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Risky business

MM

an edge.

SPOKE

Page 11

A

World-class carver likes having

*7

Singing sensations Six CSI Idol finalists

compete Thursday.

LEARNING NEWSROOM FOR JOURNALISM STUDENTS

BUGS BUNNY entertains

Faculty

Page 10

kids waiting for santa

strike

looms Talks between

OPSEU and

Ontario’s

24 colleges broke down Nov. 12 By CHRIS BAIT

The

union

representing

9,000 Ontario college instructors says it could go on strike in the new year if the colleges do not meet their conditions. Talks between the council that represents Ontario’s 24 colleges and the Ontario Public Service Employees Union (OPSEU) broke down on Nov. 12. Shortly thereafter, the council chose to draft a new employment contract for teachers that went

on Nov. 18. The new contract calls for a 7.5 per cent wage increase over four years, and changes to workload terms and condi-

into effect

tions.

In a Nov. 12 press release,

OPSEU

president

Warren

Thomas blasted the

actions of the council, calling it “unionbusting at its worst.” “In light of the colleges refusal to bargain in good faith the union will have no alternative but to go to our membership and seek a strike mandate,” said

Grad makes By MICHELLE

SOMMER

Thomas. “If this

so-called contract is

rammed through council says five

it

faculty

the will be, one in like

members

in

Ontario will experience an unprecedented increase in workload.” In an email to faculty, Ontario college presidents stated that the new contract will increase the level of input for

faculty, but will not increase the workload that will be assigned. Faculty, counsellors and

librarians

last

went on a

three-week strike in

March

2006, which affected 150,000 students across Ontario.

This competition can literalbe defined as cutting edge. Gillette’s Drafted contest has hauled in eager, wannabe-sportscasters from all over the country, but only the ones ly

with energy and an often peculiar sense of creativity wall make the cut.

Sean Menard is one of them. from 25-year-old The Hamilton is now one of the top five finalists competing for the esteemed position of sports broadcaster on The Score. Menard studied radio and television at Conestoga from

2004 to 2006 before attending

contest’s final five

Sheridan College for a

best marks, but I liked to think I was pushing the enve-

post-grad

lope,”

he

said.

He wished

program. at time Conestoga he good made use of the

that programs, such as the one he attended at Conestoga, would allow for students to show off their originality a bit more, as opposed to always following

available

specific templates.

During his

cameras and

equipment, shooting

Menard

as

much much

film and gaining as experience as he could. Menard realized he had a

making himstand out by producing

better chance of self

unusual and attention-grabbing material. “I,

for sure, didn’t get the

Menard

said programs try and simulate the workplace instead of also rewarding innovation. “I would like to see schools encourage and promote that kind of thinking a little bit more,” he said. In the past weeks of the

competition, during trivia contests and other tapings,

Menard has been tagged

as

cocky,

but he says he isn’t intentionally trying to appear that way. He is confident in his abilities and is trying to bring that on to the screen. “It’s not like I’m acting, they promote you to be yourself,”

he

said.

Despite

all

his

self-confi-

dence, there

is still

that freaks

Menard

don’t get to edit

when

it

one thing out.

or see

it

“I

so

the rest of the country see it for the first time too; I don’t have control over it.” But so far so good, and Menard is hoping for the best on the live show on Dec. 8 sees

. . .

it, I

when

Gillette will

the winner.

announce


NEWS

SPOKE

Page 2

Part-timers play the waiting game

Now deep thoughts ...

with Conestoga College

Random

questions answered by

What

is

random students

your

all-time favourite

Monday, November 23, 2009

Both sides are now waiting

By CHRIS BATT

movie?

’’Anchorman.

It’s

classic

Will Ferrell.”

Alex

Elliot,

first-year

law and security

Part-time staff at Ontario’s 24 community colleges will have to wait several months to find out whether or not they will join the Ontario Public Service Employees

Union (OPSEU). The College Compensation and Appointments Council is contesting whether OPSEU had the 35 per cent support

I

ments as

to

who

is

able to

vote.

“The process could take well into the new year,” said Debra Marshall, director of at resources human

nervous about our job security” Despite the news, officials at Conestoga insist that no changes will be made to employment conditions or student services.

Conestoga College. “The ballots are sealed, but the labour board can still order a count.”

Under Ontario law, unions must obtain signed membership cards

support staff at Ontario colleges participated in the

take place.

“Star Wars. like the action it’s a good (series).”

eligible to

“This is not good news for Shelly said part-timers,” Brown, a part-time admissions clerk at Conestoga College. “It makes me very

Between

place.

from 35 per cent of eligible workers before a vote can

employees

vote.

required to hold a vote in the first

college

hearing with the Ontario Labour Relations Board, where they will present argu-

for a

Oct. 5

and

cannot colleges “The change any employment terms before the hearing,”

Oct. 27,

said Marshall. “It will be business as usual for the

largest union certification vote in the province’s history, with up to 10,000 part-time

time being.”

and

(Counselling services presents the

CORRECTION

Peter Lawryniuk, second-year early childhood

A story in the Nov. 16 issue of Spoke contained incorrect information on

education apprenticeship

Monty Python and The Holy Grail because it’s amazing and hilarious!” “Totally

Tuesday December

the Generation N event campus. the at held Generation N was created by Mario Anglin, director of social

programming

fiiAm wor

st 1

/

IO:OOam

-

I

:OOpm

m Tit mum mu itm i

for

Conestoga Students Inc., and not by the new club Kailey Parkin, second-year general business

Campus Gamers

as stated. for the

Spoke apologizes error.

the last Bruce Willis (Live Free or Die Hard) because don’t “I

like

movie

I

watch movies for realism, watch movies to escape.”

I

Laura DeKnibber, first-year

practical nursing

go with The Lion loved it as a kid, all the music and songs. have the soundtrack and “Let’s

King.

I

I

saw the

play.”

Neil Foster,

Q? HEART AND STROKE FOUNDATION

second-year law and security administration

LAST-DITCH EFFORT “Probably Braveheart it’s got a good

TM OUeSSMM

because

uev dad, rrs

and it has a Scottish element to

CAUWO

story. It’s exciting

max.

dust I

TO...

touts ABt MAX... VOUR SOU...

MAX'!

J

it.”

Andrew Munroe, computerized note taker (with disability services)

O Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent! 02006 John Kroon

UIS

snu A

uTTue utser ABOUT UtM Biomuo up rvue OABAoe.

DAD,

ms

AMUCStA STUUT

DIDUT HOOK LAST

rm union


NEWS

Mo n d ay, Novembe r 23, 2009

SPOKE Page

Second Career program getting back on track By ALEX COOKE

An update and some to Conestoga’s

context

Second Career

were discussed in by college council members on Nov. 16. When the Ministry of issues detail

Training, Colleges and Universities first proposed the Second Career program in 2008, Conestoga College was more than willing to implement new programs, to help retrain people who had been laid off. This was done to compete with private post-secondary institutions such as

TriOS, Everest and Medix colleges.

Sandra Schelling, chair of engineering and information technical training, has been

communicating with She alerted

the the Ministry in May of the high number of students looking to take the government up on its

MTCU.

offer of training for a career.

new

In September, the Ministry &ot the hint.. They contacted Conestoga College and asked if students would be allowed to attend school without the

required MTCU approval, since they were backlogged with applicants. Just a couple of weeks later, applicants were notified that the initial $355 million in funding had been used up, and that the was declaring a “pause” in funding, because they had underestimated how popular the

MTCU

Second Career would be.

program

College.

ed out. “The Ministry could have been more sophisticated with their winding down of the program,” said Tibbits. An additional $78 milli on was committed to continue the Second Career program Oct. 13, but at college council it was suggested it was used to process the backlog of

ing with the backlog of applicants approved in the summer.

Conestoga College applicants

Mike Dinning,

is

who

ready are

vice-presi-

dent of student affairs, pointed out that the Second Career students only account for 40 per cent of the college’s

growth this year. “I’m encouraged by the strength of programs outside of Second Career,” Dinning said.

Of the 1,150 new students this year, 700 of those have enrolled in “traditional” pro-

grams.

tab.

By NICOLE HANNUSCH

is in demand in their community which requires a credential or licence.

approved by MTCU, but their numbers are low, since the MTCU seems to still be deal-

cants hoping futures on the government’s

surpassed The 2009 United Way Be Change, Make Change, See Change campaign is drawing to a close at Conestoga

between September and December this year, as college president John Tibbits point-

applito brighten their

|

funding will be for a training program, not an income support program, and applicants must plan to train for a job that

for

new

goa 0f $50,000

“That money ($78 million) hasn’t affected admissions so far,” Tibbits said. The pause will be in effect until Nov. 20, when new guidelines for Second Career funding will be implemented. Included in the guidelines are that the

Students weren’t the only ones left holding the bag. Conestoga College created 27 new programs, set to start

applicants, not for

United Way’s

While

not all of the fundraising activities have

been

Conestoga

held,

has

already passed its fundraising goal of $50,000, with a total of $51,914 raised so far.

Last year, Conestoga managed to raise $55,834. Events will be continuing at the colof end until the lege

November, so the school

still

which raised $1,258. Student Life events, run by student life programmer

Ryan Connell, raised $3,323. The goal for the Student Life initiatives was $2,500. The business foundation students raised a record amount of $757 between their three noon-hour events, the largest amount ever brought in by a class on campus for the

United Way drive. Paula Sears, HRIS co-ordinator, expressed her appreciation for those

like to express

year’s record.

all

employee the During pledge/donation drive, fewer

who

er average

compared

amount

of $163,

to last year’s aver-

age of $156. The lasagna luncheon was not held in favour of an employee bingo,

donated.

our thanks to employees and students

has a chance to break last

employees donated toward the event, but donated a high-

who

“On behalf of the United Way, the committee would

participated in events,

provided prizes for events, or made pledges or donations. We couldn’t do it without them.” A grand total for the entire Conestoga College United Way campaign will be available in early December.

EVERYONE BENEFITS FROM random acts of kindness

sgmm

PHOTO BY CHRIS BATT

Random

Act of Kindness Day

courtesy, respect

and

civility

was

held Nov.

13 on campus,

with everyone being encouraged to

toward one another. Above, Joni Blueman,

moted the Respect Campaign during the

special day.

left,

show

and Brenda Laugalys

pro-

PHOTO BY MICHELLE SOMMER Act of Kindness Day had students making their way to the CSI offices, where they received free popcorn, cotton candy and, for those interested, even free mugs.

Random


Monday, November 23, 2009

SPOKE

Page 4

Vehicle thefts

alarming GREG COWAN

Bv

quick, the new cliche the college doesn’t do something like steahng trucks “It’s describing easy pickings will be lot.” parking College from the Conestoga college properAt least two trucks were stolen from the staff, faculty students, for Unfortunately ty last month. campus and security, acts of vehicular thievery around If

aren’t rare occurrences. oliices Before the masses start parading to the security

demanding more

it is

protection,

worth noting what a

jackpot the Conestoga campus is to carjackers. the Think about it, the campus is seconds away from is home to garand getaway, the as known highway, also countless gantuan and numerous parking lots, housing baby. a from candy cars. It’s like taking superThere is no conceivable way the security staff can could they if Even lots. the vise ah the vehicles exiting the how would they be able to pick out the students from of night hard a after An early morning class,

Conestoga Colleges parking

background Car alarms have become nothing more than blaring Everyone has been guilty of hearing the concerned. than annoyed horns and becoming more better And store-bought theft deterrents seem to do a the than cars their starting job of keeping drivers from don t have you besides, And them. steahng thieves from YouTube video to be a professional to watch a two-minute describing how to get around those roadblocks. Other college and university campuses have sensor conleave trolled parking arms that only allow a vehicle to

As soon as the

noise.

unmanned

The H1N1 virus has caused a huge panic all over North America, which, in turn, caused frustration with

HlNl

security that,

receive.

concerns about rationing preferential treatment

and

welcome

Letters are Spoke welcomes

letters to the

than

started to arise.

500 words.

Spoke reserves the

should be

right to

signed and include the

edit any letter

name and telephone

for publication.

number of the

Address correspon-

writer.

Writers will be contact-

dence

ed for verification.

The

No unsigned

letters will

Doon

be

published. Letters should

be no longer

There have also been controversies involving Canadian professional sports franchises

and whether their players were given preferential treatment when getting the HlNl flu shots. The NHL’s Calgary Flames and Toronto Maple Leafs, The AHL’s Abbotsford Heat and the NBA’s Toronto

to:

Editor,

Spoke, 299

Valley Dr.,

Room 1C30, N2G 4M4

at

HlNl

clinics.

Kitchener, Ont.,

Raptors are

all in

What Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment did

are under investigation. My question is did we really think this was not going to ics

a shocker; celebrities got preferential treatment. I don’t understand what all the fuss is about. That is the perk that comes with being a celebrity or professional athlete; you become top priority because you make rich people even richer. And we, the normal folk who are complaining, are the ones to blame for them getting this special treatment. We all treat celebrities as if they were special human beings and we place them on a pedestal. Think of it this way: Let’s pretend you’re an art collector and happen to own a vase

worth $1

million.

was just

protect

its

most

prized possessions,

its

athletes.

Now I know most people would disagree and say who cares about making money, this is just totally unethical,

there are children and elderly who need this shot more than sports celebrities do. To these people I ask just one question: If you were in the player’s situation,

when

would you say no

told to get the shot?

If you said yes, then I guess you are the moral compass of humankind. As for the rest of us, we will be looking for any

way

You hear on

the news that an earthquake

the middle

What

An Alberta

Canada Health employee has been fired and in both Ontario and Alberta the clin-

What

opened,

clinics first

The views herein represent the position of the newspaper, not necessarily the author.

doesn’t break.

sions, its athletes.

an investigation after being moved to the front of the lines

of

happen?

Only a week after the

it

Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment did was just protect its most prized posses-

flu shot.

Flu clinics had only been open a week when concerns about rationing and preferential treatment started to arise. Clinics in Alberta were suspended due to the number of doses available and the small supply they expected to

working.

editor. Letters

safe so

the administering of the

while hardly foolproof, would make the work of the thieves a bit harder. The arms would also free up college security from ticketing illegally parked cars, because if drivers didn’t have a pass they wouldn’t be able to get into the lot. This is one suggestion. There are others, and there may even be better ones. However, one thing is for certain, the current level of vehicle security at the college isn’t

going to hit your city sometime today and it’s going to be a big one. The first thing you are going to do is find that vase and lock it up somewhere

is

clinics

ed.

the proper verification, usually a

level of

no big deal

opened, the controversy start-

magnetic card.

The arms provide a

are a iinie ioo

Preferential treatment

thieves? with his “studying,” could make any student fumbling keys look like a shady character.

when presented with

lots

to get ourselves to the

front of those lines.

SPOKE IS

PUBLISHED AND PRODUCED WEEKLY BY THE JOURNALISM STUDENTS OF CONESTOGA COLLEGE

Editor: Greg Cowan Advertising Managers:

Production Managers: Sarah Chris Batt

and Dane

Brason

Spoke Online

Editors: Alex Cooke and Janelle

Scheifele

The views and opinions expressed

Stacey Falconer and Freeman Carter

Phone: 519-748-5220, ext 3691, 3692, 3693,

Bucher, Mitch Muir and Nicole Frank.

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser:

3694

Circulation Manager: Nick Dasko

Christina Jonas

E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

Photo Editors: Heather Muir, Gillian

in this

newspaper do not necessarily

Macintosh, Lisa

Nicole Hannusch,

Webber, Michelle Sommer, Justine

reflect the views of

subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a

Reist,

Conestoga College. Spoke

MS Word file would

shall not

Spoke’s address

is

Kitchener, Ontario,

299 Doon Valley N2G 4M4.

Dr.,

be liable for any damages arising out of errors

be helpful. Letters must not contain any libellous statements.

Room 1C30,

in

Fax:

519-748-3534

Website: www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

advertising beyond the

amount paid

for the space. Letters to the editor are


NEWS

Monday, November 23, 2009

Sparse crowd at Royal Winter Fair has me worried In Toronto there are 10 days each year when country

meets

SPOKE

Page 5

AVG OF 2.5 CUPS/nJLL TIME STUDENT/DAY = 21 ,250 CUPS Hypertension

kior nines rfdeUetto*

ENERGY CAFFEINE

DATE

maker

beans

rilter

THINK ABOUT

{, IseuIt

large

SIj

lineuP

Qa^

city.

The

Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, held Nov. 6 to 15 this year, featured a

Janelle

Scheifele

Opinion

horse show, trade fair, the entertaining President’s

SuperDogs agility show and judged classes for cows, sheep, goats, poultry and produce. I have been attending the Royal for years, mostly to watch the horse show and shop, but something seemed to be missing this year - people. The booths and exhibits were the same as ever -

innumerable

vendors

for

horse supplies, booths showcasing the country’s geographical regions and the always interesting display of the largest vegetables. The area for livestock was full and horse show entries were the same number they have always been, including many international riders. The difference was the crowd, or lack thereof. Granted, I did go to the show on a weekday, but I was there from about noon until midnight. The biggest absence was school trips. Elementary students usually bustle around with bags of purchases, yelling to one another and always blocking your view of the ring when they all file out together. I followed the equestrian message boards for discussions about the Royal and some brought up concerns about H1N1. There were a few people who planned not to attend for fear of germs, but the majority said they were going to use hand sanitizer and not lick any door handles. However, these sites are for horse people, who probably would rather risk being sick for a couple of weeks than miss the pinnacle event of the horse show season. These flu concerns are a very likely explanation for the lack of school trips. Germ contact is inevitable whenever a crowd of people are gathered and many parents (and schools) probably didn’t want to put their children at risk. A second explanation for the sparse crowd is the poor

economy. My ticket cost almost $50 and included both my admission and entry to the evening horse show. My costs would have been less if I

had only attended

the afternoon, but the best

show jumping

is later.

When

N*,™

awake

Choice

you add in Starbucks (have to stop there), gas, parking,

food and shopping (there are

always good deals), it can be quite an expensive day out. In a time when people are worried about their jobs and money, admission alone is pretty pricey and many families probably won’t make this a day trip. Even if you just paid admission and nothing else, mom and dad probably don’t want to lug around a cooler all day filled with enough food for a fami-

strong

black

biPArs

v

4c«* «w’ "°Z amt INSTANT

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WHY 18 IT THE LAST 2 WORDS TO COME TO MIND ARE REUSABLE MUG?

ly of four. I

thought

I

did fairly well

and kept under control in the shopping area. But including my ticket, souvenirs and food I probably spent just over $200. However, one benefit of the lower turnout was shorter Usually lines. at

Greenhawk, an equestrian supply store that is a major sponsor of the show, I have to wait behind at least 10 people before making my purchases. But this year the cashier was waiting for me! The low attendance numbers have

me

a bit worried.

I

the Syracuse Invitational Sport Horse Show in Syracuse, N.Y., in October and found out that this show, which has been going on for over 100 years, ended up in the red. It is get-

attended

ting more and more difficult to find sponsors and the future of this historical show that used to be held at

Madison Square Gardens

now

is

in jeopardy.

I worry that the fate of the Royal will become similarly uncertain. CN was a major sponsor this year, but if they aren’t compensated for their contributions they may be unwilling to offer such sup-

port in the future. And truthfully, riders won’t come if the prize money is poor and the show won’t be as competitive without the top-quality riders it is

known

to draw.

We all have our stories that brought us here. We support one another through whatever we face and take the time to learn from each other.

be interesting to find out official attendance and It will

financial

numbers

when

everything is tallied. But I think we need to really make an effort to preserve events such as the Royal, that showcase our history and are steeped in tradition.

Thank You

for Being the Difference

CONESTOGA


Monday, November 23, 2009

Page 6

SPOKE

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NEWS

Monday, November 23, 2009

Christmas not in the It’s mid-November and I’m already dreading the music that will be joyously playing over stores’ crappy PA systems. It’s mid-November people, not December. It’s not

SPOKE

Page 7

BIG TURNOUT at the guelph santa claus parade

is

air! Justine Reist

even close to Christmas and already I am sick of hearing

Opinion

carols.

We we

have a month left until need to start getting

really

ready for the biggest holiday of the year. There is no need to be putting up your trees, hanging the lights or putting that annoying waving Santa on your front lawn. Some of us are still in that “Did summer really happen?” phase and would not like to be plagued with the thoughts of snow coming our way. I was outside just a few days ago where the weather was so nice I felt as though spring had come early. I walked my dog around the block, enjoying the rays of sunshine; I was lost in a feeling of full content until I

rounded that last corner. On one of my holiday-loving neighbour’s lawn sat a big grinning snowman mocking me as it swayed in the sunlight. The first snowfall hasn’t even hit us and already we’re putting out inflatable snowmen. I wanted to run over there and pop it, possibly let-

an evil cackle as it slowly melted toward the ground. Some neighbours still have pumpkins rotting on their front porch from Halloween which are accompanied by bright, flashing ting out

Christmas lights. I tend to be a bit of a peeping tom when it comes to these houses covered in lights and decorations. I’m always intrigued to see if they already have their trees up as well. More often than not, there in the living room stands a great big Christmas tree,

fully

decorated,

some

with presents already beneath it. I have a hard enough time keeping my cat from making the tree into a fort for herself a few days before Christmas, I would not want to be doing that for

more than a month. Nov. 1 and I saw numerous

hit

Facebook statuses of friends

who were “Soooo

excited to

put up the tree today, Christmas is in the air!” Christmas is not in the air! Fall is, let me enjoy fall before we skip into that dreadful season we know as winter.

Santa Claus parades are already underway as well. I attend them, for the candy, but I still resent it every minute. We all stand on the street in the middle of November with nothing but a light sweater on to keep us warm and wait for that jolly old Saint Nick to come down the street on a float or fire truck. It’s almost a ploy to get kids hopes up, reminding them that Santa comes soon so they better be good, even though they have over a month before Santa falls down their chimney. Stores are the worst at this time of year. Even before Halloween makes its appearance stores are stocking up on wrapping paper, bows, silly cards and that oh so dreadful music. If I have to hear that chipmunk song one more time I am going to lose it. The song horrible on a normal stereo system or on TV, but it’s ear

is

PHOTOS BY LISA BUCHER Thousands lined the streets to catch a glimpse of St. Nick and other colourful characters at Guelph’s Santa Claus Parade Nov. 15. Above, a Toronto marching band entertains the crowd with their toy soldier costumes and lively music.

- -St.

wound

«

...am.ies a.ong

me two-hour

its

bleeding material when played on a crappy PA system. The worst thing about it is Christmas music seems to

were on hand, as was the Guelph Humane Society, which encouraged everyone to come out and adopt a pet. Everybody

there should be a ban on it being played before Dec. 10 after Dec. 25.

who

should also save their Christmas cheer for December. People

If not,

turn

me

downtown Guelph The Quebec Street oast

Street to

Radio station personalities

linger around until the first week of January. I think

and

route through

way from London and Woolwich streets, along Norfolk George’s Square and ended up by police headquarters.

event

of

participated walked a two kilometres.

Reconstruction of

Wyndham

and Norfolk streets parade organizers.

you’re all going to into a scrooge. Bah

tota

didn’t detei

humbug.

Mbft HEART &

TRANS FATS REST f

IN

STROKE

PEACE,

FOUNDATION Finding answers. For life.

learn

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at heartandstroke.ca

THIS

IS

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SPOKE

Page 8

Monday, November 23, 2009

NEWS

Ceremony

WHEN DATING TURNS DANGEROUS The

to get carried

so easy

It’s

abuse

early signs of

with the excitement of

away

Often, this exhilaration prevents us from detecting

Here are some warning signals I

Wants

I

Becomes

to

to look for.

trivial

some

Your partner

know where you are and who you are very angry about

a new

of the early signs of

may be abusive

with at

all

ensures we’ll never forget

relationship.

if

abuse.

he or she:

times

things, like not being ready

on time or wearing the

“wrong” clothes

traditional ideas

Has

I

don’t

obey or decide

Has ever

I

If

hit

about hurting you, hurting your friends or committing suicide

you, no matter

Counsellors are available ext 3360,

Room

how

1C04, 885-0300 to

you

in

sorry afterwards

in

ext.

may be

your partner, you

the Counselling Office,

Guelph Campus, Admin.

Report behaviours

if

to leave.

you recognize these behaviours

5220

Poppies aren’t easy to wear. In addition to countless finger pricks, they slip off of our

your friends and asks you to stop seeing them

I Criticizes

Office,

in

a dangerous

relationship.

Doon Campus, Room 1A101, 748-

824-9390

ext. 148 or

Waterloo Campus,

224.

Campus

Security

(Doon campus Room 2B10

ext.

3357) and/or the

Police.

Information

on community support

is

available

through your Counselling Office.

Both services are confidential.

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

Dropping Out

“Do I really want to be here?” Many students, exhausted by workload, discouraged by borderline marks or unsure of program choice consider leaving college. Counsellors see many students who want out and hope to return later. But is “out there” any better? Leaving may cause other problems. A sudden void is created in the student’s life. Jobs are elusive. Contact is lost with school friends who form a natural community of support. Returning to school seems a monumental task.

Know

the costs and consider

all

Sonser’s somber reflection was honest and realistic, with

By ALEX COOKE

alternatives carefully.

Consider options other

than withdrawal from a program:

a hint of hope for a future

without war. Elissa Cressman, a student

shared programmer, heartwarming stories of her Major W.G. grandfather,

coats continuously, and end up littering sidewalks for weeks. Everyone has their

life

own

secret to keeping the trademark secured over their hearts, and proudly display-

Ferguson,

ing their respect for our fallen and fighting soldiers. The bright red symbol was on full display on Nov. 11. the a.m., 10:35 By Conestoga at Sanctuary College had filled to capacity with students, faculty and staff who came to pause for a

many

moment in their busy college lives and remember. First-year business management student, Frazer Stalkie, was one of the first to grab a seat in the Sanctuary to pay his respects to his who grandfathers, both served in the Second World War.

halls of Conestoga

The congregation stood for the recordings, followed by a moment of silence and respect. A few of the mourners welled up with teai-s and

“It’s comforting to come (to the ceremony),” said Stalkie. “It’s been a tradition since

wiped them away discretely. The college’s ceremony was attended by Lt.-Col. Gordon

high school.”

Conestoga

who served

in the

Second World War. “It

was

fantastic to see so

take a few minutes and remember,” Cressman said after the ceremony. Ferguson’s favourite story to tell his

granddaughter was

an Ireland, visiting untouched oasis in war-torn

of

Europe.

As 11 a.m. drew

closer, the

grew eerily quiet, especially during a recording of Taps and the Last Post, performed on the bugle.

Greavette (retired). Greavette now the chair of liberal

Students Inc. president Sheena Sonser opened the second annual Remembrance Day ceremony. She gave a stirring speech as images of Canadian soldiers fighting in wars, old and new, were projected on a screen

tion of

beside her.

the college,” Greavette said.

is

communications and studies at Conestoga. Decked out in uniform, the retired officer was happy to see so many in attendance. “It was great to see recognifull

Remembrance Day

at

Find out more about your program and the variety of possible jobs you can seek through resources such as faculty and Career Services.

Drop a course which is salvageable and pick before conceding defeat.

it

up

later.

Consult your instructor

Pick up a failed course through Continuing Education evening or

summer

classes.

Discuss partial load with your co-ordinator or the program chair. Better to save a few than lose all. for Peer Tutoring. The cost to the student is minimal and it works. Considering transferring to another program within your school. Communicate with a peer or faculty with whom you are having difficulty. Ask for help from faculty or classmates.

Apply

Seek temporary shelter

if

home has become untenable. Community resources

are

listed in Counselling Services.

See your doctor. A sudden decline in energy may indicate a treatable Take off a day or two to deal with personal issues if necessary. Take advantage of any or all service areas to assist you.

illness.

These and many other solutions have been explored by students with a counselWe are here to listen and help when you have run out of ideas. Most find they can get through with some support or leave if necessary with a plan for completing

lor.

PHOTO BY ALEX COOKE Jaqui Reid, from

their education.

retired Lt.-Col.

A Message from

Counselling Services, 1A101.

and studies tive,

left,

a security representative at Conestoga,

Gordon Greavette, chair of liberal communications and Rod McNeil, a security represent a-

at Conestoga,

stand for a

moment

of silence at

11 a.m. on

Nov. 11.


Monday, November 23, 2009

SPOKE Page 9

Conestoga

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SPOKE

NEWS

Page 10

Monday, November 23, 2009

BEATING

BOREDOM with

basketball

Libra September 23 October 22

spend the week awesome Steve McQueen movies. You will

You

will

watching be

sad

find out that died in 1980.

to

McQueen

Someone will put bouillon cubes in your showerhead this week. Prepare to take a shower

in

-

of

sort

Scorpio

Taurus April 20

some

broth.

May 20

October 23

November

-

21

While going out the door week you will get cov-

A

bird will fly into your at some point this week. You will be surprised at how quickly everything

You should wear a poncho

becomes covered

keep clean.

home

in its feces.

this

ered in a bucket of oatmeal.

w

Gemini May

21

-

June 21

to

Sagittarius November 22 December 21 PHOTO BY GREG COWAN

be stunned at how people go see the latest Twilight movie. It is a shame that they won’t get their wasted time back.

You

will

many

You will get cayenne pepper in your eyes this Thursday. This is quite painful. Get some eyewash or milk to stop the pain.

Tomasz Rozdeba and Matt Burkhart, two second-year from

their studies to play basketball at the rec centre.

Singing their

ffTOj Capricorn December 22

to

-

January 19

You

will

get shot in the

forehead by a rubber band. If this is an accident you should forgive whoever shot you. If it was on purpose, you should get vengeance.

Top

On

a Monday, you will be arrested, on a Tuesday you will be put in jail. Ideally you look good in stripes, because they will be around your shoulders.

January 20 February 18

Beware of a purple poodle, as someone who has no common sense at all owns it. They also don’t bother picking up its droppings.

This week you will learn trucks should not have drum brakes when you see an accident. Everyone will be fine but the cars won’t be.

why SUVs and

Virgo

§*£

This week you will see an elderly woman walking in a

amount

of feath-

ers.

Hopefully you do not

have

allergies.

February 19

back

to sing again

By FREEMAN CARTER

Conestoga has

when

talent, espe-

comes to singing. CSI Idol is back for another year, and this Thursday the top six finalists will perform it

for the coveted title. After a

gruelling audition round, the best six scorers have been asked to come out one more

time to perform in front of both a live audience and special guest judges.

on Thursday

In no particular order, the top six are: Paul Tremblay, Erin Farrar, Katherine

Laguna,

Karissa

Woroch,

Thomas Clarke and

Julia

Pilgrim. Each of these participants scored more than 20 points out of a possible 25.

Contestants were judged on four different criteria: vocal skill, worth up to 10 points, as well as stage presence, originality of presentation and personality, each worth up to

five points.

The three special guest judges this year include radio personalities Angie Hill from KOOL FM and Mark Paine from KFun 99.5, as well as Conestoga’s own audio-visual technologist Bert Last. The final six will be scored using the same criteria from the audition rounds. While there won’t be any William Hung-style performances, students are urged to come out to cheer on their fellow classmates and friends as Conestoga looks for its next CSI

Idol.

Eating out tonight? Make a smart choice.

Pisces

August 23 September 22

ridiculous

six

way

stardom at CSI Idol

in front of special guest judges

cially

Aquarius

international business students, take a break

-

March 20

excellent period film called

For healthy food choices, food safety and 100% smoke-free seating, choose an Eat Smart! restaurant. Contact the Waterloo

There Will Be Blood. Don’t confuse this with Crimson Tide, which is a war movie.

Region Community Health Department nwm eatsmart web, net.

This week you will see an

Nick Dasko

is

journalism student

at

m

883-2253 or

these

a » M wino * mm rattif Beum Prqp *

up

for

your amusement.

ft

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a second-year

who .makes

visit

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.


M onday

,

November 23, 2009

NEWS SPOKE

Page 11

Conestoga College offers reincarnation course By LISA BUCHER

the day discussing the theories

Do you have

a fear with no logical present life explanation?

Or maybe you wonder things happen to

why bad

good people? Perhaps your present life struggles can be explained by exploring your past lives in Reincarnation - Who Where You?, a one-day course offered College’s

by

Conestoga

continuing education on Nov. 28 from 10 a.m to 4 p.m. The course is taught by

Canada

s top radio psychic Valkos, who has been teaching at the college for around 19 years. Valkos said he went

Dan

through PHOTO BY SARAH MACINTOSH c Peter Findlay, a world-class woodcarver, was a guest speaker at Conestoga on Nov. 9. He was given a gift from the woodworking S club, The Three Legged Stool. a

..

.

an

evolutionary

process when he got involved with the field of paranormal in 1969 as a skeptic. He is now a firm believer that

everyone has unlimited psy-

Carving a path for Conootoga'0

chic potential, it’s just a matter of tapping into those abilities.

The workshop spends half

Bv SARAH MACINTOSH

Peter Findlay has made countless pieces that you would have a hard time believing were actually made out of wood. “I

was born with sawdust

in

my

blood,” said Findlay, the guest speaker at a Nov. 9

seminar and demonstration hosted by the Conestoga

woodworking club, The Three Legged Stool. The club brings in guest College

speakers to provide knowledge to the members on how to create a variety of different

things and teach them new ideas. Findlay, a world-class woodcarver, did just that. Many students gathered to

hsten to Findlay and ask him about his knowledge, experience and inspirations. He began woodworking at age 10. Over the years he’s taught workshops for children, night courses and woodworking classes at Conestoga College. From chip carving, relief carving and wood turning to

and reconstruction, Findlay knows his woodwork-

sculpting

“We must risk going too how far we can

goes for a type of response

where he has people wondering how he did it. He believes the most important skill is the ability to be able to visualize where you are going.

However, he also said problem solving and experience are important as well. Findlay’s hero is Leonardo da Vinci. He said you won’t get wealthy by doing something everyone else does; you have to do something original. You have to use your time wisely and be creative. ‘You make mistakes to see how far you can go and then you don’t make the same mistakes,” said Findlay.

Many

students admired his

far,

go,”

risk.

Findlay said. He told students how he always takes a risk. If something seems impossible

&

work and Findlay’s words will help inspire them to take that

ing.

just to see

he finds a way to get around it and make it work. He’s made projects such as curved candlesticks, a dancing doll, miniature woodpicture animals, carved frames and a 1931 Chrysler Imperial that’s 52 inches long. As you can imagine, he needs a lot of tools to create an unbelievthese pieces able 1,025 tools to be exact. When creating things he

“Findlay’s a god to us,” said Hall, a second-year woodworking student.

carnation and the other half

of fire

burnt at the stake.

‘You are now the sum total you have seen, felt and experienced in all of your prior lifetimes,” said of everything

said Valkos, “I was a in the British Army. I was on an island in the South Pacific and I was life,

lieutenant

Valkos.

For more information on the which costs $80, call the Conestoga College continuing education general interest and leisure department at

machine

gunned by the Japanese. I was (also) a black the pre-U.S.

course,

Civil

War. I died in the swamps by snake bite and I was (also) a

519-748-5220, ext. 2200. You

prairie farmer’s wife, like in Little House on the Prairie, although I didn’t have a hus-

can register through continuing education online through the student portal, in person at the Doon campus’s Registrar’s Office during regular business hours, by mail or by fax 519-895-1085. Registration forms can also be put in drop boxes located at the Waterloo campus, 108

band as good looking as Michael Landon.” So why do bad things happen to good people? Valkos says sometimes it’s because you’re paying off a karmatic debt from another lifetime, a topic he will discuss in his

University

course.

As

for fears,

sometimes

Ave.

there is no logical present life explanation the fear could be

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died

drowned or if you are terrified you may have been

a sort of meditation, to have the students remember three of their past lives. In my most recent past sis,

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in a past life. If you have a fear of water perhaps you

Valkos uses regressive hypno-

THY

if Sir

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traced back to

behind karma and rein-

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>


Monday, November 23, 2009

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