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Page 6

ON DAY. OCTOBER

5.

puppy love Organization gives

rescue animals a second chance.

LEARNING NEWSROOM FOR JOURNALISM STUDENTS

CONESTOGA

2009

Adorable

Page 11

wMiKKusS

nTaSritffii

PHOTO BY STACEY FALCONER Conestoga students and their friends danced the night away at CSI’s

pub night of the year. For more Toga Party pictures, see Page

first official

7.

CSI toga party rocks the Sanctuary By DANE BRASON

On

Sept.

Conestoga

24,

Students Inc. transformed the Sanctuary into a site from ancient Rome, at Toga Party.

its

annual

As students streamed

in,

each dressed in a toga, the atmosphere became more and more electric. With the music blasting and people dancing,

quickly,” said

event

Tera Herriot, the

co-ordinator

Conestoga

Students

for

Inc.

The toga party is one of CSI’s most popular events of the year and is the first of many pub nights at the college. This

260,000-square-foot campus in Cambridge Sept. 25.

A groundbreaking ceremony was held that day with Cambridge

MP

Gary

Goodyear, minister of state for science and technology, among the many federal, provincial

and

local leaders

in attendance.

The new campus will be located

directly

across Highway 401 from the Doon campus.

The

college

purchased 54

hectares of land from the City of Cambridge in October 2008, for $5.7 million.

We

are very proud to have

former student changing some of

the pub nights compared to

year they gave away a New Year’s Eve trip for two to Montreal, courtesy of

If the Toga Party is a sign of the changes, then Conestoga students are in for a great year

really well,

layout.”

Breakaway Tours.

of

it

sold out really

community

Cambridge,” Conestoga College officially construction of a

a

am

everyone in the room was having a good time. “Yes, I think it went over

a

began

I

“Everyone, I believe, had a really good time, now that the Sanctuary has a overall impressive atmosphere and

Cambridge campus construction By CHRIS BATT

“Being myself,

college

said

in

Doug

munications

for

through

safety,

The

Additionally, house the

will

Institute

Food Processing Technology, which will focus on

budget.

management.

“The idea that we could attain federal funds was a huge breakthrough,” said

are the second largest engine in the Craig said province,” Richardson, president of Grand River Foods. “It’s crit-

Tibbits, president of Conestoga College. “It could only happen with a lot of

partnerships.”

The new campus

will

house

the School of Engineering and Information Technology,

which focuses on training in robotics, manufacturing renewable energy, telecom-

begins

the campus

new

Knowledge Program and Ontario’s 2009

John

officially

events.

and informa-

training in food process automation, electrical systems, refrigeration technology and plant

the federal Infrastructure

pub

tion technology.

mayor of Cambridge. college will receive a total of $72 million from both federal and provincial levels of government, Craig,

last year,” said Herriot.

skills

“We

economic

that we have highly trained people on our processing floor.” With the construction of

ical

new campus, Conestoga College will now have six

this

campuses

located southern Ontario.

across

Local officials broke ground for Conestoga’s new Cambridge campus on Sept. 25, which will be built on 54 hectares of land across

Highway 401. Participating were, from left, Doug Craig, mayor of Cambridge; Ken Seiling, Waterloo regional chair; Leeanna Pandergast, MPP Kitchener-Conestoga; Gary Goodyear, minister of

and technology; John Tibbits, president of Conestoga and Sheena Sonser, president of Conestoga Students Inc.

state for science College;


NEWS

SPOKE

Page 2

Monday, October 5, 2009

Now deep thoughts ...

with Conestoga College

Random If

questions answered by

random students

you were stranded on a desert

island

and could only take one book,

one CD and one movie, what would they be? “New Moon by Stephanie Meyer. Colbie CaillatBreakthrough. Love You Man.” I

Lisa Phillips, first-year

visual

merchandising

PHOTO BY SARAH MACINTOSH Kyle Boland, a first-year general arts

getting things

done ahead

and science student

at Conestoga, stays on top of his studies by

of time.

“A dictionary.

Michael Jackson

Beat

-

It.

Getting the hang of things

Lord of the Rings.”

Russell Zhang, first-year

recreation

Students adjusting to college

and

life

leisure

By SARAH MACINTOSH “The Host by Stephanie Meyer. A random mix CD with everything from country to techno. The Parent Trap.”

Laura Vansickle, second-year

accounting

day of attending college is like the first day of attending high school. Students don’t know what to expect and they don’t know where their classes are. Two big fears are getting lost and meeting new people. Yet first

everyone’s in the

same

situa-

tion.

I’m ultimately enjoying

“A personal journal to write

The

in.

being a student again.

Anything Leona Lewis. Seven Pounds.”

Whitney

-

Kathryn Koch

Bell,

and science, has adapted to the college life reasonably well in the past few weeks. “The major changes for me were getting adjusted to the new schedules and learning-

how Koch

Derek Mashinter, a firstyear student in construction engineering, is enjoying the

nursing

said.

After two weeks students

A memory

stick with U2,

Bowie and Hendrix. The Professional.”

Cameron Lourenco, third-year

management studies

around

The major change

was going from a

for

me

full-time

job back to the student

- Kyle

life.

Boland

“I’m ultimately enjoying being a student again,” said Koch.

You are invited to

start of his college experience.

“The Bible.

time,”

able with finding their way and getting more acquainted with the school. They are meeting people in class and are atartin^r to aao familiar faces in hallways.

There are also many services and activities around school to get students involved and introduce them to new people. “I live in residence and I really get along with my roommate. She introduced me to a few people, I met some people in class and I’m also trying to get involved with more volunteer services within the Conestoga campus,”

Koch

fourth-year

my

to manage said.

have become more comfort-

“The biggest change for me would be the workload difference since it’s a lot more than in high school and also living on my own, it’s like a new lifestyle,” Mashinter said. Kyle Boland, a first-year student in general arts and science, took roughly two years off after high school before coming to Conestoga

Femfest

2009

Thursday, November I

College.

“The Sun Also Rises by Earnest Hemingway.

was going from

Sonata Arctica Dark Knight.”

back to the student Boland said.

-

Unia.

David Agotesku, fourth-year

computer programmer analyst

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!

“The major change

for

me

a full-time job life,”

Students who move out on own also experience changes unrelated to school. Most have to get used to cooking, laundry and time management. Kathryn Koch, a first-year student taking general arts

at the

Schwaben (lub

in

Kitchener

their

This fundraiser

is ii

of fret pampering

celebration of

women. Come

and do some shopping

in

our

for

on evening

silent auction.

Check out wwwjosrwr.org for ticket and event

details.


Monday, October

5,

NEWS

2009

SPOKE

Page 3

Get Involved! By NICOLE FRANK

outside organizations

Start the day off right and get involved. On Sept. 24, Conestoga College hosted its annual Get which at Involved Fair,

life

munity displayed ways

fun.

for

Commons, Conestoga multicultural club, the recreation centre

and

Student

Life.

Community

PHOTO BY NICOLE FRANK Respect Campaign at Conestoga hands out information to students. Representatives from the Respect Campaign

A member

of the

were among over 40 school clubs and outside organizations Get Involved Fair on Sept. 24.

at the

organizations also set up tables, including Children and Family Services of Waterloo Region and the YMCA. with involved Getting Conestoga College or with

building and architect contracts By JANELLE SCHEIFELE 12.000-

build up to square feet.

The board of governors approved two contracts in their meeting on Sept. 21.

large shops for programs such as welding and industrial

The first granted the building contract for the new roofing square-foot the at training centre

two-storey research labs, multiple 800to 1,000-square-foot classrooms, as well as temporary

to campus Waterloo Cambridge-based Collaborate

food services, library and student services facilities. The most esthetic areas of the building will be viewed from the front, with the less visually appealing areas facing the parking lots at the back.

Structures Ltd.

The

second

awarded

a $l-million contract to Stantec Architecture Ltd., to design the new 75,000-square-foot addition to the E-wing of the Doon campus for health and 260.000life sciences.

Also at the meeting, Kevin Mullan, vice-president of corporate services, presented architectural drawings for the new Cambridge campus. The first phase will be square feet, with the college hoping to eventually

Conestoga, said

it is

so

at

much

“It is a great way to meet students who are in different programs.” Cressman said volunteering at Conestoga College also helps students learn leadership skills. The multicultural club is one group that would be great

to join.

The

of people

college is

from

all

made up over the

world and it is a wonderful opportunity for students to

meet these people and learn from one another. Charlotte Heath is a member of the multicultural club and she said that this year their main focus is to “fill the gap.”

“We want to bring international and local students together,” Heath said. Children’s Family and Services of Waterloo Region also needs help from students, specifically with mentoring, driving children to appointments and helping in the office. If you missed the fair it is not too late to get involved. Visit the Student Life Centre or contact Ryan Connell, stu-

dent

life

programmer, at

ext.

2373.

of governors have fun

despite dealing with serious issues

one-million-

phase

first

programmer

Members of board

Board of governors approves

The

tunity to learn new skills. Elissa Cressman, a student

groups and organizations from the school and the comstudents to get involved. Those who participated Learning the included

makes

student life more fun and Volunteering meaningful. looks great on a resume and also gives students the oppor-

will

By JANELLE SCHEIFELE

house

maintenance,

The natural areas along Fountain Street will be left alone, and the campus will be very transit friendly. “We are not going to change any of the natural vegetation along Fountain Street,” said Mullan. A groundbreaking event took place on Sept. 25.

Passage of time should reduce

fruit

and drinking tea and

coffee.

Members of the Conestoga College board of governors are not a stuffy or formal bunch, but rather welcoming and really quite funny. The board of governors meets monthly and is made up of outside community members, college staff and the president. They are responsible for providing leadership and establishing the goals, objectives and direction of the institution. Members review and approve the school budget, business plan, annual and financial reports, and also approve any contracts that the school enters into. The first meeting of the year was held Sept. 21, and

members greeted one another with first names and shared stories about their summer while snacking on sandwiches, squares and

members, new Three Martha Gedrge, Helen Jowett and Craig Richardson, were introduced and immediately

made

welcome. “These are very strategic (member) appointments that will help us move forward,” said Conestoga College president John Tibbits. These new members bring knowledge and experience in the construction, commerce and food processing industries. These are areas that Conestoga is currently lookto feel

president of Arjune and Engineering Manufacturing Inc. Arjune lightened the atmosphere when he asked if the

and

trees

in

the

architectural

drawings projecting the new

campus

Cambridge

were

already in place. He also delivered a very unusual chair’s report about his golf

game

earlier that day. “That’s probably one of the most exciting chair reports,” said Tibbits. The board of governors meet again on Oct. 26 at 5:30

p.m.

ing to expand and offer future

programs of study. Although the subject matter requiring serious, approval of new programs

was

and lucrative building projects, the atmosphere was often interrupted with laughter, especially with joking from the new chair, Dave

Arjune, a Conestoga graduate

CLASSIFIEDS Volunteers Needed Volunteer with a child at their school

improve

and help

their self-

esteem and

confi-

dence. 1-3 hours a week com-

major paridng lot problems

mitment. By JANELLE SCHEIFELE First-year enrolment is up over 21 per cent which has translated into major parking problems, board of governor members were told at a

meeting. College officials expected the problems to be sorted out by Sept. 25, when timetable scheduling kicked in and passes were Sept.

21

sorted out.

been approved. Conestoga was awarded $3.3 million through the fedgovernment’s eral Adjustment Community

Fund

to

Canadian Mental

Call

Health

744-7645 X314

develop a campus

with studies in the power cluster, such as power line

The

technicians and forklift train-

needs volunteers

be about 57 programs offered and the school already has a “cherry picking” truck to be used for

provide confidential,

ing.

There

will

During the meeting, members received breaking news

studies.

that the land site for the new Ingersoll campus, near the CAMI plant, had just

are currently only available Cambrian College in at

Courses of study in this area

Sudbury.

Distress Centre to

supportive listening on

our Crisis PHOTO BY JANELLE SCHEIFELE Tessa Dueck takes a break from helping students

at the informa-

desk in the LRC. First-year enrolment is up over 21 per cent, which Dueck says means more hustle and bustle in the library.

tion

lines.

&

Distress

Complete

training

provided. Call

300

519 744-7645 x


Page 4

COMMENTARY

SPOKE

GRT falls By GILLIAN

Monday, October

5,

2009

short

WEBBER

Parking at the Doon campus has been the subject of since the beginning of school and so far the discussion has overlooked what might be one of the most effective ways to reduce the number of vehi-

much grumbling

cles:

public transit.

Perhaps the reason why no one

is proposing this as a partial solution is simply that the bus routes to the

secluded main campus are not good enough to be a valid option for most students. A student travelling to Doon campus from Waterloo on Grand River Transit’s iXpress and 110 Express routes (advertised as the fastest routes available) still has a journey of close to an hour and a half, assuming there is no wait time between transferring from one bus to the other. Many of these students also take a third bus just to meet up with the iXpress route, pushing their commute time to around two hours. It is not hard to imagine why many of these students would rather pay to own a car than leave the house at 6 a.m. to arrive at school for an 8 a.m. class. Does it not seem strange that it is faster to drive to Fanshawe College in London or take a Greyhound bus

Taking a bus to Conestoga College shouldn't take two hours

Impatient drivers cause chaos

Toronto than it is to bus from Waterloo to Doon? ride for students from Kitchener may not be as lengthy, but there are still major flaws in the 10 and 110 routes connecting Fairview Mall to the college. Too few of the buses on these routes arrive at times that are not excessively early, but still allow students enough time to get to their classes. Due to the high demand for a seat on these buses, operators are often forced to drive past waiting students because the bus is already full. Some improvement was made last year when new routes were introduced to shuttle passengers from Cambridge to Doon. Unfortunately, students from the north side of Highway 401 have continued to be neglected. Grand River Transit should implement a route for Conestoga College similar to the many “school special” routes that cater to several of the individual high schools throughout Waterloo Region. A bus that ran from Conestoga Mall, made stops at a few transit hub areas and then arrived at the college in time for morning classes might make more students leave their cars at home. Conestoga has a bright future ahead with a new campus and a larger student population. We must also try to make our school’s future greener by urging Grand River Transit to improve its routes to and from our campus. to

The

So, I’m driving down Highway 8 coming to school,

and I’m approaching a merging lane to my right. Even though I’m leaving lots of space in front of me for the other drivers to merge safely, I’m preparing for the inevitable.

Sure enough, after I’ve driven to the end of the lane, a self-centred and clueless driver pulls up alongside of me at the last minute, expecting me to move over. Little does he know, I’m more likely to shove him off the end of the road than let

him push

The views herein represent the position of the newspa-

lished

editor. Letters

than

500 words.

Spoke reserves the

should be

right to

signed and include the

edit any letter

name and telephone

for publication.

number of the

Address correspon-

Writers

will

writer.

dence

be contact-

The

ed for verification.

No unsigned

letters will

Doon

be

published. Letters should be no longer

in front of

an

article titled

McGuinty

to:

Editor,

est mistake?

Spoke, 299

I have no problem with others going a bit over the speed limit. But regardless of how

Valley Dr.,

Room 1C30, N2G 4M4

says.”

Well duh. That’s an understatement. I’m not a perfect driver. I go 10 to 20 km/h over the limit on highways. I’ve run a stop sign and a red light before. But where do you draw the line between being ignorant and making an hon-

welcome

letters to the

way

“Reckless driving must be stopped by drivers themselves,

Spoke welcomes

his

everyone else to shave a few seconds off his trip. On June 19, 2007, the Waterloo Region Record pub-

per, not necessarily the author.

Letters are

while heading south on Martin Grove Road past Steeles Avenue in Toronto on July 16. What would possess anybody to go that fast? They need to slow down so Mario Andretti can actually pass them.

Kitchener, Ont.,

fast you’re going,

you need

to

give the other drivers the

space they deserve. You’ll also see women doing their makeup and hair in the rearview mirror. Here’s a

message queens:

for these

prom

Makeup and

can wait!

I

don’t care

driver could

body.

It

be any-

could be your

hair

teacher, or the student

if

you’re going to be late, I don’t want to get hit. Kudos to the car companies who have gotten smart and put hands-free devices in the cars. This eliminates the

sitting next to you.

On March

handset, making it more like a conversation than a call. The hand-held device just had too big of a dark side. Put away your lightsabre Mr. Skywalker, this has nothing to do with you. A bad driver could be anybody. It could be your teacher. It could be the student sitting next to you. But don’t worry, they’re not hiding in wait for you. They generally make their presence known by doing something stupid. Take these two for

Two

drivers were nabbed doing speeds of 200 km/h through a 50 km/h zone instance:

A bad

3,

a

man was

caught by OPP allegedly doing 250 km/h in an Infinity G35. That was said to have set a new OPP record for the highest speed anybody has ever been caught doing. So if you want to go from Toronto to London in 45 minutes, go as fast as the G35. If you want to live and keep everyone else safe, get your hands on the wheel, your phone out of your ear, lipstick away from your face and the pedal off the floor. The road belongs to the people of

Ontario. If you

want

to drive

your driveway, go ahead, make your day, but don’t make mine.

like that in

SPOKE IS

PUBLISHED AND PRODUCED WEEKLY BY THE JOURNALISM STUDENTS OF

Editor: Greg Cowan Advertising Managers:

Production Managers: Sarah Chris Batt and

Dane

Brason

Spoke Online

Editors: Alex Cooke and Janelle

Scheifele

The views and opinions expressed

0NEST0GA COLLEGE

Stacey Falconer and Freeman Carter

Phone: 519-748-5220, ext 3691, 3692, 3693,

Bucher, Mitch Muir and Nicole Frank.

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser:

3694

Circulation Manager: Nick Dasko

Christina Jonas

E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

Photo Editors: Heather Muir, Gillian

in this

C

newspaper do not necessarily

Macintosh, Lisa

Nicole Hannusch,

Webber, Michelle Sommer, Justine

reflect the views of

subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a

Reist,

Conestoga College. Spoke

MS Word file would

be

helpful. Letters

shall not

Spoke’s address

is

Kitchener, Ontario,

be

liable for

must not contain any

299 Doon Valley N2G 4M4.

Dr.,

any damages arising out of errors

libellous statements.

Room 1C30,

in

Fax:

519-748-3534

Website: www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

advertising beyond the

amount paid

for the space. Letters to the editor are


NEWS

Monday, October 5, 2009

SPOKE

Conestoga’s CJIQ not just

Page 5

Demonstrating for peace gram

By ALEX COOKE

in 1981.

Another event that was

Imagine a world without

a college radio station

violence.

This is the inspiration Roger directors behind Albrecht and his brother Matt Albrecht. The brothers, both from Kitchener, are also the driving force behind a

By ALEX COOKE

For eight years Conestoga College’s

own

local non-violence festival.

radio station,

Sept. 21

CJIQ, has been broadcasting from the Doon campus. Not only does the station reach from Mount Forest, it is also a second-year radio broadcast students hungry to get on the airwaves. Mike Thurnell, recently appointed program director

for

and co-ordinator

Bureau for Broadcast Measuring (BBM). the

a research agency BBM whose membership includes radio stations, television stations and advertisers across is

PHOTO BY ALEX COOKE Second-year radio broadcast students, Kate Cardy and Jeremy Ross, discuss the week’s classes in one of three radio studios at Conestoga College.

Carrie Humphries volunteers every Friday night, from 7-9, hosting the indie rock

invasion show (I.R.I.S). She first got a taste of broadcasting when she was in her first year of the broadcast radio and television program in 2002. Although she didn’t have the opportunity to finish the second and third years of the program, she did remain working at her co-op with

Rogers Television.

amazing,” was Humphries said. Humphries enjoys being a “It

part of CJIQ, the largest

col-

lege station in Canada. The station is dedicated to excellent programming, and is

earning a reputation for being a breeding ground for future radio personalities. “It’s a privilege to be includfamily this in ed said broadcasters,” of Humphries. “CJIQ is well-

tallying.

part of the team.”

now

over 15,000 every week, triphng over the last couple of years,” Thurnell said with a

“There are

CJIQ

listeners

proud smile. ‘We even get feedback from as far

away

as Erie, Penn.”

located

and form a human

known and I

feel special

being

Monday through Friday

the rock influenced, featuring such groups as Kings of Leon, Three Doors Down and Nirvana. On the weekends, however, there are shows such as Rhythmic

programming

is

Saturdays, featuring reggae, hip hop and club music. Sunday starts with multicultural shows, featuring Polish, Serbian and Spanish music. Sunday afternoons are lighter and Stage, On with Thurnell’s own Songs From a Quiet Place, featuring anything from Celtic to light jazz and even classical music. Although some of the shows do stream to the Internet, the station as a whole does not. The station is regulated by SOCAN, the society of composers, authors and music publishers of Canada, which collects licence fees

and

royal-

musicians played. “It would be nice if the stathe (to streamed tion Internet) but it will cost money for the royalties,” Thurnell said. Jeremy Ross, a second-year student in the radio broadcast program, is considering extra optional courses such as sales available to second-year students. He also liked the opportunity to meet Dave

ties for the

The demonstrators used and tambourines drums, chanted a tribal beat that slowly got faster and faster,

By JUSTINE REIST

made available on the LRC webpage to students who

The school year has started and tests are coming your

have completed at least two

to

find the

textbooks and the proper notes and to figure out the best way to study. But, do we all need to study the same correct

way? David Smiderle and Trish Green, full-time instructors in the business department,

want

to find out.

Starting today, a link will be

semesters in a business or hospitality program. “We want to centre the survey for now and then hopefully we can make it available to said programs,” other Smiderle. The survey focuses on students’ study habits when preparing for tests and

Smiderle hopes

exams. narrow down the best study to

habits for different types of

Mountains

Andes

in

Argentina. For the first time in world history, marchers across the globe will circle the planet. At the same time organizers will have activities in over 100 countries, such as exhibits, concerts and social, athletic, and educational cultural events to raise awareness for the need for peace. “This (march around the world) has never been done before,”

The

Roger

said.

while their volunteer photographer, Colin Yeardly, was hoisted into the air on a fire truck ladder to take a picture. While precariously perched atop the swaying ladder, Yeardly had a moment of

step in getting involved with the group is to non-violence at endorse

panic.

ties as the

“There was a second when I thought it wouldn’t descend

dow n,” Yeardly said with a smile. Operating on a 100 per cent volunteer basis, the Albrechts have a group that meets at back

r

the Queen Street Commons Cafe every Tuesday at 7 p.m. to discuss their five yearly events to promote non-violent strategies.

“We promote a rejection of violence in all forms,” said Roger, a Conestoga College graduate himself.

He graduated from lege’s

film

the

col-

production pro-

first

www.worldmarch.ca. Thousands have added their names to the endorsement including such celebriDalai Lama, Lou Reed, Yoko Ono and David Suzuki. The second step, said Roger, is to get involved, help organize events and spread aware-

list,

your

ness

to friends.

family

and

many people come to me me what should be done,” Roger said. “My plate “So

and

tell

you think something should be done, then, you know, do it.” For more information on how to join the march, or any other non-violence demonis full, if

strations,

visit

www.the-

worldmarch.org.

Schneider, program director

Kool FM and KFUN. CJIQ is on air all week at 88.3 FM. Staff can be contact-

A small group

ed at www.cjiq.fm.

ing a peace sign with their bodies at Victoria Park.

for

of

PHOTO BY ALEX COOKE peace demonstrators chant and drum while mak-

Business and hospitality program students asked to

way again. You scramble

in

peace sign.

Canada. They measure ratand feedback with thousands of volunteers keeping a paper diary of their listening habits and mailing their results back to the agency for

ings

Park,

peace,

tion, said all

radio industry. “We have relevant courses, in an interactive atmosphere,” Rock said in between on-air segments at the station. In fact, it’s during weekdays when the station receives its highest ratings, according to

Victoria

At 7 p.m., 35 to 40 people gathered in front of the clock tower to demonstrate for

of the sta-

second-year students are involved in the daily running of CJIQ. “The station serves as a lab for the students, they rotate through all the different positions here,” Thurnell said. George Rock, a second-year radio broadcast student, was most impressed with the preparation students received in courses such as broadcast operations, writing, announcing and programming, from teachers who work in the

their third in

demonstration

downtown Kitchener, which was also the International Day of Peace.

Ont. to Port Dover,

classroom

marked

annual

held recently was the world march for peace and non-violence that began Oct. 2, Gandhi’s birthday. The march wraps up on Jan. 2, 2010. The march started in Wellington, New Zealand, and will end at the foot of the

students. “We are interested if those who do well on exams use all, some or none of the best practices as identified by teachers, learning and library experts,” said Smiderle. Green said, “Nobody studies

the same. What might be good for one student might not work for another.” “There are a lot of benefits said research,” the to Smiderle. “Including giving us, instructors, better insight as to what we should or

fill

out survey

should not be encouraging our students to do in order to prepare for exams. Example, do we really need to use a

really help other students.”

textbook?”

will

The Research Ethics Board, which

is

new

to the college,

be reviewing the survey in order to maintain that none of the students are at risk of being identified based on their information or answers to the questions. ‘We will be relying on honesty here,” said Smiderle. “This has the potential to will

The survey, which takes approximately 10 to 15 minutes, has 18 questions and run until Oct.

30.

After filling out the survey you will be able to fill out a ballot

win one of including an

to

many

iPod Touch, Food Services gift certificates or a bookstore gift prizes

certificate.

“This is something new for the college,” said Smiderle. “We’re really excited to be doing it.”


Page 6

*

ENTERTAINMENT

SPOKE

Monday, October 5, 2009

Choose your side The Nerdy Gamer reviews: Marvel Ultimate Alliance 2 omic books and video games. 1999’s atrocity simply as known Superman 64 seemed to prove that those two nerdy pastimes could never mix. Five years later, a beacon of light shone from the abyss of comic book video games;

C

Finally, Spider-Man 2. gamers could play as a super-

hero the way they wanted. Wall-crawl your way toward your next boss fight with an

Spider-Man villain, or some time webswinging around New York,

iconic

just

kill

stopping petty crimes. It took another five years before we would get not one, but two superhero games that did justice to their nameOrigins: X-Men sakes. Wolverine let Wolverine do what he does best, and what he does isn’t very nice. But it was certainly nice-looking.

Dismembering falling

soldiers, free-

from helicopters

(after

them in mid-air of and watching your

destroying course),

organs grow back after getting shot at point-blank all felt very Wolverine-like.

Batman: Arkham Asylum came out in late August to rave reviews. Stealth and combat actually work together, as you the Joker’s plans yet again. If you are a Batman fan, you owe it to yourself to at least try the demo of it. It IS actually as good as they say. Believe the hype. This ut I digress. foil

B

review is for Marvel Ultimate Alliance 2. Could the gaming industry really give us three fantastic superhero games in such a short time span? To try and keep the comic book nerd separate from the video gamer, let’s give the nerd his own style ( like Deadpool and his brain).

The game

you off conmore iconic Marvel characters; Captain America, Iron Man, SpiderMan and Wolverine. Just like starts

trolling four of the

the comics,

Wolverine

is

in

everything. After a brief tutorial level, you get the option to choose between most of the 24 characters (25 if you preordered from EB Games), and customize your team. But most of the “good” characters are locked out, and for good rea-

Jean Grey, Green Goblin and the Hulk are all unlocked near the end of the son. Thor,

game, which at least forces you to try out some of the less powerful characters first.

By the end of the game, I found myself with three characters always making the cut for the four-man roster; Thor, Green Goblin and Deadpool. As the God of Thunder, Thor lays the beatdown with his mighty hammer Mjolnir, easily defeating most enemies, and even bosses in a matter of seconds. Green Goblin is a speed gamer’s dream come true. Once he hops onto his glider, the bad guys might as well just lie down and fake their deaths, since he rains

machine gun

fire from above zipping around the screen (although there is a

while

nice sense of satisfaction

when

you scatter pumpkin bombs around you). Deadpool (or The Merc with a Mouth for us comic book fans); for those of you who

him in the newest Wolverine movie (before they completely butchered him near the end of the film, but let’s not start that discussion right now), Deadpool is what didn’t catch

would happen if Peter Parker was the Punisher, and knew that he was a comic book character. Some of the best lines in this game come out of his mouth, especially when he starts talking to the player. He is well aware that he is in a video game, even going so far as to argue with one of the

game developers during

the

ending credits. Sadly, once you realize that this is just another “hack and slash” game, even playing as your favourite group of Marvel characters can’t save it from becoming a bore. Find the attack that works best for any given hero, and mash said button.

and you

Rinse,

INTERNET GRAPHICS

Marvel Ultimate Alliance focuses on the Civil War storyline, where you must choose to either support the Superhuman Registration Act with Iron Man, or rebel against it with Captain America.

have a couple of nights to it is rental worthy for sure. Rating: 2.5 out of 7 Hold up, hold up. That rating is way too low. In what other game can you team Spider-Man up with Venom, Green Goblin and, umm, the Juggernaut? That’s what I Playing as the thought. Juggernaut also causes an urge to yell out “Don’t you

just

kill,

know who

the final boss without too

much work. Adding some other players only causes the screen to get more crowded, and you have to do less (one of my friends actually fell asleep while playing, and we couldn’t tell until he kept running into a wall). If you are a fan of the hack and slash style of game, or

am?

I’m

the

NOT

get old while playdoes ing at one in the morning. If

you know the difference

between a Skrull and a Kree, can rattle off more than 10 XMen in 30 seconds, or just want to spend time buttonmashing your way through hordes of bad guys as your

Deadpool, the Merc with the Mouth, and Thor, God of Thunder,

become

will

team as soon as they are unlocked, but for different reasons. Thor can vanquish most foes in one swing, while Deadpool just runs his mouth at everyone, including the player. staples of any

favourite Marvel character, this game is for you. Not as Wolverine or strong as Batman, but still worth your time. Rating: 5.5 out of 7

OOO

repeat,

will find yourself at

I

Juggernaut b****!” as you clear out a whole room of bad guys with one body slam. This

Freeman Carter

is a selfprofessed nerd first, and a second-year print journalism student second, who is always looking for some-

one

to talk nerdy with. If there is a game you want to see reviewed, or you just

want to complain about something he said, send him an email at fcartercc@conestogac.on.ca

Green Goblin, the sometimes Spider-Man foe (and new leader of H.A.M.M.E.R.), destroys anything and everything in his way as he flies around on his Goblin Glider.


STUDENT LIFE

Monday, October 5, 2009

SPOKE

moh

•hsimz

Conestoga students and guests danced the night away at the annual Toga Party. It was held in the Sanctuary by Conestoga Students Inc. on

Sept. 24.

Togas were worn in every colour imaginable and students did not

fail to

get creative.

PHOTOS BY STACEY FALCONER

FALL IS HERE

At

IN

EVERY FORM AND COLOUR

left: Fall is

making

its first

appearance in the form of a colchicum. The cooler temperatures are producing bright

colours on the

autumn bloom-

ing flowers.

PHOTO BY MICHELLE SOMMER

right: The summer is over and the sun is disappearing earlier. With less sun in our presence, winter is just around

At

the corner.

PHOTO BY JUSTINE REIST

Page 7


NEWS

SPOKE

Page 8

Monday, October 5, 2009

Word on the Street defies foul

weather

By NICK PASKO

Classroom in Guelph, started by Stewart 10 years ago.

Jennifer Stewart was one of the many vendors at Kitchener’s Word on the Street festival who was carefully watching the sky all

After three years of teaching, she felt there was a need to get “this medium into the hands of young readers.”

day on Sept. 27. one-day annual The national book and magazine family festival celebrates literacy and the written arts. It was held in Victoria Park in Kitchener, as well as in and Toronto Halifax,

Vancouver.

Thousands

ON-CAMPUS CHIROPRACTOR Covered by CSI Health Plan

Many children took home volumes of what were once know as “funny

HEALTH SERVICES

books.

748-5220

of readers of all ages flocked to

the festival, which featured various vendors as well as tents where graphic novel-

and traditional novelists Margaret readings. did Atwood did a reading in a related event the day before at the Kitchener Public ists

Library. Stewart’s booth

was devot-

ed to comic books and graphic all of which were aimed at younger readers. She was the only vendor who appealed to them with this

novels,

particular genre.

Stewart runs a business the in Comics

called

Ext.

3679

She describes the current relationship between educators and graphic novels as an “if you build it they will come, situation.” As she covered and uncovered her wares with plastic due to the intermittent showers, many children took home volumes of what were once known as “funny books.” Chris Johnson, 7, was one happy customer, who was overjoyed to have the final book in the Bone series to add

*

t’tlCH'Ti

.

tnv©\*

to his bookshelf.

felpout with organizing our Annual Unite) Kay Day and join us in planning some grea fundraising events to support

wjL

the United Way!

BHlop your leadership skills and build ew ones! Wkrn more about how our Tri-City pmmunitiesare supported through the tip of the United Way! Build your

communication, organization

nd networking l/lake

skills!

new friendships and hauta blast!

e Infoerajti

PHOTO BY NICK DASKO in Victoria Park on Street the Word on at shops The Johnson family Sept. 27. The annual book festival has been going on for more than two decades

and Vancouver.

in cities

including Kitchener, Halifax, Toronto

ktionf^n

z))))

Unibed Way


NEWS

Monday, October 5, 2009

Making sense By ALEX COOKE

What does to

hospitality

mean

you?

Is

it

inviting

someone

to

your home, and then placing conditions

and

them? Come

restrictions

on

for dinner,

but

don’t use the good china

and

you have to leave by

six.

This conditional hospitality enters our everyday lives without us even knowing it. That is why Dr. Mark Zlomislic, who teaches courses such as quest for meaning, postmodto introduction

ernism and principals of ethical reasoning, wrote his book Jacques Derrida’s Aporetic

Ethics in 2007. Derrida, the deconstruction,

founder of was born in 1930 and passed away in 2004, publishing 90 books in his career. According to the Stanford encyclopedia of philosophy website

(www.plato.stanford.edu), deconstruction is an attempt to re-conceive the difference

that divides self-reflection, prevent the worst violence and render justice. Zlomislic elaborated adding that deconstruction deals with the singularity of each person in This their uniqueness.

uniqueness can’t be controlled or diminished by an

SPOKE

of philosophy

administrative structure. studied with Zlomislic 20th century Derrida, a French philosopher, at L’Ecole des Hautes Etudes (the School for higher learning) in Paris, France. Dr. David Goicoechea, who studied with Zlomislic at Brock University in St. Catharines, reviewed Zlomislic’s book and over a year organized a three-day international conference delving into the importance of

Wolves, Snakes and Rogues: Reading the Aporias of Sovereignty and Hospitality with Franciscans, Derrida and D.H. Lawrence. In lay-

and politics. The conference was held at Brock University and started

to live

ethics,

religion

Sept. 17.

keynote

Zlomislic gave the

address

titled

man’s terms his talk was on society’s need to change

what we

don’t like or under-

stand for our

own conven-

ience and profit. “I’m in an overwhelming position of having to say

something

important,”

Zlomislic admitted before his talk. “It’s

up

an honour

I’ll

have

to.”

Zlomislic first got the idea book while telling his son, six-year-old Noah, the

Aesop - The Dog and the Wolf. In the fable, a hungry wolf meets a healthy dog fable of

suggests to the wolf that

he come home with him, to get food and shelter. While walking together, the wolf noticed a rough patch on the dog’s neck, where his collar is

worn

at night.

When

the wolf learns that there is a price for the master’s hospitality, that he must be owned and tamed, he turns and tells the dog, “I refuse to

touch one bite of your fine swill. For even a treasure, that price would be too high for me.” The point of the fable, Zlomislic suggests in his book, and the other stories

and scripture he referred to

in

man is the how many wolves

his address, is that

but enslave their own species, and cannot respect his otherness and individuality?

wolf,

“Zlomislic not only gives an excellent introduction to

Derrida,

but

answers the critics and in

objections of several cases reveals misunderstandings of Derrida’s arguments,” Giocoechea said in his review in July 2008.

Another fable Zlomislic dismantles is The Wolf of Gubbio, in which St. Francis is asked by the villagers of Gubbio to save them from an evil

Conestoga! Join the Respect Student Committee! at

Develop your leadership skills and build new ones! Make a difference in your college community!

Great resume and

Make new

portfolio builder!

more by

Student Life Office! Room 2A101»2, Student Life Centre

visiting the

Located

in

Thank You

for

wolf,

hand

fed until

Being the Difference

StudOflt inspire

inform- tnvoM;

its

death.

Usually the story of the Wolf of Gubbio is regarded as an example of peacemaking, but Zlomislic suggests in his book that it is actually a story

with the villagers in peace, or as St. Francis suggested, it is “worthy of being hanged like a robber and a murderer.” This is the definition of con-

live ditional hospitality with us in peace, shed your identity, or be killed, or put

away from

CONESTOGA

resi-

tames the which from then on lived

The wolf was given the option of living

Pick up a Respect student committee application form or find out

wolf that devours

dents. St. Francis

of great violence.

friends by getting involved!

|

jrP

Mark

Zlomislic

for his

who

Be the Difference

Page 9

us.

Wolves have been used as a symbol for evil which need to

be tamed. However, when the wolf is finally tamed, is he still a wolf, or has his wolfishness been forced out of him? Snakes have also been used as a symbol of evil, as in the D.H. by Snake, story Lawrence. In the story, a farmer found a snake drinking from his well. The farmer’s first reaction is to kil l it, for that is his education. The farmer threw a stick and scared the snake back into his hole. Once the farmer realizes that he has denied a living creature the right to

drink water when thirsty, he himself revolts against lamenting, “And immediately I regretted it. I thought how paltry, how vulgar, what a mean act! I despised myself and the voices of my accursed

human

education.”

The rogue

is

one who cannot

accept the injustices of condihe is an tional sovereignty outlaw, an outcast and has no

home. “Derrida’s concern is to explore how sovereignty can

become democratic and

when

just,

contains non-demoZlomislic cratic features,” said in his address. Sovereignty allows a state to have control of borders, using force to protect itself and is under the idea that strength is power. The best example that Zlomislic can use, so we can understand the rogue to be, is the lone protester holding his grocery bags in front of a tank at Tiananmen Square. By that understanding, Zlomislic suggests that the sovereign state is the shepherd to the people, who are the lambs. The shepherd is also a man, who will slaughter and eat the lambs. it

What

it

all boils

down

to,

Derrida’s postmodernism, teachings, and the examples given by Zlomislic is, the world doesn’t have to be what

we

are told it is, it can be whatever we perceive it to be. If we want to change the world, we first need to change

how we

see

it.


-

Page 10

ENTERTAINMENT

SPOKE

Monday, October 5, 2009

Band Blast rocks on Libra

By NICOLE

September 23 October 22

HANNUSCH

-

On

Sept.

26,

Park

Pioneer

the Doon Community

You

become

a tremendous fan of “nerdcore” music. Resist will

the urge to get an tattoo.

A poster for your wall

would be

a

much

-

wiser use of

your funds.

Taurus April 20

“M.C. Chris”

Scorpio

May 20

October 23

November At some point

this

week you

get into a street fight with an off-

duty police

officer.

Consider pur-

chasing a fast car that is large enough that it can be comfortably

-

21

why

This weekend you will leam it is

a

bad idea

to

spend an entire

concert next to the speakers.

would be wise

to consult a hear-

used as sleeping quarters.

H=F

At some point

your couch has a wet spot that smells like

will find that

large

mispronounce the in

urine. Resist the urge to use

bleach or mess.

fire to

\

will

my presence.

the

Cancer June 22

have a song

-

that

pronounced “bay-gull,”

you

This

all

tires.

where you are going. Leave extra early for your appoint-

ments since you will be doing a lot of tire changes.

IST

be struck by

A seagull

Check

your shoulder

that

your insurance covers this. If you do not have insurance, get some. Remember that everyone exaggerates values insurance claims.

when

filing

a raincoat

Some

this

whenever

from Winnipeg, Quebec, Hamilton and Toronto. Unfortunately, the weather this year forced the bands

be a sign of coming luck. There is no such thing as luck and a bird pooped on you.

February 19

March 20

gym

instead of outside where the rain had taken over. Despite the weather causing lower attendance than previous years, local band

Kitchener 10 Manltou Dr 519.895.1228

Community

Centre

The Cobrahawks frontman Christian Ventura was happy

Waterloo

to be playing the event.

these kids are here to see their first show,” said Ventura about the mainly high school and younger crowd. As the night progressed the

King St. N 19.885.4500

lot of

r

crowd aged slightly, with some older support showing up for local bands Clear Point and Breaching Vista. Other bands that played throughout the event include Trap Tiger, Crisis Jane, These Silent Waves, Kayla MacLachlan, Lost Innocence

and The Fall

of Spring.

think the rain kind of affected how many of us came which sucks today, out because it’s a really good second-year said show,” Conestoga advertising student Alisha Popowich, who caught some of the later bands. “I

www.stagshop.com

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: Mature Students is a journey of exploration; one that stretches comfort zones and embraces diverse ways of thinking and doing. Returning to school after

Post-secondary education

the workplace or raising a family can be intimidating, exhilaratchallenging, and sometimes unsettling. Here are a few observations about mature

years of being out ing,

in

students that might ease some of the uncertainties about returning to learning:

KNOW THAT MOST ADULTS FEEL APPREHENSIVE ABOUT RETURNING TO LEARNING. The truth is, that most adults do very well if not better than they did before, and they actually enjoy

it.

You

week

will

CD.

diapers.

another copy.

it

on to a new

disc. If not,

buy

what

is

important to you and how

it will

best

fit

is

a second-year

journalism student holding in the

palm of

his

you find

fate

your

life

circumstances and

goals.

MAKE YOUR WELL BEING A PRIORITY.

Don't compromise on the things that

keep you physically, emotionally, and spiritually

Nick Dasko

if

WHAT

wear out your

Yes, this is possible. If you nip this in the bud, you may be able to safely copy favourite

Don't be surprised

reasons other than the ones you had anticipated to continue your learning. IS RIGHT FOR YOU. There is no right way to do this. Think about DO

you will wet the bed. A rubber bed pad would be a wise investment, as would some adult

that

Kitchener

playing in the Doon

THINK ABOUT WHY YOU ARE RETURNING.

have nightmares so

vivid and terrifying this

sti

30 King St. E 519.593.2303

possible.

people consider this to

\m will

on week. Wear

will defecate

September 22

You

-

week you will get six flat You really should look

181 will

this a

December 22

H lightning this week.

Consider

iW'iW Capricorn

week. This will teach you to stop going to crappy dance clubs. Invest in a used Led Zeppelin CD set.

Your residence

is

July 22

despise stuck in your head

week you will word “bagel”

warning. Please note that the

word

fjgjip

You

remove

this

for

everyone, with live music from the early afternoon into the evening, as well as a free barbecue and rides and face painting for the younger set. The event featured several local talents, as well as bands

“A

On Wednesday morning you

of

The day promised fun

inside,

It

ing specialist.

1

the

^ yog

summer back with 2009 Band Blast event.

little bit

scare

will

Association tried to bring a This week you will participate in an intervention for a close friend and/or relative. It would be a wise decision to pick up a large supply of facial tissues and non-alcoholic beverages.

into

well.

Make sure you

build

them

your schedule.

DISCUSS YOUR PLANS.

Think about how others

in

your

life

might support you.

hand. Counselling Services can help. Contact

them

in

Room 1A101.


NEWS

Monday, October 5, 2009

SPOKE Page 11

Rescued dog gets a second chance SOMMER

nine-month-old Maltese

that heals all the dogs and cats at the shelter. Shari Jones, daughter of Blancher, helps out as much as she can. She says the best part of her job is the satisfaction of saving the rescues and finding them a better home.

poodle, Gracie appears to be the healthiest of puppies, but looks can be deceiving. She

in on a daily basis from people wanting to re-home their pets

By MICHELLE

An energetic little bundle of darts Gracie fur, white around the grass, occasionally jumping up to get a pat on the head.

A

actually has a heart murmur that almost cost her her life. It was not the murmur that nearly killed her, but rather a

breeder who was going to end her life because he did not believe she would make it. Heather Blancher, owner of

Companion Animal Rescue thought otherwise. Blancher took in Gracie, who is still living today, thanks to a strict diet and constant Oxford,

care.

Blancher says, “Calls come

for various reasons.”

Some

to another home, not having enough time, allergies and more. Blancher takes care of all

their needs, including regular trips to the vet. The cost of an adoption

depends on the incurred expenses for the pet such as health and food costs. For a dog that has been fully vetted, the average cost is

The

$325.

a

of the reasons include

moving

cost

also

varies

depending on the age of the rescue.

Calls

come

in

on a daily

basis from people wanting to

re-home

their pets for

various reasons.

-

Heather Blancher

w The heart murmur

is seri-

ous, but Blancher says they

are giving her all the time they can and never regrets having kept her. It is this kind of attitude

Although some of the dogs are older it is important they receive the same care as a puppy would. “Every dog will still need constant socialization with other dogs and humans after adoption so an adopter needs to be prepared to spend many quality hours with their new companion,” says Blancher. Some of the rescues play an important role in the lives of their owners after they are adopted.

Blancher recalls the time

Gracie, a nine-month-old Maltese poodle,

murmur and would have been Gracie can only be adopted

By GREG

not your everyday puppy.

PHOTO BY MICHELLE SOMMER Grade was born with a heart

had Companion Animal Rescue Oxford not taken new owner agrees to pay for heart surgery.

killed

the

that a little dog they’d received spent only a short period of time in the shelter before finding his own rescue. An elderly gentleman, who was diagnosed with cancer, was searching for a compan-

Crowded weight room for

if

is

ion that could during his treatments.

When finally

accompany him chemotherapy

the man and puppy met, they became

her

in.

Today,

Even if the rescues never find a home, the shelter has a “no kill” policy and will continue to house and feed them.

“We

immediate friends and have been inseparable ever since.

life,”

HEART & STROKE

FATS,

believe in quality of says Blancher.

set

a needed expansion

COWAN

Conestoga College

is

hoping

avoid the recreation centre weight room becoming the recreation centre wait room. An increase in the student population at the college this year has caused problems in the parking lots and hallways and it seems only a matter of time before it will affect the to

gym. “It seems to be a natural progression to expand the weight room, not only the weight room but the whole recreational centre,” said Paul Osborne, director of the recreation centre and athlet-

“The facility was built in 1980 with a school population of about 2,500 and now, with

ics.

the population rising to 8,000, the expansion is inevitable.”

because the school is busy with the opening of the new Cambridge campus. He did state that the school is becoming more thought forward toward health and wellness and the expansion plans should come soon. Currently, the weight room is only crowded during certain periods of the day, most noticeably in the early afternoons. While there is a good number of stationary bikes and free weights, some students think the gym could

use

more

equipment

and

space. “I just think it is a little crowded,” said second-year financial planning student Jade Perron. “If there was a bigger space and one or two

more

bench

presses

that

Osborne said there are no

would be beneficial,” Some Conestoga students

concrete plans as of now to expand the recreation centre

may be surprised to know that every full-time student

pays a recreation and athletic fee of $61.32 per semester, according to the school’s website.

The payment

is

an

inci-

dental fee for full-time programs included in the student’s tuition.

This system

may

ideal for students

not be

who

don’t

work out or have a private gym membership with a club in town, but for others

it is

a

convenience.

how

is in our you can just use it whenever you feel like it, ’’said first-year nursing student Casey Macdonald. “You don’t have to sign up for a program or membership you might not use. You don’t see the money.” So for now, gym regulars may need to exercise a little while shrinking patience down. At least until the recreation centre is ready to

“I

like

it

tuition because

expand.

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%*


Page 12

SPOKE

Monday, October 5, 2009

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Digital Edition - October 05, 2009