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(spoon) Scooping up life’s little bits of awesome.

No. 5

aug -

sep 2

011


Word.

(spoon) Welcome to the fifth issue of

l s c t m r m l e t q


life awesomeness community share spiration experiences happiness sar casm old-school holidays seasons go trivia new fun simplify indie diy han made pictures photographs words st ries food travel eat shop art vintage memories friends be do make learn live artisan entrepreneur music blog enjoy live laugh create love play history passions cook read book movies quotations how-to color mail explore Hey, Spooners!

Bienvenidos a Issue No. 5! I hope you’ll indulge my type and signage fetish with this more visual installment. I’ve been a big fan of advertising for quite a long time. The kitchen of the house I grew up in was laden with replica vintage ad signs and storage tins, which made me think I had one of the coolest kitchens in the land. In the fourth grade, one of my classes made skits of a mock TV network. Aside from being one of the news reporters, my favorite part was acting out the commercials during the break. Fast forward to college where I thought it obvious that I should be an advertising major. It wasn’t until my very last sememster and a tour of an ad agency that I realized I loathed cubicle life and corporate ladders. In hindsight, I probably should have majored in art or graphic design, but that’s neither here nor there. One thing has remained steady, and that is that I love me some rando signage.

We’re lucky here in Sacramento to have a good number of the old brick wall murals, mid-century neons, and window signs still in tact, regardless of the location’s new tennant. One of the themes in this issue is the notion that handpainted signage, made by an actual person, not a computer or machine, is on the endangered species list. Hopefully this is not the case, and looking at some of the people spotlighted this time around, there might even be hope of a resurgence. If anything, I hope this issue will find you giving pause to the urban landscape around you. There is some amazing artistry out there that often goes overlooked on the windows and walls of Main Street, U.S.A. and beyond. Don’t forget that if you’ve got comments on anything you see here or elsewhere in the Spooniverse, give a shout! The mailbox is always open.

air guitar ‘77


Tina Jett

Tina Jett is a maker of pictures, liker of vintage, and constructor of sentences. She runs: a blog called Scatterbox via her website, tinajett.com and two shops on Etsy: Scatterbox for art and photography, and Monday Pie for vintage goods. She has: a weekly column on Scoutie Girl, done some freelance writing for Trazzler, and knocked ladies down for fun with the Carolina Rollergirls. She is: a big fan of sarcasm, travel, movies, stuffing her face with good eats, and works hard to keep her sailor mouth in check.

Snail Mail

P.O. Box 580844 Elk Grove, CA 95758

holla!

Writer/Editor/Publisher Photography, Art & Illustration

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hello@spoonzine.com

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@spoonzine

Contributor

Michael Jett : Bacon Fat & Butter

STILL ON HIATUS... ...though he swears he ’ll be back to ta lk turkey for Thanksgiving dinner.

Š 2010-2011 Spoon - For comments or inquiries, please contact the Spoon haus via one of the means listed above. Opinions expressed in the zine, on the website/ blog, or in any other social media format are not necessarily those of the editor, contributors, advertisers, or affiliates.

Michael Jett spent close to fifteen years in the restaurant industry before escaping in 2006. Though he lives the life of a culinary refugee, he still burns a candle brightly for his love of food. This makes his wife very happy. In his spare time, he dabbles in sports like basketball and Australian Footy, enjoys a fine wine or two, smokes the occasional pipe while contemplating the universe (usually when campfire is involved), and listens to old-school rap.


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(contents) 8

7

Flicks in review

Artisan Spotlight: Khara Ledonne, Dana Tanamachi, & Steve Powers

14 History of advertising 15 The Sign Painter movie 16 American Sign Museum 17 Neon Boneyard 18 Word Search 24 Cityscape art 26 Nora’s New York 28 Schoolhouse style 31 Your favorite school supply 33 Autumnal Equinox 34 Oktoberfest: in pictures 39 The big quote

 : Spoon Aug/Sep 2011


FLICKS

My two cents on newer and older movies I’ve seen lately. Because you were just dying to know.

Between the Folds (2008) I’ve been on a fascination streak involving all things papercraft. This documentary looks at the work of nine different artists using varied techniques of origami, the Japanese art of paper folding. I love that paper is such an incredibly diverse medium, shown by their different methods: wetting, bending, making paper from scratch, and creating everything from living creatures to geometric shapes. Just the mathematics involved in their pre-planning is enough to blow your mind.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, part 2 (2011) Oh, Harry... I can’t believe it’s been ten years. I am still beyond amazed by the depth and detail of this world that J.K. Rowling created. If you’ve seen the movies but not read the books, I implore you to dive in. The Sorcerer’s Stone was single-handedly responsible for revitalizing my interest in reading for pleasure, which had been lost since elementary school. I’ll miss the excitement of new releases, but thankfully, I can revisit Hogwarts any time. And I still want to go to school there.

Knight and Day (2010) I was about five minutes away from pulling the plug on this movie, at about ten minutes in. I couldn’t tell if Tom Cruise’s character was intentionally being over-the-top, or if it was just some couchjumping after-effects. Turns out it was a decent movie after all, and yes, his character is supposed to be over-the-top, just like the rest of the flick. It’s not the best film ever made, but as long as you don’t go in expecting too much from it, you’ll be ok.

Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian (2009) I was testing out the new HBO Go app on my iPhone. What else can I say. So... Yeah, if you saw the first Museum movie, you’ve pretty much seen the second. I did like the new effect of the framed pictures that came to life and that the characters could enter. And I’m a fan of Bill Heder, so there’s that added bonus, too. Not really a sequel that needed to be made, but it worked for having something on in the background while working.

The Two Escobars (2010) Pretty sure I was initially drawn into this documentary because of watching the TV show Entourage... I had heard *of* Pablo Escobar, knew he was a drug lord... and that’s about it. This is an ESPN film, part of their 30 for 30 series, that explored the contradictory history of this man. The other Escobar in question was Andres Escobar, a superstar on the Columbian national soccer team. This is a welltold story about how their contrasting lives were intertwined by sport and corruption.

Van Gogh: Brush with Genius (2009) We had the good fortune of visiting the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam in 2009, when the largest collection of his works, including all of his greats, were together at one time. It painted a thorough picture of his life that you could literally and figuratively walk through. This short film follows a museum curator as she reads through Van Gogh’s telling letters to his brother, while also visiting the actual skies, fields, and buildings that inspired him in The Netherlands and France. Aug/Sep 2011 Spoon : 


artisan t spotligh

Khara Ledonne, Dana Tanamachi, & Steve Powers Normally, in the Artisan Spotlight section, we showcase one person or entity that has successfully zeroed in on a particular field of interest that has become a passion for them. This month, I couldn’t resist featuring all three of these artists, known for their work with words. In the next three pages, you’ll learn a little more about Khara Ledonne, Dana Tanamachi, and Steve Powers, on whom I have big art crushes. Their work typically isn’t featured in some hoitytoity gallery waiting for the well-to-do to drop money on, but I think it certainly would fit in there. You will primarily find their images on display to the public. A menu from the shop where you just got your coffee... A chalk sign at the office you just visited... A mural on the side of an old brick building. I find it inspiring to see artists from a younger generation embracing the craft of the handpainted word. Not all art is in a frame. Khara, Dana, and Steve show that if you take a moment to pause and observe your surroundings, you’ll find you’re surrounded by beauty and talent everywhere you look.

www.kharaledonne.com www.danatanamachi.com www.firstandfifteenth.net

 : Spoon Aug/Sep 2011


Khara Ledonne Those who are regulars to the Etsy shopping website may be familiar with Khara Ledonne’s tiny, dyptych worlds that she handpaints onto tiny, marble-sized lockets. This is how I first came to admire her work. Learning more about Khara, you would also find that she is very talented at handpainting very large worlds, too, with work found on murals in homes and businesses in the states and abroad. She is also spreading her creativity to signage. from coffee shops to restaurants, to what I spied as a craft beer label design on her website. Oh yeah – she’s no stranger to canvas, either, and has a pretty great collection of fine art works on her visual resume, as well. And double-oh-yeah – she’s currently working for a few months in Italy on an organic farm. Awesome? Yes. To catch more of Khara’s work, and read about her experience in Italy visit www.kharaledonne.com. (images via www.kharaledonne.com)


Dana Tanamachi I sooo have a crush on Dana Tanamachi’s work. Seriously, people... Do you realize how difficult it is to produce this kind of work... with CHALK? Correct answer: very. Dana manages not only to create these beautiful designs with yummy typefaces, but she does it in a medium that takes some definite patience and planning. While her day job finds her creating work at the wonderful Louise Fili Ltd. studio, her off-hours find her slinging chalk for clients. She’s done book covers, wine bottles, apparel, office and hotel walls, and signage for events, with not much more than dollar-store chalk, wet towels, and hella skills. I completely implore you to take a look at her website to see the rest of the work she shares there. Then press play on her videos to see the world that goes into them. www.danatanamachi.com (images via www.danatanamachi.com)


Steve Powers

Turning away from the world of graffiti and bartending twelve years ago, Steve Powers devoted himself to making art full-time. After traveling abroad to create, he returned to the states to continue a project he began in Ireland. It’s this project, A Love Letter for You, that has brought him current and continued attention. Working in Philadelphia and Syracuse, Steve examines the ups and downs of life and relationships and translates them into wall art. The work of Steve and his crew can be seen all around town, on buildings and overpasses. It is described as adult graffiti with a more powerful message. Learn more about the message and mission in a video about the Syracuse project at vimeo.com/15438315. Keep up with Steve’s works-in-progress on his website, www. firstandfifteenth.net. (images via www.firstandfifteenth.net)


Advertising: a brief timeline 15th & 16th Centuries

Ancient Times • Begins with verbal shouting of announcements • Papyrus,rock, and walls are the platform • Pictures primarily used as most could not read

• Printing press developed • Ads now appear on handbills

1950s • Television introduced • Consumers now have more disposable income to use on products; luxury items become popular in advertisements • Cigarette, diet, and science ads bloom

1960s • Ads shift from creating need to creating consumer identity with concepts and brands • More audience segmenting and targeted campaigns emerge

Late 1980s early 90s

1990s

• Introduction of cable television • Channels devoted entirely to advertising are created (ShopTV, Home Shopping Network)

• Marketing through the internet begins

21st Century • Companies like Google begin the use of unobtrusive ads • Guerrilla marketing (giveaways and campaigns) • Product placement shows up in movies and television

14 : Spoon Aug/Sep 2011

17th Century • Newspapers begin in England in 1620; first ad was rumored to be for a stolen horse • Ads are very straightforward, no embellishment, very few pictures • Mainly for books, newspapers, and medicines

Early 20th Century • Ads are used to create a sense of need in consumers • Ad agencies now employed to design and create ads, not just provide space for them • Beginning of mass media sees ads in movie theatres, on radio, and in magazines • WWII, Great Depression, and Wall Street crash squash affluence and spending

Early-mid 19th Century • Newspaper ads still not very important and relegated to the very backs of issues • Ineffectiveness of conventional medicines leads to competition for consumer attention

Late 19th Century • Industrial revolution • Product branding becomes popular to enhance value and manufacturer reputation • Color, images, and embellishments now popular • Series of ads for products now popular, leading to concepts of marketing and campaigns • Emergence of ad agencies created to respond to a company’s need to stay alive in a growing market • First agency, Volney Palmer, opens in 1843 in Philadelphia

Babies and razors. Top-notch job, Gillette.


The Sign Painter movie There is an art form on the endangered list. Or is it? Sign painting can be found on store fronts, windows, walls, displays, billboards, sandwich boards, and automobiles. Increasingly, however, the artistic lettering and logos, once applied by hand and brush, are being replaced by more automated methods using computers and vinyl. The Sign Painter is a documentary that seeks to explore and educate, telling the story of the men and women who make their living and legacy wielding paint for the sake of communication. It is currently in production with Faythe Levine (who brought you the documentary Handmade Nation) and Sam Macon at the helm, due for release in 2012. The movie will be full of interview goodies from seasoned sign-painting vets like Rey Geise to relativelyyoung whippersnappers like Jeff Canham, the group at New Bohemia Signs (where I would sooooo love to intern), and the previously-featured Steve Powers, who seek to revitalize the profession. I cannot wait for this film to come out. In the mean time, you can rev up your salivating by following the film’s blog, which gives you a sneak-peeks as well as other sign-related links. There are also some wonderful videos to watch, like the one about why our country is effed... graphically speaking. Check it. signpaintermovie.blogspot.com (images via signpaintermovie.blogspot.com)

Aug/Sep 2011 Spoon : 15


American Sign Museum Officially opened in Cincinnati, Ohio in 2005, the idea for the American Sign Museum was, according to the website, the midlife-crisis project of Tod Swormstedt. What began with zero pieces has grown to over 4,000 artifacts, including signs, sales items, books, and manufacturing pieces of the sign industry. As the museum was quickly filling its 4,500 square-foot digs, Tod was able to find the site for a new home in an old parachute factory. The plans to refurbish that space to completion will cost a total of $2.7 million. The new 19,300 square-foot museum space is on track to have the main construction completed by January 2012, with an official grand opening planned for that spring. Also tucked inside will be a restoration shop and Neonworks, a company that will attend to the lighting repairs and enhancements on newly-acquired residents. More projects will then be in the works to add a sound system to the reception and events area, restore signs, and build some exhibits. Be sure to check out the website to view a video tour of the museum, see a gallery of items in the permanent collection, and peruse the many signrelated links. www.signmuseum.net (images via www.signmuseum.net)

16 : Spoon Aug/Sep 2011


Neon Museum & Boneyard One of the most colorful attractions in Vegas isn’t on the strip, and you can only see it by making an appointment. When you think of the golden-era, Rat-Pack-hey-day of Sin City (of which I have a soft spot in my heart), you probably also think of the establishments that set the stage. The Neon Boneyard in Las Vegas is a collection of over 150 signs from that stage, originally found at old casinos, hotels, motels, and local businesses, like the Golden Nugget and Binion’s Horseshoe. The Boneyard is just one aspect of the Neon Museum, a non-profit entity that aims to preserve the advertising icons that make Vegas visually unique. With no electricity running through them, the shells of the former beacons are still fantastic to look at, offering a lessons in geographic history and typographic design. If you can’t get in for a tour, you can get a taste of the collection at the Fremont Street Gallery, which offers a small group of signs that you can visit on foot any day or night. It’s also the location of the Neon Museum’s visitor center, situated inside the relocated lobby of the former La Concha motel, designed by famous African-American architect, Paul Revere Williams. If you’re planning a trip to Vegas and want to add the Boneyard to your itinerary, be sure to set up your appointment at least a couple weeks in advance. www.neonmuseum.org (images by Josh Smith and Skylar Challard for an article on www.idsgn.org)

Aug/Sep 2011 Spoon : 17


Word Search The 18 words listed below are hanging out in this puzzle. See if you can find them all! Solution on page 38.

T K A F D S J L I T C D R I D

N N S R L R T D Y M R E F Q E

L U E L T Q O P E A Z P N C S

T E I M L I O W O I T A S D I

ADVERTISEMENT ARTIST ATTENTION BILLBOARD BUSINESS CITYSCAPE 18 : Spoon Aug/Sep 2011

S K T Q E G S B X N N C D Y G

S W N T R S L T S S O S B X N

J B K A E L I S Q T F Y F D U

L S P N I R B T S R M T B T Y

W H T B K Q I X R E R I Y W W

Y V U T Q B Y N I E N C I I W

DESIGN FONT HANDPAINTED IDENTITY LETTERING MAIN STREET

Y T I T N E D I G T V I N B T

D E T N I A P D N A H D S I Z

A T T E N T I O N X O D A U Z

U R B A N L E U N W N G I S B

X G U E E R S O S C J C Q S J

SIGN SKILL TYPOGRAPHY URBAN WINDOWS WORD


The art of

Brownstones by Justin Miller, $24.

Steam and Sails by Elly MacKay, $20.

Miniature City Built in a Tree by Sarah Hennessey, $60

Gramercy Park NYC by Matte Stephens, $35


f the city

Lonely Metropolis by Janice Jong, ÂŁ14.

Cleveland Skyline, Standing Around by Smalltower Press, $18.

Canal Houses by Laura Amiss, â‚Ź65.

Ice Skaters in the City by Renie Britenbucher, $129.


Nora’s New York

Nora Ephron has written and/or directed some of the most successful romantic comedies of all time, including what I like to call “The Meg Ryan Holy Trinity”, below. In most of her films, she offers up a visual love letter to New York City by featuring many Manhattan neighborhoods and landmarks. Whether you fall in love with her movies or not, she can definitely make you fall in love with NYC.

When Harry Met Sally (1989)

 Washington Square Park (5th Avenue, Waverly Place, West 4th and MacDougal Streets): Harry & Sally part ways after traveling from Chicago to New York. “Well, have a nice life.”

 Loeb Boathouse, Central Park (East 72nd St. & Park Drive North): Sally tells her friends at lunch that she broke up with Joe. “I am over him. But I’m in a mourning period.”

 Katz’s Deli (205 E. Houston St.): Sally’s fake orgasm at luch with Harry. “I’ll have what she’s having.”  Shakespeare & Co. (716 Broadway): Sally runs into Harry. “Someone is staring at you in Personal Growth.”  Metropolitan Museum of Art (1000 5th Ave. & 82nd St.): When Harry & Sally meet and find out they have other dates they’ve been seeing. “Waiter... May I have some pepper on my paprikash.”

 Bethesda Terrace, Central Park (mid-park at 72nd St.): Harry and Jess go speed-walking and discuss relationships.  New York Flowers Plant Shed (209 West 96th St.): Sally buys her Christmas tree, alone. Sleepless in Seattle (1993)

 The Plaza Hotel (5th Ave. & Central Park South): Annie and Walter’s hotel in New York.  Tiffany & Co. (5th Ave. & 57th St.): Annie and Walter shop for their registry; Walter gives her his grandmother’s ring. “She had really fat fingers.”

 Rainbow Room (30 Rockefeller Plaza): Annie breaks up with Walter at dinner. “Oh, Walter. I don’t deserve you.”  Empire State Building (350 5th Ave.): Jonah waits for Annie at the top; later, Annie rushes to see if Joe is still there. “... if I don’t at least look, I’ll always wonder about it.”

You’ve Got Mail (1998)

 Starbucks Coffee (2252 Broadway): Kathleen and Joe’s morning coffee stop.  Verdi Square (Broadway, Amsterdam Ave. & W 73 St.): Kathleen and Joe unknowingly walk by each other during their morning routine.

 Shop Around the Corner (fictional) (106 West 69th St.): Kathleen’s bookstore.  Fox Books (fictional) (West 17th St. & 7th Ave.): Joe’s newest book superstore.  Zabar’s (2245 Broadway): Kathleen and Joe run into each other at Rose’s checkout aisle. “Happy Thanksgiving back.”  Cafe Lalo (201 West 83rd St.): Kathleen (with her book and rose) runs into Joe while waiting for her penpal. “I think you’d discover a lot of things if you really knew me.”

 Lincoln Square movie theatre (1998 Broadway): Kathleen realizes she’s not really in love with Frank. “You need quiet while a hot dog is singing?”

 Ocean Grill (384 Columbus Ave.): Kathleen and Joe meet for lunch and try to decipher what the 152 in NYC152’s user name means. “152 people who think he looks like a Clark bar.”

 Gray’s Papaya (2090 Broadway): Kathleen and Joe get hot dogs. “Maybe I’ve seen him and I don’t even know it.”  91st Street Garden (Riverside Park & 91st St.): Kathleen realizes it was Joe all along. "Don't cry, Shopgirl.” 26 : Spoon Aug/Sep 2011


14

 

Bro adw ay

th Str e

 Av enu e

Ave nue

6th Av enu e

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Am ste rda

5th

    

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Ho ust on Str eet

  Ave nue

Bro a

dw ay

Eas t Riv er

1st

7th

dso nR ive r

Hu

CE N PA TRAL RK

 

 


1. Organization

Schoolhou

Think back to what you used to use to collect all those pencils, papers, and miscellany. Art supply boxes, vintage office supplies, and even chemistry class objects are perfect for holding your goods together. Use them as makeshift flower vases, homes for kitchen gadgets, or a way to keep craft supplies in one place.

2. Furniture and Lighting

Classrooms are full of desks, chairs, and other large objects that can take a beating. Lots of metal, wood, and industrial looks are the norm, with neutral color, simple lines, and little embellishment. Check for sales on Craigslist and Etsy, at thrift, vintage, and reproduction stores, or businesses and warehouses that may be closing to find these expensive pieces at a good price. Three Potato Four is one of my favorite shops to check out, supplying truckloads of schoolhouse goodness.

28 : Spoon Aug/Sep 2011

You don’t have house into a makeshift c incorporate sch It boils down key elements think industr educational, multi-functiona unexpected. Wh in your science Libraries?

Here are some of how to p toget

(All images via three


use Style

3. Storage

e to turn your a full-blown, classroom to hoolhouse style. to just a few and concepts: rial, vintage, , simplistic, al, durable, and hat did you find e and chem labs? Cafeterias?

Lockers, desks, card catalogs, simple bookcases, display cases, bell jars, and metal shelving are all staples of this timeless style. By mixing them in with softer pieces like fabrics, pillows, and rugs, it takes the edge off of their hard surfaces and lines.

great examples pull it all ther.

4. Decor

epotatofourshop.com)

Look to learning when picking out decor for your room. Globes, maps, books, charts, letters, instructions, and diagrams all make great accessories for wall art and tabletop conversation pieces. Maybe cover some of your books with paper bags, like you used to doodle on? You could also lean towards more extra-curricular activities for inspiration: Plaid blankets from football games, old programs, sports letters, yearbooks, class photos, trophies, megaphones...

Aug/Sep 2011 Spoon : 29


k r o Y w e N e v o l u o y t ’ Don s e k a m t I ? l l a f e h t n i l o o h c s y u b o t t n a w e m d n e s d l u o supplies. I w y l w e n f o t e u q u o b a u yo w e n k I f i s l i c n e p d e n e sharp . s s e r d d a d n a e m a n r u o y Fox - Tom Hanks as Joe in You’ve Got Mail


What was your favorite new school supply when you were a kid? Notebook, with the clean, lined paper... and a new pen to completely deface the cover within hours. - Karen, carolinarollergirls.com

Trapper Keeper! Had to stay fly! All those compartments were very exciting to someone who likes to stay organized. - Tammi, carolinarollergirls.com

Gradeschool: Crayolas, hands down. HighSchool: saddle shoes. (p.s. That was Catholic school, as you can imagine, with uniform.) - Deb, ronwear.com Crayons - the smell and pristine-ness of that ‘new box’, in addition to the new, clean notebooks. - Sue

Looseleaf binder. - Ruby

Notebooks! - Rosalie, unanimouscraft.com

It’s for sale. You know you want it.

White, pleather, Donny & Marie lunchbox, ‘cause that’s how I rolled. Don’t be jeals. - Lisa

Notebooks and binders... the blank surfaces just waiting to be covered in doodles that advertised the many intricate facets of who I am to my fellow classmates. “I love Debbie Gibson”, yet also “I love The Beatles” - deep, eh? - Sandy, robotinbloom.com

Ditto on the Trapper Keeper! My fave was 4th grade... Care Bears. It even had a little Care Bear printed on the lined paper that came inside. It was tough being THAT cool at such a young age! - Susan, peacecorps.gov

Also for sale...

Aug/Sep 2011 Spoon : 31


Academy of Autumn by Tina Jett

32 : Spoon Aug/Sep 2011


Autumnal Equinox September 23, 2011

The Autumnal Equinox, also known as the September Equinox, occurs in the Northern Hemisphere on September 23rd at 9:04am Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). For many, it is a muchanticipated date on the calendar, especially after a slew of 90- and 100degree-temperature days have more than overstayed their welcome.

Annoy the New England locals by paying them a visit: “Leaf-peepers”, as they are called... politely... are the droves of tourists that migrate to the Northeastern-most states to catch the amazing display of foliage changing colors. Yankee Magazine even has an entire website dedicated to helping you plan your trip: www.yankeefoliage.com

There are many superstitions, myths, and celebrations associated with the date. In the Buddhist faith, Higan is a time when followers remember the dead by cleaning, visiting, and decorating their grave sites. Pagans celebrate Mabon, a time to participate in a second harvest, prepare for winter, and be thankful for the sunlight that will soon wane. The Chinese Moon Festival occurs around the time of the full moon to celebrate the bounty of the summer harvest and make offerings to the moon and coming darkness. Families get together, the streets are filled with lanterns, and fire dragon dances are performed.

Crank out the fall foods: Pumpkins, squash, apples, cranberries, spices, ciders... Indulge in your favorite autum staples and flavors. Food.com has a bucket-load of recipes for you to try, or at least send my way.

Here are some other suggestions on how you can celebrate the season: Test the superstition that you can balance an egg on its end: It’s said the best time to try is within a few hours before and after the exact time of the equinox.

Go camping: You may not have the extended summer vacation time anymore, but you can still plan an overnight weekend getaway near you. Bonus: not as many bugs, not as much heat. The peeps at REI.com have tons of tips and advice to make outdoor life easier. Tailgate: These days, you don’t even need to have tickets to a sporting event to have a good time. Some never leave the parking lot. Living in the South exposed me to a whole different level of pre-game partying. Tailgate.com will tell you all you need to know, from tips to recipes, to... yes... the new National Tailgating Championship.

Aug/Sep 2011 Spoon : 33


Oktoberfest Munich, Germany September 17 – October 3, 2011


Word Search Solution! And I’ll know if you’ve been peeking... Puzzle on page 18.

T K A F D S J L I T C D R I D

N N S R L R T D Y M R E F Q E

L U E L T Q O P E A Z P N C S

T E I M L I O W O I T A S D I

S K T Q E G S B X N N C D Y G

S W N T R S L T S S O S B X N

J B K A E L I S Q T F Y F D U

L S P N I R B T S R M T B T Y

W H T B K Q I X R E R I Y W W

Y V U T Q B Y N I E N C I I W

Y T I T N E D I G T V I N B T

D E T N I A P D N A H D S I Z

A T T E N T I O N X O D A U Z

U R B A N L E U N W N G I S B

X G U E E R S O S C J C Q S J


I don’t think any day is worth living without thinking about what you’re going to eat next at all times. ~ Nora Ephron

A book of quotations I’ve compiled since my freshman year of college. Aug/Sep 2011 Spoon : 39


Spoon : the e-zine* www.spoonzine.com

Spoon : the final issue October/November 2011

(*It’s got a little poo in it!)

Spoon: Issue No. 5 - Aug/Sep 2011  

Welcome to Issue No. 5 of Spoon! Spoon is a bi-monthly, digital zine based on the little things that make life awesome: inspirations, experi...

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