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Steve Bullock©

Steve Bullock Australia

Living in Australia means lots of great photographic opportunities for Australian Wildlife, which is a passion of mine, but it also means its a long way away from the place I have always wanted to visit, Africa. This year I fullfilled a life long dream and travelled around 4 countries in Southern Africa and now understand why they say its a photographers paradise.. I have been interested in Photography for only a few years now, but the bug bit hard and now I take a camera everywhere, I love Macro work, and wildlife images are where I feel I do my best work. Capturing an animals personality is something I always strive for. I use a Canon 40D and 50D Camera, use mainly Canon Lens’ but the Sigma 50-500mm came in handy in Africa! More of my work can be seen at www.bullockphotos.com l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

Steve Bullock© Spring 2009


Steve Bullock© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Steve Bullock© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Steve Bullock© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Steve Bullock© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Steve Bullock© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Steve Bullock© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Steve Bullock© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Steve Bullock©

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Steve Bullock©

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Spring 2009


191mm. Exposure Compensation -0.3 The ever weary Lioness – Taken in the Mosi-a-Tunya National Park in Zambia as she rested with 2 sisters against a tree in the afternoon shade. She looks to the sky as if to echo a view of hope for the endangered African Lion. CANON 50D ISO 1250 1/500, F5.6, Lens 50-500mm Sigma Focal Length 313mm. I have included a few shots of the Lions, I can’t decide on which to choose so its all in your more than capable hands! CANON 50D ISO 320 1/250, F5.6, Lens 50-500mm Sigma Focal Length 137mm. Nothing Serious – the back end of a yawn shows the incredible teeth which keeps them at the top of the food chain in Africa, this young lioness is still growing so one can only imagine the strength they have as adults. CANON 50D ISO 500 1/320 F5.6, Lens 50-500mm Sigma Focal Length 161mm. Exposure Compensation -0.3 Big Bull – This large male was showing who is the boss as he displays his huge teeth in the Mud Pool with 20 or so other Hippo’s. Taken on the Chobe River in Botswana at Sunset. CANON 50D ISO 1000 1/800, F6.3, Lens 50-500mm Sigma Focal Length 500mm. The amazing Okavenga Delta – as the ‘polers’ take you by traditional Mokoro boat up the rivers and streams which form the Delta, you just can’t escape the beauty of the area. The deep blue sky, water lilies and clear water, as Hippo’s surround you with keen eyes. What a place. CANON 50D ISO 100 1/100, F11.3, Lens 17-85mm Canon IS Focal Length 17mm.

Fun and Games – Well this girl looks like she is having a great laugh but it’s no more than a well timed yawn. This shot was taken at the Cheetah Conservation Fund in Namibia. This girl was being kept as a ‘pet’ on a nearby farm before authorities confiscated her, unfortunately due to malnutrition and a calcium deficiency she can no longer be released back to the wild. CANON 50D ISO 500 1/500, F5.6, Lens 50-500mm Sigma Focal Length 313mm. Exposure Compensation -0.3 This was one of the most beautiful Cheetah’s at the CCF in Namibia, she stared into the distance until we turned to look at what she was looking at, to find the males were walking past close by! CANON 50D ISO 400 1/500, F5.6, Lens 50-500mm Sigma Focal Length 313mm. Exposure Compensation -0.3 This 12 year old Cheetah was the quietest of the bunch, she has a noticeably greyer appearance, her eyes a deeper Red, and she is much smaller than the others, but she tells you a story as you look into her eyes. CANON 50D ISO 800 1/500, F5.6, Lens 50-500mm Sigma Focal Length 363mm. Exposure Compensation -0.3 Got your Back – these Zebra’s are pretty immobile in the middle of the day with the African heat coming down on them. They rest on each other’s backs, and keep a close eye out for predators from either direction. Problem being they seem to enjoy being in the middle of the road when they do this! CANON 50D ISO 100 1/500, F5.6, Lens 50-500mm Sigma Focal Length 363mm. Exposure Compensation -0.3

The African Sunset – The sky turns every shade of Yellow, Orange, Red, Purple and Pink as the sun sets over the beautiful countryside. The ripples in the water caused by the nearby Hippo’s as they emerge from there day spent soaking in the river. A sunset you will never forget. CANON 50D ISO 100 1/800, F5.6, Lens 50-500mm Sigma Focal Length l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Steve Bullock© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

Steve Bullock© Spring 2009


It’s a LONG way down – Watching Giraffe’s drink is amazing, it’s seems such a battle to get their heads all the way to the water. They stumble up to the waterholes, one leg at a time do a leg spread and slowly bend there massive neck’s down to the water. Olifantsbad Waterhole – Etosha National Park, Namibia. CANON 50D ISO 100 1/800, F6.3, Lens 50-500mm Sigma Focal Length 500mm. Exposure Compensation -0.3 Lilac breasted roller – This beautiful bird is a bird watchers favourite. Its amazing Blue’s, Purples and other colours make it a stand out on the African Landscape, taken in the Etosha National Park – Namibia. CANON 50D ISO 125 1/640, F6.3, Lens 50-500mm Sigma Focal Length 500mm. Exposure Compensation -0.3 Zebra Smiles – I caught this male pulling some faces at the cars who had pulled in to watch a huge ‘Dazzle’ of Zebra arrive to a waterhole in Etosha. I thought it was a cute shot which shows his personality. CANON 50D ISO 200 1/800, F6.3, Lens 50-500mm Sigma Focal Length 500mm. Exposure Compensation -0.3 Springbok – One of the most common animals you will see in Namibia, these guys form huge groups. This shot was taken as they faced the sun in the early afternoon, the white patch on there face serves to reflect the rays of the harsh sun. CANON 50D ISO 100 1/800, F6.3, Lens 50-500mm Sigma Focal Length 500mm. Exposure Compensation -0.3 Yellow Billed Hornbill – These birds are fairly common across Africa, we spotted them from Zambia, all through Botswana and Namibia, until I managed a decent shot of one in Kruger National Park South Africa. CANON 50D ISO 160 1/800, F6.3, Lens 50-500mm Sigma Focal Length 500mm. Exposure Compensation -0.3

and steal it off the cubs. There quite aggressive animals, and some of the most efficient hunters in Africa. CANON 50D ISO 400 1/640, F5.7, Lens 50-500mm Sigma Focal Length 417mm. Exposure Compensation -0.3 Wild Dog 2 – Another portrait of the wild dogs at the HESC in South Africa CANON 50D ISO 320 1/250, F5.6, Lens 50-500mm Sigma Focal Length 191mm. Exposure Compensation -0.3 Fast Learner – This young Elephant was part of a group of about 30 animals as they bulldozed their way through the Balule Nature Reserve in South Africa, he was copying his older brothers and mock charging our truck. CANON 50D ISO 1600 1/250, F5.7, Lens 50-500mm Sigma Focal Length 226mm. Exposure Compensation -0.3 Textures – A young male Bull Elephant close up. CANON 50D ISO 1600 1/128, F5.6, Lens 50-500mm Sigma Focal Length 363mm. Exposure Compensation -0.3 White Rhino – Still endangered, the white Rhino are a huge ‘softie’ of the African Landscape, very nervous animals who will retreat at any sign of danger. Unlike the Black Rhino, whilst much smaller, are willing to charge rather than retreat. I caught this guy through some branches in the Balule Nature Reserve. CANON 50D ISO 400 1/800, F6.3, Lens 50-500mm Sigma Focal Length 500mm. Exposure Compensation -0.3 Warthog Battle – Two warthogs engage in a play fight in Kruger NP. Whilst it’s all fun and games, they can still inflict some damage with the hard and sharp tusks which other animals are very wary of. CANON 50D ISO 160 1/128, F6.3, Lens 50-500mm Sigma Focal Length 500mm. Exposure Compensation -0.3

Wild Dog – This shot was taken at the Hoedspruit Endagered Species Centre in South Africa. It was amazing to watch these animals feed as the mother regurgitated her food to her 8 cubs, the males were more than happy to come l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Steve Bullock© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Steve Bullock© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Steve Bullock© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Steve Bullock© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Steve Bullock© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Steve Bullock©

Steve Bullock© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Steve Bullock©

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Steve Bullock©

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Steve Bullock Editors’ Note : In a word ‘Superb’. Steve Bullock’s view on African Wildlife is as unique as one can imagine. Using close-up imagery of the ‘beasts of Africa’, Steve conveys an intimacy to his audience in a way that dredges up memories of game drives, trips to the wild places and real game. Steve’s technical skills in photography come to the fore, probably subconsciously, a reflex action from years of experience in the Australian outback and translated just perfectly in his treatment of African Wildlife. The viewer can almost smell the wildlife, up close. Steve has avoided the cliché which is the common fault amongst the mere ‘picture-takers’. Steve has met his travels to Africa with enthusiasm and returned with memorable images. The images here are more-or-less ‘off-camera’ with minor cropping and exposure adjustments. I came across Steve Bullock through Redbubble® and noted his position as moderator for a group or two which shows his passion, not only for wildlife but for photography as well. He has a good spatial recognition for what is good and what is very good. More images can be viewed using the URL link at the beginning of this schapter, and on http://www.redbubble.com. - search for Steve Bullock. Steve Bullock© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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I was born and still live in Africa. I live on a gamefarm/lodge close to a small town called “Tolwe”, 60km from the Botswana border. I love photography with a passion and have been taking photos since I was a small girl. I am a nature lover, love gardening and also do landscaping when I get the time. My captures are all realistic and nature inclined. My goal, and dream, is to show the beauty of Gods Creations on Earth, through the lens of my camera, the way I see it.

Magaret Meintjes l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

http://www.redbubble.com/people/mags

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Magaret Meintjes© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

Leopard in ‘Camo’

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Magaret Meintjes© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Magaret Meintjes© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Magaret Meintjes© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Magaret Meintjes© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Magaret Meintjes© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Magaret Meintjes© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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BUFFALO – Syncerus caffer Nikon D50 2008/10/04 17:40:55.9 Image Size: 1200 x 920 Lens: Focal Length: 300mm Exposure Mode: Metering Mode: Multi-Pattern 1/160 sec - F/5 Exposure Comp.: 0 EV LION – Panthera leo Nikon D50 2008/09/13 07:55:05 Image Size: 920 x 1200 Lens: Focal Length: 300mm Exposure Mode: Metering Mode: Multi-Pattern 1/640 sec - F/5.6 Exposure Comp.: 0 EV AFRICAN ELEPHANT – Loxodonta africana Nikon D50 2008/09/05 09:29:26 Image Size: 1200 x 920 Lens: Focal Length: 300mm Exposure Mode: Metering Mode: Multi-Pattern 1/1000 sec - F/5.3 Exposure Comp.: 0 EV

l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

LEOPARD – Panthera pardus Nikon D50 2008/09/05 09:42:27 Image Size: 1200 x 805 Lens: Focal Length: 300mm Exposure Mode: Metering Mode: Multi-Pattern 1/500 sec - F/5.6 Exposure Comp.: 0 EV

LEOPARD IN “CAMO” Nikon D50 2008/09/05 09:50:26 Image Size: 1200 x 805 Lens: Focal Length: 300mm Exposure Mode: Metering Mode: Multi-Pattern 1/800 sec - F/5.6 WHITE RHINOCEROS – Ceratotherium simum Nikon D50 2008/09/11 11:20:17.9 Image Size: 1200 x 805 Lens: Focal Length: 300mm Exposure Mode: Metering Mode: Multi-Pattern 1/500 sec - F/5.6 Exposure Comp.: 0 EV

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WHITE RHINOCEROS – Ceratotherium simum Nikon D50 2008/09/11 11:21:21.9 Image Size: 1200 x 805 Lens: Focal Length: 300mm Exposure Mode: Metering Mode: Multi-Pattern 1/500 sec - F/5.6 Exposure Comp.: 0 EV SPOTTED HYENA – Crocuta crocuta Nikon D50 2008/09/09 07:19:37.1 Image Size: 1200 x 805 Lens: Focal Length: 300mm Exposure Mode: Metering Mode: Multi-Pattern 1/400 sec - F/5.6 Exposure Comp.: 0 EV LOCATION CAPTURED: “The Kruger National Park”, South Africa

l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

Magaret Meintjes

Editors’ Note: Images as presented here through the lens and eye of Magaret Meintjes are simply difficult to find. Magaret does not try ‘too hard’ to impress her peers - what we see in the visual form is what Magaret sees - I recall an email received during our correspondence - there is no image manipulation other than slight cropping and perhaps a tweek or two in exposure adjustment. This of course is a very small portfolio of her works - (use the link to view the best amateur imagery in the public domain). Magaret has no influences outside her realm of Nature Photography. I have never heard or seen a mention of a mentor in as long as I have known her on the net. The facinating thing about Magaret’s images are they are as natural as they can get, and have all the elements of composition, lighting and that elusive ‘moment in time’. The Editor is expecting a full colour photography book published really soon. Certainly a well travelled person, with all nature pictures from Mozambique to Namibia. And we are glad that she has discovered the gratification of digital imagery.

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Magaret Meintjes© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

Spring 2009


Magaret Meintjes

Images are Copyright Magaret Meintjes© All Rights Reserved

l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

Spring 2009


LES BOOTH - USA About eLITHOgraph®

OOAK Digital Gallery was originally conceived in 1978 as an outlet for my pen&ink, watercolor, photography and wood carving projects. In 1984 I officially ‘opened’ OOAK as a studio and began offering my repertoire of work for sale as extremely limited, hand-made editions. I did not know – nor realize – then, but I had just stepped onto the path that would lead me to develop the eLITHOGRAPHIC© process.

“No one is crueler to us than we are to ourselves.” Me

I am a Graphic Designer, not a Fine Artist. I make that distinction at the outset whenever discussing the work I do. The eLITHOGRAPH© will appear to ‘look like fine art’. It is designed to do just that.

The eLITHOGRAPHIC© process is… the result of ‘a designed technical creative process’ – not the result of a ‘fine art media interactive process’.

Thus, through the eLITHOGRAPHIC© process, I produce imagery that will ‘appear’ as works of various ‘Fine Art Media’, when in fact they are ‘creatively designed’ to appear so. Please do not replace ‘creatively designed’ with ‘engineered’ for my work is not engineered. There is no template beyond the software parameters, which I use – and even theb7n they are subject to my own technical creativity. Each image is ‘created’ to become what I visualize them to become. I just use tools that are – as yet – not recognized as ‘fine art media tools’.

One day eLITHOGRAPHY© may be held in the same regard as fine art, but it will need to grow to that point. No doubt the process will follow along similar lines of the infamous – and still on-going in some circles – art feud of photography vs. fine art. Let’s hope, that as we all move along this path, we can equally bask in the rare, tranquil and healing light radiating from the power of the creative process.

I’m fine with this mission.

OOAK products - images, writing and other 'goodies' - are available for viewing and purchase, online at OOAK Digital Gallery and Akilologos. Please visit and do let us know what you think. We do enjoy your feedback. l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Drum at First Light

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l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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Muskox Defense

l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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LES BOOTH - USA eLITHOgraph®

Caption: Muskox Defense DESCRIPTION: A herd of muskox ‘circle up’ against an unseen foe; protecting the young of the herd at the center. eLITHOGRAPH constructed from 6 major photographic and illustrated elements. Caption: Sankalai DESCRIPTION: Bull elephant, from a photographic image, taken by Tienne Riekert of Botswana, Africa. The final image is an eLITHOGRAPH. The Title comes from the Swahili word used to describe a big, lone male elephant; usually in musth.

hannesburg, South Africa. The final image is an OOAK Digital Gallery, eLITHOGRAPH. Caption: Drum at First Light DESCRIPTION: A male Ruffed Grouse () takes his place on his ‘drumming ground’ to establish his territory and attract his mate. The final image is a composite of 8 photographs and 12 constructed elements to become an OOAK Digital Gallery, eLITHOGRAPH. Caption: Cutthroat Palette DESCRIPTION: Cruising the waters of it’s western home range a cutthroat trout begins it’s rise to engage a fallen hopper. But not just any ‘fallen hopper’. This is a Dave’s Hopper ready to complete it’s illusion. Dinner is served... but for whom? The final image, comprised of 3 photograhs and 6 design elements, is now an OOAK Digital Gallery, eLITHOGRAPH

Caption: Mboza (headshot) DESCRIPTION: A bull white rhinoceros stands on the browing plains Caption: Lucy at Elephant Sands grasses - dominating his domain. Mboza is Swahili for the White Rhino. DESCRIPTION: A lone cow elephant - but not just any cow elephant - The ‘base photo’ was taken by Paul Lindenberg, Johannesburg, South this is Lucy, a well known matriarch of her home range. This image -with Africa. The final image is an OOAK Digital Gallery, eLITHOGRAPH. permission- was based upon a photograph base shot by Tienne Riekert, of the Chobe region of Botswanna. The final image is an OOAK Digital Gallery, eLITHOGRAPH. OOAK Digital Gallery Les Booth Caption: Mboza (full body) +01 765-588-1152 DESCRIPTION: A lone bull white rhinoceros stands on a small rise ooakgallery@gmail.com amid tall plains grasses - dominating his domain. Mboza is Swahili for http://ooak.com the White Rhino. The ‘base photo’ was taken by Paul Lindenberg, Jol’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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GHOSTS OF AFRICA

WHITE LIONS Karen-Jane Dudley©

KAREN-JANE DUDLEY

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KAREN-JANE DUDLEY SOUTH AFRICA/UK

GHOSTS OF AFRICA

Born in London, Karen–Jane Dudley took the decisive step to progress her long time interest in wildlife photography into a full-time profession in 1998, after relocating to the Isle of Wight Her passion for the natural world and deep love for Africa has since evolved into a career specialising in “big cat” photography giving an up close and personal insight into the lives of some of the world’s most stunning big cat species

during this emotional journey to safety and freedom, culminating with a rare chance to capture the first official signature portraits of the next generation, after news was announced in October 2008 of the successful birth of the first cubs of the vital re introduction programme, The first wild cubs to be born into freedom on the soil of their ancestors after an enforced extinction of almost two decades within their natural endemic range of the Greater Timbavati Region.

In 2006 Karen-Jane launched “The Ghost of Africa Campaign “in the UK to help raise the awareness of the tragic plight of the White Lion and raise vital funds to assist the groundbreaking conservation and re-introduction programme of the Global White Lion Protection Trust (WLT) in Southern Africa, founded by conservationist and author, Linda Tucker.

February 2009 saw the opening of Karen-Jane’s Photographic Exhibition hosted by Dimbola Lodge –Julia Margaret Cameron Trust, “ An intimate portrait of nature “ unveiled the photographic story of these incredible animals and their journey to freeedom, proceeds from sales at the exhibition were donated to WLT. Combined with her passion for the natural world and deep love of Africa, Karen-Jane’s emergence as a specialist of big cat photography has coincided with an increasing demand for her images on an international level with works now published in Europe, South Africa, USA, Australia, Asia,

In August 2008 her dedication was rewarded by the Trust with KarenJane receiving the prestigious WLT R.O.A.R award (Recognition of Animal Rights) for her ethical and sensitive approach to the photographing of large predators both in captivity and in their natural environment, The annual award aims to recognise individuals and organisations that To see more of Karen-Jane’s work visit her website www.k1photography. embody bona fide conservation principles and pursue authentic conser- com vation objectives. For more information on the vital work of the Global White Lion Protection Trust: Karen-Jane said: “I’ve been privileged to spend time with Linda and www.whitelions.org to add your support the team in South Africa to witness the magnificent ambassador pride l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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GHOSTS OF AFRICA

Karen-Jane Dudley©

Karen-Jane Dudley© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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GHOSTS OF AFRICA

Karen-Jane Dudley© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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GHOSTS OF AFRICA

Karen-Jane Dudley©

l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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GHOSTS OF AFRICA

Ghosts of Africa | White Lions | Legend or Fact Magnificent in stature, ghostly in appearance, the White Lions of Africa, on first sighting it is not difficult to understand how this stunning specie has made its place within the pages of legends . Unlike their recognizable tawny cousin, this rare king of the African plains bares a milky white coat and opaque eyes heralding its ghostly appearance leading to mythical status. Though similar in resemblance to the Albino, the lions white coat is a result of a rare unidentified recessive gene which causes the leucism*. To spend anytime in the company of these magnificent cats it is difficult not to be moved by their plight and an urgency to continue in every effort to raise awareness of just how important today’s conservation efforts have become. * Lack of colour pigmentation caused by recessive IE gene.

Karen-Jane Dudley© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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GHOSTS OF AFRICA

Karen-Jane Dudley© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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GHOSTS OF AFRICA

Karen-Jane Dudley© l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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GHOSTS OF AFRICA

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GHOSTS OF AFRICA

Ghosts of Africa | White Lions | Legend or Fact by Karen-Jane Dudley

The first scientific records showing evidence of white cubs in the wild was not confirmed until 1970 by researcher Chris McBride in the Timbavati Reserve, South Africa, this news would result in whites becoming instant targets for hunters who regarded the white pelt as the ultimate hunting trophy resulting in pushing the numbers ever closer to extinction, the decision was finally taken after much deliberation to remove the cubs from the wild, their removal from their natural habitat was the beginning for the launch of Operation White lion ,a programme that would require help from private collections to commercial breeders, fears were voiced over the cub’s removal from their natural habitat would effectively mark the end of the whites important presence in the wild ,br>As with many conservation efforts during past decades, a number of programmes took a downside with many captive bred cubs being sold to circuses to add an air of magical enhancement, but most alarming with cubs also being bred by commercial hunters for the growing barbarism of canned hunting with wealthy hunters paying in excess of $200,000 to shoot a white lion for means of personal pleasure for the prized pelt. In our continuing knowledge, commitment and understanding into climate and conservation efforts worldwide, today’s generation of whites face a totally different challenge, to finally prepare to reinstate the leucistic gene back into the wilds of the African bush, a process that may take many generations with the successful introduction and breeding of integrated tawnies and whites to enable the leucism to enter the specie gene pool, The ground breaking and remarkable dedication of the Global White lion Protection Trust will once again herald a chance for the whites to rightfully take its place amongst Africa’s rich culture and wildlife,but even once the recessive gene has been re introduced it may be decades even centuries before whites may be seen roaming free and gracing Africa in numbered prides, many have voiced opposition to the proposed reintroduction claiming the white gene should be allowed to die out naturally, but natural selection has proved its strength with further evidence of white cubs being born into a wild tawny pride within the Timbavati range , clearly showing that the gene is still strong and evident in the wild

Opinions have been divided over the whites successful chance of its long term return to its natural habitat, with many convinced the white colouration and therefore lack of camouflage will become its nemesis, But with the lion being a predominantly large prey predator, much of the large prey are held in vastly numbered herds which may help in this quest, A natural survival instinct combined with the coordinated hunting skills of a pride may aid in their success rate, other challenges may prove to become a more important factor, with young males looking to take over established prides at every new opportunity, mortality rate for cubs is high, with new males ridding the pride of young cubs to establish its own bloodline, without the leucistic gene present in the bloodline this will effectively lessen the chance of white cubs being born into future litters and with tawny numbers significantly higher than the rare whites will signal a natural lottery process I have been honoured and privileged in recent months to finally come face to face with this mythical legend in the form of two important young white cubs Thabo and Nahla, *Sadly on 9th May 2007 female white lioness Nala passed away, after showing briefs signs of illness sadly Nala’s health deteriorated rapidly, after a series of extensive tests and scans carried out by an expert team the diagnosis for Nala showed a severe deviation to her spinal column, the heart breaking decision was taken to end Nala’s suffering To everyone who had the honour of becoming so close to Nala during her short time with us,a deeply emotional mark was clearly left on everyone , she had taught us so much, her zest for life and her affectionate nature had made its mark so deeply, a beautiful little lady who will be remembered with great affection There are highs and lows in our continuing crusade for conservation sadly Nala showed us both Nala was a wonderful ambassador for the White Lion Conservation movement and trust; all who met her instantly loved her. She will be sadly missed but never forgotten Through the lessons that Nala taught us it is now vital that her sad passing was not in vain She showed us the importance of this magnificent specie and to help understand her very existence and those of her kin who we must now urgently protect l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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GHOSTS OF AFRICA

Around the globe we are now becoming increasingly aware as to what is happening to endangered species. We have to stop and think what impact our specie is making on the natural world, how selfish and cruel can a hunter or poacher be to shoot an animal for his pleasure or profit, remember that extinction is for life, what can we do for our next generation to ensure they know what a White Lion is, and to also be aware of their known natural habitat in the wild and what we can do to safe guard it’s future. To look into the eyes of a lioness and see her pure soul, see how fragile a strong animal can be and just how important she is for her cubs. From the Coliseum games to circuses shows, humans have always had curiosity to witness just how powerful and aggressive a predator can be. It’s time to change our vision, to start to see the tenderness and beauty of nature Every time we remember Tasmanian Tigers, Dodos, and many other extinct species we have to look at just how many more can we possibly allow to suffer the same tragic fate ,the answer is simple , NO MORE What can we do to avoid our sons, daughters, grandsons, and granddaughters and beyond being denied the right to share the beauty of these animals , we must act now and together we can make a difference My grateful thanks go out to Peter Sampson and Lynn Whitnall at Paradise Wildlife Park , Hertfordshire for their very kind help and permission in the early publication of this article

l’Afrique du Sud - PhotoGraphicas©

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http://www.katiegrubb.co.uk/

Katie Grubb Katie is a Zimbabwean artist living in the UK. After some artistic training in the 80’s in Ireland and in Zimbabwe, Katie took time out to have three children. She then graduated with a BA(Hons) from the University of Brighton, and is currently doing a Masters degree in Fine Art there. She has exhibited both in the UK and in Zimbabwe, and has works in private collections around the world. Her work in recent years has been concerned with Human Rights abuses in Zimbabwe and all of her work has an African flavour, be it her decorative work, landscapes & seedpods, or her fascination with cultural identities and the intricacies therein.

Images of Artwork are Copyright Katie Grubb© All Rights Reserved. Katie Grubb©

Every piece of work I do is dedicated to Zimbabwe, and its people, who are needlessly suffering at the hands of a cruel dictatorship. Most of my work is concerned with cultural identities, cultural differences and questions the concept of belonging. At the root of all my work is a strong passion for Africa, my birthplace. Its beauty, diversity, and its myriad of wonderful cultures. The natural world also holds great fascination for me. Trees, bark, seeds, pods and the tiny close-up details in nature are a source of endless inspiration. http://www.redbubble.com/people/katiegrubb


Katie Grubb

On The Brink. Rhino poaching worldwide is poised to hit a 15-year-high driven by Asian demand for horns, according to new research. Poachers in Africa and Asia are killing an ever increasing number of rhinos— an estimated two to three a week in some areas—to meet a growing demand for horns believed in some countries to have medicinal value, according to a briefing to a key international wildlife trade body by WWF, IUCN and their affiliated wildlife trade monitoring network TRAFFIC. An estimated three rhinos were illegally killed each month in all of Africa from 2000-05, out of a population of around 18,000. In contrast, 12 rhinoceroses now are being poached each month in South Africa and Zimbabwe alone, the three groups told the 58th Standing Committee meeting of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species Standing Committee. My good friend Julie Edwards devotes her life to saving this endangered species. 50% of proceeds of sales of this work go to Julie’s dedicated work at the Hokoyo Wildlife Trust in Southern Africa. www.hokoyowildlife.org – website still being set up but please stay posted! Acrylic & Inks on canvas

Katie Grubb©

http://www.redbubble.com/people/katiegrubb/journal/3524486-will-these-disgusting-men-ever-be-stopped


Katie Grubb

Identity Series These masks represent a fusion of African and English cultures. They are a mixture of two strong yet differing worlds. They are made mostly from old English lace, pva glue, sand and the occasional mix of rhino dung. I have also experimented with photography and fusing my own face with African masks to represent my inner identity and deep passion for a place and a culture to which ultimately, I do not belong.

Katie GrubbŠ

Prints: Printing is one of my favorite mediums. This work represents a small section of the printing I have done in recent years and continue to do. Techniques include screen printing, transfer prints, linocut, lazertran and easy-print.


Katie Grubb

Floral Benin Mask.

Katie Grubb©

Screen Print on Velux paper. Part of my “Identity Series”, exploring and celebrating the diffrences between African and English culture


Katie Grubb

Blacklace 2

Katie GrubbŠ

Identity Series. Defining the merge of African and English cultural identity.


Katie Grubb

Blacklace 1

Katie GrubbŠ

Part of Identity Series representing the merge of English and African cultural identities.


Katie Grubb

Identity Series Mask

Katie GrubbŠ

English Lace, Sand, Glue, Mixed Media Mask. This is part of a series of photographs of masks I made for an Identity project. The mask was cast from the face of a Nigerian artist who’s work I greatly admire. This mask represents a fusion of both African and English cultures.


Katie Grubb

Sleepy Rhino (Lines Series) Ink on Paper It’s tiring being on the brink of extinction. The last remaining Black Rhino in southern Africa are in real trouble. I have a friend back in Africa, Julie, who works tirelessly for the black rhino. A percentage of sales of this and other artwork to come, will go towards her fantastic, lifelong work to save this incredible animal.

Katie GrubbŠ

http://www.fatheroflions.org/Book_Hokoyo.html


Katie Grubb

Redscape.

Katie Grubb©

Acrylic on Canvas. Inspired by the heat of home….. the beloved land…. Africa.


Katie Grubb

Untitled. Acrylic & Chalk on Paper. Done 4 years ago, also in response to “murambatsvina”

Katie Grubb©


2008 BA (Hons) Degree in Fine Art Brighton University/ Hastings College 2005-2007 Foundation Degree in Fine Art Contemporary Practice. Brighton University 1984/85 Foundation Studies Diploma in Art and Design University of Ulster

Katie Grubb Ambiguous identity is a subject that for me stems from two important cultures - African and English. As a white British person identifying strongly with my African birthplace, it is of great personal interest to me. The work I did two years ago (large transfer prints) was concerned with human rights abuses in Zimbabwe. This led me, through my own personal experiences, and watching the flow of communities out of their homeland to a foreign place, to investigate the question of identity within a Diaspora community. The work you see here is a mix of two cultures. Placing items one would identify with one particular culture - within another, a confused dialogue of cultures and a restaging of identity. Masks are often used in African cultures and can also be translated as a façade one might hide one’s true identity behind. The masks I have made are African in essence, yet made with English lace and crocheted doilies. I have used rhino, elephant and giraffe dung in some of my work, incorporating this with English lace provokes a multitude of effects.

Exhibitions/Awards 2009 Eat@ Café, Hastings 2008 Claremont Gallery, Degree Show, Hastings 2008 Eat@ Cafe, Hastings 2007 Stables Gallery, Hastings “Eclectic Mix” Group Exhibition 2007 HCAT, Degree Show FDA, Hastings 2006 Stables Gallery, Hastings “Neither Here Nor There” Group Exhibition with the Chapman Brothers. 2006 Eat@ café, Hastings 2006 Battersea, London Battersea Arts Fair, London, UK 1993 Standard Bank Gallery, Zimbabwe Group Exhibition in Harare, Zimbabwe. 1992 Gallery Delta, Harare Group Exhibition Zimbabwe 1990/2 Zimbabwe National Gallery Won awards for wine label design for Cairns Wineries in Zimbabwe, Designs printed on wine labels both years. 1988 - 1992 Zimbabwe National Gallery Exhibited at the Annual Zimbabwe Heritage Exhibition five years running. Work for this exhibition is chosen and judged by an international panel of recognized artists. Awarded a Highly Commended Certificate in 1989. 1989 United States Embassy, Harare Solo exhibition at the US Embassy in Zimbabwe. Collections Permanent Collection of the National Gallery of Zimbabwe. Private Collections in Zimbabwe, Britain, Canada, USA, Japan and Switzerland.


In Katie Grubb’s own words “I am a Zimbabwean artist. I work in many mediums, drawing, painting and printing being my favourite. I use photography in my work too and appreciate all art forms. I love organic forms – seeds and pods, bark and trees. Much of my work is inspired by nature.”

Katie Grubb

Below are Live Links to catagories presented by Katie Grubb on Redbubble.com® SEEDS

http://www.redbubble.com/people/katiegrubb/art/everything/tags/seeds

TREES http://www.redbubble.com/people/katiegrubb/art/everything/tags/bark

Identity Projects – I have several ongoing projects relating to the subject of Identity, which stem from my being born and raised in Africa, and the complexities therein. IDENTITY SERIES

Katie Grubb at work.

http://www.redbubble.com/people/katiegrubb/art/everything/tags/mask

An outstanding Talent.

Political Projects – My passion for my birthplace has been a platform for my work relating to the human rights abuses taking place there, and an ongoing concern for my fellow countrymen…. a beautiful paradise in ruin. ZIMBABWE SERIES

Being an ex-Zimbabwean myself (Editor) I tend to lean toward my fellow expatriates and their achievements, especially in their adopted home, in exile or as a relocated resident, - the diaspora. A glance at Katie Grubb’s exhibition venues over the years show her commitment to the people, the conditions and situation in Zimbabwe.

http://www.redbubble.com/people/katiegrubb/art/everything/tags/zimbabwe

INK DRAWINGS http://www.redbubble.com/people/katiegrubb/art/everything/tags/ink

SCREENPRINTS http://www.redbubble.com/people/katiegrubb/art/everything/tags/screenprint

All artwork is Copyrighted © All rights reserved. All the material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, copied, edited, published, or uploaded without written permission from the artist.

Although this publication is primarily about wildlife art and photography, the inclusion of Katie Grubb’s ‘other’ artwork, outside of the Wildlife arena, is to highlight her style of presentation and commonality each artwork shares. The opening image in this chapter was the first we saw of Katie Grubb’s work because it was about wildlife, not in the ‘normal’ context, but as a beacon of thought and mainly of concern. We hope that this image, and others related to wildlife (in Zimbabwe), sees the light of day beyond the internet, and perhaps a new exhibition.

Afriqu du Sud Photographicas  

Wildlife photographics

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