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October 27, 2011

It’s their time SRV water polo shoots to break through. Pg. 14

hot stuff SSM names summer’s best. Pg. 27

endure | excel | achieve

Norcal football

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Top

vol. 2. issue 34

Pg. 23

red zone: vista del lago lights it up. Pg. 22

impulse: Rudy Project will have you stylin’. Pg. 32

livermore’s star running back Damariay Drew is plugged in. Pg. 18


all access

How ’bout that Cowboy?

PHONE 925.566.8500 FAX 925.566.8507 Editorial Editor@SportStarsOnline.com Editor Chace Bryson. Ext. 104 • Chace@SportStarsOnline.com Contributors Bill Kolb, Erik Stordahl, Mitch Stephens, Doug Gardner, Matt Smith, Clay Kallam, Jim McCue, Eric Gilmore, Dave Kiefer, Liz Elliott, Tim Rudd Photography Butch Noble, Bob Larson, Jonathan Hawthorne, Darryl Henick, Norbert von der Groeben Creative Department Art@SportStarsOnline.com Production Manager Mike DeCicco. Ext. 103 • MikeD@SportStarsOnline.com

Livermore’s Damariay Drew might be his school’s best-ever football prospect. Pg. 18

Publisher/President Mike Calamusa. Ext. 106 • Mike@SportStarsOnline.com Advertising & Calendar/Classified Sales Sales@SportStarsOnline.com Account Executives Erik Stordahl • Erik@SportStars Online.com (Special Sections, Calendar, Marketplace sales) Reader Resources/Administration Ad Traffic, Subscription, Calendar & Classified Listings info@SportStarsOnline.com • Deb Hollinger. Ext. 101 • Distribution/Delivery Mags@SportStarsOnline.com Distribution Manager Butch Noble. Ext. 107 • Butch@SportStarsOnline.com Information technology John Bonilla CFO Sharon Calamusa • Sharon@SportStarsOnline.com Office Manager/Credit Services Deb Hollinger. Ext. 101 • Deb@SportStarsOnline.com

Butch Noble

thirsty for success: San Ramon Valley goes from no pool to title aspirations. Pg. 14

First Pitch.................................................... 6 Locker Room............................................. 8 AAA SportStars of the Week...............11 Training Time............................................17 Health Watch...........................................25 Behind the Clipboard.............................26 Tee2Green................................................31 Impulse......................................................32 Camps + Clinics......................................34 Reader Survey..........................................38

Red Zone: Vista del Lago piling up gaudy offensive numbers. Pg. 22

tough enough? Know when to play through pain and when to protect yourself. Pg. 26

ON THE COVER: Damariay Drew. Photo by Dennis Lee.

Board of Directors Dennis Erokan, CEO, Placemaking Group Roland Roos, CPA, Roland Roos & Co Susan Bonilla, State Assembly Drew Lawler, Managing Director, AJ Lawler Partners Brad Briegleb, Attorney At Law community SportStars™ Magazine A division of Caliente! Communications, LLC 5356 Clayton Rd., Ste. 222 • Concord, CA • 94521 info@SportStarsOnline.com www.SportStarsOnline.com

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your ticket to bay area sports admit one; rain or shine This Vol. #2, October 2011 Whole No. 34 is published by Caliente! Communications, LLC, 5356 Clayton Rd, Ste. 222, Concord, CA 94521. SportStars™© 2010 by Caliente! Communications, LLC. All rights reserved. Subscription rates: 24 issues, U.S. 3rd class $42 (allow 3 weeks for delivery). 1st class $55. To receive sample issues, please send $3 to cover postage. Back issues are $4 each. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission of Publisher is strictly prohibited. The staff and management, including Board of Directors, of SportStars™© does not advocate or encourage the use of any product or service advertised herein for illegal purposes. Editorial contributions, photos and letters to the editor are welcome and should be addressed to the Editor. All material should be typed, double-spaced on disk or email and will be handled with reasonable care. For materials return, please enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope. SportStars™© and STARS!™© Clinics are registered trademarks of Caliente! Communications, LLC.

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Coaches are leaders who sometimes like to mislead, too

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amesmanship. That’s a word being tossed around the Bay Area media a lot over the last week. A confident firstyear NFL head coach — no, the other one — decided he would play coy with the national media for a week in naming his starting quarterback. He did this, presumably, because he felt he may have been misleading an opponent which was attempting to build a game plan against him. The problem, as many of you know, was that it backfired. Miserably. Both quarterbacks ended up playing, and neither had a good performance in what was an ugly defeat. Afterward, the coach admitted that he knew who he was going to start at quarterback all along and stated he was using a bit of gamesmanship. Coaches don’t actually play the game. That’s something they have to let their players do. And it’s tough. So when they get a chance to gain an edge with their own action, or inaction, they do so. And it’s gamesmanship. The coaches refer to it as gamesmanship because it sounds so much better than what we, the writers, like to call it — sandbagging. This doesn’t just happen at the professional level, though. High school coaches will do it, too. Many of us writers who cover East Bay high school sports on a regular basis, will get a kick out of the coaches who regularly employ these tactics — whether consciously or subconsciously. It’s especially enjoyable for us when a writer new to the area gets suckered into the sandbagging and perhaps picks a coach’s team to finish near the bottom of the standings during the preseason, only to see that same team undefeated eight weeks into the year. With more than 10 years built up as a conduit for various styles of coaching gamesmanship, I’ve singled out three different styles.

a quarterback committed to a Pac-12 school, and your top two defensive players?” “You’re right, maybe pick us to finish third.” And laughter typically ensues.

THE CLOSE-TO-THE-VEST TACTIC This style of gamesmanship is probably the most utilized. And it can be more frustrating to writers because we often have a good inclination that the coach is holding something back, but we can’t get him to spill it. Most often a coach’s reasoning for this type of gamesmanship makes sense. For instance, a key player may be injured and the coach wants to keep it hush-hush so an opponent can’t alter its game plan. We writers can grasp that, and respect it. Even if we’re convinced the coach is bordering on paranoia and it bugs us that we can’t write about what we want to write about.

THE UNDERSELLER

The true sense of sandbagging. It doesn’t matter how good his or her team is, this coach will go to great lengths to convince the writer — and all readers — that there is just a long way to go before the team can reach its potential. Here’s an example of a blatant Underseller at work — based off an actual interview I experienced a few years back. “Coach, this seems to be matchup that’s good for you this week. Joe Smith rushed for 170 yards against this defense last year, you’ve got to feel good about Chace@ the possibility of moving the ball on the SportStarsOnline.com ground.” “Joe did well against them last year, (925) 566-8503 but that was a different offensive line. There’s a few new faces up front for us and we’re still adjusting.” Now, that might be a reasonable comment going into the first week of the season. This interview happened in Week 6. The coach’s team was 4-1, and Joe Smith (not his real name, of course) was one of the top five running backs in These coaches tend to be the most enjoyable to interact the region to that point. with because, even if they’re attempting to use some gamesAnd this coach was serious. It was not a wink-and-nod. manship, they refuse to take themselves too seriously. Often Obviously there’s a ton of different things that go into they know their team is really good, and they know that the coaching a high school team in any sport. It’s not only about writer isn’t going to be convinced that it’s not. X’s and O’s. There are several things that need to be considA typical preseason conversation between writer and ered week in and week out. And many times that can skew coach will go like this. what they say when it gets time to talk to us. I understand “Hey, Coach. How’s this team shaping up?” that, of course. But I’ll continue to get a kick out of the coaches who con“We have a lot of work to do. You can probably slot us to sciously try to pull one over on the rest of the competition. finish fifth or sixth this year.” At the very least, it keeps us writers on our toes. ✪ “Really? Even though you return nine starters on offense,

FIRST PITCH Chace Bryson Editor

THE WINK-AND-A-NOD APPROACH

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36

count’EM Point differential in Campolindo’s 42-6 football victory over rival Miramonte on Oct. 21, the biggest margin of victory between the schools in more than 30 years. Both teams entered the game undefeated.

Butch Noble

Substitutes for the “over-aggressive” post-game handshake There was a recent dust-up between a couple of coaches during the traditional post-game handshake. Maybe you heard about that. It got a little bit of media attention. Seems this fracas has pundits calling the entire concept of sportsmanship into question. We here at SportStars place a pretty high premium on sportsmanship. It’s right up there with patriotism and personal hygiene. So the contretemps between Jim Harbaugh and Jim Schwartz got us thinking of other, better ways that coaches of all sports can amicably display their differences of opinion. ■ 1. Pregame thumb wrestling. Forget the coin toss. You want the ball first? Limber up those digits, boys and girls. ■ 2. Halftime pillow fight. Way we see it, this is gonna be far more entertaining and instructive than those idiotic sideline interviews. ■ 3. Water balloon toss. This seems appropriate any time. Don’t like your opponent’s vein-popping, headset-throwing act? Lob a water balloon across the field/pitch/pool/ court and cool that coach off. ■ 4. Three words: Inflatable. Sumo. Suits. ■ 5. Postgame noogies. Losers get headlocks and knuckles to the dome. Winners get pure, unadulterated joy (and awesome photo opportunities). — Bill Kolb

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Throughout the week we poll our Facebook fans on random things that come to our mind here at SportStars HQ. Come ‘Like’ us at www.facebook.com/sportstars to join in. No high school sports on Sundays. So, what’s your favorite way to spend (most) everybody’s day off? ■ “We can spend our time reading the blogs about the games,” Dave M. ■ “Reading bitter blog posts from rival teams,” Eddie V.

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rapidFIRE

Most overrated athlete Colin Kaepernick

Al Davis: First word that comes to mind

PS3, XBox 360 or Wii

Favorite Apple product

Solid

iPhone

Raider

iPad

Manager

iPod touch

Karl Thornton, Campolindo football

Cristiano Ronaldo

Ashley Love, Las Lomas cross country

Derrick Rose

Elliott Pitts, De La Salle basketball

Hours of homework each week

5-6 15 7

Next Bay Area team to win a title

sayWHAT? “I wasn’t really expecting us to be undefeated, but we just had one goal and we became really close. And this is what’s happened so far.” San Ramon Valley boys water polo player, John Speros. The Wolves were 17-0 as of Oct. 24. To read more about their unbeaten season, and take a look at the top NCS water polo contenders, turn to page 14. Support Your Local Business • Say You Found Them In SportStars™

Jonathan Hawthorne

October 27, 2011

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October 27, 2011

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Powered by

natalie bodnar golf . amador valley . senior

Butch Noble Like us on Facebook

NATALIE’S QUICK HITS Favorite golfer: Rory McIlroy Favorite course: Pebble Beach Favorite class: English, Photography

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Winning the league title was expected. Going undefeated was just icing on the cake. The Amador Valley girls golf team has Natalie Bodnar to thank for the latter. The senior golfer blazed the field with a 1-under 70 in the East Bay Athletic League championship held at Deer Ridge GC on Oct. 17. In addition to capturing the EBAL team title, Bodnar also won her first individual title. SportStars Magazine: You won by a rather comfortable margin. What was working for you in the EBAL championship? Natalie Bodnar: I was actually put in the third position for Amador so I was playing the No. 3 girls, so I didn’t know what the other girls were shooting. I just went out there and played. … My mom was out there supporting me the whole time which was good. SSM: Be honest. Did you think your team would go undefeated in league? NB: Going into it, I was hoping it would be that way. We haven’t really been a team to have high expectations. We’ve been focusing on being a team and strategizing that way. I was pleasantly surprised this year. … It’s cool for me being a senior.

honorable mention

Jade santos The Moreau Catholic senior outside hitter helped hand Bishop O’Dowd its first league loss since 2004 as she picked up 14 kills, 23 digs and four aces in a win on Oct. 11.

zach kline The San Ramon Valley QB was electric in a 42-38 win over California on Oct. 14. He threw for five touchdowns and rushed for another. He finished with 337 yards on 19-for-23 passing.

olito thompson Concord’s junior running back amassed 243 rushing yards on 23 carries to go with four touchdowns in a 52-15 defeat of Ygnacio Valley on Oct. 15.

October 27, 2011

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USYVL grows as the “Little League” of volleyball By erik stordahl | SportStars

Pop Warner. AYSO. Little League. What do all of these leagues have in common? For millions of kids, these leagues serve as their first encounter for some of the most common sports in the world. Not only for them but for their fathers, their fathers fathers and so on. And until 1997, nothing like that existed for volleyball. Enter the United States Youth Volleyball League. Based in Southern California, the USYVL is the household name for young volleyball athletes nationwide. “The league started with 100 kids,” said Veronica Sanchez, a consultant for the USYVL. “We’re now at 10,000 kids. We’re almost up to 120 programs.” Ten thousand may not be the same number as the more known organizations for the most popular sports, but it’s a number that’s been growing exponentially since the league’s genesis. “We started getting requests (to form satellite programs) in 1999,” Sanchez said. “We went from four to 10 to 25 to 45.” Having the USYVL in place allows kids to get acquainted with the sport of volleyball, even if they know very little about it to begin with. Members learn the basics of bumping, setting and spiking. But they also learn valuable characteristics like teamwork, selflessness and sportsmanship. “We run our programs in a positive environment,” Sanchez said. “There’s no yelling or screaming.” Such a league is ideal for parents who want to get their kids exposed to the sport, especially in an environment that’s less competitive compared to club volleyball. “There are no tryouts, just open registration,” Sanchez said. “Every kid gets to play. It doesn’t matter if you’re athletic or whether you’re coordinated. … It’s an all-inclusive program.” With 120 programs, it’s obvious the USYVL isn’t in every single community in the country. But for those interested in establishing one, it’s rather simple. Sanchez explains that for a program to start in a community, it’s all about volunteering. It starts with finding a site director. “All they need is a willingness to volunteer,” Sanchez said. “To be active in the community, doing administrative work.” Once a site director is found, it’s crucial to find someone with a sound understanding and knowledge of the many facets of the sport. Preferably someone with playing experience at the high school or, even better, college level. Once those two positions are filled, it’s all downhill from there as the USYVL literally takes care of the rest. They have league representatives train the site directors, kind of like how McDonald’s or 12

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USYVL in the Bay Area

Following are the USYVL programs located in the Greater Bay Area. If you don’t see one near you, research how to start your own at USYVL.Org. Cupertino Los Gatos-Leigh High Los Gatos-Blossom Hill Park Morgan Hill Mountain View Palo Alto San Jose-Kirk Park San Jose-Butcher Park

Burger King will train it’s new franchise owners. It’s a real turnkey operation. “USYVL puts up all costs,” Sanchez said. “We’ll provide everything you need from paper clips and pencils to volleyballs and nets. If you’re willing to open a program in your community, we’ll help you. We do everything.” Receiving all of the nuts and bolts for a new program is like assembling new furniture from IKEA. It can be confusing and a real test of patience. But the fact that the USYVL goes one step further in providing a walkthrough on building the program and ensuring its completion speaks volumes for the organization as a whole. The bulk of USYVL’s programs are located in California, but that doesn’t mean there can’t be more. The reason for most of the programs being set up in California makes perfect sense when remembering where they are headquartered. Sanchez explains it’s easier to set up a program in, say, Oakland, than it would be in Fairbanks, Alaska or Lincoln, Nebraska. “It’s more inexpensive to start a program in California,” Sanchez adds. If the desire and willingness to volunteer is present though, rest assured more programs will be built. ✪

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Inside NCS Water Polo

■ TOURNAMENT DATES Nov. 2 - First round Nov. 5 - Second round Nov. 8 - Quarterfinals Nov. 10 - Semifinals Nov. 12 - Championships @ Soda Aquatic Center (Campolindo High) ■ DEFENDING CHAMPIONS Boys: Acalanes (Div. I), Las Lomas (Div. II) Girls: Monte Vista (Div. I), Campolindo (Div. II) ■ BOYS TEAMS TO WATCH San Ramon Valley: Wolves likely to enter tournament as the team to beat thanks to an unbeaten record through Oct. 24. Miramonte: Charlie Wiser leads a hungry Matadors team which lost in the Div. I final a year go.

Acalanes: The defending champion might be getting overlooked, despite a solid offense featuring Tanner Cullen and Andrew Schnugg, above. California: An EBAL team quietly lurking in the shadow of San Ramon Valley. ■ GIRLS TEAMS TO WATCH Las Lomas: Senior-laden Knights will look to match the run the Las Lomas boys made a year ago.

YEAR Wolves OF THE

After five straight years of NCS semifinal losses, the San Ramon Valley boys water polo team is poised to end that streak

Campolindo: Cougars have a great shot at repeating in Div. II behind returning standouts Kimi Klein, Sam Flower, and Gracie Fowler, above. James Logan: Colts have a promising look after going 21-2 through Oct. 20.

Jonathan Hawthorne

above right: San Ramon Valley junior Nick Pasichuke winds up to fire an outside shot during an Oct. 18 match at Acalanes. The Wolves won the match 17-10. 14

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O

By Chace Bryson | Editor

nly a few weeks remained before the San Ramon Valley High boys water polo team could take to the water and begin training for its 2011 season. That’s when the team found out it would have no water to train in. At least, not on its own campus. Continuing renovations to the San Ramon Valley athletic facilities meant a new pool, and a couple of displaced water polo programs. “That put a bit of a damper on things,” Wolves coach Corey Dolley said. But that’s been about the only disappointment for the SRV boys, who cruised into the last full week of October an unbeaten 17-0 and a heavy favorite to compete for the North Coast Section Division I championship on Nov. 12. The NCS tournament has not exactly been a wonderland for the Wolves in recent years. In fact, it’s pretty much been a massive source

of frustration. In each of the past five seasons, the Wolves have reached the NCS semifinals only to hit a wall. The team has lost its semifinal matches by five goals or more in each of the past four seasons. Despite a rich history in the sport, no SRV boys water polo team has ever reached an NCS final since it became an official section-championship sport in 1995. Miramonte, the team which vanquished the Wolves 12-7 in last year’s semifinal loss, has 11 of the 16 NCS Division I championship banners. “It was a pretty bad feeling (a year ago),” said John Speros, one of the Wolves three senior captains. “We wanted to win that semifinal, but we kind of knew we didn’t try 100 percent the whole season. That’s what we’re trying to do this season.” Dolley, a 1995 graduate of San Ramon Valley who went on to be an All-American for Long Beach State water polo, is in his fifth year heading the program at his alma mater. He, just like his team, is ready to break through that semifinal barrier. Upload photos and team stats! www.SportStarsOnline.com


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October 27, 2011

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Jonathan Hawthorne

Tyler Martin rises up for a shot against Acalanes on Oct. 18. Teammate Nick Candau referred to Martin as one of the team’s stronger defenders, and a key to the Wolves’ consistently getting out on good counter attacks. And while he’s enjoying the current run his team’s on, he can’t pretend he completely expected it. “Every year we have a goal of winning section,” the coach said. “Are we surprised (at being undefeated), yeah. But we also kind of expected it, because we expect to win each time out. That’s how we play.” And it sure doesn’t hurt to have the type of starting lineup Dolley gets to send into the pool each match. With a strong mix of senior leadership and some up-and-coming talent, the Wolves have a menacing lineup that builds its success on strong defensive play and strong execution on its counter attacks and offensive sets. “I think the key to our success so far is that we’ve just really been jelling as a team,” senior hole set Nick Candau said. “We’ve had hard practices where we’ve really mixed it up. We’re playing solid team defense and the chemistry in the starting lineup is there that hasn’t been there in prior years.” Candau joins Speros as one of the three senior captains in the starting lineup. Justin Roberto completes the trio. The rest of the lineup consists of juniors Nick Pasichuke, Tyler Martin and goalkeeper Sammy Yorke, along with sophomore southpaw Conor Neumann. “They’ve come so far since they started playing water polo,” Dolley said of the entire group. “I’m just glad to see them playing good water polo offensively and defensively. They are understanding positions and where to go, and their shooting is phenomenal.” Asked to breakdown the starting lineup, Candau was at no loss for words. On Speros: “He’s a great shooter with a really hard shot. He really gets us out on the counter attack and into a good offensive set.” On Roberto: “He’s really strong and really smart in the water. He’s got a strong shot and is a big key to our defense.” 16

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On Pasichuke: “His main job is to get outside on the counter attack. He’s got a great outside shot and really drives it home.” On Martin: “Tyler is a really strong defender. He looks to take opponents’ centers out of the game and allows our other players to press. That also helps us get out on counter attacks really well.” On Yorke: “He’s our defensive captain. He’s very verbal and a very sound goalie.” On Neumann: “He’s a left-hander with a gnarly outside shot. He’s a great addition to our offense.” As for Candau himself, Dolley took care of that. “When we haven’t had Candau at the two meter position, our offense has been pretty stagnant,” the coach said. “If that spot is filled with a good athlete, it makes a big difference. He can post up in front of the goal and just let everyone get it to him.” One won’t get any the players to talk about the team’s unbeaten record. Primarily because that’s never been the goal. The goal is reaching that NCS final, and then beating the team they meet there. The consensus among them is that they expect it to be none other than Miramonte. The Matadors went 12-5 through their first 17 games, and have more than enough firepower to contend with the top teams in the section. “Hopefully the two best teams will end up in the final,” Dolley said. “If we’re there and Miramonte is there, that’s who we’re going to end up playing. They’re very good, a very fundamental team and they work together very well. It’s good water polo.” Until then, the Wolves will remain singlefocused. “Get to the NCS final and win,” Candau said. “Our season will count as a loss if we don’t get to that final game, so we’re just gonna take it one game at a time.” ✪

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In training young athletes, testing will never replace teaching M

Coaches and trainers must progress away from the ‘valueintensive’ practice of training young athletes in short bursts (six to eight weeks) and shift to a more longterm and ‘principalfocused’ approach to working with kids.

any coaches and trainers feel the need to test absolute strength (amount of musculoskeletal force generated for one all-out effort) via one, four or eight RM (rep maximum). The thought process is that once they have a baseline measurement of a given young athletes strength capacity, they can deduce two specific things: ■ The strength gain(s) that an athlete will see following a training program (because inevitably they will re-test the athlete at the conclusion of their six or eight week training cycle). ■ The percentage of absolute strength the athlete can and should perform in their training programs (for example, if a one RM squat equals 225 pounds, then a ‘training weight’ may be 70% of that, or 158 pounds). Biomotor improvements (strength, speed, flexibility) are not hard to come by with young athletes and are often just as attributable to their natural adolescent maturation process as they are to any ‘cutting edge’ training program a given trainer or coach will put together. Moreover, as demonstrated in countless studies, detraining effects will occur in a relatively short pe-

riod of time once the training program has concluded. Coaches and trainers must progress away from the ‘value-intensive’ practice of training young athletes in short bursts (six to eight weeks) and shift to a more long-term and ‘principal-focused’ approach to working with kids. A training program should not look to isolate and improve biomotor ability as much as it should act as a teaching agent with a focus on improving transferability to sport. Kids should not be placed in a situation where the efficacy of their training is based on how much more they can squat in Week 7 than they did in Week 1. Again, trainers and coaches should focus on the rate of improvement in technical ability in the development of young athletes. This places the focus on how well they are progressing from a form and function standpoint. Not only is this a more ‘teaching-based’ approach to strength and conditioning, but it also changes the focus and mental stress for the athlete — from performance considerations (i.e. how much weight can they lift) to technical considerations (i.e. how well can they lift it). One of the more problematic issues regarding testing revolves around why a trainer or coach is

Training Time Tim Rudd for IYCA

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testing at all. The reason to test must be completely based on what trainers and coaches want to learn from the results — and most don’t seem to see that clearly enough. If your kids have no lifting experience, then by nature of that conclusion, the role of a trainer/coach is to teach. Period. There is simply no reason to test strength capacity in a situation where your young athlete has no experience at all. The reality is that in the United States, many high schools use a programming model that is based on test/re-test situations right from freshman through varsity. The notion that incoming freshman, with little to no technical ability, are being asked to perform strength assessments from day one is nothing short of ridiculous. And maybe a touch dangerous as well. Teach. Teach. Teach. I cannot re-state that enough. Trainers and coaches need to forget about testing biomotor ability and concentrate on actually teaching young athletes the skills they need to excel in sport and remain injury free. ✪ Tim Rudd is an International Youth Conditioning Association specialist in youth conditioning (level 3), speed and agility (level 2), and nutrition specialist (level 1). For more information on anything you read in Training Time, email him at tim@fit2thecore.com.

October 27, 2011

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Ride 'em

COWBOY After several dismal seasons, Livermore football rises up behind a second-year coach and Damariay Drew — perhaps the school’s best player in decades

T

he East Bay Athletic League is chock full of football tradition, powerhouse teams, local coaching legends and of course, supreme talent. It is considered the best public school league in Northern California, if not the state. Well, it’s 86 percent public with the one private school being De La Salle, which, with six mythical national championships and a national record 151-game win streak on its resume, may be the top program in the country. This season, the EBAL’s claim to fame is a trio of Division I-committed quarterbacks – San Ramon Valley’s Zach Kline (Cal), Monte Vista’s Jeff Lockie (Oregon) and De La Salle’s Bart Houston (Wisconsin). Yet consensus with those in the know — the coaches — the league’s best all-around player resides in, of all neighborhoods, near Livermore High, the league’s undisputed doormat. Damariay Drew is a 5-foot-11, 195-pound block of sheer speed, muscle and athleticism. “What an athlete,” Monte Vista coach Craig Bergman said. “What a burst. He’s so explosive.” 

Said Amador Valley coach Rick Sira: “Very, very impressive.” Said Foothill coach Matt Sweeney: “The kid is a flat out stud.” Besides speeding past defenders into the end zone or jack-hammering an unsuspecting ball carrier, Drew is blowing up a reputation — one that claims the Cowboys are a pushover, a much-needed breather during a brutal league run, an automatic victory. “We’re moving in the right direction,” Drew said following a 28-27 heartbreaking loss at 6-1 California on Oct. 21. “But we got to get the job done. We’ve got to get that victory.” The Cowboys came into the season having lost 21 straight EBAL games, and 43 of 45. During that same seven-year slide, they were 16-56 overall. The California loss dropped them to 3-4 and 0-4 in league play, extending the losing streak to 25. But besides a 62-0 loss to nationally-ranked De La Salle, the Cowboys have been more than competitive and very much snake-bit. Livermore largely outplayed Amador Valley but five turnovers and nine penalties led to a 14-12 defeat. Drew had a career-high 15 tackles in that game to go along with 117 yards rushing and a touchdown. “That was our game,” Drew said. “We let it slip away.” Against Monte Vista, he exploded for 208 yards rushing and four touchdowns and the Cowboys piled up almost 400 yards. But Lockie threw for 309 and four touchdowns and Monte Vista ran up 442 total yards in a wild 49-40 win. “We were right there,” Drew said. “We’re just that close.”

In the California game, the Cowboys trailed 21-7 at halftime, made a gallant comeback and Drew sprinted up the middle on a 17-yard touchdown with 54.7 seconds left to apparently tie the game. But second-year coach Greg Haubner went for the win with a two-point conversion. On a play they’d practiced all week, quarterback Zach McPherson handed the ball to Drew running from the I-formation. Rather than power up the middle, Drew attempted a jump pass, but it was tipped and fell incomplete. “They had everyone up and there wasn’t a safety in sight,” Haubner said. “We thought our tight end would be left uncovered. It just didn’t work.” Said Drew: “We’d been running the ball, running the ball and we figured they’d think we’d run again. But the play was bad from the start. They had two guys on the tight end. It was like they were expecting it.” All was not lost. The Cowboys recovered an onside kick, however four plays netted negative one yard. Another spirited effort. Another painful defeat, this to a Top10 team in Northern California. “In some ways that made it hurt worse,” Drew said. But at least it wasn’t a jack-stomping. Last season, California beat Livermore 62-0, Monte Vista blitzed the Cowboys 55-20 and Amador Valley tied one on 34-7. Those are combined scores of 151-27. This season the combined count was 91-79. “We’re closing the gap,” Haubner said. “We’ve picked up the pieces and made considerable strides.” Here, here, Drew said. He points directly at Haubner for the turnaround.

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squad in rushing (936) and touchdowns (13) but “He came into the program and immediately gave tackles as well (7.7 per game). us a winning mindset,” Drew said. “He’s such a great Not only that, Haubner said, he’s the most popular motivator. His pregame and halftime speeches will kid on campus. send chills down your spine.” “Everyone knows Drew,” Haubner said. “He’s got Haubner, 37, came over from Foothill after eight an outgoing, outstanding personality. He’s very funseasons, six as the head junior varsity coach. He ny.” brought Mike McCafferty, Livermore’s defensive coHis demeanor wasn’t always  the best on the field, ordinator, with him. Haubner said. He had trouble controlling his emoBesides learning from Foothill coaches Matt tions. Not anymore. Sweeney and John Mannion, the Saint Mary’s Col“He’s come a very long way in that department,” lege graduate said he had other great mentors while Haubner said. “He’s manned up.” assisting at California High, including Brad Tubbs Drew said he was constantly in trouble as a youth. (now at Newark Memorial) and Bret Pollack (Col“I wasn’t always the best kid,” he said. “Football lege of San Mateo). helped release a lot of anger.” Haubner still teaches economics fulltime at FootHe couldn’t pinpoint the anger, especially with hill. such a loving and supportive mother. “She’s been “(Sweeney) gave me a great deal of freedom, and there every step of the way,” he said. “She’s been at evbesides just being a good man he taught me about ery one of my games and always knows exactly what being a competitor,” Haubner said. to say when things don’t go well. I’m very lucky.” He was hired at Livermore by Principal Darrel His relationship with his father was strained and Avilla, a former head football coach at the school. vacant largely, Drew said. His dad was in and out of Avilla led the Cowboys to the pinnacle, a North his life, before he died two years ago due to an ongoCoast Section championship game loss to Foothill in ing heart problem. 1993 at the Oakland Coliseum. He experienced some “He had a heart transplant at one point,” Drew extremely lean years after that. said. “I don’t know. We didn’t talk much.” “(Avilla) has been a great support for me,” HaubDrew expresses himself profoundly on the field, ner said. “He’s shared a lot of ideas and war stories.” but it wasn’t always that way either. Not until he grew Haubner’s first job at Livermore was to change an into his body about the time he started high school. attitude and started that by painting the team and “I didn’t love the sport at all when I first started,” weight rooms in school colors with team credos: Drew said. “I quit the first year, but once I realized “Show up. Commit. Fight. Succeed.” foothill could do great things for me – pay for my Though numbers are small by EBAL standards college, release anger – it definitely grew on me.” — the Cowboys’ roster started with 41 players and He starred on Livermore Youth Football teams Damariay Drew tries to run through a tackle attempt in through attrition and injury has whittled to 34 – and was mentored by coach Dave Moss. “He and the Livemore’s 28-27 loss to California on Oct. 21. Drew finished Haubner’s team has lived up to the foundation. staff really were a good influence on my life,” Drew the game with 119 yards rushing and a touchdown. “We practice, tackle and play very hard,” he said. said. “We had a lot of success. We won a lot of cham“We may not play perfect, but we play very hard. pionships.” We’ve got tough kids.” Titles weren’t likely to happen at Livermore, and Kids like Ryan Texeira, a 5-9, 200-pound running doesn’t throw much (just 17 of 32 for 157 yards), but he rarely after his freshman season Drew considered a transfer to De La back who has rushed for 578 yards and seven scores, includ- turns the ball over. “He’s gaining confidence,” Haubner said. Salle. But then-head coach Mike Profumo convinced him that ing 111 and two touchdowns against California. The defense swarms to the ball and gang tackles, especially he could help turn around a program. “Ryan has great strength and he’s very competitive,” Haub Drew is thankful he stayed. ner said. “He can bench press 300 pounds, squat 400, has a 6-foot, 189-pound senior linebacker John Rapley, who aver“We have a great group of guys and though we’ve not won ages 7.2 tackles per game. vertical of 30 inches and he’s smart.” yet (in EBAL) we’ve definitely turned the tide,” he said. “We’re But the undisputed leader is Drew, who not only leads the Quarterback McPherson, a 6-foot, 195-pound junior, going to get there.” Without recent team success, Drew’s recruiting growth was stunted, Haubner said. But now the word’s out. And Drew’s name and reputation is growing like wildfire. A basketball and track and field athlete — he’s high jumped 6-8, long jumped 22-5 and runs a 4.45 40-yard dash — Drew has been offered full football rides to Fresno State, Nevada and San Jose State, Haubner said. The coach, however, is getting daily calls from Pac-12 Conference schools. In the last week, Drew has heard from UCLA, Washington and San Diego State. Most schools want him as a safety, which suits him just fine. Out of need, he’s playing linebacker for the Cowboys, which allows him to make more plays in the box. “I really like to hit,” Drew said. “It’s a lot easier for me to hit, to go after guys and just tackle people. I don’t have to think.” Said Haubner: “When he hits someone, they definitely feel it. He hits with a tremendous amount of force. The young man is just special. He was flying under the radar for a while, but it’s pretty obvious Damariay Drew is going to be a big time player.” ✪ Mitch Stephens is a senior writer and columnist for MaxPreps.com.

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Red Zone

Football in Folsom is about big offense, and Vista del Lago is fitting right in

James K. Leash

ABOVE: Vista del Lago receiver Logan Smith makes a point to keep his toes in bounds after a sideline grab against Consumnes Oaks-Elk Grove on Oct. 14. RIGHT: Eagles quarterback Aaron Young ranked second in the state in passing yards (2,383) through Oct. 14. By jim mccue | Contributor It can be difficult to be the new kid on the block. Even in high school football. Vista del Lago-Folsom, just four years into existence, has had the added challenge of established resident Folsom High — winner of the 2010 CIF Division II state bowl game. But the Eagles are doing their best to earn at least a portion of the local spotlight in 2011. Vista del Lago’s passing tandem of quarterback Aaron Young and wide receiver Logan Smith are attracting attention in Folsom and beyond. With some impressive statistics, the duo have helped the team to a 5-3 record, including a 3-1 mark in the Sierra Valley Conference, but the Eagles still find

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Vista del Lago-Folsom

themselves looking up to the established Bulldogs. “To a certain degree, that’s a challenge for us to overcome,” Vista del Lago head coach Chris Jones said of being the second-best school in the Folsom. “If we are successful as a program, then we will get the attention.” Young and Smith are grabbing some headlines with gaudy numbers, including a Northern California record 24 catches for Smith in a 41-33 victory over Liberty RanchGalt, but they still face a challenge to keep up

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Red Zone with the Bulldogs. Smith leads all receivers in California with 96 catches and 1,300 yards (a stunning 12 receptions and 162.5 receiving yards per game). Young is second in the state with 2,383 passing yards and has thrown 21 touchdown passes compared to just 6 interceptions. Comparatively, Folsom quarterback Tanner Trosin has followed up national player of the year Dano Graves’ amazing offensive performance (85 offensive touchdowns, including 3,700 yards and 62 passing scores) with an equally impressive season thus far. Trosin leads the state with 2,933 passing yards and 40 total touchdowns. Bulldogs receiver J.J. Muldrow is fourth in California with 1,123 yards and 13 scores. Despite the local battle for attention, Young and Smith are doing plenty to make names for themselves and to make Folsom a legitimate two football team town. Both are attracting interest from colleges. Young spent two years as the backup to Anthony Mull before finally getting his shot as a senior, and his hard offseason work has paid dividends. In May, Young turned heads at the ESPN Elite 11 quarterback competition as he outperformed a group of highly-touted quarterbacks to earn the Golden Gun jersey at the competition’s Northern California stop at Stanford University. Young scored highest in hitting five different targets ranging from a short hitch to a 40-yard “moneyball.” “I knew after our playoff loss last year that I needed to put in a long, productive spring.” Young said. “I had been waiting for this for two years, so it was very exciting to finally be getting my time.” Young had a tough start to the season with just 187 yards passing in a 33-22 loss at Oak Ridge-El Dorado Hills. He then caught a groove by passing for more than 300 yards in five of the next seven games for the Eagles, including a season- and career-best 408 yards and four scores in a win over River City-West Sacramento. In the Eagles’ most recent game, a 34-21 loss to league rival Cosumnes Oaks-Elk Grove, Young connected on 27 of 42 passes for 331 yards and two touchdowns, but the senior threw a pair of costly interceptions that the Wolfpack turned into points. After a bye week, Vista del Lago plays league

contests against Union Mine and El Dorado with a chance to earn a share of the Sierra Valley title and a playoff berth. Key to the playoff run will be the continued performance and leadership of Smith. As a junior, the receiver hauled in 34 catches for 619 yards and three scores. With the graduation of the team’s leading receiver, Smith raised his expectation for his senior season. But the numbers he has produced thus far have shocked even him. “My initial goal was 75 catches and 1,000 yards for the season,” Smith said, “but I would like to be the best receiver in the area and be first-team All-Section. I can reflect on the numbers and any records later. Right now, I just want to be the best player I can be to help the team win.” Smith’s breakout season is likely to make him a consensus pick as a top regional receiver, but his all-around talents have his college options rapidly expanding. Cornell has been an early favorite, but more schools have emerged to consider Smith as a targeted recruit. In the Cosumnes Oaks game, Smith squared off with a pair of Division I talents as a two-way star. On offense, he was covered much of the game by the Wolfpack’s Marcus Rios, who has verbally committed to Boise State. At defensive back, Smith blanketed UCLA-commit Michael Thomas. Smith measured up to the Division I talent with 14 catches for 159 yards to go along with an interception on defense (Thomas was held to one catch for five yards). “He wants that,” Jones said of Smith’s two-way matchup with Division I talents. “Logan wants to get what those guys have, and he competes his tail off to get the recognition that he deserves. Without a doubt, he is a Division I player. He just needs someone to love him as a player like we do.” Smith, Young, and their Eagles teammates are beginning to find more love and attention — both local and throughout the Sac-Joaquin Section. “It’s great to put up the offensive numbers that we are to get noticed, but that’s not necessarily winning ball games,” Jones said. “Wins will get us the attention that we really want.” ✪

SportStars NorCal Top 20 All records through Oct. 22 Rank (Last Wk.) School Record 1 (1) De La Salle-Concord.........................6-1 2 (2) Bellarmine-San Jose..........................6-1 3 (3) Buhach Colony-Atwater.....................8-0 4 (4) Pleasant Grove-Elk Grove.................7-1 5 (5) Lincoln-Stockton................................7-1 6 (8) Elk Grove............................................8-0 7 (7) Del Oro-Loomis..................................6-1 8 (6) Folsom................................................6-1 9 (9) Grant-Sacramento.............................5-3 10 (12) San Ramon Valley-Danville ..............6-1 11 (17) Marin Catholic-Kentfield....................8-0 12 (15) Vacaville.............................................7-1 13 (10) Cardinal Newman-Santa Rosa..... 6-0-1 14 (11) Palma-Salinas................................ 6-0-1 15 (14) California-San Ramon.......................6-1 16 (18) James Logan-Union City...................8-0 17 (16) Escalon...............................................8-0 18 (NR) Leland-San Jose................................7-0 19 (13) Granite Bay........................................6-2 20 (20) Oakdale..............................................8-0

Top 20 Facts-Figures-Fallout DROPPED OUT: No. 19 Los Gatos (Lost to Milpitas 35-30 on Oct. 21) BIGGEST MOVER: Marin Catholic-Kentfield finally gets a big boost, jumping six spots as Granite Bay slides down and Vacaville (who Marin Catholic beat 33-29 on Sept. 10) continues to win. TOTAL TEAMS STILL RANKED FROM PRESEASON TOP 20: 13 KNOCKING AT THE DOOR: Windsor (8-0), Serra-San Mateo (6-1), St. Mary’s-Stockton (6-2) SMALL SCHOOL TOP 5 (500 enrollment cutoff): 1. Le Grand (8-0), Central Catholic-Modesto (6-2), 3. Salesian-Richmond (7-0), 4. Bradshaw Christian-Sacramento (7-1), 5. Ferndale (6-1). rankings updated every wednesday at www.Sportstarsonline.com

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Red Zone

Defining the three elements that every good quarterback should have

T

he quarterback position is often one of the most debated positions in all of sports, when it comes to what makes a good one. As I’ve been developing

quarterbacks from head coach to coordinator to private skills coach, my personal belief on this topic has evolved from simply looking the part and having a strong arm. It boils down to three key observations. All great quarterbacks better be smart, better be tough and better be mechanically sound.

Toughness

There is a great responsibility playing the quarterback position that requires you to be mentally and physically tough. Since the ball is in your hands the majority of the time, the viewers, teammates and coaches give too much blame and too much credit to the quarterback. Are you able to stay true to yourself and handle the heightened criticism and praise that comes with the position?

A quarterback needs to be resilient. How do you respond after throwing an interception? Are you going to be like Brett Favre and know you’re going to throw a touchdown after throwing three interceptions? Or are you going to cave in and just have a bad day? Off the field, are you going to continue working on your mechanics and watch film after a great game? Or are you going to be complacent? If you want to play quarterback, you better be physically tough and be able to handle the punishment play after play. After a 250-pound defender gets a 20-yard running start at your defenseless rib cage, are you going to get back up and be fearless throwing the next pass or are you going to have happy feet? Every time you are down, your entire team is looking to see if you are going to get up; this is the essence of leadership.

Gridiron Lessons Roger Theder

Smarts I think a strong arm and good mechanics are important for a quarterback, but this doesn’t mean you are going to be a good quarterback. Before you ever throw a pass, do you know every receiver’s route, your offensive line’s protection, the coverage that the defense is running, and where you should look to go with the ball? All of the greats are able to quickly process their playbook and film work in a split second when they step on the field and properly react to pressure. It doesn’t matter how far or how accurate you can throw a pass if it doesn’t get thrown to the right guy wearing your team’s jersey.

Sound mechanics The final piece to putting together a great quarterback is the ability to throw the football. When you know who to throw the ball to, can you do so on time and accurately each and every single time? Strong quarterback mechanics enable you to translate the intangibles to the field and make plays under pressure. All of these skills combined are the foundation of what makes a great quarterback. Since the game of football has grown to be more complex everyday, it takes more than just the kid who can throw the hardest to be a quarterback. When we name some the current great quarterbacks, we look at Peyton Manning, Tom Brady, Drew Brees and Aaron Rogers and describe their talents not for their physical gifts, but rather their smarts, intangibles and accuracy. This is what makes evaluating quarterback so difficult because there is no exact science to measuring all of these skills. But when you see a good one, chances are they are going be smart, tough, and mechanically sound individuals. ✪ Roger Theder was the head football coach at Cal from 1978 to 1981 and is widely recognized as one of the leading quarterback coaches on the West Coast. A former assistant at both Cal and Stanford, he has tutored dozens of top collegiate quarterbacks including Drew Olson (UCLA), Ken Dorsey (Miami) and Trent Edwards (Stanford).

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Knee pain could be an indication that you have OCD. Say what!? O

Some doctors think OCD happens after an injury, such as a twisting and bending incident that causes the shinbone (tibia) to come in contact with the thighbone (femur). Often, it is not clear what has caused the problem.

steochondritis dissecans (OCD) is a small area of dying bone tissue (bone necrosis) that most commonly effects the inside part of the knee. OCD can happen in any joint, but most often it effects knees. Children of all ages can get osteochondritis dissecans, but it is more common in teenagers. The small section (think of the size of an eraser tip of a pencil) of bone dies because it is not getting enough blood supply. Then the cartilage that covers the end of that portion of bone separates from the bone inside the joint. If the condition is not treated, a chunk of bone can come loose inside the joint. OCD is diagnosed by a doctor with both a clinical exam in the office as well as an X-ray (radiographs) and a magnetic resonance image (MRI) to see inside of the knee joint. Some doctors think OCD happens after an injury, such as a twisting and bending incident that causes the shinbone (tibia) to come in contact with the thighbone (femur). Often, it is not clear what has caused the problem.

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With OCD of the knee, young athletes may: ■ Have a vague pain on the inside of the knee with minor swelling after activity ■ Have pain when they move or put weight on their leg ■ Hear a “clunking” sound in their knee when they bend it ■ Feel their knee catch or give way As many as 80 percent of growing athletes can heal from osteochondritis dissecans without surgery. The athlete will need to undergo physical therapy programs designed to keep their muscles strong while protecting their joints. Medical professionals agree that patients need abstinence from sports as initial treatment. This is then followed by a progression to a full return to sports without the brace. The return to full sports activity is only cleared once reossification (healed bone) of the lesion appears complete on radiographs or MRI. Often it takes between six and 12 months for the growing athlete to heal. During that time, the athlete will need to limit their impact

Health Watch Michelle Cappello

activities and wear a brace that helps to unload the compression and stress on the OCD region of the knee. If the bone does not heal, or the fragment is loose in the joint, then the defect will need to be corrected surgically by an orthopedic surgeon. It is important to be aware of the symptoms of OCD of the knee, as this a unique condition in the young athlete. If it’s caught in the early stages, it can heal well without long term cartilage damage. Of course all sports have an element of injury risk, but if the athlete has good strength combined with good technique for their sport, the risk of stressing the knee will be reduced.

Michelle Cappello is a physical therapist for the Sports Medicine For Young Athletes, a division of Children’s Hospital Oakland with a facility also located in Walnut Creek. If you have questions or comments regarding the “Health Watch” column, write the Sports Medicine For Young Athletes staff at Health@SportStars Online.com. Reference: Wall EJ, Vouraveris J, Meyer GD, et al. The healing potential of stable juvenile osteochondritis dissecans knee lesions. J Bone Joint Surg (Am). 2008;90(12):2655-2664.

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Gutting out an injury is admirable, but don’t be afraid to protect yourself No one (well, maybe your mom) is as invested in your own well-being as you are, and in the end, the person you have to rely on to make sure you don’t hurt yourself in football practice – or fooling around with your buddies on ATVs – is you.

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I twisted my ankle a couple weeks ago at freshman football practice and I missed the next day. I felt like the coaches didn’t believe I was hurt, so I came back to practice after the one day off – but my ankle is still bothering me. I’m afraid if I tell the coaches, they’ll think I’m not tough enough to play football, or they’ll demote me. What should I do? R.G, Brentwood   o here’s the first rule of sports, and in fact, the first rule of life: Protect yourself. No one (well, maybe your mom) is as invested in your own well-being as you are, and in the end, the person you have to rely on to make sure you don’t hurt yourself in football practice – or fooling around with your buddies on ATVs – is you. That said, your coaches aren’t necessarily trying to sacrifice your body so they can win another game. They don’t know you that well, and to them, it may not appear that the injury was that serious. And since you’re a freshman, they probably think you don’t know how much pain you can deal with and still practice and play. (And that lesson, by the way, is one of the important ones that sport

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teaches: Just because you’re uncomfortable, or even in some pain, doesn’t mean you can’t perform whatever task is assigned you.) And remember, you can’t feel anyone else’s pain, and they can’t feel yours. Some people have a “high pain threshold”, which could mean they soldier on through pain that others can’t handle; or it could mean that their nervous system isn’t nearly as efficient at transmitting pain signals as most people’s. But even though the whole idea of a “high pain threshold” is kind of murky, football coaches, being the manly types they are, appreciate that trait, and they want to encourage all their players to ignore the bumps and bruises of the sport, suck it up, and go out and hit someone. In your case, they’re dealing with an ankle injury, which though painful and potentially a long-term problem, usually isn’t that serious. And since you can run on it, and you’ve gone a couple weeks without hurting it again, they probably feel it’s healing. But thanks to an elevated sense of the danger of concussions, everyone is taking blows to the head a lot more seriously now than they did just a year or

Behind the Clipboard Clay Kallam

so ago, so you can bet if you said you got hit on the side of the helmet and you were dizzy, they’d react a lot differently. Knee injuries also get treated more seriously than ankle injuries, and veteran coaches are extremely wary of any kind of back injuries. I’ve had three girls tweak their backs one day — and then never play again. So now if someone’s back is bothering them, they’re done with practice for the day. Overall, though, the question of reporting injuries to your coaches, and their reactions, is one of the most difficult parts of the coach-player relationship. Players want to play, and they want the approval of their coaches, who almost always respond better to a player who guts it out than to a player who sits it out. So there’s a tendency for young athletes to ignore injuries for as long as possible, and sometimes they wind up with a much more serious injury — and sometimes they wind up with an injury that hampers their activity the rest of the their lives. So remember, you’re the one who has to live with whatever goes wrong with your body. And remember the first rule of life is to protect yourself. ✪ Clay Kallam is an assistant athletic director and girls varsity basketball coach at Bentley High in Lafayette. To submit a question for Behind the Clipboard, email Coach Kallam at clayk@fullcourt.com.

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With respect to all of the female athletes SportStars considered for this award — including the two honorable mentions — we would have felt silly naming anybody other than Trinity Wilson. She quite literally ran away with the honor. No single athlete performed so dominantly, or on a bigger stage, than Wilson. She ran her signature 100 meter hurdles event in state, national and international competitions and grabbed gold in every one. Racing the best young hurdlers in the country (twice) and world (twice), she didn’t lose once. And she did it all over a sevenweek span in June and July. If it sounds a bit overwhelming, Trinity would be the first to agree. “I remember one day toward the end of summer when I was sitting with my friend and talking,” Wilson said. “She was telling me everything I’d done, and I was like ‘Oh yeah, I DID do that.’ I had never really embraced it because I was in that moment.” Wilson’s historic, er, run, began at the California Interscholastic Federation state championships on June 4. The then St. Mary’s junior bested Southern California favorite Melia Cox of Long Beach Poly with a time of 13.41 seconds. That was a personal victory as it closed the book on her 2010 CIF finals race when she was caught from behind in the

final 10 meters and ended up with silver. The victory catapulted Wilson to a new level of confidence that would lead to a time of 13.15 in the finals of the U.S. Junior Outdoor Championships on June 24 in Eugene, Oregon. Five days later that confidence would produce a first-place finish (13.42) at the World Youth Championships Qualifier in Myrtle Beach, Florida. Her confidence level would peak in Lille, France, during the second week of July. According to IAAF.org, Wilson won the 100 hurdle final at the World Youth Championships in the event’s second-fastest time ever. She posted a wind-legal mark of 13.11 by holding off Switzerland’s Noemi Zbaren, who finished a mere six one-hundredths of a second behind. “I went into that race honestly with the most confidence I’ve had in my whole life,” Wilson said. Two weeks later she completed the amazing summer with a 13.17 gold medal finish at the Pan American Junior Championships in Miramar, Florida. “I hope that feeling comes back,” Wilson said, speaking mostly of France. “That felt like once in a lifetime, but it came to early to be once in a lifetime. So I’m gonna try to find it again.” ✪ — Chace Bryson

the TRINITY FILES

Bob Larson

Mariya Moore Salesian basketball

Beginning with the U.S. U16 team trials in late May, Moore had a summer of hoops that clearly separated her from the crowd. Though she didn’t make the U.S. team, she certainly impressed in her time in Colorado Springs. She then came home and played a dominant two months with the Bay Area Lady Warriors. During a collegiate evaluation period that spanned from July 6-19 and included multiple tournaments against teams and players from throughout the West Coast, Moore drew a 9.1 rating (out of 10). It tied one other player for the second-highest mark.

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THE STATS: Five gold medal finishes in the 100 meter hurdles over a nine-week span — including a pair of international events. SIGNATURE PERFORMANCE: A personal-best time of 13.11 seconds to defeat Switzerland’s Noemi Zbaren (13.17) at the IAAF World Youth Championships in Lille, France. SUMMER SOUND BITE: “I was just like ready,” Wilson said just a few days after her victory in France. “I felt like I’d never been so ready in my life to do what I did. I never felt so good and so confident. I just felt capable of doing anything.” RANDOMLY: One of Trinity’s favorite things to do at school is visit the front office and mingle with staff and administration. “I can get some funny looks from students about it, but (that office staff) has a lot of the people that make me most happy at school.”

Beth Ritter San Ramon Valley soccer

Playing in goal for the Mustang Blast soccer club, Ritter was practically unbeatable during a week-long stretch at the Region IV FarWest Championships in Boise, Idaho. Ritter allowed just one goal throughout the entire tournament — six matches —including 1-0 shutouts in both the semifinal and championship matches. She also picked up a win in the Youth Soccer National Championships, helping the Blast top eventual runner-up Hurricane FC 95 Shubert (Okla.) 2-1 in preliminary play.

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Word can travel fast amongst the Bay Area’s wrestling community. The arrival of an up-and-coming talent will often make it travel the fastest. Needless to say, it took less than a month of the 2010-11 high school wrestling season for the buzz to begin building around De La Salle freshman Jon Jay Chavez. It didn’t hurt that Chavez was part of a Spartans team that would set NCS records for team dominance. But Chavez certainly helped his own buzz by reaching the 119 pound finals at the NCS championships, narrowly missing the crown as a freshman. He lost a 3-2 decision to Ty Stevenson of McKinleyville. That’s not bad considering freestyle wrestling isn’t his strongest style. And it isn’t until summer when Chavez really turns all his attention to the mat. “A lot of (wrestlers) going into the summer season aren’t as focused as they are in high school,” Chavez said. “My main goal was summer wrestling, because that’s when you can really get better. Mainly because you don’t have to balance school and wrestling at the same time.” Chavez certainly showed what he can do when he can put all his focus on wrestling. Competing at the Junior/Cadet National Championships in Fargo, North Dakota, on July 15, Chavez picked up his first national title after beating Wyatt Keck of Pennsylvania 1-0, 1-0 in the Greco Roman final.

For the novices out there, Greco Roman is a style of wrestling in which competitors are not allowed to perform any holds below the waist. The majority of high school wrestling is freestyle wrestling. “I like Greco just because it’s something different,” a modest Chavez said. “But I think I like freestyle more because it’s a bit of a bigger challenge for me.” Meeting wrestling challenges head-on has come second nature to Chavez since the sport was suggested to him by an out-oftown cousin at the age of 7. “He talked about how he was wrestling, and my dad had wrestled in high school, too,” Chavez said. “And I was bad at baseball.” He said it wasn’t the perfect marriage at first, but it definitely grew on him. Now a sophomore, Chavez has set his sights on wrapping up a few more titles on the local stage instead — starting with that NCS championship that slipped away from him a year ago. This goal comes with a new commitment to improving his freestyle technique, something he learned after being humbled in the freestyle action at Fargo. “After wrestling the best guys in the country in freestyle, I realized I had to change my style a bit,” Chavez said. “I had to commit myself to get better.” But he can still call himself a defending national champion. ✪ — Chace Bryson

the jon jay FILES

Bob Larson

James Marvel Campolindo baseball

In addition to a standout season for his travel club, the Danville Zoots, Marvel was chosen to play in the ESPN Rise Area Code Games as a representative of a Northern California all-star team selected by scouts for the Oakland Athletics. And upon making the trip to Long Beach, Marvel didn’t disappoint. He was one of only three Athletics players to earn Player of the Game honors during the tournament, picking up the C.J. Wilson “Throw Strikes” Award for his performance against the Texas Rangers’ squad.

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THE STATS: Just 15 years old, Jon Jay Chavez defeated Wyatt Keck of Pennsylvania 1-0, 1-0 in the Junior/Cadet National Championships on July 15. He also took two thirds and a second place during the qualifying tournament. SIGNATURE PERFORMANCE: Defeating Keck 1-0, 1-0 in the national championship match. SUMMER SOUND BITE: “It gave me a lot of confidence,” Chavez said in late July of his national title victory. “It’ll make me sort of complacent, and I don’t want that to happen. Next year, I’m hoping to go back (to Nationals) and win freestyle.” RANDOMLY: Chavez is an avid longboard skater.

Charlie Wiser Miramonte water polo

Wiser was an absolute force for the Lamorinda Water Polo Club’s U16 (10th GradeUnder) squad. The team went undefeated, earning championships in four national/state level tournaments. The last tournament was the SwimOutlet.com Junior Olympics. Playing in the Platinum Division, Lamorinda came from behind to beat Los Angeles WPC 12-10 in the championship match. Wiser was named the MVP of the tournament.

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tee2green

Sister duos lead teams into NCS Tournament of Champions

Butch Noble

Alex (left) and Katie Sborov, Foothill High

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For the high school girls golf teams who just missed out on a league championship, the path to the North Coast Section Tournament of Champions had to include a stop at Franklin Canyon Golf Course on Oct. 24 for the NCS Division I Qualifier. And the key to surviving the winds of the Hercules foothills was apparently sister power. Mission San Jose posted the top team score of the day behind sisters Meredith and Madison Hirsch. Meredith paced the Warriors with a 5-over-par 77, and her sister finished one stroke behind. Foothill finished second behind its own sister duo of Alex and Katie Sborov. The sisters actually matched the Hirsch tandem in combined relation to par. Alex posted a 3-over 75 and Katie carded a 78. Granada’s Yuri Ahn put up the best individual score of the day with a 1-over 73. That helped secure third place for the Matadors. The top 12 teams earn berths to join the league champions in the Tournament of Champions at Las Positas Golf Course in Livermore on Oct. 31. Dougherty Valley was the last team to make the cut, edging Ukiah by two strokes. There were also 12 individual qualifiers, led by the 75 shot by Megan Conder. The Tournament of Champions will be followed by the California Interscholastic Federation NorCal Championships on Nov. 7 at Stanford University Golf Club in Palo Alto, and then the CIF Championships on Nov. 15 at Poppy Hills Golf Club in Pebble Beach. — Staff

TEAM SCORES TOP 35 INDIVIDUALS NCS Division I Qualifier Yuri Ahn (Granada).............73 Samantha Chan (Campolindo).......................83 Mission San Jose..............405 Jessica Goldstein Cathy Canepa (Eureka)......85 (Miramonte).........................74 Foothill................................414 Kasey Chew Elizabeth Schultz Granada.............................441 (San Leandro).....................85 (Acalanes). . ..........................74 Carondelet.........................456 Khiana Schmuhi Miramonte..........................461 Megan Condor (Heritage)...75 Ali Hoffman (Novato)...........75 (Analy-Sebastopol)..............87 Monte Vista........................467 Lauren Ipsen (Car)..............88 Alex Sborov (Foot)..............75 Campolindo.......................476 Lauren Kim (Aca)................88 Monica Chen Acalanes............................477 Tiffany Chan (Monte Vista)....89 (Mission San Jose)..............77 Deer Valley........................477 Cristina Gonzalez Meredith Hirsch (MSJ)........77 San Ramon Valley.............484 (Deer Vly).............................89 Madison Hirsch (MSJ).........78 Carmen Valentine Eureka................................512 Lulu Huang (Foothill)...........78 (Berkeley)............................89 Dougherty Valley...............516 Katie Sborov (Foot).............78 Veera Valkeinen (Ukiah).....89 Ukiah.................................518, Sabby Virtusio Emily Wei (Foot)..................89 Redwood...........................527 (Carondelet).........................78 Elizabeth Whisler (MV).......89 Heritage.............................542 Andrea Neilson (Freedom)...79 Morgan Allen (Car)..............90 Analy..................................543 Janelle Reali (Granada)......79 Sydney Benson San Leandro......................549 Lindsay Slocum (Del Norte-Crescent City)....90 Berkeley.............................550 (Redwood-Larkspur)...........79 Marissa Chan (Cam)...........90 Freedom............................554 Sarah Rotter (MSJ).............80 Elise Lee (Gra)....................90 Concord.............................619 Taylor Coover Angela McElory (California)..90 Santa Rosa........................631 (Deer Valley)........................82 Taylor Robinson (Deer Vly)...90

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impulse Balancing Act: TriStars columnist and USAT Level 1 endurance trainer, Liz Elliott is all about technique. Rudy Project NA gear is all about performance. Liz balances performance with determination and technique to compete in the triathion world. Iif you’re not quite ready to compete at her level, you can still look great while training. Check into Rudy’s gear and wear what Liz wears.

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Noyz Pink Fluo with Multilaser Blue Lenses item number: SP043990 $179.99

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Arm Warmers Racing Black item number: RP960502 $39.99 Regular Shorts Racing ITem numbers: RP940103 (black), RP740102 (white) $94.99 Cycling Gloves Racing White item number: RP760202 $29.99

not pictured Bandanna Racing Black item number: RP960801 $19.99 Backpack 2 - 22 L Black/Yellow item number: AC003062 $79.99 Tri Suit Racing Black and White item number: RP950101 (black), RP750102 (white) $134.99

get all the gear!

Rudy Project, Technically Cool!

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support the cure www.Nationalbreastcancer.org

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camps + clinics BASEBALL/SOFTBALL Golden Era Baseball Based in the East Bay, we offer several instructionalbased programs as well as 9U thru 18U Club Teams. We are currently taking sign-ups for our Spring Hitting Classes. Please see our website for full details: www.GoldenEraBaseball. com The Pitching Center We develop baseball players to their full potential. The Pitching Center has grown to become the Total Player Center (TPC), a full-service baseball and softball training academy. Age- and skill-specific programs are available for students ages 8 – High School. Info: 925-416-1600, thepitchingcenter. com SportForm Based in Concord, SportForm provides individual and team instruction in baseball, softball, lacrosse. Highly trained professionals provide accelerated and advanced skills clinics. Prepare to Perform! Info: 925-459-2880. All American Softball Girls of all ages welcome. Check into our six-week softball improvement program for all ages. Info: 916-3741907, www.softballschool.com.

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BASKETBALL Bladium Triple Threat Academy Alameda’s Bladium Sports & Fitness Club hosts multiple hoops camps for ages 6-12. Designed for players of ALL skill levels. Registration: AlamedaSales@bladium. com, 510814-4999; www.bladium.com. Mike Allen Sports Learn the basics of basketball, sharpen your skills and improve daily at the Ballin’ Ambassadors basketball clinics! Hosted by Mike Allen Sports in the South Bay, registration is easy. Go to www. mikeallensports.com to reserve your spot. (408) 279-4123 CHEER CheerGyms.com We offer the best clinics in California! Customize your clinic to fit your needs from basic stunting techniques or working on twist cradles out of one leg stunts, we take your team to the next level! Info: 866-685-7615, www. CheerGyms.com East Bay Sports Academy Recreational, competitive athletes benefit from training with the best coaches. Our 10,000 sq. foot facility is clean and bright with the newest equipment. Info: 925 680-9999, www. EastBaySportsAcademy.com.

EQUESTRIAN Kelly Maddox Riding Academy Develop new friendships with other horse-crazy kids. Weekly activities include learning horse colors, markings and breeds; arts and crafts; a farrier demonstration and human horse show; bareback riding and more! Info: 925-575- 4818, www.KellyMaddoxTraining.com Franklin Canyon Stables Based in Martinez, we provide two covered arenas and easy access to trails. Beginning riders or experienced equestrians, we have a place for you. Instruction in horsemanship on the ground and in the saddle while having fun. Info: 925- 228-1801; http://www. kimshorsetraining.com/franklin_ canyon.html Castle Rock Arabians Activities for tweens and teenagers, where we build team spirit through various team activities on horseback. Visit the ranch by appointment. Info: 925-933-3701, www. castlerockarabians.com Earthquake Arabians Fall and Christmas Break camps are around the corner for Earthquake Arabians! Thanksgiving Break: Nov. 19-23 and Christmas Break: Dec. 19-23 and Dec. 26-30. Registration is OPEN. Log on to www.

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camps + clinics earthquakearabians.com for more info. (925) 360-7454. FITNESS Aspire Pilates Dramatically increase core strength, power, flexibility, balance, focus and joint stability, while preventing injury. Aspire prides itself on helping propel athletes to the next level by addressing muscular imbalances, helping athletes increase body awareness, correct faulty body mechanics, and access untapped strength. Info: 925.680.4400, www. AspirePilatesCenter.com. Fit 2 The Core As a Youth Conditioning, Speed/ Agility and Nutrition Specialist with the IYCA, Fit- 2-The-Core Training Systems offers an innovative approach to getting young athletes back on the field post-rehabilitation, and continuing the process by progressing their bodies to handle what they must endure on the field or court. Info: 925- 639-0907. Transform FX At Transform FX Fitness, we believe that parents can take better care of their kids when they take care of their own health and fitness. This is the reason we have designed our adult fitness bootcamp workouts to fit your busy lifestyle. Each bootcamp workout is carefully designed to help you burn fat and increase your cardiovascular endurance in less time. Call us at 925-289-8042 or visit us online at www. transformfxfitness.com. Walnut Creek Sports & Fitness We offer over 70 group classes per week. Members also enjoy our heated pool, sauna, spa, and steam-room. Massage, skincare and chiropractic services are available. Call us today for your free week pass! Info: 925932-6400, www.wcsf.net ENRICHMENT Dianne Adair Programs We offer a wide variety of enrichment programs for your child during the school year. Activities include: Home work help, 4th & Up Club, art and crafts, science, sports, and

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games. Info: www. dianneadair.org. E.Nopi and Palm Academy Concentration is on early literacy, critical thinking, problem solving, social understanding, physical coordination, creativity, cooperation and self control. Programs serve children from infancy to preschool, kindergarten, and through 12th grade. Students learn at their own pace. Locations: Fremont, 510-9799794; Newark (E.Nopi), 510-7936674; Pleasanton, 925-461-6284. FUZE Fit For A Kid FUZE is a privately-held, DOJcertified youth-only health club and curricula modeled after the principles of the Positive Coaching Alliance. FUZE enhances athletic development, socialization and selfesteem. Info: 888-FIT 4 A KID; www. fuzefit.com GOLF Dave DeLong Junior Golf Camp This camp is for advanced and beginning junior golfers. Camps are designed for golfers 7-15. Camps include a 4 to 1 ratio of students to teachers where safety is the top priority as well as player development and enjoyment. Boundary Oak Course, Walnut Creek. Info: 925-997-3683; www. delonggolf.com Coach Rick Golf Learn to play on the course, where it matters. Golfers of all ages can sign up. For more information, call 510 917-6442 • www. ThePersonalGolfCoach.com The First Tee-Contra Costa The First Tee is a youth development program for boys and girls 7-18. Participants learn about golf and life skills and values inherent to the game, rules and etiquette. Instruction occurs at Diablo Creek Golf Course in Concord. Info: www. thefirstteecontracosta.org; angela@ thefirstteecontracosta.org or 925686-6262 x0. The First Tee-Oakland The First Tee of Oakland has delivered The First Tee Life Skills Experience to over 262 participants. Each receive a min. 12 hours of instruction over

an 8-week period. Instruction is at three Oakland courses: Metropolitan Golf Links, Lake Chabot GC and Montclair GC. Info: 510-352-2002; www. thefirstteeoakland.org. The First Tee-San Jose The First Tee of San Jose develops youth through the game of golf throughout Silicon Valley. Participants learn to appreciate diversity, resolve conflicts, build confidence and set goals. We welcome participants ranging from second to twelfth grade. Scholarships available. Info: 408288-2973; www. thefirstteesanjose. org. The First Tee-Tri-Valley The First Tee of the Tri-Valley offers seasonal The First Tee Life Skills Experience Classes for ages 7-17, held at the Pleasanton Golf Center on the Alameda County Fairgrounds. Info: 925.462.7201, www. TheFirstTeeTriValley.org LACROSSE Atherton Lacrosse Our lacrosse camps are designed for boys and girls ages 5-14, who are beginner or intermediate players. Our group of coaches and staff are leaders in the lacrosse community. Info: 888- 526-3330, www.AthertonLacrosse.com. SportForm Based in Concord, SportForm provides Individual and team instruction in baseball, softball and lacrosse. Highly trained professionals provide accelerated and advanced skills clinics. Prepare to Preform! Info: 925-459-2880. MARTIAL ARTS United States Karate Systems Adult and children’s programs, kick box fitness, mixed martial arts. Providing excellence in martial arts instruction and services for the entire family. 925-682- 9517; www. usksmartialarts.com MOTORSPORTS Keigwins@theTrack We conduct motorcycle schools and practice events (“track days”) at famous racetracks in the West for experienced motorcyclists looking

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camps + clinics

Advertiser Index ❒❒ A A A Northern California, Nevada & Utah..................10 ❒❒ Aabco Printing..........................................................36 ❒❒ Army National Guard Recruiter.....................................5 ❒❒ Aspire Pilates Center..................................................34 ❒❒ Back Forty B B Q.........................................................17 ❒❒ Bay Area Golf Show....................................................30 ❒❒ Big O Tires....................................................................2 ❒❒ Cheer Gyms..................................................................6 ❒❒ Club Sport Renaisssance ............................................15 ❒❒ Community Youth Center...........................................16 ❒❒ Contra Costa County Fair.............................................24 ❒❒ Crowne Plaza.............................................................34 ❒❒ Diablo Car Wash & Detail Center.................................36 ❒❒ Diablo Rock Gym........................................................37 ❒❒ Diablo Trophies & Awards...........................................37 ❒❒ E Teamsponsor...........................................................39 ❒❒ Earthquake Arabians..................................................36 ❒❒ East Bay Sports Academy...........................................22 ❒❒ Excellence In Sport Performance................................23

to improve skills and build confidence. Riders provide their own motorcycles and protective gear. Keigwins@theTrack takes care of everything else. Info: www. keigwin.com or 650-949-5609. UmiGo You’ll learn passing techniques, cornering techniques, throttle & breaking techniques, advance seat position, kart operation, kart control, real racing and improving your lap times. Racers need to be at least 10 years old and at least four feet, 10 inches tall. Two- and four-day camps are available. Info: www.umigoracing.com. OUTDOOR SPORTS Bear Valley Mountain Soccer, Archery, Tennis, Climbing, Cycling ... If there’s an outdoor activity you enjoy, there’s a good chance you can do it Bear Valley Mountain. Info: www.bearvalley.com University of Surfing Instructor Matt Cole offers lessons/ camps in Pacifica. 650-359-1425, mattcolesurfs@

hotmail.com; universityofsurfing.com. SOCCER Heritage Soccer Club A Pleasant Hill/Martinez based competitive soccer club welcomes players ages 8-18. Learn new skills and hone existing ones from top flight coaching staff with years of experience spanning the high school and college ranks.Info: www. heritagesc.com. SWIMMING-DIVING Walnut Creek Swim Club WCSC is a recreational team sponsored by the City of Walnut Creek celebrating its 50th anniversary. Led by the experience of coach Brad Hoy, the staff is the finest in the area. WCSC believes in finding the healthy balance between competition and family fun. Info: 925-766-5664 Sherman Swim School Lafayette swimming, diving school celebrating 50th year. Year-round schedule allows children, adults to learn, retain and improve their skills with little interruption. Info: 925-283-2100, www.ShermanSwim.com

VOLLEYBALL Pacific Rim Volleyball We offer several skill-based camps and clinics, including setting camp, hitting camp and an all-skills camp. Campers will be evaluated and placed in a group that challenges their level of play. Registration for beach volleyball is going on now as well. Info: www. pacificrimvolleyball.com U.S. Youth Volleyball League We’re the leader in developing, maintaining youth volleyball leagues for boys and girls ages 7-15. With an emphasis on positive reinforcement, we seek to build confidence and self-esteem in each child. Info: 1-888-988-7985 or www.USYVL.org. MULTI-SPORT City of Concord Skyhawks Sports Skyhawks Sports and the City of Concord have teamed up to provide safe, fun and skill-focused sports camps for ages 4-12. Camps range from soccer to lacrosse to our popular multi-sport camp (soccer, basketball, and baseball). Info: www. concordreg.org or (925) 671-3404.

❒❒ Fit 2 The Core..............................................................12 ❒❒ Fore 2 Your Door.........................................................31 ❒❒ Heavenly Greens........................................................35 ❒❒ Home Team Sports Photography................................20 ❒❒ Kaiser Permanente.....................................................13 ❒❒ Kinders B B Q................................................................3 ❒❒ Lone Tree Golf Course.................................................34 ❒❒ Mc Coveys..................................................................12 ❒❒ Mike Allen Sports.......................................................21 ❒❒ Mountain Mike’s Pizza..................................................7 ❒❒ Niles Personal Fitness.................................................37 ❒❒ Rocco’s Pizza...............................................................37 ❒❒ Rockin Jump...............................................................25 ❒❒ Scandia Family Center................................................20 ❒❒ Simply Selling Shirts..................................................37 ❒❒ Sport Clips..................................................................15 ❒❒ Sutter Urgent Care......................................................40 ❒❒ The First Tee Of Contra Costa.......................................34 ❒❒ The Mt. Diablo Memory Center - Sport Concussion Program.....................................................................24 ❒❒ Tpc / The Pitching Center...........................................16 ❒❒ Tri Valley Tri Club........................................................33 ❒❒ Usks Concord.............................................................34 ❒❒ Velocity Sports Performance......................................37 ❒❒ Walnut Creek Sports & Fitness....................................26

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*Name____________________________________________________________ Address (optional) _____________________________________________________________ *City/State ___________________________ *Zip______________ Phone (optional) __________________ E-mail: _______________________________________________ Check the most appropriate option for each. All information held in confidence Are you: ❏ Female ❏ Male ❏ Married ❏ Single ❏ Age 12 or below ❏ 13 to 19 ❏ 36 to 45 ❏ 20 to 25 ❏ 46 to 55 ❏ 26 to 35 ❏ Over 55 ❏ Student ❏ Full-time employed ❏ Part-time employed ❏ Self-employed ❏ Not employed ❏ Retired Number of people living in your home: Male: Age(s) __ / __ / __ / __ / __ Female: Age(s) __ / __ / __ / __ / __

Home ownership: ❏ I own my home ❏ I rent/lease ❏ I live with my parents Education: ❏ Pre High School ❏ In High School ❏ High School Grad ❏ Some College ❏ College Grad ❏ Post annual household income ❏ Less than $35,000 ❏ $35,001 to $50 000 ❏ $50,001 to $75,000 ❏ $75,001 - $100,000 ❏ $100,001 - $150,000 ❏ above $150,000 Do you own: A mobile/smart phone? ❏ No ❏ One ❏ Two or more A credit card? ❏ No ❏ One ❏ Two or more A laptop/tablet? ❏ No ❏ One ❏ Two or more A car? ❏ No ❏ One ❏ Two or more Social Media Do you use: ❏ Faceboook ❏ Twitter

In which sports do you regularly participate? Check all that apply ❏ Baseball/Softball ❏ Basketball ❏ Cheer/Gymnastics ❏ Endurance: Swim/ Bike/Run ❏ Equestrian ❏ Football ❏ Golf ❏ Hockey ❏ Lacrosse ❏ Motorsports/BMX/ Skateboarding ❏ Outdoor/Adventure/ Snow board/Ski/ Mountaineering ❏ Rugby ❏ Self Defense/ Wrestling/Fencing ❏ Soccer ❏ Tennis/Racquet sports ❏ Volleyball ❏ Other _____________ Which sports do you watch regularly (check all that apply) High School Sports ❏ In person ❏ On TV Teen League Sports ❏ In person ❏ On TV College Sports ❏ In person ❏ On TV Pro Sports ❏ In person ❏ On TV Jr. Sports (younger than high school) ❏ In person ❏ On TV What other sports publications do you regularly read? ❏ Pro sports magazines ❏ College sports magazines ❏ High School sports magazines ❏ Endurance magazines (swim, bike, run) ❏ Outdoor / Adventure magazines Do you primarily read these magazines: ❏ In print ❏ Online

Do you participate in games or tournaments as a coach? ❏ routinely ❏ somewhat often ❏ occasionally Team Parent? ❏ routinely ❏ somewhat often ❏ occasionally Player? ❏ routinely ❏ somewhat often ❏ occasionally Golf Do you consider yourself an: ❏ avid golfer ❏ Sunday golfer ❏ Occasional golfer How often do you golf? ❏ weekly ❏ monthly ❏ annually How much do you spend per year on Greens Fees $___________ Equipment $___________ Endurance: (Swim, Bike, Run) How often do you participate in Running, Biking &/or Swimming/Diving? ❏ routinely ❏ somewhat often ❏ occasionally Types: ❏ Fun runs (5k/10k) ❏ Marathons ❏ Triathalons About SportStars Magazine Please rank each of the following sections in order with ‘1’ as your favorite, etc...: (rank as many as you can) __ First Pitch (Editors Opening Column) __ Behind the Clipboard (Coaching Advice Column) __ Health Watch (Medical / Health Advice Column) __ Locker Room (Quick & Fun: Rapid Fire/Digits/Top 5) __ Game Day (Breaking Game Coverage) __ AAA SportStars of the Week (Honoring teen athletes) __ Training Time (Training Tips & Techniques) __ Club Scene (News & Coverage of league play) __ Features (in-depth stories on teams and players) __ In the Paint (Basketball Coverage - seasonal) __ Red Zone (Football Coverage - seasonal) __ Extra Bases (Baseball/Softball Coverage - seasonal) __ Tee2Green (Golf) __ TriSTARS (Endurance: Swim/Bike/Run, Outdoor & Adventure) __ Camps & Clinics (Resource) __ Impulse (New Products) __ 24/7 (Events Calendar) __ Photo Finish (Last Page Photo) How often do you read SportStars Magazine? ❏ Every issue ❏ 3 out of every 4 issues ❏ 1 or 2 of every 4 issues How would you classify yourself as a SportStars Magazine reader? ❏ I read it cover to cover ❏ I read most of the articles ❏ I read one or two articles each issue Do you prefer to read SportStars Magazine... Print Edition ❏ Daily ❏ Every issue ❏ Monthly Internet Edition ❏ Daily ❏ Every issue ❏ Monthly How long do you spend reading each issue: ❏ More than one hour ❏ 30 minutes to one hour ❏ Less than 30 minutes How many others read your copy of SportStars Magazine? ❏ 1 ❏ 2-4 ❏ 5-7 ❏ 8-10 ❏ more than 10

Do you keep your copies for future reference? ❏ Always ❏ Often ❏ Sometimes Where do you pick up your copy of SportStars Magazine? ❏ School ❏ Restaurant ❏ Retail store ❏ Gym/health club ❏ I subscribe ❏ Other Name of location ___________________________________ How often do you visit our website? ❏ Daily ❏ Weekly ❏ Monthly ❏ other Would you say reading SportStars Magazine influences your decision to: ❏ Play sports ❏ Buy sports equipment/goods ❏ Work out/stay healthy ❏ Eat healthy ❏ Watch sports Would you say you use SportStars Magazine to choose: ❏ Where to play sports ❏ Where to watch sports ❏ Where to select a camp or clinic ❏ Other _________________________________________ What subjects do you think there should be more coverage of in SportStars Magazine? 1. _______________________________________________ 2. _______________________________________________ 3. _______________________________________________ Contest ends Dec. 15, 2011. No purchase necessary to win or enter. Return this survey to SportStars Magazine c/o Reader Survey Prize, 5356 Clayton Rd., Ste. 222, Concord, CA 94521 or fax to (925) 566-8507.



Issue 34, October 27, 2011