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March 2018 Issue #64

www.sportsenergynews.com

Tony Luis Holds Boxing Camp for Akwesasne By Jim Riddell

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orth American lightweight boxing champ Tony Luis, born and raised in Cornwall is no stranger to getting involved and putting back into the community. In the past Tony has visited local schools, and has appeared at various events. Tony recently ran a six week boxing program for the youth of Akwesasne called “Empower Your Inner Warrior”. The program ran for 2 hours every Wednesday evening from early January to midFebruary focusing on fitness and self - empowerment. In addition to the boxing training, each week a different guest speaker covered topics such as nutrition, self-care, and drug prevention. On the final night Tony shared his own personal story and some of the struggles that he encountered at their age as he developed his boxing career.

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Greater Cornwall & Areas Community Sports Newspaper

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Sports Panel

Greater Cornwall & Areas Community Sports Newspaper

After many professional championships, what should be a party and celebration of the team’s success often turn into riots, vandalism, mob looting, and mayhem.  Why do you think fans react this way?

Sports Energy Greater Cornwall & Areas Community Sports Newspaper

Gilles Gaudet - Sports Enthusiast - Major sports championships are costing North American cities hundreds of thousands, if not millions of dollars, in security costs, damages, and injury settlements due to sports fans (for the most part) reacting in ways they normally would not in normal circumstances. Academic studies have concluded that these fan behaviors can be attributed to a mixture of several factors: intense identification with a team, strong feelings of victory or grief when a team wins or loses, and behavioral changes and poor decisions when people become part of a mob. People are social creatures and search for sense of belonging; many people find this sense of belonging and elevated psychological boost bonding with a community, city, or country cheering on their team. This sense of belonging and brotherhood intensifies when sports organizations and media create tremendous hype leading up to championship contests creating elevated physiological stress and anxiety with fans. Why do I think fans react this way? A championship victory, a rush of relief, an elated alcohol-fueled victory celebration amongst thousands of people restricted to a few city blocks, I believe, creates an environment for some people (not all) to make very bad decisions.

Jake Lapierre - Conditioning Coach - If a non-sports fan was watching the Super Bowl celebrations in Philadelphia a few weeks ago they might think that it was some sort of apocalyptic event. No, the world wasn’t ending; it was just another example of alcohol/drug fuelled stupidity, with the unruly mob using their football team’s victory as an excuse to damage and destroy.  In the history of sports celebrations this one was actually mild, and by mild I mean nobody died!  Detroit, Chicago, Cairo, and Brussels are a few cities among many that have seen death as the result of sports riots.  In fact in 1964 in Lima Peru, 320 people were killed in a soccer riot; however, it wasn’t because they were celebrating.  It was because they didn’t like a referee’s call!  Psychologists would probably state that these riots are initiated by a few psychopaths, and then accelerated by a large group of their followers.  Philadelphia is known as the city of “Brotherly Love”, it’s obvious that a misguided few weren’t very loving to their brothers on Super Bowl Sunday.

Jim Riddell - Seaway Karate Club - The vast majority of sports’ fans are law abiding citizens that would never consider destroying property or being involved in any type of criminal activity. The rioters consist mostly of young males with very few female or older men participating. The large numbers make picking out and identifying those involved in the looting and destruction very difficult for the police and video surveillance. The combination of an excessive amount of alcohol and the safety in numbers “mob mentality” created by the group seem to make many of these young men easily influenced and incapable of making smart choices; leading to incidents that they would normally not be a part of.

Sports Energy News, Cornwall, Issue No 64, Mike Piquette  

Sports Energy News, Cornwall, Issue No 64, Mike Piquette

Sports Energy News, Cornwall, Issue No 64, Mike Piquette  

Sports Energy News, Cornwall, Issue No 64, Mike Piquette

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