and with the cooperation of GIZ (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit). 2 The Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking (SPPHT) aims at fostering a renewed perspective and understanding of human trafficking as a societal challenge faced by all countries in the region. Our efforts include improving decentralized social services of governmental and non-governmental institutions catering to the needs of vulnerable groups and strengthening capacities of organizations dealing with social inclusion and integration programmes for persons affected by human trafficking.

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Documentation Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Part I: Trafficking Victims Reintegration Programme (TVRP) Annual Partner’s Meeting

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Partnering for Sustainable Social Services

Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Opening Ceremony Ms. Saliha Djuderija, Assistant to the Minister of Human Rights in Bosnia and Herzegovina Ms. Saliha Djuderija welcomed the guests and addressed special thanks to the hosts of the Sustainability Week, the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH and King Baudouin Foundation. Ms. Djuderija delivered a key note speech in which she gave an overview of the challenges faced by the whole region in the field of anti-trafficking, pointed towards the achievements over the last several years, in particular in Bosnia and Herzegovina, and concluded by expressing the support of the government of Bosnia and Herzegovina to the success of the future work of the TVRP partners.

Social Enterprise Fund During the opening ceremony the organizing partners King Boudain Foundation and the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH had the pleasure to launch the Social Enterprise Fund by introducing its aim and objectives over the upcoming two years. In addition participants were introduced to the implementing partner NGO MOZAIK as well the technical expert Mr. Dario Vins, responsible for implementation of the Fund and provision of expert advice.

Besides the traditional briefing on the latest developments in the region in the field of anti-trafficking the event offered insights in three main strategies towards sustainable social service provision: • Social enterprises, • Fundraising with the private sector, • Mobilising local communities, donors and governments. These strategies were introduced by the respective experts Mr. Zoran Puljic, representing MOZAIK Foundation, Ms. Daniela Keess, representing NGO CIRa, and Ms. Mia Vukojevic, Trag Foundation3. Following the introduction three working groups were established to review the experiences of NGOs regarding the respective sustainability strategies and to share some advice with them on the basis of practical examples from their work while supporting NGOs working in similar fields in the region.

3 Presentations can be found in ANNEX II

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Documentation Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Working Group 1: Fundraising with the private sector Expert: Ms. Daniela Keess, CIRa, Macedonia Rapporteur: Ms. Stanislava Vidovic, GIZ SPPHT The discussion focused on three main issues: • types of fundraising • percentage of private sector donations in the overall NGO budgets and • challenges faced by NGOs The experiences of the NGOs in this field range between having no experience to modest engagement with companies. The most frequent type of support received is in-kind and very rarely support has been provided as direct financial support. When it comes to support regarding beneficiaries it has been stressed that employment options for beneficiaries as well offering medical services for free are also a common type of assistance provided by the private sector. In terms of the budget share secured through company donations either financial or in-kind most NGOs mentioned that they have a very modest experience, which amounts only up to 5% of their overall annual budgets. Only one NGO reported that a significant 20% of the total budget was secured through company support, mostly by in-kind donations.

Challenges #1 – One of the greatest challenges faced by NGOs is the sensitivity of their work and the need to protect the identity of the beneficiaries. This, according to them, is not in line with business interests as companies require visibility of the donations they have made. This understanding is due to the fact that CSR and related philanthropy activities are still understood as hidden marketing in the region, but also it is an indicator of the need to educate and make NGOs aware of the fact that fundraising with the private sector should not be understood as charity, but rather as a strategic activity with an equal share of give and take on both sides. To overcome this challenge NGOs need to receive additional training and guidance. #2 – Another problem is the uncertainties related to the legislation on tax relief. The legislation in most countries is considered either as lacking in terms of poorly designed incentive mechanisms or the administration of the donations is burdensome and time consuming. #3 – Other challenges include problems with reaching out to the right people at the decision-making level, prejudices towards the target group, lack of awareness about the problem of human trafficking, etc.

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Conclusion

Resulting from the discussion the NGO representatives concluded that transparency and open door policy are key factors for every successful fundraising activity.

This would help the NGOs to position themselves as a trustworthy partner for the private sector.

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Documentation Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Working Group 2: Mobilising local communities, donors and governments Expert: Ms. Mia Vukjevic, TRAG Foundation, Serbia Rapporteur: Ms. Rrezarta Jashari, GIZ SPPHT

Challenges #1 – The greatest focus of the discussion was directed towards the responsibility of governments in the region to finance social service provision to victims of human trafficking. Most governments support service provision only partially, thus hindering the long term planning of programs offered by these NGOs. #2 – Tax incentives are again mentioned as a challenge as legislation in most countries does not motivate individual philanthropy. #3 – With regards to fundraising at the community level, the stigma related to victims of human trafficking is perceived by the majority of NGOs as a hindering factor in their efforts to engage with the local communities.

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Conclusion

The greatest challenge lies in the government’s responsibility towards financial support of the provided services. In order to overcome this, NGOs proposed accreditation and standardisation of service provision to be implemented by the governments in the region.

If the process is carried away in a transparent and credible manner t is expected to serve as a level playing field for all service providers, be it governmental or non-governmental institutions, improving cost efficiency and increasing outreach to more people in need.

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Partnering for Sustainable Social Services

Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Documentation Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Working Group 3:

23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Table 1: Previous income generation experience

Social Enterprises Expert: Ms. Vesna Bajshanski, NGO MOZAIK, Bosnia and Herzegovina Rapporteur: Mr. Fabrice de Kerchove, KBF

None Producing and selling items Makeup purses Jewellery workshop Fine art items Other Bagel shop Farm Fundraising

2 1 1 2 1 1 1

In-kind donations

1

Fund for vocational training

1

Providing services

8

The discussion focused on previous experiences of NGOs related to social enterprise, the challenges faced in the process of implementation and finally ideas for future social enterprises projects. The following table depicts the diverse experiences among the TVRP NGOs in the region. Most of them have had some kind of income generation activities. Majority of social enterprise activities fall under two main categories: production and selling of items/goods and service provision. Other income generation activities include in-kind donations, fundraising and fund for vocational training.

Source: Own depiction on the basis of inputs received during the working group discussion.

2 8

Hair salon Renting space Internet cafĂŠ Catering Car wash/Tire service Printing/Copying shop

3 1 1 1 1 1

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Impeding factors: • • • •

Businesses had to close because they didn’t generate income No previous management/business experience Increasing competition Lack of capacity to run and manage the businesses properly

Social business or equivalent idea • Beauty shop Space will be rented from municipalities and initial operational costs will be covered by grants and/or donations. The NGO and the beneficiaries will be coowners. • Embroidery shop The shop will make logos for a diverse range of clients: hotels, restaurants, hospitals, etc. Both professionals and beneficiaries will be employed in the shop. A market analysis already conducted by a marketing agency gave favourable results.

• Production of linen items The shop will produce organic or eco linen bags, makeup purses, book covers and similar items, the sales of which will mostly be to donor organizations and projects. There are already 54 sewing machines available (24 in the centre, 30 in the field) with the capacity to produce 900 bags per day. The women beneficiaries that work in the shop will be trained and certified for production, earning approximately 2 BAM per bag. • Second-hand shop Items will be collected and sold in the shop. The shop will employ one beneficiary (a young adult who recently left the shelter).

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Documentation Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Common challenges:

• Printing T-Shirts The idea is to get away from the advocacy mind-set towards a business mode of thinking. The shop will work with organic materials which are cheaper than the fair-trade options but still ethical. • Event management No additional details provided. • Laundry and Dry cleaning service The service is fully registered as a business. It provides employment for 3-4 beneficiaries and equipment is purchased through foreign donations.

• Ideas are seldom developed into business plans, and very few of them are implemented. • There are no plans on how to make the businesses sustainable over a long period; NGOs are not clear on what they need to do in order to succeed. • Low sales; better marketing needed. • No specific SME regulation in (most of) the countries. • One NGO has no developed ideas as they believe that social businesses are not suitable for everyone and beneficiaries should not be used to sustain the services of NGOs. • One NGO is discouraged to start a new business after the bad experience they had in the past.

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Part II: Opportunities for Cross-Sector Partnerships The concept of Cross-Sector Partnerships CSSPs are grounded on the logic of partnering between different sectors, pooling resources from various stakeholders and creating joint solutions for challenges and issues of common concern. Complex social issues such as human trafficking and social inclusion of potential victims definitely affect the whole of society and thus require multidisciplinary work when looking for long term sustainable solutions.

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Documentation Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

CSSPs acknowledge the fact that each sector organisation - be it an NGO, a company or a municipality - poses resources which are unique for the respective sector (public, private or NGO) and cannot be offered by any other. The advantage of CSSPs is that besides joining untapped resources it serves as a dynamic network advocating for solving complex problems which otherwise could be less likely to be solved on an individual basis. There are a number of international examples where companies, NGOs and state institutions joined forces with a specific focus on anti-trafficking. These examples include MICROSOFT ‘Unlimited potential’4 program – a community learning curriculum implemented in cooperation with NGOs in the Asia-Pacific region aimed to enhance employability of potential and identified victims through trainings on computer technology.

4 More information on the program can be found here http://www.microsoft.com/philippines/citizenship/news3.aspx

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Similar partnership projects are initiated by ECPAT-Body Shop campaign5 aimed to raise awareness for the importance of prevention programs among at-risk communities especially children and at the same time used to generate funds to support these programs. A few CSSP projects have been implemented in various social fields in the Balkan region but, unfortunately, not in the field of social re/integration of potential and identified victims of human trafficking. Therefore the GIZ-KBF initiative ‘Partnering for Sustainable Social Services’ brought together stakeholders from the public, private and NGO sector, to jointly learn from international and local examples and to inspire new initiatives on the basis of powerful cross-sector partnership networks which will support financial sustainability of social re/integration services and strongly advocate for greater awareness on human trafficking.

5 More information can be found here: http://www.ecpat.net/TBS/en/about_campaign.html and at http:// www.ecpat.net/EI/Publications/Trafficking/Summary_Global_Child_Trafficking_for_Sexual_Purposes.pdf

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Day 1 Key Note Speech “Cross-sector Partnerships as a win-win formula for Businesses, NGOs and Governments” Speaker: Dr. Barbara Dubach, engageability The key note speech was delivered by Dr. Barbara Dubach from engageability – a Centre of excellence for sustainable development and stakeholder engagement.

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Documentation Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

In her speech Ms. Dubach focused on today’s challenges faced by society and businesses among which are also child labour, human rights and human trafficking. Many of those challenges cannot be met only by one actor, but instead need stakeholder engagement and partnerships.

When identifying stakeholders organizations should keep in mind the following questions:

In her speech Dr. Dubach addressed several questions:

• To whom does the organization have legal obligations?

• Why is it important to engage with businesses? • Why do companies engage with stakeholders?

• Who will be positively or negatively affected by the organization’s activities?

• Who will benefit from the project?

when they deal with sustainable development and what is expected from the stakeholders?

• What are the challenges in stakeholders’ engagement? Dr. Dubach also presented an approach for systematic and pro-active stakeholder engagement including three steps, of which situation analysis (identifying stakeholders and common issues) is perhaps the first and most crucial one. Only after this partners could eventually continue with developing a strategy, and a defined process of implementation and evaluation.

• Who has been involved in the past when concerns needed to be addressed? • Who can help the organization address specific impacts? • Who would be disadvantaged if excluded from the engagement? • Who are the most vulnerable, least visible and voiceless? • Whose opposition could be detrimental to the success of the project?

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Partnering for Sustainable Social Services

Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Examples of successful partnership initiatives with a focus on anti-trafficking issue:

23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

#2 Multisectoral partnership providing economic empowerment of victims of human trafficking

Cross-sector partnerships in the area of human trafficking: Organizations: Confederation of Indian Industries (India), Nestlé, Café Coffee Day, ITC, National Institute of Fashing Technology, Bharat Petroleum Corporation Ltd. , International Institute of Hotel Management, Sinar Jernih Private Limited, Lanco Light Foundation, Hindustan Unilever Ltd. Dabur India, Taj Group of Hotels, Goa Chamber of Commerce and Industry. Objective: Trafficking prevention and provision of assistance to victims of trafficking through skills development and the enhancement of employment potential.

#1 Multisectoral partnership providing a sustainable awareness raising campaign solution September 2009, The Body Shop started a campaign together with ECPAT International (End Child Prostitution, Pornography and Trafficking) and local NGO partners around the world to Stop Sex Trafficking of Children and Young People. Body Shop stores are used to engage with customers and raise awareness through a petition (over 7 Mio. Signatures) and the sale of a special hand cream.

Results: • Establishment of various economic enterprises • Skills training in housekeeping and food and beverage retail management • Employment opportunities to survivors of human trafficking

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Partnering for Sustainable Social Services

Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Documentation Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Figure 1: Types of partnerships

Key challenges: • Mobilization of resources • Limited number of business sensitized to the issue of human trafficking • Need for establishing models that can be scaled up and replicated Dr. Dubach also elaborated on the different types of partnerships and the benefits they offer, especially for the companies involved. Longterm benefits depend on the level of engagement and the relevance of the partnership activity to the specific business operations. The example of the Greenpeace and DKK Scharfenstein partnership shows a typical ‘business opportunity’ type of partnership which resulted in product innovation based on the inputs and contribution from both partners organizations. ³³ Product innovation: Greenfreeze – 20 years ago Greenpeace and DKK Scharfenstein who was about to go bankrupt developed the first HFC free refrigerator.

Source: Dubach, Barbara (2013). Cross-sector partnershipsas a win-win formula for Businesses, NGOs and Governments [slide 17]

Tips for partnership assessment • Define the goal and scope of the partnership – evaluation of potential projects • Identify and select partners carefully – work with highly legitimate NGOs or third parties • Ensure internal support • Engage the partner – build the relationship • Perform periodic evaluation

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Panel 1: “What makes a Good Business Case – Why and when to invest in Social Initiatives” Good practice: Vodafone Foundation, Albania Panellist: Mr. Albi Greva, Executive Director Example of: how technology can be used in an innovative way to address social issues and engage the company with other stakeholders in an effective way. The effort goes beyond charity and philanthropy and into the area of social responsibility. Type of partnership: private business (Vodafone Albania – supplying the technology), the civil sector (NGOs – in charge of coordination and information sharing) and the governmental sector (police in charge of responding to calls and supporting the person in need). This is also a very good example of a business link between the CSR activities of a company and the company’s business.

The Project: The project TecSOS uses mobile technology to support those at risk of domestic violence. It is a handset specifically designed for this purpose. If the person using it feels scared or threatened they press the central button on the handset, while it is still in their pocket or bag. This activates the TecSOS handset and it makes a rapid connection to the police. From the moment the call is picked up by the police it is being recorded and these recordings can be used as evidence in courts when prosecuting attackers. Through the TecSOS protocol when a handset is activated, the identity and the history of the user are immediately known to the police. The location of the user in the moment of activation is also known using GPS coordinates. All TecSOS activations are designated as high priority by the police and support is immediately deployed to the scene of the incident. Thus, the TecSOS technology allows emergency services to respond faster and more effectively to incidents of domestic violence.

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Documentation Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

How do victims know about this product? The project is not publicly announced. The information is spread through the NGO community and municipal structures. Trainings are also conducted by the NGOs and they are in charge of the administration of the project.

Click on the following links to access the two promotional videos related to this project. TecSOS - https://www.dropbox.com/s/4f1s695keuqlwc6/TecSOS-V1.mp4 ubtitle Angel Video - https://www.dropbox.com/s/bef0fe3fq3bqzys/Angel_with_English_subtitles3.mp4

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Good practice: Erste Bank a.d. Novi Sad, Serbia

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Two types of partnerships:

Panellist: Ms. Mirjana Sakic Example of: a CSR activity connected closely to the business core of the company. The bank has created special customized loans that they offer to social enterprises targeting vulnerable groups (unemployed women over 50, unemployed young people, etc.). Thus, the bank provides economic empowerment to the vulnerable groups by meeting the specific needs of a narrow but emerging market niche. The company’s CSR approach is put in a strategic framework for the company’s governance based on investment in long-term and stable relations with all key stakeholders (in the case of Erste Bank a.d. Novi Sad those are employees, clients, and citizens in local communities). Interesting: Erste Bank started as a social enterprise.

Example 1 - Bilateral partnership: Company + NGO/small SE business The company approved several small-scale customised loans supporting small social enterprises. Additionaly, the bank is constantly purchasing products and services from these enterprises. Daj Daj Diapers – employing women over 50; Bioldea soaps – employing women from the Roma community and refugees; “Milan Petrovic” school from Novi Sad – the school for children with disabilities with their 16 working centers; Ecobag – the business is run by women refugees; LiceUlice – street magazine supporting people (especially children) on the street;

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Partnering for Sustainable Social Services

Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Documentation Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Example 2 - Multistakeholder partnership: private, public and civil sector.

23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Figure 2: Super (Steps) partnership project

SuperSteps – The bank teamed up with the National Employment Service in 2011 to launch a pilot project Superstep providing business startup loans and business training to unemployed young people. The bank developed a special loan programme for this purpose and with the partners established a comprehensive support for young entrepreneurs, offering them training and education, access to finance, and mentoring and “aftercare” support. So far, it has helped to start 15 enterprises employing 21 young people.

Source: Sakic, Mirjana (2013). “What makes a Good Business Case – Why and when to invest in Social Initiatives?” [Slide 17]

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Good practice: Sharrcem, Kosovo6 Panellist: Mr. Yilber Burgija Insufficient municipal/state budget for: Example of: how a business can involve the local community more closely when developing their CSR strategy and activities. Type of partnership: private business (Sharrcem, Kosovo7) and the governmental sector (local government and local community). The project: The company established an Independent Local Advisory Board (ILAB) in the local community where their plant was located. The community Hani i Elezit: - - - -

Unemployment – 67% People under the poverty threshold – >30% Lack of local businesses All business activities related to the cement plant

6 *This designation is without prejudice to positions on status, and is in line with UNSC 1244 and the ICJ Opinion on the Kosovo declaration of independence. *Овај назив је без прејудицирања статуса и у складу је са Резолуцијом Савета безбедности Уједињених нација 1244 и мишљењем Међународног суда правде о декларацији о независности Косова.

- - - -

Infrastructure Safety Environment Education

When the company tried to establish a Community Development Fund designed to invest in the community, they found a disconnect between the needs of the community and the areas where the company was intervening. Therefore, the company recognized the need to involve the community in the decision making process and for that purpose created the multi-stakeholder Independent Local Advisory Board in collaboration with the municipality. The Board makes unanimous decisions, thus ensuring ownership of the local community regarding projects supported by the Community Development Fund. It operates as a liaison between the community and the Company in order to streamline the support activities toward the local society.

7 *This designation is without prejudice to positions on status, and is in line with UNSC 1244 and the ICJ Opinion on the Kosovo declaration of independence. *Овај назив је без прејудицирања статуса и у складу је са Резолуцијом Савета безбедности Уједињених нација 1244 и мишљењем Међународног суда правде о декларацији о независности Косова.

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Documentation Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Figure 3: Local community advisory body

The benefits: - Transparency and direct involvement of KEY stakeholders. - The Local Advisory Board, based on a unanimous voting method, distributes funds to projects and actions for the benefit of the Local Community. - All the decisions made by ILAB will be executed by direct payments by Sharrcem to the provider. As examples: - 7.000 Euros / Reconstruction of the building of The Islamic Community - 10.150 Euros / Purchase of town’s water supply aggregate (Hani i Elezit) - 1.000 Euro / Reconstruction of burned house roof (social case - individual request) Source: Burgija, Yilber (2013). Sharrcem [Slide 4]

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Good practice: Komercijalna Banka a.d. Skopje, Macedonia Panellist: Mr. Andrej Jovkovski

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Figure 4: Project ‘Women for women’

Example of: a company’s long-term commitment in supporting vulnerable groups and working on a specific issue. Type of partnership: Project funding The Project: “Women for Women” – providing psychiatric care for women that are victims of domestic violence The project was initiated and realized in cooperation with the Macedonian Platform Against Poverty (MPPS) – a group of NGOs that work on poverty issues. It is fully funded by Komercijalna Banka. Goals: - Provide professional help to traumatized women that are victims of psychological and physical violence in their homes; - Raise public awareness; and - Draft a professional handbook for psychological treatment of women that are victims of domestic violence.

Source: Jovkovski, Andrej. (2013) Corporate Social Responsibility at Komercijalna Banka AD Skopje [Slide 15]

The bank contributes to the project by: • providing financial resources for the engaged psychotherapists • donation of office equipment for the shelter centres • gifts and personal attention for the victims on the International Women’s Day (March 8th), as well as occasional visits and socialization with the victims and the shelter’s personnel • promoting this painful topic in public appearances and lobbying for broader action

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Documentation Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Panel 2: “Ideas are Great, but What About the Context?” Municipality of Zenica and NGO Medica Partner #1: Municipality of Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Mr. Zijad Softic

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

On other side the municipality managed to ensure availability of this service to the community in a cost-efficient way by covering a certain budget share which is then matched by other donors secured by the NGO.

NGO Izbor, Macedonia, Mr. Sokrat Mancev

Partner #2: NGO Medica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Ms. Irma Ahmic Bilateral partnership: the civil sector (NGO Medica Zenica) and the governmental sector (the municipality of Zenica).

Multistakeholder partnership: the civil sector (NGO Izbor), local self-government (Municipality of Strumica), Ministry of Defence, religious community, donors.

The project: Sustainable re/integration of marginalized groups of women, girls, children and victims of human trafficking through economic empowerment and comprehensive support.

The project: Therapeutic community POKROV – for people abusing psychoactive substances and hazards.

The municipality has given the NGO facilities for use and it cofinances their activities. Conclusion: The partnership proved as a win-win option for both the NGO and the municipality of Zenica. Even though the financial support was partial with regards to the overall budget costs of the shelter, the municipality’s support was provided on a longterm basis, thus enabling NGO Medica to a) decrease operational costs and to further expand and b) tailor service offered to its various beneficiaries groups.

Conclusion: The NGO works towards reaching self-sustainability. The Community POKROV functions as a social enterprise using the model: Heal + Rehabilitate + Prodece = Reintegration. The social enterprise has been provided with land and accommodation facilities by the Ministry of Defence. The rest of the equipment needed for the green house was purchase through donor grants. Parallel to this the Municipality committed itself to fully finance therapeutic treatments of a number of citizens from the city of Strumica. While receiving a standard psychosocial therapy the beneficiaries also work in the Community’s various small agricultural units. The profits go towards the financial sustainability of the Community.

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

National Employment Agency, Serbia, Ms. Koviljka Tisma

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Figure 5: Victims of trafficking as registered with the National Employment Agency in Serbia.

Bilateral partnership: the civil sector (NGO Atina) and the governmental sector (National Employment Agency). The project: Mediating the employment of vulnerable groups. Conclusion: The National Employment Agency supports the NGO in employing the victims of human trafficking. In cooperation with the NGO the Agency has a registry of such potential employers, they jointly provide trainings and the Agency mediates their employment. The Agency thus mediates between the three parties: employer, NGO, employee. The assistance of employment was provided through proactive mediation whereby the Agency used existing employment subsidy schemes having a more general focus in terms of target groups and made these accessible for identified victims. Thus the Agency managed to avoid the well-known risk of stigmatization which oftentimes is associated as a potential risk of various employment subsidy schemes exclusively designed for identified victims.

Source: Tisma, Koviljka. (2013) National Employment Agency [Slide 11]

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Documentation Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Day 2 The second day of the conference was envisioned to serve as a reality-check exercise for all participants in order to assess whether, if at all, cross-sector partnerships could be a suitable approach when dealing with re/integration of potential and identified victims of human trafficking and if so, then how can social service providers, be it non-governmental or public, make the best possible use of these towards achieving long-term sustainability.

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Presentation “Models & Mechanisms for Cross-Sector Partnerships” Presenter: Ms. Daniela Keess, NGO CIRa, Macedonia Ms. Daniela Keess focused on a number of key points which play an important role from the perspective of the private sector in establishing successful cross-sector partnership projects. Beyond philanthropy The rationale behind CSSP is not based on some fictional idea of collaboration and contribution to society, but rather on a sound logic by taking into consideration the drivers which motivate different sectors in their day-to-day business. Therefore, when engaging with the private sector it is important to have in mind the core business goals and to align these with the project idea. Some examples of core business goals include the following: ◊ To build sustainable operations ◊ To strengthen the local supply chain (e.g. investment in the education of the local communities where the business is located) ◊ Linking business with local markets ◊ Brand awareness ◊ Product/service promotion ◊ Reduce risk and reputation damage

Beyond project based activity Making cross-sector partnership projects sustainable over time is a real challenge. Sustainability could be achieved by following these three principles: ◊ Equity ◊ Transparency and ◊ Mutual benefit While all three principles are important, mutual benefit can be singled out as the most crucial because it differentiates CSSPs from concepts such as philanthropy or charity donations. A key characteristic of partnership projects is that they have a mutual benefit for the involved sector organizations as opposed to philanthropy which implies a provider-recipient relationship. Moreover, transparency is essential in developing trustworthy relationships on a long-term basis. Further, it has been discussed that CSSP can take different forms such as informal working groups either at local or national/ international level, dedicated to a specific issue or a cause, but also some can become institutionalized and develop as legally registered foundations.

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Documentation Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Some examples include the following: ◊ On-going project based support ◊ Forums (either at local or national level) ◊ Funds (corporate funds usually dedicated to a single cause distribute among many NGOs or dedicated to various issues concerning a single community) 1.1. Plenary discussion The plenary discussion that followed was triggered by Mr. Pfeil’s recommendations aimed to give the audience food for thought when designing their cross-sector partnership strategy.

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Recommendation #2 - Second important point is to look at possible “hidden marketing” strategies which might stand behind the interest for partnering of certain companies. A few examples were shared regarding the role of municipalities in partnerships. Some of the examples included a multi-stakeholder forum, partnership-based service provision to elderly people and project funding for an NGO dealing with vulnerable people.

Recommendation #1 - With respect to engaging with the private sector Mr. Pfeil explained that NGOs should think of the type of industry they would like to partner with. For e.g. engaging with the oil industry is not a good idea due to the fact that this might compromise their NGO mission as this industry is only interested in so called “green washing” due to the nature of their business.

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Working Groups The results from the four working groups showcased a range of possibilities for cross-sector partnerships in terms of focus, goals and orientation. This context could be positively shaped by two main factors: • Sensitization of specific sectors about the issue of human trafficking is crucial in securing involvement and ownership of any partnership project. In this regards the media and the private sector are singled out as a priority target group. • Visibility of partnerships is expected to ensure sustainability because it corresponds to the main drivers of the private sector such as philanthropy, reputation, risk management and CSR.

Namely, the working groups that brainstormed project oriented activities illustrated the advantages of CSSP in prevention activities targeting potential victims as well as economic empowerment as a way to achieve sustainable reintegration of former victims.

In principle all groups developed a good understanding of how cross-sector partnership project could be adapted in the context of anti-trafficking work.

By contrast the groups focusing on strategic partnerships dealt with the broader context that needs to be in place before CSSP are initiated.

However, most participants still need to clarify CSSP as a distinct model from philanthropy or charity. A remaining impression is that CSSP could be easily misunderstood as a replacement for donor funding by both the NGOs and the public sector.

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Documentation Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Feedback

Next steps

On the basis of the results of the evaluation the general impression is that participants’ expectations with regards to the Sustainability Week were fulfilled and it provided them with ideas, models and opportunities to further adapt the knowledge they gained in their day to day work.

GIZ and KBF will continue their support in the follow up process on the basis of the results of the Sustainability Week as well as the priority areas identified in the evaluation.

The feedback survey provides more detailed information on the needs for further support of social service providers. The list below displays priorities as identified by the participants themselves. Priority based needs for support: 1) Capacity building support through provision of trainings as well as tailor made workshops and expert advice for individual organizations 2) Access to networks and facilitation of cross-sector partnership initiatives (involving/sensitizing public and private sectors)

Support will be provided through various instruments and will be tailored according to the partner institution in the respective sectors.

Supporting TVRP social service providers The Social Enterprise Fund will be available only to TVRP NGO partners and will include both technical assistance and financial grants. While all TVRP NGO partners are eligible to receive technical assistance throughout the remaining two years of the program, only a selected number of NGOs will receive financial support for their social business plans.

3) Field visits

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

The overall administration of the Social Enterprise Fund will be implemented through 6 phases:

Phase 1 - Program Launch (Dates: Sep 1 - Sep 30, 2013) Phase 2 - Business Idea Development (Dates: Dec 1, 2013 – Apr 15, 2014)   Phase 3 – Selection (Date: Apr 22 - Apr 25, 2014)   Phase 4 – Awards (Date: May 1, 2014)   Phase 5 - Business Planning (Dates: May 1, 2014 – Nov 1, 2014)                              Phase 6 – Implementation: Business Start-up (Nov 1, 2014 – up to Nov 1, 2015) Building Strategic partnerships between Municipalities, NGOs and businesses In the area of cross-sector partnerships our main beneficiaries would be institutions at central and municipal level and NGO partners. A selected number of leading private sector partners will indirectly benefit from the advisory services provided by GIZ. 1) Tailor made capacity building

In response to the priority areas as identified in the evaluation, GIZ SPPHT will provide technical assistance to the TVRP NGO partners by upgrading their knowledge on CSSP especially as it has been established that a considerable number of partner institutions still confuse the concept with philanthropy, charity donations and CSR.

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Documentation Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Capacity building will be tailored towards the following aims: • to build up cooperation to companies and public institutions and to get fundraising and Cross-Sector-Partnership started for a real case. • to establish a fundraising strategy which will guide the organization in future fundraising and cooperation efforts. • to build up fundraising and communication structures in the organization. • to facilitate exchange of experiences between participating CSOs.

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

2) Empowering municipalities to act as facilitators

However, it is of upmost importance for GIZ that social service provision to both potential and identified victims of human trafficking is not left in the hands of the NGO sector alone, but that state institutions, primarily municipalities take up a proactive role in this respect. Therefore, our focus in future crosssector partnerships will be even more strongly directed towards empowering our partner municipalities in exerting their role as facilitators of cross-sector partnership alliances at strategic level. Through the joint support of the CIM expert Ms. Daniela Keess and the respective GIZ SPPHT National Coordinators we will support and advice municipalities to frame measures aimed at re/integration of potential and identified victims of human trafficking in the broader context of cross-sector partnerships. Thus, municipalities will be able to create a more conducive local environment for long term sustainable solutions for vulnerable groups. GIZ SPPHT will support partner institutions in forming a proper understanding of CSSP in order to avoid a risk of confusing CSSP, in particular engagement with the private sector, as a second hand option in the absence or decreasing of donor support. We do believe that CSSP, if designed and implemented with a sense of ownership by all partner institutions, could serve as a sound platform for transition from the current donor dependent service provision towards a more sustainable and local community based support for vulnerable groups.

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

ANNEX I Bosnia

Macedonia

Project: Social Enterprise

Project: Cross-sector Campaign: partnerships for prevention of human trafficking among street involved children.

• The Bosnian group project “Social Enterprise” • Type: production of ecological bags

• Target group: former victims and women at risk of human trafficking • Partners: Municipality – providing facilities Opportunities:  Municipality – Increased employment rate among

women at risk of human trafficking; Reduced poverty in the municipality; Preventing risk of re-trafficking for former victims;

Goal: To create a joint fund for supporting the day care centre for street involved children exposed to risk of human trafficking. Partners: Municipality of Skopje could provide partial funds to support the day care centre. NGO Equal Access and NGO Open Gate will provide social services to the children and their families. The chain of Supermarkets TINEX could dedicate a percentage of the sale of bags in the chain as a contribution to the joint fund.

 Business – Increased reputation by purchasing bags

as a marketing material for their company;

 NGO – improved sustainability by income generation.

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Documentation Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Serbia Project: Action Plan Step 1: Developing a strategy at municipal level (New Belgrade and City of Belgrade) for social welfare in the context of sustainability of service provision. Step 2: NGO CYI and Municipality of Belgrade will involve other local stakeholders to support the day care centres in New Belgrade. Step 3: Joint meeting between CYI, ATINA, New Belgrade, City of Belgrade and the National Anti-Trafficking Coordinator in Serbia with the purpose to improve the coordination between local and national level as well as NGO and public sector coordination. Step 4: Meeting with the Secretariat of Economy within the City of Belgrade as a link with the business community in Belgrade. Step 5: Coordination meeting between CYI and ATINA with the purpose of mapping available resources and drafting a plan on how to approach potential business partners.

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Kosovo8 and Albania Project: Cross-Sector Partnership Network Partner members: • Municipalities • Businesses • NGOs

• Media • Municipalities act as a facilitator of the network Step 1: Media promotion of the Cross-sector Partnership Network Step 2: Sensitization of the various interest groups (stakeholders) Identified risks: Public promotion of the network is seen as an incentive for attracting partners and for maintaining the network sustainable over time. However the exposure to public may be a risk for the security of former victims.

Step 6: Creating a cross-sector partnership network. 8 *This designation is without prejudice to positions on status, and is in line with UNSC 1244 and the ICJ Opinion on the Kosovo declaration of independence. * Овај назив је без прејудицирања статуса и у складу је са Резолуцијом Савета безбедности Уједињених нација 1244 и мишљењем Међународног суда правде о декларацији о независности Косова.

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

ANNEX II – Presentations Key Note Speech “Cross-sector Partnerships as a win-win formula for Businesses, NGOs and Governments” - Dr. Barbara Dubach, engageability https://www.dropbox.com/s/v654yy8mpl8l7du/Dr.%20Barbara%20Dubach%20-%20Key%20Note%20Speech.pdf Panel 1: “What makes a Good Business Case – Why and when to invest in Social Initiatives” Vodafone Foundation, Albania, Mr. Albi Greva, Executive Director https://www.dropbox.com/s/4nkey9d0uman3wk/Mr.%20Albi%20Greva%2C%20Vodafone%20Foundation%20Albania.pdf Erste Bank a.d. Novi Sad, Serbia. Ms. Mirjana Sakic https://www.dropbox.com/s/msgzztpjoxpwy1u/Ms.%20Mirjana%20Sakic%2C%20Erste%20Bank%20Serbia.pdf Sharrcem, Kosovo9, Mr. Yilber Burgija https://www.dropbox.com/s/07b4ntal04p5d0x/Mr.%20Yilber%20Burgija%2C%20Sharrcem%20Local%20Advisory%20Board%20Project%2C%20Kosovo.pdf Komercijalna Banka a.d. Skopje, Macedonia, Mr. Andrej Jovkovski https://www.dropbox.com/s/0douzfdrwqk4q37/Mr.%20Andrej%20Jovkovski%2C%20Komercijalna%20Banka%2C%20Macedonia.pdf Panel 2: “Ideas are Great, but What About the Context?” Mr. Zijad Softic, Municipality of Zenica and Ms. Irma Ahmic, NGO Medica, Bosnia and Herzegovina, https://www.dropbox.com/s/pwz5hlcx86jg4ak/Medica_Zenica.pdf Mr. Sokrat Mancev, NGO Izbor, Macedonia https://www.dropbox.com/s/vuvn2tlemz2h32i/Mr.%20Sokrat%20Manchev%2C%20NGO%20Izbor%20Macedonia.pdf Ms. Koviljka Tisma, National Employment Agency, Serbia https://www.dropbox.com/s/perhneqn3ff4os4/Ms.%20Koviljka%20Tisma%2C%20NAE%2C%20Serbia.pdf Presentation Ms. Daniela Keess, NGO CIRa, Macedonia https://www.dropbox.com/s/3ixif80j9fwmopo/Ms.%20Daniela%20Keess%2C%20Businesses%20in%20CSSP.pdf 9 * This designation is without prejudice to positions on status, and is in line with UNSC 1244 and the ICJ Opinion on the Kosovo declaration of independence.

* Овај назив је без прејудицирања статуса и у складу је са Резолуцијом Савета безбедности Уједињених нација 1244 и мишљењем Међународног суда правде о декларацији о независности Косова.

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Documentation Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

ANNEX III – Participants Name and Surname

INSTITUTION

1

Ms. Saliha Djuderia

Ministry of Human Rights and Refugees, Bosnia and Herzegovina

2

Ms. Irena Puzic-Penc

Ministry of Human Rights and Refugees, Bosnia and Herzegovina

3

Ms. Samira Huncek

Ministry of Security, Bosnia and Herzegovina

4

Ms. Irma Ahmic

NGO Medica, Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina

5

Ms. Sabiha Srna

NGO Zemlja Djece, Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina

6

Mr. Dragan Jokovic

7

Mr. Zoran Puljic

Mozaik Foundation, Bosnia and Herzegovina

8

Ms. Vesna Bajsanski Agic

Mozaik Foundation, Bosnia and Herzegovina

9

Mr. Zijad Softic

Municipality Zenica, Bosnia and Herzegovina

10

Mr. Dragan Bozic

Municipality Bijeljina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

11

Ms. Alma Berisalic

12

Mr. Dario Vins

13

Ms. Jasmina Dimiskova Rajkovska

14

Ms. Sanija Burageva

15

Mr. Socrat Mancev

NGO Izbor, Strumica, Macedonia

16

Ms. Daniela Keess

NGO CIRa, Macedonia

17

Ms. Eleonora Panceva Nikolovska

NGO Otaharin, Bijeljina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

ALMA&RAS Olovo, Bosnia and Herzegovina 49-FortyNine, Centre for Economic Solutions, Bosnia and Herzegovina NGO Open Gate, Skopje, Macedonia NGO Equal Access, Skopje, Macedonia

City of Skopje, Macedonia

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Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

Partnering for Sustainable Social Services 23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

18

Mr. Andrej Jovkovski

Komercijalna Banka a.d. Skopje, Macedonia

19

Ms. Suzana Vasovska

Supermarkets TINEXS, Macedonia

20

Mr. Nafi Saracini

EU Delegation, Macedonia

21

Ms. Sandra Dasic

Ministry of Home Affairs, Serbia

22

Ms. Koviljka Tisma

National Employment Agency, Serbia

23

Ms. Marijana Savic

NGO Atina, Belgrade, Serbia

24

Ms. Milica Djordjevic

25

Ms. Jadranka Gvozdenovic

26

Ms. Spomenka Ciric-Jankovic

27

Ms. Mirjana Sakic

Erste Bank a.d. Novi Sad, Serbia

28

Ms. Milica Bajkic

Holcim doo, Serbia

29

Ms. Dragana Ilic

Rockefeller Brothers Fund, Serbia

30

Ms. Tanja Bjelanovic

TRAG, Serbia

31

Ms. Hamijet Dedolli

NGO PVPT, Kosovo10

32

Ms. Valbona Citaku

NGO Hope and Homes for Children, Kosovo11

33

Mr. Valbon Krasniqi

City of Pristina, Kosovo12

34

Mr. Xhevat Aliu

35

Ms. Dajana Berisha

36

Mr. Yilber Burgija

NGO CIM, Belgrade Serbia City of Belgrade, Serbia Municipality of Novi Beograd, Serbia

Municipality of Gjilan, Kosovo13 Forum for Civic Initiatives, Kosovo14 Sharrcem, Kosovo15

10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 * This designation is without prejudice to positions on status, and is in line with UNSC 1244 and the ICJ Opinion on the Kosovo declaration of independence. * Овај назив је без прејудицирања статуса и у складу је са Резолуцијом Савета безбедности Уједињених нација 1244 и мишљењем Међународног суда правде о декларацији о независности Косова.

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Partnering for Sustainable Social Services

Regional Programme on Social Protection and Prevention of Human Trafficking

Documentation Sustainability Week on Protecting Victims of Human Trafficking and Improving Social Inclusion

23rd - 27th of September 2013, Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovina

37

Ms. Brikena Puka

NGO Qendra Vatra, Albania

38

Ms. Stela Tanellari

NGO Different & Equal, Albania

39

Ms. Ardiana Kasa

NGO Tjeter Vision, Albania

40

Ms. Jonida Dhroso

Municipality of Vlora, Albania

41

Mr. Albi Greva

Vodafone Foundation, Albania

42

Mr. Fabrice de Kerchove

43

Ms. Rebecca Surtees

KBF / Nexus

44

Mr. Wolfgang Jessen

GIZ SPPHT

45

Ms. Katrin Adams

GIZ SPPHT

46

Ms. Tatjana Junuzagic

GIZ SPPHT

47

Ms. Natalija Spasovska

GIZ SPPHT

48

Ms. Rrezarta Jashari

GIZ SPPHT

49

Ms. Stanislava Vidovic

GIZ SPPHT

50

Mr. Vlatko Aleksovski

GIZ SPPHT

51

Ms. Dubravka Milovanovic

GIZ SPPHT

52

Ms. Biljana Dijanisieva

GIZ SPPHT

53

Ms. Sarika Amruth

GIZ SPPHT

54

Ms. Barbara Dubach

Engageability, Germany

55

Mr. Andreas Pfeil

Dokeo GmbH, Germany

KBF

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GIZ/KBF Sustainability Week 2013 publication  

Publication from the week-long event "Partnering for Sustainable Social Services" organized by GIZ and KBF in Jahorina, Bosnia and Herzegovi...

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