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Paw

T*E*A*M

Providing care, hope

The Pongo Fund caps award-winning first year

Favorite Holiday

Accommodations Tips from the top

Daycare LY LOCAL

GRCOAWLLNY LO OWNED

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Holiday Gift Guide

Everything Pet In The Northwest • November 2010

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TM

We will donate $3 from the purchase of each PaWSitively Yours item to The Humane Society of the United States.

See our entire collection online

fredmeyerjewelers.com

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Spot Magazine | November 2010

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FeaTUreS

Paw

T*E*A*M

care, hoPe 18. Providing Selected for Willamette Week’s upcoming Give!Guide, the timing couldn’t be better for this group that provides free vet and related services (flea treatments, nail trims) — soon they’ll lose their current base of operations. Everything about this group is stunning: the number of vet professionals and laypeople giving their time and expertise, the number of clients and variety of services being provided monthly, the hardcore “M*A*S*H” feeling of the place (jobs well done, wacky humor and all), and the joy of just being among them.

deParTMenTS caps award-winning first year

17. PeT PhoTograPhY TricKS oF The Trade

14.

This month the Pongo Fund Pet Food Bank wraps a big first year that began and ends with awards. But before there was a warehouse and pallets of pet food, before there were awards, and long before there was a Pongo Fund, there was a man named Larry and a dog named Pongo. Here’s their story.

David Childs is a rare combination of high energy, lover of pets and people, gifted teacher and writer, and master photographer. When teaching the tricks of his trade, Dave shines: presenting simple concepts and easy-to-apply techniques that are surprisingly powerful — as seen in the assignments his students create.

7. MaTchMaKer

Favorite Holiday

Accommodations

Considering adding a new family member? Labs are hugely popular for many good reasons. Check out their breed basics, including temperament, common concerns and popular traits. Megan also highlights rescues specializing in the breed. This month: TheGreyhound.

aways for pets and their people.

6. reScUe Me

Tips from the top

Meet the precious foundlings who made their way to Spot this month. These are often babies who need an extra boost finding their way home — a little older, sometimes needing special care, often just too long in a shelter or foster home.

in time for the frenzy of booking for the holidays, the experts 11. Just are here to tells us what to look for, and what to avoid, when

26. FeTch crunchy little newsbits to chew on

Harris highlights vacation properties in popular locales that 8. Vonnie offer services and amenities that promise heavenly seasonal get-

Daycare

Holiday choosing doggie daycare.

Gift Guide

The skin doc is

gift-giving 22. The season is here! Spot presents a special selection of wonderful boutiques, artistans and products – just right for the pets and petlovers on your list!

in

Jon Plant was that rare kid who not only “wanted to be a vet24. Dr.erinarian” when he grew up, but who actually stayed the course to become one. A recent addition to the Portland area wellness scene, The Skin Doc is IN.

- Do it Yourself Dog Wash opens in Vancouver - Help CAT help - Pro-Bone-O activates Chip In - Whisker Wonderland kicks off holiday gala season - Time for Santa Paws Portraits - WHS hosts anniversary, open house - TTouch workshop supports Indigo - Merle’s Door author visits Powell’s - Tom & Mom Cat Special celebrates 10th anniversary - Pooch in the Pub: Good times for a great cause - Greenhill presents Art for Animals 28. MarKeTPLace/ - Online resources to bookmark cLaSSiFiedS - Candidates address animal issues - Use your voice . . . on the Animal Rescue site 29. FUrrY FUnPLanner - FDA cautions against online prescriptions

Spot Magazine | November 2010

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OUr TeaM Jennifer McCammon Publisher w/ Jack Publisher@SpotMagazine.net

Magazine Vol. 8 • No. 3 November 2010

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS > David Childs > Jake Faris > Vonnie Harris > Megan Mahan > Camilla Mortensen > Vanessa Salvia > Kristan Dael

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS > Marnie McCammon > Dantas Photography > David Childs Photography

Cover Model 411

aDVerTISING Jenny Kamprath Advertising w/ Willie & Bonne Belle Jenny@SpotMagazine.net

Jennifer McCammon w/ Broadway Publisher@SpotMagazine.net

MISSION: OUR MISSION

Companion and working animals are important, beloved members of the family. Spot Magazine is the one-stop resource for information, ideas, and events of interest to these animals and their people.

OUR POLICIES Spot Magazine welcomes opinions and letters to the editor. To be considered for publication, letters should be signed and include the writer’s full name, address, and daytime telephone (for internal use only). Spot reserves the right to edit letters for length and clarity. Mail to: Spot Magazine PO Box 16667 Portland OR 97292; Fax to: 503.261.8945; email to: publisher@spotmagazine.net. Opinions and ideas expressed by writers and/or advertisers herein are not necessarily endorsed by, or necessarily reflect, the opinions of Spot Magazine or Living Out Loud, Inc.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES:

aDMINISTraTION Marnie McCammon Eugene/Springfield Office w/ Zip & foster kitten Gage Marnie@SpotMagazine.net 541.741.1242

1 year $15; 2 years $25

SPOT MAGAZINE PO Box 16667 Portland, OR 97292 Voice 503.261.1162 Fax 503.261.8945 Published monthly. Distributed from Vancouver to Eugene/Springfield & Sandy to Forest Grove. All rights reserved. Reproduction (whole or part) without permission prohibited.

© 2010 LIVING OUT LOUD INC

Vonnie Harris Events, Distribution, Writer w/ Jake Vonnie@SpotMagazine.net 360.903.4174

Wendy Kohn DVM (L) is co-founder and director of PAW Team. Robyn Luchs is a longtime volunteer who coordinates all of PAW Team’s spay/neuter services. Here they are shown treating Trés, a cherished family member whose family has fallen on hard times. Kohn and Luchs are joined monthly by some 80 volunteers, including top veterinarians, vet techs, and amazing laypeople who are fiercely committed to helping, and lifting up the lives of others. Currently PAW Team operates out of a donated former grocery store at 30th and Division in Portland. That space will soon be unavailable to them, so they are actively seeking a new home for their monthly clinics. Donations (cash, a building) are greatly appreciated and will be put to excellent use. To learn more, visit pawteam.org.

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Jake Faris Webmaster, Writer w/ Buddy Jake@SpotMagazine.net

WWW.SPOTMAGAZINE.NET

SPOT MAGAZINE IS PRINTED IN PORTLAND, OR ON RECYCLED PAPER.

PrOUD SPONSOr

INTerN Megan Mahan Intern w/ Smokey Megan@SpotMagazine.net

Spot Magazine | November 2010

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Photo by Alicia Dickerson • Four Legged Photo

FrOM THe PUBLISHer

Jennifer McCammon With Broadway

T

hose of you who’ve been

are specific and easy to follow. This

The kids have been busy with

with us awhile know the Spot

Come hang out at Spot’s House!

month’s focus: cropping and ratio.

homework that their teacher Mary

We want to show off our latest ad-

crew is hard working, fun loving .

Best of all? Turns out the key to

Rankin developed around the

ditions (plus we love hanging out

. . and that we tend to regard the

exquisite shots isn’t the gear; David

magazine, and in the weeks and

with you!).

pet community as family. In fact, I

says it’s your awareness of the pres-

months ahead they’ll be sharing

call our website “Spot’s House,” and

ent moment.

with us their notes and photos,

our always simmering think-tank

stories and ideas.

“the kitchen.” And baby, lately the

We’re delighted to wel-

kitchen at Spot’s House is cookin’!

come these kids and their

Our tech hotshots, Jake and

teacher and aids, and

Vonnie, have been busy updating

eager to follow the ad-

“Spot’s House” — this month adding

ventures to come! I love

a rescue page (tied to both the

powerful models like this:

website and Facebook), featuring

proof that it takes so little

postings of adoptables, and needed

for so many to connect,

fosters and transports. Willamette

learn and thrive. Growing

Valley crew members Megan and

our communities takes a

Marnie will manage this, and are at your service to post things needed,

Teacher Mary Rankin, Jessica LeBoeuf and Jennifer

Another new addition to the

as well as happy endings (needs

Spot family is the special educa-

met). I’m excited to see this develop,

tion class of Silverton High School.

as it is no less than love in motion.

Silverton companies have helped

Please let us know if we can help,

us build them a delivery route, and

and be sure to visit and share!

Jake and I met with the students

Another new addition to the

last month, welcoming them to the

website is David Child’s photogra-

fold and prepping them for their

phy classes. I never anticipated we’d

new job (they already do dogwalk-

be hosting classes, and with such

ing, a little doggie daycare, and

talent at the “chalkboard!”

make/sell treats toward building their vocational and life skills). This

David’s tricks of the trade are easy to learn and apply, and his lessons

adds another wonderful new room

little effort, sure, but the

rewards are far greater. Please welcome the class of

A final, quick note: we’re now busy preparing for the Top Dog Awards. If you get a call from Spot in the weeks ahead, and we’re speaking in hushed tones, you’ll know you’ve won. A great deal of prep precedes the awards celebration in January, and it has begun. Thanks to all who voted (you TRIPLED last

Silverton High School! To the Silver-

year’s vote count!), and for all you

ton businesses who’ve welcomed

winners: talk to you soon. ‘ )

the kids, and allowed us to make Spot available to their guests and customers, Thank you! — They are: Silverton Fitness, LePooch Grooming, The Oregon Garden, Silvercreek Animal Hospital, Silverton Public Library, Silverton Senior Center and Wilco.

to Spot’s House. Spot Magazine | November 2010

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Rescue ME! Patience Ok, this may be a long shot, but I need a home and I’m something of a ‘fixer upper’. I have been long neglected and need someone to take the reins and restore me to my beautiful self. I have earned my name for being so patient with the medical treatment I have been given so far. What can you do for me? Provide me with high-quality food, medicated baths, and continued treatment for my skin and ears. At this time, I need a family with older kids only, because my ears are sensitive. If you have the time and resources for a dog like me, please ask to meet me today! I am about 4 years old and I weigh 53 pounds. Please call 503-988-7387 and ask for Patience, Animal ID# 516300. I can’t wait to meet you!

Puff Daddy Puff Daddy here. I’m a big dude with big hair. Don’t let my size scare you. I’m a lover, not a fighter. I’m a 3-year-old mellow guy who likes people and other cats. Despite my girth, I’m good at catching da bird and chasing da laser light. I’ve been waiting six months for a home. Please come meet me . . . I think you’ll like me! 503-292-6628.

Bingo & Daisy

Flynn

The home arrangements of this adorable, very adoptable rabbit couple changed quickly and dramatically. It would be good for them to get back in a home where they can move around and enjoy people. rabbitadvocates.org

This gentle 2-year-old boy is a small (45 lb.), neutered, Pit Bull mix. He is great with dogs and LOVES people! Flynn is a super friendly guy who likes to go on walks and cuddle at night and watch a movie with you. No cats. To meet Flynn, call Angela 503-888-4583, or visit www.bapbr.org.

Whiskers Life’s been pretty amazing so far — especially considering that I’m here today to say I’d love to show you what a joy a loving kitty can be! My past may be rough, but my future is bright: more so because you’re in it! At my previous home I was kept outside even though I’d sit on the porch crying to come in. There were dogs and cars and I was scared. Then one day it happened: someone shot me. The bullet can’t be removed but I can still play, though I drag my leg a little. You won’t find a more affectionate, loving kitty, and I’ll sure be glad to get home at last. Please call the nice people at Animal Aid to meet me: 503-292-6628.

Patches This lovely 9-year-old black and white lady is talkative, friendly and especially likes being groomed. This gentle girl likes a little quieter living space than what Greenhill has to offer, so you’ll find her in the Shy Room — a special space set aside for those cats who love people but who prefer a quieter pace of life with only a few gentle kitty friends. Patches gets along well with other cats, but dogs and children are a little too much for her. She was an indoorsonly kitty in her previous home before being transferred to Greenhill from another shelter. Patches has a lot of love to share and gives it freely: come see for yourself! Patch’s adoption fee is reduced through Thanksgiving. Call 541-689-1503 to meet her, or visit www.green-hill.org to learn more.

Mariad Best suited for a quiet household, Mariad is a bit shy. She is a sweet, affectionate lap cat who is mellow, likes to be petted, and is a champion kneader. Mariad loves attention, being touched, and softly talked to. For playtime she loves balls and play mice she can bat around. Tortoiseshell coloring is found almost exclusively in females, and Tortie cats are believed to bring good luck in the folklore of many cultures. Mariad would love to meet you! To meet her, contact CAT at 503-925-8903 or contactus@catadoptionteam.org.

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Matchmaker,

Matchmaker

Megan Mahan • Spot Magazine

THe GreyHOUND Trademark:

Greyhounds have been bred and used for racing because of their long, powerful legs, deep chest, and slight body, which allow them to reach speeds of up to 45 mph!

Personality:

Best Matches:

Known for their speed and grace, Greyhounds are also sweet and mild-natured. They are laid back, gentle and intelligent, and often become deeply attached to one person. Adoptable Greyhounds are often retired racers.

This breed should live indoors as they don’t have enough body fat to keep them warm for long periods outdoors. They typically have no problem adjusting to being retired athletes, but like all canines prefer structure and a routine.

Preferences: Not distance runners, Greyhounds are sprinters with short bursts of energy, and they sleep much of the time. They enjoy daily walks and are generally laid back. For their own safety they should run in fenced areas or on leash only; they’ve been bred to chase moving objects.

Size: 50-85 lbs. Life Expectancy: 12-14 years. Common Health Problems: Typically a very healthy breed, hereditary illness is rare. They are prone to bloat, however, so don’t run them for about 45 minutes before and especially after a meal. They can also injure the tips of their tails by wagging against hard objects.

Featured Rescue: Homes for Hounds, based out of Waldport, Oregon, places Greyhounds in forever homes throughout Oregon and Washington. Cee Cee is a 7-year-old female currently available. She’s a kennel favorite, and is cat and small animal safe and toddler friendly. What a sweetie! Visit www.homes4hounds.com to learn more about CeeCee and other adoptable Greyhounds.

Greyhound Tips: If you’re considering adopting a retired racer Greyhound, organizations like Homes for Hounds have a great support structure and thorough adoption process, providing great odds for finding your perfect match! Megan Mahan lives with visiting foster animals, quite a few fish, and her boyfriend in Eugene, Oregon. She has a ‘day job’ in an office, but devotes much of free time to fostering pets and creative writing. From her high school gig as Dog Bather to her more recent years working at the Santa Cruz SPCA, where she was contributing editor of the newsletter, Megan has always lived, loved and worked with an for animals.

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Favorite Holiday

Vonnie Harris • Spot Magazine

Accommodations

Hotels and vacation rentals roll out the red carpet for pets and their people The holiday season is traditionally a time to be with family, and for many of us that includes our animals. The Northwest is paws-down one of the most pet-friendly communities in the nation, and many properties offer superlative amenities, great rates, and spectacular services for holiday revelers, and our furry best friends. Spot sniffed out some great accommodations to consider for a holiday getaway this season, in some of our favorite getaway locales.

The Coast

A sense of tranquility grows exponentially with each mile nearer to your destination. Of course any trip to the coast should include the pooch, and coastal towns tend to be uber pet-friendly — the hard part might be choosing your favorite! Gearhart Ocean Inn No cookie-cutter rooms here! Attention to detail shines at this charming little inn. Super pet-friendly, dogs receive their own welcome basket complete with biscuits, beach towel, and blanket. The cozy loft bedroom is ideal for curling up in the dormer window with a great read. Or borrow a bike or kite from the inn and head four blocks for some beachside fun. The tiny town of Gearhart is just a block away, and it’s a quick drive to Seaside or Cannon Beach for more daytime options. $15 per pet per night with a maximum of 2 pets per unit. 503-738-7373 GearhartOceanInn.com

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You and your dog will enjoy romping on this secluded stretch of sand where even during summer months you may not encounter another soul. Owner Susy Wolfson has perfected the details in this completely remodeled haven away from home. Here you’ll awake to spectacular views, thanks to vaulted ceilings, numerous skylights and floor-to-ceiling windows. Other amenities include a sizable cedar deck and cheerful patio, roomy kitchen, a fireplace and games and movies galore. 503-662-5420 IdyllicBeachHouse.com Salishan Lodge Salishan’s breathtaking setting offers the perfect relaxed atmosphere with a cool back-to-nature vibe. The luxury hotel spa and golf resort’s 205 cabin-like rooms are designed for extraordinary comfort, with fireplaces, plush robes, comfy pillowtop beds . . . and a great big welcome mat for the dawg! Select rooms available for pet guests. Be sure to mention he/she will be traveling with you when making your reservation. 541-764-2371 Salishan.com

Central Oregon Cool, crisp mornings, pleasant sunny days — the high desert country of Central Oregon is a delightful place to enjoy a holiday retreat AND adventure with the furry ones! With no shortage of pet-friendly accommodations, Central Oregon is a great place to stay and play with your animals.

Horizon Rentals If you prefer tons of options, contact Horizon Rentals based in Lincoln City. With a generous inventory of pet-friendly vacation rental homes all along the coast, you can be as specific as you like and select from oceanfront, lakefront or mountain view homes, condos or cabins. Horizon Rentals has done the work for you in your version of perfection. Virtual tours of pet-friendly rental homes are just a click away. 541-994-2226 HorizonRentals.com

Bennington Properties The Bennington family loves dogs! Their 180+ family-owned dog-friendly vacation rental properties in beautiful Sunriver range from cabins to luxury homes. Dogs are guests too at Bennington Properties, and are greeted by name and given their own welcome package of doggie bowls, treats, bandanas, tennis balls and tags. All guests have access to the off-leash recreation area and complimentary self-service dog wash with grooming amenities. All you need to bring is your dirty dog! 888-610-9700 BenningtonProperties.com

Idyllic Beach House At the edge of a forest and off the beaten path just a block from the beach, the dog-friendly Idyllic Beach House can accommodate up to nine people.

Diamond Stone Guest Lodge Located between Sunriver and LaPine, a stay at one of Diamond Stone’s bed & breakfast or vacation lodge homes are picture-perfect getaways from civiliza-

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The dalles inn An historic site with abundant amenities and dog-friendliness make The Dalles Inn an ideal choice whether traveling on holiday, business or pleasure. Accepting dogs of all sizes, canine guests receive a basket of items to make their stay comfy. 541-296-9107 TheDallesInn.com Idyllic Beach House tion. The property proves you needn’t go far or pay a lot to recharge your batteries. Radiating a Norman Rockwell feel, Diamond Stone is not your average hotel. Hosts Doug & Gloria Watt let guests unwind with their own unique experience, complete with outdoor beauty, fresh air, family fun, and a little romance. Of course pets are always welcome! 866-626-9887 DiamondStone.com Sunriver resort This is canine paradise, thanks to thousands of acres of national forest brimming with hiking trails and lakes, over 30 miles of paved walking routes and bike paths, and plenty of wide-open spaces. The biggest and best-known resort in the area, Sunriver has over 70 pet-friendly accommodations in home rentals and lodge guestrooms and suites. Pet rates vary, so check when making reservations. Tell them Tivi sent you! 800-801-8765 Sunriver-Resort.com

Columbia River Gorge Hiking, waterfalls, windsurfing, photography, wildlife, birding — you can do all this and more during holiday travels through the Gorge. Eighty miles long and up to 4,000 feet deep with the north canyon walls in Washington and south canyon walls in Oregon, the Gorge is simply spectacular.

Many hotels and vacation rentals offer holiday and mid-week dis-

counts. If you’re planning a holiday adventure, call as soon as possible as policies, rates and availability change frequently. And be sure to ask about pet rates, limitations (some properties limit the number of pets allowed per room), and special amenities or services. There are many wonderful choices, and you should easily find the purrfect thing for you and your faithful co-pilot!

Vonnie Harris

is a freelance writer, and operator of BowWows & Meows Pet Services of SW WA. She and her brood, Jake and Jessie, both yellow Labs, and parrots Pedro (Yellow-Nape Amazon) and Lorali (African Grey) reside in Vancouver. Vonnie also is “the face of Spot” at many Portland-area pet-related events. Contact her at vonnie@spotmagazine.net.

Best Western hood river inn In the heart of the Gorge, this petfriendly lodging is convenient to almost everything the Northwest has to offer. Select from scenic waterfront or mountain view rooms that are comfortable, clean and affordable with riverfront access and private beaches. This shoreline hotel is an easy, scenic one-hour drive from Portland. Call for pet rates. 800-828-7873 HoodRiverInn.com

Spot Magazine | November 2010

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Tips from the top

Daycare

Spot sought out regional professionals considered experts in doggie daycare. Here they offer their expertise and opinion on the Top 3 most important Tips for pet parents seeking daycare.

Kristan Dael • Spot Magazine

1

NOaH’S arF

Find a daycare rich with exercise, socialization and play activities that will help your dog alleviate negative behavior at home due to boredom.

2

A trained staff that receives ongoing training from professional handlers and is knowledgeable in managing a large group of dogs. Policies to ensure the safety of the dogs and employees.

3

Your dog should feel welcome and excited to come to daycare. The main objective should be for the enjoyment of your best friend.

Personal Note

1306 NW 18th Ave Portland, OR 97209-2419 503-223-6624 Proprietor Kris Price

10

Noah’s Arf is a full-service pet care facility dedicated to high customer satisfaction for excellent service, quality pet care, and a fun, clean, enjoyable atmosphere. Services for both dogs and cats include indoor/ outdoor daycare, boarding, inhome care, grooming, self-wash, taxi, training, and products.

Spot Magazine | November 2010

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OPPOrTUNITy BarKS 1 ask for referrals Go to people you trust for referrals. Most of our clients have been referred by other clients, veterinarians, trainers and groomers.

2 Tour the Facility Call ahead to determine when you can tour the facility. Don’t be discouraged if staff isn’t available to meet with you if you drop in without an appointment; they are supervising the dogs, which gives you peace of mind that your dog is safe while having fun. Questions you can ask during your visit: a. What is the staff-to-dog ratio? Rule of thumb is 1 person: 10 dogs. b. What are the staff’s qualifications? c. How are new dogs integrated into the pack? d. What do the dogs do during the day and where do they play? e. What are the vaccine requirements? Are titers accepted? f. What is the acceptance process? g. Can staff accommodate senior dogs and dogs with special needs?

3 choose Wisely How did the staff and facility make you feel? Does it smell fresh and clean? Does it give you warm fuzzies or make your hackles rise? Did you leave feeling your dog would be well cared for? Follow your heart and you’ll make the best decision for you and your dog.

Personal Note

84293 Hill Top Drive Pleasant Hill, OR 541-726-8435 www.opportunitybarks.com Proprietors: Carol Rozek and Sonya Mandel

Opportunity Barks LLC opened its doors in May 2009 in Pleasant Hill, Oregon. Located on 2½ acres, the state-of the-art facility is designed to ensure the health and safety of your dog. Amenities include home-baked treats, central heating and A/C, lots of room to run, and endless love from the caring, knowledgeable staff. Also offered: training, daycare, boarding and educational workshops.

Spot Magazine | November 2010

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2 Play space options Just like people, dogs have their own personalities and like to hang out with like-minded friends, so it’s important to find a daycare that gives them options to socialize in ways they prefer. When seeking a daycare facility, find a place that separates dogs by activity level and/or size. More active dogs can romp around, while less active dogs can relax and enjoy a more peaceful setting.

3 check out the play space

SNIFF ORANGE PANTONE 144U GRAY PANTONE COOL GRAY 9C

1 Look, listen and smell The daycare facility should be clean, free from urine and fecal matter and odor, and properly ventilated and air-conditioned. In terms of safely, scout the facility for things like double-locked doors (which prevent escapes) and policies ensuring that dogs wear ID at all times. Last but not least, listen for happy ‘dog talk’ — this indicates a controlled daycare environment and doggy harmony.

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It’s important a facility does not overcrowd its play area. Dogs need space to play as well as rest during the day, and overcrowding can increase conflicts. Dogs spend much of their active daycare time running with their canine buddies, so it’s good to check out the play-area surface. Look for padded surfaces that are easy on paws and joints. Designated areas for downtime and napping spots are also important, as an afternoon siesta is often a part of every dog’s daily routine at daycare.

Personal Note Sniff Dog Hotel offers a variety of innovative services and amenities, including hotel-style boarding, daycare, salon grooming, and spa, massage, training, a 1828 NW Raleigh St., self-service dog wash and a cafe for huPANTONE 144U Portland OR ORANGE GRAY PANTONE COOL GRAY man9Cguests. Four-legged friends bask 503-208-2366 in the clean, fresh-smelling indoor-play sniffdoghotel.com area or relax in their very own standard Proprietors: Brothers Casey and room or luxury suite. Corey Murry and sister Jamie Mollas

Spot Magazine | November 2010

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STay A “one-size-fits-all” dog daycare doesn’t exist. The following is what we consider “must-haves.” Much of the rest that will guide your decision is personal taste.

1

Staff should be knowledgeable and well-trained to handle different dog behaviors. They should interact with the dogs, recognize and stop potential problems before they arise. Chatting amongst employees should be minimal, and the fewer squirt bottles you see the better! Rarely is a squirt bottle needed if attendants are proactively working to resolve behavior issues within a group.

2

An appropriately-sized play area. Just like people, dogs need their space. Too many dogs in a confined area can lead to problems. Check out the daycare to ensure your comfort. It’s also important for dogs to have an outside potty area — after all, that’s where most dogs are used to going! Some may be averse to tinkling indoors.

3

Staff to dog ratio. Our general rule is one attendant per 12 dogs. Each group of dogs, and how they interact, is different. It only takes one or two rowdy dogs to necessitate extra attendants. Ask how many dogs per staff member and confirm it yourself.

Personal Note Stay Pet Hotel, opened in 2006, is a boutique hotel for dogs offering all-inclusive luxury lodging. Stay features 43 Standard Suites, four large Deluxe Rooms with imported beds and flat-screen TVs, and 12,000 SF of play-yard space — including 4,000 SF of artificial turf and a large indoor play-yard. Social dogs may join a playgroup while not-so-social dogs receive individual playtime. Stay’s Spa offers baths, aromatherapy, brush-outs, nail trims and massage. Stay also offers training and K9 Nose Work classes. Does your dog Stay?

3606 NE Columbia Blvd. Portland, OR 503-288-7829 www.staypethotel.com

Spot Magazine | November 2010

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caps award-winning first year Jake Faris • Spot Magazine

Pongo on his 18th birtday Jan. 1989 Oct. 9, 2007

The Mission Providing quality dog and cat food for the animals of anyone in need...further protecting these animals from being abandoned or surrendered simply because their families cannot afford to feed them.

T

he Pongo Fund Pet Food Bank is wrapping a very big first year this month. November 8th, the young nonprofit, which has quickly become a vital community resource, celebrates its one-year anniversary, and Larry Chusid, Pongo Fund’s creator and director, will receive the Spirit of Portland Humanitarian Award in a ceremony hosted by the City of Portland. The year began with Chusid and The Pongo Fund receiving the Veterinary Service Award of Excellence from the Oregon Veterinary Medical Association, and the months between were rife with perhaps the greatest rewards of all: thousands of lives lifted, honored and served. But before there were neatly warehoused pallets of pet food, before the community accolades, and long before there was a Pongo Fund, there was a man named Larry and a dog named Pongo.

Spot Magazine | November 2010

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The seed planted during Chusid’s life with Pongo was nurtured by the conversations under the bridge — a seed that, as it turned out, would grow into the largest pet food bank in Oregon. As it happened, Chusid met the owner of Canidae All Natural Pet Foods at a pet event in May 2009. The chance meeting sent Chusid away with the heady realization that he had just received a commitment from Canidae to donate an initial supply of pet food — valued at $125,000. Shortly after,

Chusid grew up in Portland, attended PSU, and by 2009 had enjoyed many years as a successful entrepreneur. In 2001 his constant companion, Pongo, was diagnosed with acute kidney disease at age 12. Chusid set out to enjoy every precious day with his beloved canine. He didn’t know how long Pongo would live after his diagnosis.“Traditional veterinary care wasn’t helping,” says Chusid. With a grim prognosis and little time left, Chusid and his partner tried changing Pongo’s diet. Success! Cooking special meals and finding just the right pet food wasn’t easy, but like so many pet parents, they did it happily, and would have readily done more for the gift of keeping their best friend healthy and happy as long as possible. In October 2007, they finally bid their friend goodbye — Pongo had lived to be almost 19. Just a few weeks after Pongo’s passing, Chusid happened to meet two homeless pups with their people under the Morrison Bridge. Mindful of the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday, Chusid asked if there was anything he could help with. Dog food, they said. Really good dog food, Chusid thought. Chusid learned from the people under the bridge that they often shared human provisions from shelters and food banks in order to give their pets food. By this time he knew a great deal about the the nutritional needs of dogs, and that in this case neither human nor canine nutritional needs were being met. He returned to the bridge the next day with good quality dog food and pet supplies for the approaching winter.

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Chusid soon became a popular fixture in the homeless community, showing up with his car loaded with bags of quality pet food. After two years of running what was essentially a one-man pet food pantry, Chusid realized the job had become bigger than him.

Chusid received the same donation from Dogswell, another pet food company with a reputation for high-quality food. The law firm of Holland & Knight donated time and expertise to help Pongo file as a nonprofit. Then, in a few short weeks, Chusid had permission from the Portland Development Commission to use the then idle former headquarters of the Action Sports Network. There, just across from the Oregon Convention Center on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, Chusid opened The Pongo Fund’s doors for the first time in November, 2009. “When we opened that first day we probably had more volunteers than people,” says Chusid, remembering. Forty families left that day knowing that for the next month they wouldn’t have to worry about their best friend’s next meal. Chusid knows from experience what a relief it is to not have to worry about the health of four-legged family members.“The pet is the soul of the family,” he says.“If you feed the pet, you feed the family.”

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Now, nearly a year after opening, Chusid reports the food bank’s “total distribution probably impacts some 2,000 families per month. ”That means The Pongo Fund, by the end of 2010, will have provided some 1 million meals to hungry dogs and cats in need. A number like that provides a big picture — a really big picture — of what The Pongo Fund has become. But the devil is in the details, and sustaining the supply of high-quality food is the greatest challenge; of course, the initial $250,000 in food donations is long gone. “Our food is now secured through a mix of food and cash donations,” says Chusid. Because of the sheer quantity of food required, the need “greatly exceeds the individual bags of food that the community can reasonably donate to keep us supplied,” Chusid says.“We buy the majority of the food that we use, but we buy in large volume with extremely large discounts, similar to

the Oregon Food Bank.” For example, Pongo can buy several bags of Canidae dog food for the retail price of just one bag. “Thanks to the generosity of our food partners, we can buy quality food at a cost far, far less than lowerquality foods,” Chusid explains. This is the simple equation that leads to everyone winning: pets, humans and food banks.

“We’re dialed in like a for-profit business with our distribution network,” he says,“with several dozen regional food banks, partner agencies and programs to distribute emergency pet food . . . throughout Oregon and SW Washington.”

His many years of experience in the the private sector taught Chusid that before the doors opened, the distribution puzzle had to be solved.

The distribution channels also extend to human food banks, because, as Chusid explains,“it’s important to provide food to human organizations so that people don’t have to choose between feeding

themselves and feeding their pets.” With the logistics solved, Chusid focused on the money.“My experience has always been based on using my own dollars,” he says about his private-sector background.“And The Pongo Fund does not spend money carelessly.” From the beginning, Chusid’s goal for Pongo was zero administrative overhead. To help make that possible, the PDC lets the organization - Continued On Page 23

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Reader spotlight Meet Maddy May Rea We had talked about wanting a dog and had even picked the name Madchen (maiden in German) — Maddy for short. It was close to my birthday, and I was watching the paper. We weren’t sure we were ready, but had found some puppies and decided to just look. Yeah right, just look. This was to be my birthday dog, but I wasn’t particularly sold on any of the pups. But my daughter fell in love with a cute dapple male, and my husband, Jay, had a female in his arms, petting and talking to her. He asked what I thought.“I don’t know,” I said. He looked at me again and said,“We’ll take this one.” Maddy loves Jay. We call her Papa’s dog. Two years later she cradles in his arms like she’s done from that first day. SPOILED. She is the whole family’s dog though, sleeping with us or the boys. As long as someone has a blanket — she loves to be warm. If Papa’s watching TV, she’s in his lap. I think she hears him sit down and she’s there. Maddy also owns her block. No person or dog can pass without her having a fit. She chased the garbage man two blocks one morning! Very playful, tennis balls are her favorite. She actually pulls enough felt so she can carry them, by the felt. Like an only-child, she tosses the ball and plays by herself. Funny to watch. Unstuffs every stuffed animal she owns. Looks like it snows in the house sometimes. Maddy likes to go with the boys on the longboard or bike, too. She’s also very sneaky. Loves certain forbidden foods, Starbucks lattes (accidentally left her in the car with one), and popcorn! She’ll get to unattended food on the table even with all the chairs pushed in, and even if the food is packaged or sealed. The latest . . . I bought one of the boys a cookie from Sweetlife Bakery. We came home to find the bag empty . . . figured she got it, oh well. Two weeks later . . . I found the cookie buried under a stack of clothes to be donated by the front door. Un-eaten. We figured, saving it for later, huh?

“tennis ba lls are he

I traveled to California last week, came home, emptied a bag of packaged nuts, r favorite” etc. onto the table. Left and came back from dinner. Thought,“Wow, what a good dog — she didn’t get up there and steal anything.” . . . The next night, getting into bed, I hear her digging at something. She was uncovering Twizzlers from the table she’d apparently buried and was saving for later. Such a silly little thing, so loving, very entertaining, and a fun addition to our family. Her Birthday is May 14, 2008. We call her Maddy May Rea, and many other terms of endearment.

Constance Rea Eugene, Oregon 16

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Tricks of the Trade. . . one frame at a time with David Childs

Highlighting your message Last month we discussed how staying aware of everything in our viewfinder can help us make more cohesive and powerful photographs. This month we’ll look at how we can use the edges of our photos to help. As photographers we get to share moments and things we find meaning in. But one of our challenges is clearly revealing what we found meaningful. Generally we don’t want our viewers to have to work hard or guess. If the viewer isn’t related to you they aren’t likely to spend much time trying to discern your message absent clear sign posts. Perhaps the clearest and easiest signposts you have in your toolbox are the edges of the frame. To use them effectively you first must be clear on what your message is. A common trap is having more than one unrelated message. For instance, if you have a photo of both your cat playing and your dog drinking water you need to consider your message. If the cat playing is what excites you, you may want to narrow in to just that. But maybe your message is how great it is that your dog and cat are at ease in the same room. There’s no right or wrong answer, but you need to choose. One nice thing is that you can sometimes choose after making the photo. If you’re using software to view and edit your photos you very likely have a crop tool. This tool allows you to select a region

within your photo and throw everything outside of that region away. If you haven’t used a crop tool before, they’re usually pretty simple, especially with tips from the program’s help page or manual. In the example photo with your cat and dog, if you decide your desired focus is the cat playing, the crop tool should be ideal. If you find that your subject — the playing cat — is on the right side of the frame and your dog drinking is on the left,

age. Our cameras have a set aspect ratio but there’s nothing magical about it. Consider it a starting point. Some photos are stronger as a square; others work better tall and narrow, while others are best wide and thin. This is a whole other space for your creativity to run free.

And the right answer for any given photograph is simply whatever you feel communicates your vision best.

Study with David live! His pet photography classes are offered at OHS. Details, DavidChildsPhotography.com.

This month’s assignment

Have fun trying a different aspect ratio than your camera produces. You might try a square portrait of a face, a tall vertical of your cat stretching, or try a wide panoramic of just an outstretched leg — anything that lets you experiment with a different aspect ratio than you normally use. I hope this assignment helps expand your creative toolbox and can’t wait to see your shots!

CLASS RECAP Try the exercise

Send your photos from the assignment to: David@ DavidChildsPhotography.com. Please put “Spot Photo Class” in the subject line Visit www.SpotMagazine.net and click on “Photography 101” to see your photos and those of your fellow students Share your great work with your friends!

Check out David’s tips and comments Meet David here in December for your next session!

David Childs David Childs is a professional photographer, photo journalist, instructor, and animal advocate. You can see his work or contact him at www.DavidChildsPhotography.com

you’re in great shape: just crop out the left side of the frame and keep only the playing cat you’re excited to show the world. Before saving the cropped version it’s a good idea to save a backup of the original so you can make different choices in the future. Now that we’ve cropped out the left side of the frame you’ll notice the new version of the photo has a different aspect ratio — the ratio of the height to the width of the imSpot Magazine | November 2010

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Paw T E A M * * *

Providing help for animals, hope for humans Jake Faris • Spot Magazine

A

line of people flows from the entrance of the building around the corner to the end of the block on Division Street in Portland. People are standing, sitting, chatting about where work is, or what brings their furry companion to the clinic today. 18

Some faces are drawn with anxiety. Is this really the clinic they’ve heard about? Is this where they can get vaccinations, flea treatments, an expert’s opinion, nails trimmed? For free? It is. The space, formerly home of Nature’s grocery, is currently the site of Portland Animal Welfare

(PAW) Team’s monthly clinic, where around 80 volunteers help people in financial need with their animal companions. To get the full experience of what Wendy Kohn, PAW Team’s Executive Director, describes as “controlled chaos,” this writer was on the scene as an embedded journalist on a recent unseasonably warm Sunday.

Veteran volunteer Melissa Sillitoe introduced herself to Brenda Vigue and her black Pug, Piddles, as they emerged from the line to enter after their was number called. Sillitoe would move with Vigue through the stations, illustrating the temporary but essential partnership between volunteer and client that keeps PAW Team’s chaos so organized.

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Volunteers like Sillitoe are the advocates and extra hands at the examining table. While helping complete forms they chat about the bond that unites everyone here — the welfare of our animal companions. Vigue and Piddles have been together since the pug was born eight years ago. This past year, while struggling to get back on her feet, Vigue has been treating Piddle’s skin condition herself. Judging from the crusty, hairless skin on Piddles’ chest and sides, Vigue hadn’t yet found a cure in available over-the-counter products. She did however, catch a break along the way when she found Jean’s Place, an all-women’s shelter that allowed Piddles.

Vigue felt the desperate situation was over: hope was written on her face. Piddles, on the other hand, didn’t look so hopeful. Fidgeting and squirming, Vigue translated,“She knows she’s at the vet.” The forms were completed just as Vigue was told a vet was ready. Positioned at each of nine tables forming a loose horseshoe around the room were a veterinarian and two vet techs. Sillitoe escorted Vigue to a table where a diminutive man

“PAW Team has been selected for Willamette Week’s 2010 Give! Guide, out Nov. 10. Check it out at wweek.com At Jean’s Place Vigue heard about PAW Team for the first time. Awaiting her turn with the vet that Sunday, Vigue looked up from the form she and Sillitoe were filling out and said, in a voice filled with emotion, “If it wasn’t for this program she’d probably die.” Though it might sound like hyperbole to someone with access to a vet, Vigue believes this. And it’s true: small, easily treated maladies left untreated can become life-threatening. For someone who can’t afford vet care, that’s a very real threat to the life of their cherished — and sometimes only — companion. As she sat holding Piddles and chatting with Sillitoe, it was apparent

in a Yankees ballcap greeted her with a charismatic smile. This was Dr. Emilio DeBess, and he immediately began examining Piddles while asking her mom about the dog’s medical history. Dr. DeBess, who is Oregon’s State Public Health Veterinarian, found that Piddles was suffering from an extensive fungal skin infection as well as Dry Eye Syndrome, caused by Piddle’s inability to produce tears. DeBess’ team — all volunteers — used every resource, from thick manuals to personal smartphones, to ensure Piddles received the best possible care.

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Paw T*E*A*M By the time Piddles left the table her inoculations were current and Vigue had the run-down on all medications and treatments she would need. Piddles was of course ready to leave the premises, but there remained one last stop: to find a new collar from a selection of donated pet supplies. The organization that means hope for Vigue, Piddles and so many like them, began as a loose network of compassionate veterinarians and vet techs working independently amidst the region’s homeless community. Uniting their efforts under one organization, they received nonprofit status in 2004 and PAW Team was born.

That’s when the owners of the former Nature’s grocery building on SE Division offered PAW Team temporary use of the space. The building’s spacious first floor is perfect for the monthly clinics.

The most needed donation, Kohn says, is money.“We buy all our vaccinations and flea medications,” which, as it happens, top the list of preventative treatments for good pet health.

Sillitoe would move with Vigue through the

The dramatic rise in pets attending the clinics has further tightened an already strained budget; PAW Team spends about 90% of its budget on running the clinics.“We have quadrupled the number of people we’re seeing [this year],” says Kohn.“We have had to stop our emergency referral,” which allowed pets to receive further veterinary care from partner clinics.

stations, illustrating the temporary but essential partnership between volunteer and client that keeps PAW Team’s chaos so organized. Free clinics held in parking lots under temporary canopies served 20 to 40 pets at quarterly intervals. This number steadily grew to an average of 70 pets as more people learned about the clinics, especially after the economy collapsed in 2008. After breaking records for pets seen in 2009, the PAW Team board of directors decided to conduct clinics monthly, in an effort to reduce the strain on volunteers and staff. 2010 was a year of surprises. The number of pets the clinic helped each month surged past 100. In May the venue hosting the clinics closed. PAW Team was without a site for its clinics at a time when the pets counting on them was at peak levels. 20

Kohn explains that the fit goes beyond the building.“This is such a pet friendly, dog friendly neighborhood,” she says.“Nearby businesses have helped out with donations. Neighbors have come in and volunteered.” Because PAW Team relies heavily on volunteers, from escorts to vet techs and groomers, they are always seeking folks willing to give a few hours one Sunday each month to help provide pets with critical medical attention. Also, if anyone in the pet community has pet supplies looking for a home, PAW Team will make sure they find their way to people who need them.

PAW Team treated 180 pets at the clinic that warm October Sunday. That day, between his 12th and 13th client, Dr. DeBess pointed out that more donations might mean better diagnostic tools. Even something as simple as a microscope or “snap” tests for parvo and the Feline Leukemia Virus would mean better care for those pets seen each month. While DeBess hopes for simple tools, Kohn’s focus is the future.“We need help with funding to stay open for longer than two months,”

she says, adding,“Even more critical, we need to find a permanent home for our clinics. There is much reason to hope. And boosting that hope is PAW Team’s selection for Willamette Week’s 2010 Give! Guide. Coming out November 10, the guide has become a Portland tradition and boon to nonprofits. According to WW’s website, last year the campaign raised over $900,000 that reached 79 organizations. Kohn doesn’t know what the future holds for PAW Team, but one Sunday a month the immediate impact of the volunteers and veterinary professionals is clear: healthy pets and hope on human faces.

Jake Faris

is a freelance writer who’s worn many different hats, including a hardhat and the 8-point hat of a police officer. Jake and his wife Charity live with their two cats and four dogs in Beaverton. The whole pack moved to Portlandfrom Wenatchee, WA three years ago. Now a dedicated Oregonian, Jake finds new reasons to love his adopted state every day. Contact him at jake@spotmagazinenet

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The Canines © 2009, Willem K. Isenberg And I saw the intruders weren’t humans but dogs and my puppy was leading the pack.

My dog has led a quiet life throughout his years with me For all he does is sleep and eat and naps from noon to three.

He saw me and pleaded they meant us no harm, but were planning to conquer our race “We shall save you from warfare and crime,” he declared “and shall rule you in kindness and grace.”

My dog and I would often walk until the daylight ends When evening comes we’ll rest outside in peace the best of friends.

The dogs have ruled us thirty years they kept us free from war The crimes and sins that troubled man shall bother us no more.

But last night as I lay in my bedroom asleep, I woke when I witnessed a flash An explosion resounded the neighborhood air and our ceiling dissolved into ash

Willem Isenberg is a young author who resides in Idaho. He has contributed works to Spot and its previous sister publication from the time he started creating masterpieces . . . in early childhood. Willem and his family are proud members of Team Spot.

In the street the invaders were marching about from my door I could see the attack NVS_SM_AD_1110_FINAL_Layout 1 10/14/10 2:08 PM Page 1

First Aid for Your Best Friend.

Photo © H2Meyer Photography

VCA-Northwest Veterinary Specialists presents a hands-on lab and lecture to learn everything you need to know about canine/feline first aid. This will include a CPR and bandaging demo/lab as well as an open forum for questions. We will discuss common emergencies including heat stroke, bloat, and brachycephalic airway syndrome as well as the 5 most frequent toxicities that we see in the ER. Each participant will receive a CPR certificate.

CLIENT VETERINARY EDUCATION SERIES:

CANINE AND FELINE FIRST AID COURSE + CPR CERTIFICATION

Date: Sunday, November 14th Cost: Free Time: 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Location: Urban Fauna (235 NW Park in the Pearl)

How to register: Email contactnwvs@vcahospitals.com or call 503-656-3999 Learn CPR and Other Pet First Aid Receive a CPR Certificate Enjoy Light Snacks and Refreshments Register for a Pet First Aid Kit Giveaway

Presenters:

www.vcanwvs.com

16756 SE 82nd Drive • Clackamas, OR 97015 •

503-656-3999

Dr. Rochelle Low, Medical Director VCA-NWVS Dr. Heidi Houchen, Blood Bank Director Dr. Gretchen Sicard, Surgeon

Spot Magazine | November 2010

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Holiday

Gift Guide

Holiday Portraits

Heartwarming portraits of people and the animals they love!

Dog Treats

Organic, handmade dog and treats, foods, toys and much more. www.twopugsbrand.com

Treats

Toys, Gear -- eveyday’s a Holiday at The Dog club! www.dogclub4u.com

www.lammphoto.com 503 682-2277

SuperSoft Ultra Pet Bed comfy and Warm! Find this and other gift ideas for your pets at your local BI-MarT store. Browse our pet beds, toys and otehr pet supplies. www.bimart.com

Spunk Level ll

Gife the Gift of Good Health 888-921-2882 www.equerrys.com

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Toys

Gifts, toys, accessories, gear one of a kinds. Daycare, selfwash and grooming 503-850-4088

Spot Magazine | November 2010

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- Continued From Page 15

Pet Massage

The perfect gift for your best friend... heal offers classes and specialized massages. www.healnw.com

use what would otherwise be empty space while awaiting redevelopment. To further reduce overhead, the entire staff — from board members to greeters — are all volunteers. There are no paid employees. As the full time director, Chusid himself volunteers 70 hours weekly, and the total number of volunteer hours logged each month is just shy of 500. For Chusid, it’s a simple equation.“If I were paid we’d have less money to pay it forward.” “My whole life has changed,” says Chusid.“It’s not for everyone, but for me it’s exactly what I’m supposed to be doing.”There’s no heat in the warehouse, no A/C. The water from the taps isn’t drinkable. And yet, as Chusid says, it’s “just one of the happiest places to be.”

Oregon Humane

If you stop by Pongo on the second or fourth Sunday morning of the month, you’ll see people start to form a line at about 9:30. Friends say “Hi,” and volunteers are everywhere, checking on regular clients, getting to know first-time visitors, working to make people feel comfortable.

www.oregonhumane.org

Once seated in the waiting area, clients complete paperwork, chat, and check out photos of Pongo’s friends on the wall. If they have health questions about their pet they can check in with Dr. Emilio DeBess, Oregon’s Public Health Veterinarian, who regularly stops by. Though The Fund doesn’t have clinic facilities, DeBess is a great resource for concerned pet parents.

Honor a pet or loved on this Holiday Season!

Mosaic

custom Pet Portraits on a 12” Mosaic Stepping Stone www.dogsteppingstones.com

k-dub designs

After an initial consultation with clients, volunteers match the food on hand with the need. After filling an order, distribution volunteers check with each client before they leave.“We want to make sure they understand what they’re getting in terms of quality and what effects they might see,” Chusid explains. Switching pet food can be tricky, and volunteers work to ensure there are no unpleasant surprises. Complementing the wall photos of Pongo’s puppy friends are framed partner logos. For Chusid, all of these photos are a reminder of why he does what he does and who made it possible.“Without Canidae, Dogswell, the Portland Development Commission, Papé [who donates the forklift], our volunteers . . . ” Chusid’s gesture indicates many others,“we wouldn’t be here.” This writer met Chusid just over a year ago, as he was soul-searching the question of whether to undertake the creation of The Pongo Fund. Now, asking how he felt about it all, about how things have gone, he replied,“It went the way it was supposed to go. I think we can tell by the number of tails wagging.” On Nov. 15th, Canidae will launch their Buy One, Give Some! Help Feed a Hungry Pet For the Holidays pet food drive. For every 35 & 44 lb. bag of All Life Stage food bought at participating premium dog food supply stores, Canidae will donate another 5 lb. bag to The Pongo Fund.

ThePongoFund.org

503-939-7555

Jake Faris

is a freelance writer who’s worn many different hats, including a hardhat and the 8-point hat of a police officer. Jake and his wife Charity live with their two cats and four dogs in Beaverton. The whole pack moved to Portlandfrom Wenatchee, WA three years ago. Now a dedicated Oregonian, Jake finds new reasons to love his adopted state every day. Contact him at jake@spotmagazinenet Spot Magazine | November 2010

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The skin doc is Vanessa Salvia Trailer • Spot Magazine was one of those Dr.kidsJonwhoPlantalways wanted to be

I chose dermatology. I was interested because it was visual field.

a veterinarian. While many say that as kids, in time, most switch to other interests. Not Dr. Plant.“I stuck with it all through high school and college, and I didn’t give up on it,” he says. Plant graduated from veterinary school at Oregon State University in 1988, but as his career evolved over the years, he found himself in consulting and academia. Until last year that is, when he opened his own clinic after realizing that directly helping patients was what he really wanted to do. Plant grew up outside of Eugene, with grandparents who owned a Gresham-area farm.“My grandfather raised cattle,” says the doctor.“I was always around animals.” Plant took undergraduate classes at Reed College. After graduating in ’88 he began a two-year residency in southern California with wellknown pet dermatologists Wayne

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IN ”

- Dr. Jon Plant

Rosenkrantz and Craig Griffin. The three men were partners and co-owners of Animal Dermatology Specialty Clinic in Marina del Rey for 15 years.  In 2005, Plant moved to Corvallis, Oregon, where he was among the first clinical faculty to join the newly-established small animal teaching hospital at the OSU Veterinary School, a post he held for three years. In ’08 he went to work with Banfield, The Pet Hospital in Portland, providing consultations

and continuing education to their vets.“I missed working directly with patients and pet owners,” says Plant, “so in September 2009, I decided to start the SkinVet Clinic in Lake Oswego.”  Following veterinary school, vets can decide to specialize and enter a residency program, just like human doctors do, for additional training. “I chose dermatology,” says Plant. “I was interested because it was a visual field.” Unlike internal medicine, with skin health issues, you can actually see what’s happening with the body. A new specialty emerging in the ’80s, the doctor says,“When I entered into it there were only about 60 board-certified veterinary derma-

tologists in the country.”  Allergies in pets usually develop between ages two to five. In his practice Dr. Plant sees about 90 percent dogs and 10 percent cats with skin issues, many with chronic problems.“What I see runs the gamut of the same kinds of skin problems that people can get,” he says.“I think it’s underestimated by some just how much itching impacts the pet’s quality of life and their interaction with people.”  When pets are itchy or their skin smells bad, their important relationships with people are affected. The challenge lies in determining whether the itching is caused by allergic reactions to fleas or other

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insects, environmental allergens such as grasses and pollens, or food allergies. The most common causes in our region are dust mites and fescue grass pollen. After an intake exam and looking at the allergenic history of the animal, Dr. Plant develops a testing or treatment plan. An important first step is ruling out other possibilities, such as bacterial or fungal skin infections. Embarking on a controlled diet for a few months can help determine if the problem is a food allergy. Ear problems are also common. “We’re seeing dogs that have aller-

gies first and chronic infections of the ear canal,” says the doctor. They can be caused by yeast at first and bacterial infections later.”The more chronic the infection, the more difficult to resolve.“We use fiber optic video to go into the ear canal to examine more in-depth what’s going on,” says Plant.“It’s one of the more rewarding things we do, because ear infections are frustrating and they tend to be recurrent.” Veterinary dermatologists can perform blood or skin prick tests to identify offending substances. These, however, can give false negatives or positives, so having a record of the pet’s exposure and allergic reaction

to investigate whatever might be causing your pet’s discomfort. Skin problems are common, and specialists like Dr. Plant really want to help. “It’s nice to be able to contribute to their wellbeing,” he says,“and see the rewards of making them feel If you’re a cat owner, consider yourself lucky: cats don’t experience better.” skin problems as frequently as dogs. Learn more at skinvetclinic.com or by calling 503-352-3376. For dog guardians, don’t hesitate history can really help.“Allergy immunotherapy is one of several treatment options available for pets with allergies,” Plant says.“I usually teach pet owners to administer allergy shots themselves.”

Vanessa Salvia Trailer

Vanessa Salvia lives with her two kids , one very sweet, fluffy cat (named Fluffy), and a husband (also very sweet) in Eugene, Oregon. When not clickety-clacking on a computer, you can find her browsing the farmer’s markets or feeding ducks from her patio. A freelance writer for more than 10 years, Vanessa has written extensively about music and entertainment in the Northwest. As mom, wife and companion to countless animals over the years, she has vacuumed more than her share of pet fur.

Check out 2 Dogs 2,000 Miles. Cancer has touched most of us at some time — through friends, family members, us. This blog moved me to actually get involved to honor those affected by cancer in my life. Maybe it will touch you, too.

2 Dogs 2,000 Miles

Kennedy Morgan • Spot Magazine

People used to keep diaries. Then they journaled. Now we blog. When it comes to pet blogs, many feature stories that are funny, educational, and chock-full of pictures. Spot’s Blog Report will bring you pet blogs that piqued our interest and we believe you’ll enjoy. First up is 2 Dogs 2,000 Miles (2dogs2000miles.blogspot.com/), an offshoot of the website of the same name. The writer, Luke Robinson, had his heart broken and the course of his life changed when his dog Malcolm lost his long fight with bone cancer. Selling or storing everything he owned, Robinson and his remaining two dogs, Murphy and Hudson, hit the road. Theirs was an amazing journey. They trekked from Austin to Boston, garnering support from around the globe as they went. Robinson’s goal? To honor all pets lost to cancer. The stories are touching. Heartbreaking. Inspiring. Many posts also serve to teach more about cancer. As fate would have it, 2 Dogs 2,000 Miles evolved to become more than the blog or the walk of one man. Each step he, Murphy, and Hudson took led to the formation of a nonprofit that raises money for one thing — cancer research. After 826 days, Robinson’s journey in many ways is starting over. In August Murphy was also diagnosed with cancer and is undergoing treatment. Despite this step backward, all of Robinson’s strides forward — more than 2,300 miles — are keeping him going. The ongoing saga of Murphy’s treatment and battle with The Big C continues in this engaging, heartwarming blog.

Spot Magazine | November 2010

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FETCH

Crunchy Little Newsbits To Chew On

Pro-Bone-O activates chip In

Help caT help Every month, Cat Adoption Team distributes over 2,600 lbs. of cat food. For perspective, that’s about the weight of a 2007 Ford Focus. That translates to keeping cats in homes with their families. Demand on the food bank has exceeded 624 percent since it opened in 2008. Want to help? All cat food given out is donated by animal lovers. In addition to food, CAT needs scoopable litter and small bags of unopened, unexpired cat food (3.5 to 8 pounds). Learn more at catadoptionteam.org.

Janetta Overholser, board member of the Community Veterinary Center, checked in recently to say the group is working to obtain funding to complete Phase 1 of its project by year-end, which includes moving the twice monthly ProBone-O clinics into the building. The group is asking friends and family to Chip In! — contributing $5 toward their goal. Access their Chip In page through this link: sugarbabies. chipin.com. For more details, visit communityvet.org or proboneo.org.

Whisker Wonderland kicks off holiday gala season

I’m feeling better. Watch out cat! Strength. Ability. Recovery.

503-546-8995 | www.backontrackvetrehab.com 26

If Merle’s Door captured your heart . . .

Cat Adoption Team’s 7th annual Whisker Wonderland silent/live auction is happening Friday, Nov. 5 at 6pm at the Crystal Ballroom in Portland. Encoring this year is the Pussycat Package, which @ $125 per person, includes a signature drink, a drink voucher, a CAT totebag and travel mug, and cat toys and goodies. The first 50 to purchase Pussycat Packages will also receive $100 gift cards toward portraits by pet photographer Kathi Lamm. The folks at CAT are feline-clever when it comes to galas, and they’ve come up with several purrfect ways — like the Golden Ticket and Bottomless Champagne Class — to make sure this event tickles your whiskers. Details 503-925-8903, ext. 257.

You’ll be delighted to learn that author Ted Kerasote has delivered another treasure with Pukka The Pup After Merle, and will be appearing in support of this latest effort Nov. 11 at 7:30pm at Powell’s on Hawthorne in Portland. Told in the voice of Ted’s new pup and bursting with over 200 photos, Pukka tells the story of Ted and a young yellow Lab, recounting their early bonding while exploring Kelly, Wyoming and the wider world. Walks became hikes, hikes became

climbs, with their adventures culminating in a rugged wilderness journey that teaches both Pukka and Ted something new about the dog-human partnership. Pukka is a love story as well as Ted’s take on raising a puppy. It does pictorially what Merle did with words — show how dogs thrive when treated as partners, while illustrating the many ways dogs open the doors to our hearts. Learn more at kerasote.com.

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WHS has served over half a million animals since its inception in 1965, providing services including humane education, training classes, kids’ summer camps, and a low-cost spay & neuter clinic. Details HYPERLINK “http://www.willamettehumane.org” willamettehumane.org.

Ho, Ho, Ho Yeah! It’s that time Santa Clause is coming to town Nov. 6 & 7, noon-3, as Santa Paws Portraits returns to raise funds for the Oregon Humane Society. Cats, dogs and other pets can pose with Santa and, for $20, get two professional 5x7 portraits, a holiday card and more. Santa’s schedule at Fred Meyer Garden Centers is: Saturday: Interstate, Johnson Creek, Tualatin & Beaverton Sunday: Gateway, Hollywood, Oregon City & Raleigh Hills

WHS hosts anniversary and open house Willamette Humane Society’s 45th anniversary celebration and open house is happening Nov. 6, 11am-6pm, at the shelter in Salem. Activities include fun, informative seminars on the half-hour by guest speakers addressing topics like Understanding Your Dog, Grooming Tips, Enrichment for Cats, and more. Davenport’s Den, the shelter’s onsite pet supply store, will offer specials, reduced adoption fees will be in effect, and door prizes will be in the offing.

TTouch workshop supports Indigo A TTouch workshop Sunday, Nov. 7, 10am-4pm, at Indigo Ranch in Vernonia, OR will support Indigo Rescue. TTouch addresses physical and behavioral issues such as fear, aggression, timidity and other reactive behaviors, and supports recovery from illness. TTouch also helps deepen the human/animal bond. The day-long workshop will introduce TTouches, calming signals, and techniques that support healthy nervous system response. Exercises will be tailored to attending dogs. Details indigoranch.org.

Be the Cat’s Meow: Spay – Neuter – Save Lives So says the group behind the Tom & Mom Cat Special, which celebrates its 10th anniversary Saturday Nov. 13, 1-5pm, at Western Pet Supply in Portand. The daylong celebration will feature a raffle and silent auction, light bites by local vendors, face painting, handcrafted items for sale, and more. The event is family- and pet-friendly, and is a chance for community members to gather for fun and food, contests and giveaways — all while helping

the critically important cause of spay/neuter. The Tom & Mom Cat Special enables families to keep their pets, reduces the number of cats surrendered to local animal shelters, and saves feline lives. To learn more, visit spayoregon.org.

Pooch in the Pub: Good times for a great cause Project POOCH and Dave’s Killer Bread present Project POOCH’s 17th anniversary fundraiser Thursday, Nov. 18, 6:30 -10pm at the beautiful Tiffany Center in Portland. Highlights include entertainment by guitarist Jay Bird Koder, silent and live auctions, great edibles and good company. Proceeds support Project POOCH, a nonprofit that provides opportunities for incarcerated youths to learn patience, responsibility and compassion through working with shelter dogs. Admission is $50/advance, $60/ door, and includes a hosted bar, hors d’oeuvres and dinner. For tickets or more info, visit poochinthepub. org or contact Susie@pooch.org or 503-697-0623.

Been to Spot’s House lately? Come Ovah!

www.spotmagazine.net

Greenhill’s Art for Animals returns One of the most highly anticipated events of the season, Art for Animals is being held in two adjacent retail spaces at Crescent Village, 2772 Shadow View Dr. in Eugene. The event is happening Nov. 19, 6:30-9pm, at this bustling new urban village full of eateries, shops, and a wine bar. The evening will feature live music by Mark Alan, food, wine, and beautiful art open to bids. To learn more, visit green-hill.org.

This hit the radar at press time, and while we couldn’t determine whether the group behind this site works to support Pit Bull rescue and/or related concerns, Spot’s publisher is an old San Rio fan and deemed this item “too cute not to share.”We hope it’s helping the Pits. But hey, even if it’s not directly, wearing positive messages about Pitties can only help, right?

www.DavidChildsPhotography.com

Spot Magazine | November 2010

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MarKeTPLace

PET FRIENDLY SHOPPING OF THE HIGHEST QUALITY Compassionate Care

Home Pet Euthanasia and Aftercare Service

503.880.1172 Lori Gibson, D.V.M. lori@drlorigibson.com Supporting the human-amimal bond

Muttley Crew The 806 NW Murray Blvd. Portland, OR 503-626-8212 www.themuttleycrew.com

Open Monday-Friday 6:45am to 6:30pm Saturday 8am to 4pm

High Quality Kibble and Raw Foods for Dogs and Cats

EVO • Origen • Taste of the Wild • NOW Primal Nature’s Variety Dog Daycare, Grooming & Premium Pet Supplies

Brody’s DogHouse,LLC Pet Boarding/ B & B Andrea M. Schacher 503-830-7005 Donald, OR Brodysdoghouse@gmail.com

cLaSSIFIeDS ADOPTION coMPanionS For LiFe 300 cats & kittens looking for forever home, altered, tested, vaccinated, microchipped, indoor, ready to love. adoption fee $85-$125. M-F: 11-7, Sa-Su 10-6. cat adoption Team 503-925-8903 www.catadoptionteam.org Volunteers welcome. Fosters needed.

DAYCARE aJ’s K-9 Kamp Spoiled rotten K-9s love it here! K-9s under 25 lbs. Daycare in my secluded private home. Near the airport 15 yrs. experience. 503-252-7652

HOUSE CLEANING Nov 4, 2010:

Chris Cary on writing a book on the importance of active fathering.

Nov 11, 2010:

Q Madp, Iraq War Heroes, on honoring our troops.

Nov 18, 2010: Paula Beaulieu, MITCH Charter School, on: “Charter schools are a public school of choice making a positive difference in public education.”

Nov 25, 2010:

Sonja Harju with an update on Oregon issues.

98.1 FM • kpsu.org webcast 24/7 • huge diversity

28

organic hoUSe cLeaning Dog hair is our specialty, HePa filter vacuum Natural cleaning products. Lic, Bond & Ins. Free estimates, online or in-house visit. 503-913-4378 • whitelotuscleaning.com

HOUSE & PET SITTERS dePendaBLe reTired coUPLe We do overnight and vacation house and pet sitting. Dogs, cats, horses, whatever! responsible with great references. 503-537-9719 or 503-679-5613

BowWows & Meows Pet Services Need a pet-sitter who will love your pets as much as she loves her own? BowWows & Meows Pet Services . . . Because It’s all about Them! We also love birds! Serving West Vancouver & Jantzen Beach areas. Pet-sitting and Mid-Day Potty Breaks. 360-903-4174

WANTED: BARN HOMES FOR FERAL CATS & KITTENS 12 feral kittens & 10 cats have been left to fend for themselves on an abandoned property. They will be spayed/neutered before placing. They need regular feeding in order to keep up the good work they do in providing you a rodent-free property. Please help! contact Serena @ allanimalscount@comcast.net.

Spot Magazine | November 2010

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ADVERTISING DIRECTORY ADOPTION/ RESCUE

MASSAGE

MultnomahCounty Animal Services......... 7

Heal NW,Rubi Sullivan.............................. 23

APPAREL

PHARMACY

badcogs caninecoats............................... 22

CreativeCompounds................................. 24

BOARDING/ DAYCARE

PORTRAITS

3Dogs Boarding& Daycare....................... 10 Brody’s Doghouse..................................... 28 CascadePet Camp..................................... 13 Cooper MountainKennel.......................... 12 CountrysidePet Spa.................................. 13 Howliday Inn............................................. 12 Laurel Acres Kennels................................. 12 Many Paws Kennels & K-9Social Club....... 2 Opportunity Barks..................................... 28 Sniff DogHotel.......................................... 11 WagtheDog............................................. 12

LammPhotography.................................. 22 Sara MonahanStudios.............................. 22

CREMATION/ MEMORIAL/ HOME EUTHANASIA CompassionateCare.................................. 28 DignifiedPet Services................................ 19

EVENTS KPSUWeekendReport.............................. 28 MCASRabies, Lic,‘ChipClinic..................... 7 Project POOCH’s 17thAnniversary............. 24 Tom& MomCat Special Celebration.......... 6

FITNESS

2Pugs Brand............................................. 22 BiMart....................................................... 32 Healthy Pets Northwest............................ 23 Jesse’s K-9Cookies.................................... 28 TheMuttley Crew...................................... 28 Snowfire- distributor of finefoods........... 16 SolidGoldNorthwest................................ 8

GIFTS

1 MONDAY

baddogs caninecoats............................... 22 FredMeyer Jewelers.................................. 2 Healthy Pets Northwest............................ 23 Snowfire- distributor of finefoods........... 16

SOCIAL/ PETNETWORKING

Weekend Fun! www.spotmagazine.net

PRODUCTS

pdxdog.com.............................................. 27

SPAY/ NEUTER MultnomahCounty Animal Services......... 7

SUPPLIES BiMart....................................................... 32 Healthy Pets Northwest............................ 23 TheMuttley Crew...................................... 28

TRAINING Opportunity Barks..................................... 28 WagtheDog............................................. 12

VACATIONRENTALS BenningtonProperties.............................. 9 IdyllicBeachHouse.............................. 9, 28

4 Thursday • TROUTDALE — Artist Hisako Furukawa art show at Capital M Lending. Art sale benefits MCAS. Great art + helping animals = winning combo! PORTLAND • Noon — Pet Loss Support Group at DoveLewis, 1945 NW Pettygrove. These groups last one hour and are a free community service. Dropins are welcome. Please take a photo of your pet to share. PORTLAND • 6:05pm — Tune into 98.1 FM Radio for Spot’s Report on Pet-friendly events this weekend. The Furry FunPlanner report opens the KPSU Family Show.

Weekend Fun!

VETERINARYCARE

WELLNESS

GROOMING

Animal Allergy & Ear Clinic........................ 25 Back onTrack............................................. 26 Paws Aquatics........................................... 17 SkinVet Clinic............................................ 15 VCANWVeterinary Specialists.................. 21

homeless kitties at the Crystal Ballroom. Tickets $75 & up; details catadoptionteam.org/whisker. FRIDAY REMINDER! NOTE TO SELF: Grab the camera and capture a few fun moments this weekend, then send your photos to Vonnie@SpotMagazine.net — she’ll post them at Spot’s House to share with hundreds of friends that week!

  

6 Saturday

SALEM • 9am — New Volunteer Orientation at the Marion County Dog Shelter in Salem. Details 503.566.6966 or sheard@co.marion.or.us. WOODBURN • 10am — Fundraiser & Adoption Outreach with Marion County Dog Shelter at PetSense at Woodburn Company Stores ‘til 4. Come meet some sweet, adoptable dogs. This event is a shopping day fundraiser for area charities, including Marion County Dog Shelter. To purchase tickets and support Marion County Dog Shelter, stop by the shelter or visit shop-woodburn.com/ extravaganza and choose MCDS as your beneficiary. PORTLAND • 10am — Pet Nutrition & News with Chip Sammons on KKPZ, 1330 AM radio.Chip helps you help your pets live long, healthy, happy lives. Airs every Saturday at 10.   SALEM • 10am — Salem Friends of Felines Adoption Outreach at Pet, Etc. in West Salem ‘til 2. Another outreach is happening 11-4 today at PetSmart in Salem.

Animal Allergy & Ear Clinicof Oregon. ..... 25 Back onTrackVet RehabilitationCenter..... 26 RoseCityVeterinary Hospital.................... 7 SkinVet Clinic............................................ 26 VCANWVeterinary Specialists.................. 21

FredMeyer Jewelers.................................. 2

Bows & Bones MobileGrooming............... 28 Cooper MountainKennel.......................... 12 CountrysidePet Spa.................................. 13

PLANNER WHAT’S SO FUN ABOUT MONDAYS? It’s the day Spot’s Vonnie Harris accepts photos of good times shared over the weekend. One day, after inviting online Spot friends to check out new photos, we had 700 visitors to Spot’s House (the website) in a single day. That’s A LOT of friends to share your favorite photos with!

Paws Aquatics........................................... 17

FOOD/ TREATS

FURRY FUN

 

5 Friday

PORTLAND • 11am — OHS Adoption Outreach at US Bank, 636 SE Grand Ave. ‘til 2. PORTLAND • 6pm — Whisker Wonderland silent/live benefit auction for CAT. A purr-fect evening benefiting

11am • SALEM — Willamette Humane Society’s 45th Anniversary Celebration & Open House ‘til 6 at the shelter in Salem. Mini seminars, refreshments, door prizes and reduced adoption fees. Details in Fetch this issue or at willamettehumane.org. BEAVERTON • Noon — Find some bunny to Love. Meet sweet adoptables and their Rabbit Advocates at Western Spot Magazine | November 2010

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Pet Supply in Beaverton ‘til 3. Conversation/info about care & adoption, plus light grooming & nail trims for visiting bunnies (suggested donation). Details adoptarabbit.org. PORTLAND • Noon — OHS Adoption Outreach at Furever Pets, 1902 NE Broadway, ‘til 4. An OHS outreach is also happening today 11-3 at PetsMart in Tigard. PORTLAND • Noon — Santa Paws Portraits at Fred Meyer Garden Centers ‘til 3. Cats, dogs and other pets can pose with Santa and, for $20 get two professional 5x7 portraits, a holiday card and a copy of the images. Proceeds benefit the Oregon Humane Society. Today Santa will be at the following stores: Interstate, Johnson Creek, Tualatin & Beaverton. EUGENE • 2pm —   Dog Tale Time every Saturday at the Downtown Library. Kids grades 1-6 build skills by reading to trained dogs. Dogs & handlers provided courtesy of PAAWS (People and Animals Who Serve), a local chapter of the Delta Society. Pre-register for 15minute reading sessions. Details 541-682-8316.

8 Monday

13 Saturday

WHAT’S SO FUN ABOUT MONDAYS? It’s the day Spot’s Vonnie Harris accepts photos of good times shared over the weekend. One day, after inviting online Spot friends to check out new photos, we had 700 visitors to Spot’s House (the website) in a single day. That’s A LOT of friends to share your favorite photos with!

LAKE OSWEGO • 10am — MCAS Adoption Outreach at Lake Oswego Petco, 333 S. State St. ‘til noon. The Red Lizard Running club will take adoptable dogs for a jog (or walk, as the case may be). A perfect opportunity to “test drive” your new best friend!

11 Thursday PORTLAND • 9am — Pet Loss Support Group at DoveLewis, 1945 NW Pettygrove. Free, hour-long sessions. Drop-ins welcome. Please take a photo of your pet to share. Details dovelewis.org. PORTLAND • 6:05pm — Tune into 98.1 FM Radio for Spot’s Report on Pet-friendly events this weekend. The Furry FunPlanner report opens the KPSU Family Show.

Weekend Fun!

PORTLAND • Noon — OHS Adoption Outreach at PetsMart, 9721 NE Cascades Pkwy, ‘til 4.  PORTLAND • Noon — Santa Paws Portraits at Fred Meyer Garden Centers ‘til 3. Cats, dogs and other pets can pose with Santa and, for $20 get two professional 5x7 portraits, a holiday card and a copy of the images. Proceeds benefit the Oregon Humane Society. Today Santa will be at the following stores: Gateway, Hollywood, Oregon City & Raleigh Hills. HILLSBORO • 1pm — Puppy Romp at Schroeder’s Den Sundays with Dr. Kirsten Nielsen, CPDT. Weekly fun & socialization for puppies helps build confident, well-adjusted dogs. Trainersupervised. Puppies 10 weeks to 6 months. Admission $8. Details/RSVP schroedersden.com or 503-614-9899.

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SALEM • 11am — Adoption Outreach with Marion County Dog Shelter at PetsMart on Lancaster ‘til 4. SALEM • 11am — Salem Friends of Felines Adoption Outreach at PetSense at Woodburn Company Stores ‘til 3.

15 monday WHAT’S SO FUN ABOUT MONDAYS? It’s the day Spot’s Vonnie Harris accepts photos of good times shared over the weekend. • SHERWOOD — Fall Feline Adoption Special at CAT. Through Nov. 28, receive 50% off adoption fees on any cat or kitten at CAT’s Sherwood shelter or one of CAT’s 10 adoption outreach locations. PORTLAND • 7pm — Pet Loss Support Group at DoveLewis, 1945 NW Pettygrove. Free, hour-long sessions. Drop-ins welcome. Please take a photo of your pet to share. Details dovelewis.org.

PORTLAND • 6pm — Wet Nose Soiree, DoveLewis’s largest annual event. Join in to honor the animals we all adore. Hosted reception with signature cocktail, silent & live auctions, formal dinner and entertainment. Tickets/Details WetNose- • PORTLAND — Studio 6 Pet of the Soiree.com. Week on Koin 6. Tune in to meet this week’s sweet adoptable, now waiting for a forever home at Multnomah County Animal Services.

16 tuesday

14 Sunday

7 Sunday SHERWOOD • Noon —  The Cat Food Bank is open ‘til 2 at CAT’s shelter, 14175 SW Galbreath Dr. The Cat Food Bank provides cat food for pet parents in financial need. Details catadoptionteam.org.

PORTLAND • 10am — Pet Nutrition & News with Chip Sammons on KKPZ, 1330 AM radio. Chip helps you help your pets live long, healthy, happy lives. Airs every Saturday at 10.  

confident, well-adjusted dogs. Trainersupervised. Puppies 10 weeks to 6 months. Admission $8. Details/RSVP schroedersden.com or 503-614-9899.

12 Friday SALEM • 11am — Salem Friends of Felines Adoption Outreach at PetSmart in Salem ‘til 4. This is Second Chance for Love, PetsMart’s National Adoption Weekend. Adopt a cat and receive a free trial bag of Science Diet cat food, The Guide to Lifelong Health and coupons. This event continues tomorrow and Nov. 14, 11-4. SHERWOOD/ PORTLAND METRO • Noon — Adopt a Cat this Weekend. CAT counselors are on site at local PetsMart stores ‘til 4. PetsMarts are located at Cascade Station, in Clackamas, Hillsboro, Tanasbourne, Tigard, Tualatin, Wilsonville and Washington Square. Also noon-4 the weekends of Nov. 20 & Nov. 27. FRIDAY REMINDER! NOTE TO SELF: Grab the camera and capture a few fun moments this weekend, then send your photos to Vonnie@SpotMagazine.net — she’ll post them at Spot’s House to share with hundreds of friends that week!

SALEM — Harvest of Hope Adoption Outreach and fundraiser at Salem Friends of Felines Shelter, 980 Commercial St. The day will feature games, raffles, prizes, spiced cider & treats and photos by a pet photographer. Details 503-3625611 or salemfriendsoffelines.org. PORTLAND • Noon — OHS Adoption Outreach at Kiehl’s 712  NW 23rd Ave, ‘til 3. PORTLAND • Noon-2:30 — The Pongo Fund Pet Food Bank, helping anyone who needs help feeding their pet(s), at 910 NE MLK Jr Blvd in Portland. Details thepongofund.org. PORTLAND • 1pm — Memorial Art Community Workshop at DoveLewis in NW Portland. Families 1-2:30, ages 16-adult 3-4:30. Enid Traisman MSW facilitates. Create a unique memento of your beloved and spend a little time in good company. Free; RSVP to dovelewis. org/giftshop. HILLSBORO • 1pm — Puppy Romp at Schroeder’s Den Sundays with Dr. Kirsten Nielsen, CPDT. Weekly fun & socialization for puppies helps build

18 thursday PORTLAND • 6:05pm — Tune into 98.1 FM Radio for Spot’s Report on Pet-friendly events this weekend. The Furry FunPlanner report opens the KPSU Family Show. PORTLAND • 6:30pm —  Pooch in the Pub at the Tiffany Center. Project POOCH and Dave’s Killer Bread invite you to celebrate Project POOCH’s 17th anniversary fundraiser. Enjoy a casual evening of food, live music, and silent & live auctions. Proceeds benefit Project POOCH, a nonprofit serving incarcerated youths. Details poochinthepub.org. PORTLAND • 7pm — Pet Loss Support Group at DoveLewis, 1945 NW Pettygrove. Free, hour-long sessions. Drop-ins welcome. Please take a photo of your pet to share. Details dovelewis.org.

Weekend Fun! www.spotmagazine.net

Spot Magazine | November 2010

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19 FriDAy

24 wEDnEsDAy

FRIDAY REMINDER: Grab the camera and capture a few fun moments this weekend, then send your photos to Vonnie@SpotMagazine.net — she’ll post them at Spot’s House to share with the hundreds of friends that week!

PORTLAND • 6pm — Waggy Hour: Wine, Wags & Wishes with LexiDog Boutique & Social Club and the Oregon Humane Society at the Jupiter Hotel on Burnside ‘til 8. Enjoy food & local wines, pet-related artists, and adoptables from OHS. Celebrate and learn about a few local animal-related nonprofits. In attendance will be Fences for Fido, Guide Dogs for the Blind, DoveLewis, OHS Investigations, and OHS Technical Animal Rescue team.

20 sAturDAy PORTLAND • 10am — Wild Arts Festival at Montgomery Park. Now in its 30th year, the festival celebrates nature in art. Find nature-related art and books, a silent auction, entertainment, and The Audubon Society’s Educational Birds. Details audubonportland.org. Event hours are 10-6 today, 11-5 tomorrow. PORTLAND • 10am — Pet Nutrition & News with Chip Sammons on KKPZ, 1330 AM radio. Chip helps you help your pets live long, healthy, happy lives.

25 thursDAy PORTLAND • 6:05pm — Tune into 98.1 FM Radio for Spot’s Report on Pet-friendly events this weekend. The Furry FunPlanner report opens the KPSU Family Show.

26 FriDAy

SALEM •11am — Adoption Outreach with Marion County Dog Shelter at Pet Etc. in West Salem ‘til 4. Come meet some SHERWOOD — Black Cat Friday at sweet, adoptable dogs! CAT. Adoption fees for all black or mostly black kitties just $25 today only. Details SALEM • 11am — Salem Friends of catadoptionteam.org. Felines Adoption Outreach at PetsMart in Salem ‘til 4.

21 sunDAy HILLSBORO • 1pm — Puppy Romp at Schroeder’s Den Sundays with Dr. Kirsten Nielsen, CPDT. Weekly fun & socialization for puppies helps build confident, well-adjusted dogs. Trainersupervised. Puppies 10 weeks to 6 months. Admission $8. Details/RSVP schroedersden.com or 503-614-9899.

PORTLAND • 11am — OHS Adoption Outreach at the Christmas Bazaar today and tomorrow at the Portland Expo Center.

FRIDAY REMINDER: Grab the camera and capture a few fun moments this weekend, then send your photos to Vonnie@SpotMagazine.net — she’ll post them at Spot’s House to share with the hundreds of friends that week!

27 sAturDAy

HILLSBORO • 1pm — Puppy Romp at Schroeder’s Den Sundays with Dr. Kirsten Nielsen, CPDT. Weekly fun & socialization for puppies helps build confident, well-adjusted dogs. Trainersupervised. Puppies 10 weeks to 6 months. Admission $8. Details/RSVP schroedersden.com or 503-614-9899.

PORTLAND • 10am — Mt Dog Meetup in Fernhill Park (SE corner). Take your dogs out so they can strut their stuff and you can brag on them. Details ldmiller@ aracnet.com or 503-282-6706. PORTLAND • 10am — Pet Nutrition & News with Chip Sammons on KKPZ, 1330 AM radio. Chip helps you help your pets live long, healthy, happy lives. Airs every Saturday at 10. SALEM • 10am — Salem Friends of Felines Adoption Outreach at South Salem Pet Supply ‘til 2.

28 sunDAy SALEM • 11am — Adoption Outreach with Marion County Dog Shelter at Petco on Lancaster ‘til 4. PORTLAND • Noon-2:30 — The Pongo Fund Pet Food Bank, helping anyone who needs help feeding their pet(s), at 910 NE MLK Jr Blvd in Portland. Details thepongofund.org.

29 monDAy PORTLAND • 5pm — Annual Dog Walk at PIR ‘til 9. Portland International Raceway is closed to vehicle traffic one night a year so only walkers and walkers with dogs are allowed to walk the almost 2 miles around the track while enjoying the Winter Wonderland Light Show. Last year over 1,000 peeps and over 600 dogs showed up. Admission is $6; age 13 & under and pups are free. Details: winterwonderlandportland.com. WHAT’S SO FUN ABOUT MONDAYS? It’s the day Spot’s Vonnie Harris accepts photos of good times shared over the weekend. LAKE OSWEGO • 7:15pm — HEAL Dog Massage for Owners class at LexiDog. Details 503-635-3733 or lexidog.com.

30 tuEsDAy PORTLAND • Noon — OHS Adoption Outreach at PetsMart, 9450 SE 82nd Ave, ‘til 4.

22 monDAy WHAT’S SO FUN ABOUT MONDAYS? It’s the day Spot’s Vonnie Harris accepts photos of good times shared over the weekend. One day, after inviting online Spot friends to check out new photos, we had 700 visitors to Spot’s House (the website) in a single day. That’s A LOT of friends to share your favorite photos with!

Weekend Fun! www.spotmagazine.net

CirCLE thE DAtE!

2 DECEmbEr

* Annual Service of Remembrance presented by DoveLewis and Dignified Animal Services. Details dovelewis.org.

Spot Magazine | November 2010

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Contentment:

Being at ease in one’s situation.

Shop Bi-Mart for cat and dog food, pet care products, toys, accessories and more at great value and price. The next time you have pet items on your shopping list, visit your local neighborhood Bi-Mart store!

Still only $5 for a lifetime family membership!

JUST RIGHT FOR THE

NORTHWEST

BI-MART PORTLAND-METRO AREA STORES: ALOHA BEAVERTON DAMASCUS FOREST GROVE

GRESHAM ORCHARDS HILLSBORO McMINNVILLE

NEWBERG OREGON CITY MOLALLA SANDY

TIGARD VANCOUVER WASHOUGAL WOODBURN

PORTLAND 17108 S.E. Powell 4315 S.E. Woodstock 12321 N.E. Halsey

BI-MART WILLAMETTE VALLEY AND CENTRAL OREGON COAST STORES: ALBANY, CORVALLIS (2), COTTAGE GROVE, CRESWELL, EUGENE (4), FLORENCE, JUNCTION CITY, LEBANON, LINCOLN CITY, MONMOUTH, SALEM (2), SPRINGFIELD (2), STAYTON, VENETA VISIT BI-MART ON-LINE AT WWW.BIMART.COM

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November 2010 - Spot Magazine