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PHOTOGRAPHY MANUAL 2016


WELCOME TO SPOTHERO


Our photographers are an integral part of SpotHero success. As a SpotHero photographer, you play an important role in helping our product come to life in it’s best form. This manual serves as the main guide to communicate in depth our photography style and to determine the photographer’s extent of resposability.


WORKFLOW OVERVIEW 1

Accepting a project After confirming your availability, we’ll send: location listing, batch map, contract, introduction letter and start date. (We will prep any sites of your expected arrival beforehand, if possible). You should send the signed contrast BEFORE shooting starts.

2

Before the shoot We create the assignment based on a template, however sometimes we add some important information for you, please read carefully all the material sent. Plan your photoshoot with time. Try creating a route based on the distance, hours and your time available. Before shooting, check all spots assigned to you on our App, there you will find a reference photo as well as “How to get there” instructions that could help you find the right spot. Another usefull resource to locate a spot is Google Maps/Streetview. We want to avoid any time lost on looking for a spot or photographing the wrong location. If you are not sure where is the spot located after checking all the previous resources, please send an email to the Photography Manager. Remember you CAN’T start the shootings withouth sending the signed contract first.

3

At the shoot Sometimes location’s staff might wonder who you are, despite our preparation. If you already have your t-shirt, please wear it to any assignment. When asked, you are a SpotHero photographer, shooting photos for our website. If anyone has any questions, tell them to call Photography Manager, Laura Cristancho, at (407) 779 - 0293. Please remember you’re a representative of SpotHero when at a shoot, so be considerate and friendly at all times. Bring the “Photo Check List” with you to any photoshoot. This will help you to keep track of what you’re doing and what’s left. Safety will be always first, so there is no need to risk your life for a shot. Be careful and do your best wihtouth putting yourself in danger.


WORKFLOW OVERVIEW 4

Editing photos / delivering files Please crop out unnecessary things like obstructions, people walking, finger on lens or anything that does not make for good composition. In post-production, you may add saturation, brightness, color balance, etc. to match our photo style and improve quality. We will go deeper in this topic a little bit later on this manual. We’ll prepare an specific folder on our main Google Drive. Here you will upload the final images for every assignment. The folder’s link will be sent to your email. While your photos are being uploaded to the Drive you can go ahead and make the necessary notes on the “Location listing”. Things like: “No machinery on site”, or “Under construction” are important for us, so please let us know. Once all images and notes are ready and up on the Drive, please send an email to the Photography Manager to start the reviewing process.

5

Feedback / Adjustments Once the images had been evaluated for our team, you will receive an email with two possible options: OPTION ONE: “Everything is all-right you can submit your invoice now.” OPTION TWO: “We need some changes/adjustments/ reshootings to be done”. More details will be within the email.

6

Invoice / Payment After receiving the approval for the photos delivered, you will be ready to submit your invoice. Please make sure to inlcude in the invoice all the necessary information: Your contact information SpotHero contact information Issue date Due date (15 days after submitting) Brief description of the work done. (Number of locations and city) Rate per locations Total due Preferred payment method We pay via check or ACH direct deposit. Payment will be done in the next 15 days.


WHAT TO SHOOT SpotHero loves bright, airy photographs that make the best use of natural light. We want to bring our photos to life with vibrancy, rich color, and solid composition; but remain authentic, without sugar-coating the product beyond recognition.


ALLOWED

Daylight shots only

Use lenses 35 mm and above

Shoot only in landscape/ horizontal orientation

Keep vertical and horizontal lines straight

Always double check the focus

Shoot at eye level to reduce perspective distortion

NOT ALLOWED

People or moving cars in the shot.

Night shots

Obstructive views of entrances or exits

Piles of snow. A very light snow layer will be admisible

Use of flash

Use of wide-angle lens, below 35mm.

Angles that a user wouldn’t recognize or see (e.g. from goundlevel, aerial)


PHOTO CHECK LIST GARAGE

Front / Entrance

Machinery

Frontal shot. Just to show how the entrance

Take a close up shot of the in/out control

looks like including some of the context.

system. E.g. Scanner or card reader.

Make sure all lines are straight

Perspective of driver - Right.

Perspective of driver - Left.

E.g. If driver is heading from the right, take a

If the street has two-way lanes, take

long shot from direction of the traffic.

both shots. (Right and left)

Rates signage - General

Rates signage - Special

Take a photo of the “General” rates

“Special” rates are usually located on a

board and the “Special” rates.

sandwich board out front and include “Early bird”, “Night” and “Event” specials


Inside 1

Inside 2

Take an open shot of the inside of the garage.

You could also try taking “aisles� of cars.

Try to show a nice space available to park.

Access door After you park, you usually find the way out. But it can be difficult to find your way back in. We will need a photo of the Pedestrian access door to the garage from outside. Try a frontal shot, including something of the surrounding area to facilitate location.


PHOTO CHECK LIST LOT

Front / Entrance

Perspective of driver - Right.

Frontal shot. Just to show how the entrance

E.g. If driver is heading from the right, take a

looks like including some of the context.

long shot from direction of the traffic.

Make sure all lines are straight

Perspective of driver - Left.

Rates signage - General / Special

If the street has two-way lanes, take

Take a photo of the “General” and the

both shots. (Right and left)

“Special” rates. “Special” are usually located on a sandwich board out front and include “Early bird”, “Night” and “Event” specials.

Inside 1

Inside 2

Take an open shot of the inside of the garage.

You could also try taking “aisles” of cars.

Try to show a nice space available to park.


PHOTO CHECK LIST VALET

Valet location

Perspective of driver - Right.

Frontal shot. Use a long shot for this Image,

E.g. If driver is heading from the right, take a

including street lanes and any marquee

long shot from direction of the traffic.

that serves as a reference point.

Perspective of driver - Left.

Rates signage - General / Special

If the street has two-way lanes, take

Take a photo of the “General” and the

both shots. (Right and left)

“Special” rates. “Special” are usually located on a sandwich board out front and include “Early bird”, “Night” and “Event” specials.

Airport locations When shooting an airport location make sure to also shoot the Van/Shuttle that takes the costumer from the location to the airport or visceversa.


SQUARE CROPPING


TAKE A LOOK AT THIS

WEBSITE

The images on this page are from the same exact spot; as you can see the same photo is displayed in two formats. This is what we called “square cropping”. Depending on the device where the information is being requested, the images might be cropped to a square format. YOU SHOULDN’T CROP ANY OF THE PHOTOS, but you should have in mind that “square cropping” when composing on the frame. images should look great in both ,landscape and square format. MOBILE APP


THIS IS RIGHT

Take shots of garage machinery. Use close-up camera settings for ‘product shot’ style.

Try different angles to find the most appealing.

Take shots of rate signage. Be sure the letters are crisp.

The signs should be shot in a frontal angle and with close aperture to ensure focus.


Take shots from different perspectives, including from inside lots, so viewers can see how roomy (or not) spots and aisles are. Photo was edited post-production for increased brightness and saturation.

Always remember to show the reality of the place.

The lighting is even. Interior and exterior are both balanced.

Try to find and shot a “nice� spot available.


THIS IS RIGHT

Front entrance. (Valet location) Rich color and even cropping.

Angle taken from direction of viewer in car, how they might approach the lot. No obstructions, even lighting, good line composition and rich color.

Inside of garage. Showing machinery and entrance gateway. Authentic lighting of garage.

Close-up of machinery.


Even lighting, not overexposed or shadowcast. Light should be shown accurately. If lighting is naturally very dark, try to lighten for details.

Inside garage. Showing roominess, ease, and authentic lighting of interior. Good composition and cropping.

Despite its unglamorous setting, the pic shows sharp details, correct level of vibrance and saturation, even lighting with no shadowcast, pleasing lines composition. It reflects its accurate context, as well as shows Spothero sign.

Appropriate detail on exterior and interior of entrance (interior entrance is not too dark), light is balanced and bright, correct level of saturation, crop is focused.


THIS IS WRONG

Blurred, lacks contrast/detail, shows person in front, and crops too closely on the sides but not on top and bottom.

Image is out-center. Blurred. Lacking of vibrancy and no sharp details

Photo is out of foucus White Balance (WB) is bluish Composition is not right Entrance of spot is not centered

Blurred, and shows too much shadowcast from trees, signs, and buildings. Angle obstructs signs and shows vehicle in front.


Entrance is too dark, not enough detail shown. Also, there is too much snow on the ground

Blurred, with uneven lighting and overexposure of interior lights. Should have used tripod, lowered ISO for less noise, and color balanced either in camera or post-production.

Lights are overexposed Lines are not straight Entrance of the garage is in the center Lacking color/saturation

We discourage night shots. Lights are overexposed.


THIS IS WRONG

Flares are not allowed. Contrast is too strong and entrance is not centered.

Image is too contrasted. Lacking details in shadows and lights.

Image is not centered/symetrical. WB is too warm and lines are not straight.

Image is too contrasted. Color are oversaturated, lines are not straight and composition is not right.


TECHNICAL GUIDELINES INITIAL FILE TYPE* (Before editing) RAW (.NEF / .CR2) FINAL FILE TYPE (After Editing) .jpg COLOR MODE sRGB MAX FILE SIZE 3 MB RESOLUTION 96 DPI

*Please always make sure to shoot on RAW format.


TECHNICAL GUIDELINES

Framing When framing the image, try to show as much of the space as possible. Remeber the “Square Cropping???, Well, now make sure to frame your pictures thinking that eventually the image will be also display on a square format. Symetrical compositions are usually the way to go, however some times the “Rule of Thirds” might work. Always think how your image will look on a square format.

arrows indicate entrance/exit, or you may choose to shoot special architectural details to help the composition. Close-Up Details Detail shots of machinery/gates/etc give life to the spot and allow the user to see more detailed product information. Focus

Straight Lines Straight lines are one of the important aspects of interior photography. Shoot from a leveled tripod in order to keep your vertical and horizontal lines straight. Images should be shot at or slightly below natural eye level to help reduce distortion. Do not shoot too high or too low, as it creates skewed lines. Make sure to correct any barrel, perspective, bowing or vertical distortion in post-production before submiting the images. Tilted, skewed, or bowed images will not be accepted. Also remember that we only accept “Landscape/Horizontal” photos. Engaging the Viewer Shoot both straight on and into corners to vary the angles within your set. Shooting from corners adds dimensionality and draws the viewer in. Please try to capture an equal amount of ceiling/sky and floor space -- feel free to show more floor if

All delivered images should be focused correctly. When shooting open frames (e.g. Driver’s perspective / Frontal shot of entrance) using a close f might be the best option as this settings allows most of the planes to be sharp. However when shooting close up/details (e.g. Machinery / rates board) an open f will focus the attention on the detail and leave the background and context noise as a blur. People on the shoot We would love to get images when no one is around, just showcasing the architecture and the plain space, that is the ideal, howevwer that is not always possible. Just try to avoid people as much as possible. Wide Angle Fisheye and extremely wide angles will not be accepted. Images shot with very wide


angle lenses must be corrected in postproduction to reduce distortion. Usually a zoom lens will be the best approach to have a wide range of posibilities, but, please don’t shoot with anything below 35mm. Over-Editing Never use HDR editing. Avoid OVER use of sharpening, “shadow/highlight”, “clarity” or “recovey” filters. These tend to look unnatural and give an inaccurate representation of the space. Color Correction Color correct each set of images in postproduction always. We can not accept photos that are not neutral across the set. You may increase saturation and vibrance if necessary. Always make sure that WB seems even as well as contrast and brightness. Dodging and Burning Please limit dodging and burning done in post-production, unless entrances or areas of shot are shadowcast and need greater detail, or if lights are overexposed and need toning down. Vignetting Vignetting will not be accepted. If naturally occurring, please reduce it post-

production before submitting photos. Please do not add it for dramatic effect. Interior of locations. When shooting interiors of garages, expose for the interior, rather than any windows. Parking garages are often dim; we like the images to be bright enough for the user to see the interior structure, even if windows are overexposed. There should be details in the highlights of the interior. We do not allow any photos that uses filling Flash. Please stick with the natural light available in the lcoation. Exterior of locations. When shooting exteriors of garages/lots, be careful not to create too much contrast or overexpose. Avoid shadow casting from signs/streetlights/other buildings. You may try either a polarizer or neutral density filter to avoid glare or overexposure. Low Light Always use a tripod, especially in low light situations. Never shoot at night. If you need to shoot with little or no natural light, use longer exposures, and lower ISO to reduce noise.


QUESTIONS


If you have any questions or need help, please contact: Laura Cristancho, Photography Manager Email: laura.cristancho@spothero.com Phone: (407) 779 - 0293


SPOTHERO 2016


Photography Style Manual / SpotHero