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Photo by Joshua McHugh, courtesy of Filipacchi Publishing.


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Home Can be Hipper the Second Time Around By Rose Bennett Gilbert

Q: We are second-time young marrieds and

want to start fresh when decorating our new house — no carryovers from either "starter marriage" (I had Early American, while his was Bauhaus modern). What's new and fun? Can you show something to get us thinking?

A: I could show you 100 fresh, fun "some-

things," thanks to Michael Lassell, author of a new book showcasing 100 projects that he calls "the last word on modern interiors." That may be a bit of a pun: The "word" comes from the pages of the Metropolitan Home magazine, which has now ceased publication. The magazine's loss is a book-lover's gain. Titled "Design 100" (Filipacchi Publishing), the book offers an insider tour of modern interiors by top designers all across the county. And there's nary a cliche in its 240 pages. The pictured eccentric living room is the love child of Jonathan Adler, the potter-turned-contemporary designer of furniture and furnishings that smack of 1950s but take on a new life of their own, thanks to Adler's wonderfully wacky way of looking at things. This is the sitting room

Fun, familiar, and yet unique, there's no place like this home designed by Jonathan Adler. Photo by Joshua McHugh, courtesy of Filipacchi Publishing. of a New York City penthouse, but its unconventional attitude could translate almost anywhere. Takeaways include the black-and-white color scheme (revved up with jolts of turquoise and screaming pink); the interesting interplay of textures (slick, dark wood floor against shag — yes, shag — rug); and dramatic scale of the furnishings (towering lamps on dainty nesting tables). This is hardly your erstwhile Early American or run-of-the-Bauhaus modern! Author Lassell calls it "playfully glamorous." "There's no other place remotely like it," Lassell concludes. COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM.

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Lukewarm about a Traditional Bath? Q: I like contemporary design, but my wife is into more traditional decor. We are adding a master suite to our house (which is mostly traditional — guess who rules this roost!) There will be two baths, his and hers, and I am determined that "his" will be con-

temporary. I would consider any ideas for blending our tastes, if that's possible.

A: Not only is it possible, "blendship" seems to be the latest word in design, at least for the millennials, children of the post WWII boomer generation, born between 1980 and circa 2000. The darlings of the marketing

pros, millennials are mad about modern, as in cutting-edge now ! It's OK for their parents to fawn over mid-century modern, but the next generation wants to come home to minimalist rooms — cool, calming, serene and uncluttered. Candice Olson is one designer who knows how to turn all those adjectives into living spaces. Author and star of

Warm wood walls and textured flooring take the chill off an ultra-contemporary, prize-winning bath. Photo courtesy Duravit. HGTV's "Divine Design," she has just created a collection of cool rugs for Surya that debuted at the High Point, N.C., Furniture Market last week. "Urban Contemporary," as Candice calls the look, is all about sleek and clean. But her definition of "cool" includes a generous helping of warmth. According to the designer, the millennials want their hardedged, angular contemporary softened with "natural materials like wood, leather, and wool." The rooms she showed were balanced with textures — pile — even shag! — carpeting on the floor, weathered wood paneling on the walls, like that. Home should be a retreat from the millennials' high-pressure real lives, Candice said. Take, for example, the ER doctor who asked her to create a home that would be serene and free of the chaos and drama that dominated his day job. "For him, minimalism was perfect," she said. So she curated and edited, using angular, geometric furnishing and just enough texture — supplied by shag rugs — to take off the chill. It's the wood walls and tradi-

tional herringbone floor that takes the chill — but not the thrill — away from the ubermodern bath we show here. Designed by the firm Alberto/Esteban (Alberto Mizuno and Esteban Cruces), it's literally a winner. Duravit, the venerable German company known for out-there designs in bathroom furniture, just gave this bath an honorable mention in its first design competition, the Duravit Designer Dream Bath Competition. The Canadian architect Nicolas Koff was the top winner in the competition, but I thought the Alberto/Esteban bath might inspire you with its warm woods and vigorous textures balanced against Duravit's luxuriously

PICTURE FOR ILLUSTARTION PURPOSES ONLY

By Rose Bennett Gilbert

sleek DuraStyle products. Stay tuned for more trends and ideas that surfaced at the vast High Point Furniture Market. The Market's approximately 80 million square feet of show space are vibrant with the latest in designs for everything from sofas and chandeliers to fabrics, lamps, light fixtures and rugs. We may not cover all 80 million square feet, but Decor Score's Market Report will continue next week ... and the next. Rose Bennett Gilbert is the coauthor of "Manhattan Style" and six other books on interior design. COPYRIGHT 2013 CREATORS.COM


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Spotlight Homes November 2013