Page 1

Union bus rolls into Conestoga

OPSEU

Hypnotic solution Stressing over exams? Hypnotherapy could be the answer.

raises

awareness on issue of

union rights for

Condors lose

and

part-time

2008

April 7,

semis

Fatigue caught up

sessional workers.

Monday,

in provincial

A

learning

newsroom

Conestoga College, Kitchener, Ont.

for

journalism students

Conestoga

to

the end.

in

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

40th Year

Conestoga students sure can By ELIZABETH BATE

— No. 13

build

to

Pac-Man and Ghost. meal award went to Christie Digital Systems Inc. which had the best variety from Canada's Food Guide in their 3,200-can display. The judges’ favourite was a structure of a

The Student

from

volunteers

the

architecture construction engineer-

program proved a tin can is able do more than just hold food. The Food Bank of Waterloo Region hosted the annual Canstruction event at Conestoga Mall on March 28, where particiing

best

pants built artistic structures out of

pear constructed out of 2.700 cans by Medicalis. An honourable mention went to the Association of Registered Interior Designers of Ontario,

cans and other non-perishable food

Grand Valley Chapter,

items.

4,000-can construction of two faces entitled Face to Face with Hunger.

The event

is

part

of a larger

inter-

national competition started in

New

structure entered

in

the internation-

competition. This

is the first year Waterloo Region participated.

that

''We're just

so

excited,"

Region. “This

is

way

a great

to

give

food inventory a boost." All of the cans used in the competition will be donated to the food

bank

his students last semester, said he

said

Wendi Campbell, executive director of the Food Bank of Waterloo

after the structures are disas part of their \ spring

mantled,

and other faculty are trying

(Photo by Elizabeth Bate) Above, the Conestoga team, under Jim Gerrard and Glen Good, won the prize for best structural integrity at the annual Canstruction event March 28, which was hosted by the Food Bank of Waterloo Region at Conestoga Mall. Below, Gerrard instructs his students on how to build a winning structure. A total of 10 local teams took part in the annual event. try.” said Jim Gerrard, one of two

on March 28, to 8 a.m.

day

to build their structure.

of food to build a "wasted globe" beside which stood a ladder.

Gen-ard said the structure symthe world in its present

bolized

condition and that for reconstructing

had to be supplied by individual

many teams

fundraising to raise to

that

The

meant

the

money

Amanda Hassum have 30 days

to

He it’s

has dismissed a $2-million classaction lawsuit filed by two Ontario

Roffey and Hassum filed the suit on June 6, 2007 on behalf of all full-time and part-time students at Ontario's 24

college students.

colleges.

the

appeal Ontario Superior Court judge

The

lawsuit challenged the charg-

ing of ancillary fees (extra fees not

covered by tuition) by colleges. On March 28 Justice Joan Lax ruled the case had “no chance of success" because the rules against ancillary fees are a policy, not a law.

A

policy cannot be enforced by

the law because

it

is

not a part of

Code. Policies can only be enforced by the agency creating the rule, in this case the Ministry of Training. the Criminal

Colleges and Universities.

The

Dan former George Brown

representative plaintiffs.

Roffey.

College

a

student,

Conestoga

and

College

won

was

which

They

ruling.

the

state the college is

charging

extra ancillary fees for libraries and

technology

information although

it is

(IT),

against the ministry's

Only the IT fee applies to Conestoga students. According to the Stop Unfair Fees website, a document that was sent to all college presidents was obtained through the Freedom of

policy.

stated

it's

unfortunate and it

if

sends the mes-

sage that students have no rights. "The rules have been disregarded

in

the

best

awarded

to

certain

ancillary

fees

they should." said Elliott.

In the past the pattern has

the rules and

the ministry

makes

the colleges

break the rules and

is

done about

it.

he said.

new minister now John Milloy - so maybe things will There's a

change.

The

still

analyzing

the decision and have yet to decide to

appeal

the

decision,

"I think there are

some flaws

judge's) reasoning

and

in her

think

under those

nothing else comes trom this lawsuit but student awareness of the

Doug

Elliott,

lawyer, said he

student

with the ruling.

1

there are grounds for appeal." he said. If

the

students'

was disappointed

have no regrets. have an enormous amount of

issue. Elliott will "I

they will not regret the file

participating

community

in

proj-

which can also be considered socially good projects. "We're trying to teach that these skills can be used for good and not just for a career," said Good. Both Good and Gerrard would like to see Conestoga students parects

ticipate annually in Canstruction.

Campbell

said the food

bank has

ipants interested in next year’s event.

This year's spring food drive aims 205.500 pounds of food.

to raise

For more information contact the Food Bank of Waterloo Region at www.thefoodbank.ca

Tibbits

is

pleased with the ruling.

"We were

quite

confident

to court, the colleges will take

comes, said Tibbits. When asked if he received the as

at

were made

public meetings." he said.

The

fees are for services such as

it

2004 document regarding lary fees

com-

puter labs and software.

the first

the

case would be thrown out." he said. If an appeal takes the colleges

back

secret, all the decisions

were to be cancelled open access labs would be the

If the fees

the lawsuit either.

Conestoga College President John

"1

(the

former

He knows decision to

it

plaintiffs are

whether

their students to realize the value in

wireless access, open access

did."

been

cannot be charged by the college and the IT and library fees fall fees.

for them (Roffey and Hassum). It takes a tremendous amount of courage to do what they

respect

so they're not protecting students

said Elliott.

Information Act. It

thinks

nothing

"What’s interesting is that there mandatory community hours in high school, but when you get to post-secondary there's nothing," he said. Both Good and Gerrard want are

ancillary fee lawsuit

allowed to stand

way

future.

already had phone calls from partic-

it.

Kasian Architecture Inc. for their

Judge dismisses An

structure

labels

in indus-

By JENN SPRACH

the students'

awards ceremony on March 29. Other awards included best use of

for the cans through

and contacts

their classes

is

structural integrity category in an

enough money

buy the cans needed. "The students raised pretty much

all

it

generation that will be responsible

All of the building materials used

teams. For

the

Conestoga team. “Zellers gave us a discount, otherwise it would have been much more expensive." The Conestoga team under Gerrard and Glen Good used over 5,000 cans

of Student Engineers from the University of Waterloo. Each team was given 10 hours, p. m.

members supporting

faculty

Society and Waterloo Association

the next

to get

kind of student volunteer work recognized for course credit in the this

food drive. This year there were 10 local teams competing, including a team from Conestoga College and a team made up of the Engineering

from 10

their

The structures remained up at Conestoga Mall until April 4, when the teams took them apart so the food bank could distribute the food. Good, who also participated in a Habitat for Humanities build with

York City in 1992. Competitors compete against each other locally and winners move on to have their al

for

the ancil-

thing to go. said Tibbits.

The room

labs lake

away from

class-

space, therefore, costing the

college

money

he

said.

The college

doesn't want to do that because

would

it

affect the quality of learning.

said

Tibbits

labs

the

were

designed to save students money, not increase the cost.

he responded he did.

don't think the IT fee meets the

The

labs

were put

into place so

policy prohibitions as far as we're

students wouldn't be required to

concerned."

purchase a computer or software

The IT fee at Conestoga College was approved by CSI before going to the board of governors which

order to attend school.

includes a student representative, said Tibbits. “It's not as

if this is

a

in

Kevin Dove, a media representawouldn't com-

tive at the ministry,

ment on

the issue

appeal period.

due

to a

30-day


News

Now ..with Random

What

deep thoughts Conestoga College

questions answered by

are

random students

you looking forward this summer?

to

most

(Photo by Jackie Allwood)

Cathy Casburn,

of

Cambridge,

lights

a candle so she can see during Earth Hour, March 29.

Earth Hour exceeded goals By JACKIE “Getting time to relax.”

On March

second-year

law and security

turned out their city lights to help

Many

29 the world participat8 to 9 p.m.

Tel Aviv, Australia and Asia were

According Fund’s

Toronto’s to the

(WWF)

World

Wildlife

website. Earth

Hour

Australia in

was created in Sydney, 2007 and has developed into a global event to symbolize making a pos-

“Going to other people’s cottages.”

itive

In

Alex

impact on climate change.

Canada over 150

cities partici-

pated in the event, helping to con-

Gilbert,

some of the highest energy conservation worldwide in one day. tribute to

second-year

According

police

foundations

“Camping and

party-

ing.”

A lyse

Welsh,

second-year business

foundations

“The beach and swim-

ming with

friends.”

Kelly Danson, first-year

public relations

“Getting a

permanent

job, since I’m

graduat-

ing.”

Pankaja Gunasekera,

second-year police

foundations

“Not coming back to school.”

David Vandarack,

second-year law

'

and security

administration

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!

monuments and

tower, Alcatraz prison, the Sydney Opera House and the Sears Tower.

Hour from

Vancouver.

administration

national

help conserve energy and many other places followed, ending in

Earth

to

the

WWF,

more

cities

lights in their

the event as well.

the first to turn off their lights to

in

homes, some

than 35 U.S. cities participated in

world wonders that are usually illuminated had their lights turned off including Niagara Falls, the CN

ed

Carl Hayes,

ALLWOOD

Nathan

mayor and a

lights-out

Phillips

residents

New Year’s Eve

party

in

Square with the

was more

like

celebration.

Cambridge saw a

five

per cent

drop in hydro usage, KitchenerWaterloo hydro reported a three to five per cent drop and the City of Toronto reported an 8.7 per cent decrease, which greatly exceeded their initial goal of five per cent.

In addition to people turning out

lower consumption. Kirby, a first-year general

Dave

business student, said he the Earth

Hour but

“I didn't ticipate,”

knew about

didn't participate.

know what hour

to par-

he said, adding he will

participate

if

there

is

one next

year.

Paul French, a first-year police foundations student, participated

even though he was “I

at a

party and

done every year. was at a party and they

(the

didn’t

said

hopes party

it is

goers)

like

it,”

French.

Cambridge

resident Findsay Allan

said her family shut everything off.

There

is

no word yet

if

there will

be another Earth Hour next year.


News Students

4

sheets a year

million

By HIEN DINH

soft

Conestoga College

at

more than 11,500 sheets of

print

is

specialist,

but

it

not

seem

said that

days and

large

that

includes weekends,

summer

numerous holiday

the

breaks throughout the year.

“Students

approximately 4.2 million sheets of paper in 2007, 700,000 more than in 2006. This total

is

April,

from September from January

not it's

to to

December.” There arc 6,900 full-time students at Conestoga this year, an increase of 900 students from 2006. Schueler said despite the additional

amount of about the same for

students,

paper used

is

the

both years.

officer

at

the

college,

said

Conestoga spent $125,000 paper and toner in 2007.

He all

to

on

said the annual tech fee that

full-time students are required

pay

is

expected to

by the cost of cost of living

rise next fall

2007 the increased more than living. In

two per cent. Gibson said he doesn't expect increase to be more than $5.

the

which will costs of comput-

cover the (raising) ers, providing Internet service, improving the college’s e-mail system, purchasing different licences, paper and much more."

CSI president Roxy Stanciu CSI has to approve the tech

said fee

who thought that each stuhad a maximum balance of 700

Stanciu,

sheets,

was

than 10

sheets of paper so reaching

(may

1,500

be) abusing printing (rights)."

Schueler said the soft cap was reached by averaging all the differ-

amounts by students. Staff in the computer services department saw that it was only the top five percent of all students printed

more than

who

1,500, so they

decided

that 1,500 pages would be good soft cap, he said. "However, a lot of students only print 200 or 300 sheets (per semes-

a

we used

have students who printed over 8,000 sheets.” Schueler said although there ter) but

to

Current president Roxy Stanciu served as prime electoral officer the board

now

is

pleased that

from outside the school of

board of directors’ election held in March.

more

New

members

— Page 3

was

ing

Only 410 people

“I

really

week

shorter than

voted.

busi-

ness. “I

a full

last year.

has representatives

Conestoga students care who runs Conestoga Students Inc. Voter turnout was low for the student

2008

board elected

for the election and

Apparently, only six per cent of

April 7,

felt

diverse

people,”

really felt

we’d need

some more

we'd need some said

diverse

people.”

Stanciu.

Roxy Stonein,

Corey Oulette, second-

nominees, she put together a team of people who visited programs in different areas

year marketing, Melissa Canning,

such as engineering, nursing and

first-year

liberal studies.

Director Matt Ware suggested Conestoga needs to find out what

Sarah

are

Carmichael, first-year radio broadcasting,

advertising,

Radcliffe,

Lukas,

first-year

Josalyn

BScN, Matt

first-year

business and Christopher Carson, second-year marketing.

They will join board member Pham, a business management

Will

student

serving

To

second term, vice-president Jennifer Watson and president Sheena Sonser.

attract

She also

tried to attract

ers to the election.

forum

dates

Student

Life

booths were

was

An

more

vot-

all-candi-

held

in

the

Centre and polling

set

up outside the CSI

office.

a

total

strategies other colleges are using to attract voters.

He cent

function

properly and

the

time for campaigning and vot-

Fanshawe had a

said

voter turnout

for

21

its

per

recent

election. “It

Unfortunately, the polling booths didn’t

CS/ president

was disappointing,

to say the

least,” said Stanciu.

my

"I tried

best to

make

it

a suc-

cessful event."

haven’t been any cases of misuse

have been

in

we found

students

previ-

ous years. “In the past

printing

pornography," he said. "I'm sure there are some students

who are misusing paper this year but we don't stand in front of the computer and

say, 'Hey, look

what

you're printing!'"

By CHARLOTTE PRONG PARKHILL

“Students tend to waste paper. They print off a lot of PowerPoint slides because they don’t want to write stuff down," he said. Students can check their printing balance at anytime by going to the start menu, clicking on run and typing in “balance.” protocols

enforced by

computer services can be found

“We’re out a couple of times a at program awards,” said

week

The association conmoney for student awards

Milton.

What

Alumni Association and what do they do? is

the

Beginning

However, Schueler said computer does keep track of the amount of paper students print in

Printing

Alumni Association increases

tion will

in the fall, the

in

old

Tim

will stay

Student and Client Services

Building, the association wanted to

have a more visible and available area to assist grads and students.

"We want to make students more aware of the Alumni Association,” said president Susan Milton. This is a busy time of year for the Alumni.

programs throughout the colMilton

is

also a

member

of the

CSI board, and gave a briefing of Alumni activities at the board meeting March 25. The association is co-sponsoring an event at the rec centre April 29 Work, to showcase called Tech the skills of graduating students in all of the college’s technical pro-

@

grams. Milton asked if someone from CSI could be a regular contributor to

Connections,

which

the

Alumni

is

published

three times a year. Stanciu said the

board would

try

to contribute

surprised to leant that the

"The Alumni and CSI have

really

steps in terms of

working together,” said Milton.

SLO-PITCH Female players needed for Sunday Morning Kitchener

CO-ED league. May 4th to Aug 24th. No Long weekends. Forest

Hill

area. $65. contact:

evansmatthew@rogers.com

magazine.

at

dentsvc/computersvc/printing.jsp,

along with tips on different ways to conserve paper.

Recognize a Conestoga grad By KAYLA GRANT

held- at

-

The

each

convocation

awards

honour

Do you know a Conestoga grad who deserves recognition? Now

career success and the

is the time to submit nominations June 2008 awards. the for Outstanding Conestoga graduates the through recognized are

Make

Alumnus of

Distinction

Award

contributions

of

the

year.

both

the

community recipient.

COUNSELLOR'S CORNER: Community Resources counsellors at Counselling Services are here to help with here to issues that students face on a daily basis, but we re also

The

help you connect with the

We have

your area.

sure to complete and sub-

mit a nomination form by Friday, April 11. To get a form, go to

www.conestogac.on.ca/alumnidev/awards/alumnus_dist.jsp.

Help

!

H-o-u-r-s

in

available

in

information, brochures and contacts with

employment, housing, counselling and other Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge, Guelph and other

in

communities. Especially as the school year draws to a close for graduating

EXAM WEEK E-x-t-e-n-d-e-d

many resources that are

social services,

agencies

the

Resource Centre details® www.conestogac.on.ca/lrc

important to make a connection with people and an places outside the college. These resources can help you find affordable home, find a car seat, baby clothes and toys, connect students,

it's

phone to counselling groups and workshops, or give a number to a crisis. Specific professional support can be provided for

in

pregnancy, alcohol and drug counselling, single parent and family supports, credit counselling, legal aid, and many other services.

If you're not sure where to go for help, just ask you get connected with the right people.

A Message from

Counselling Services

;

1A103

to

future issues.

made dramatic

lege.

have an information desk

Door 4 where the Hortons was located. Though its main offices inside

in the

associa-

tributes

visibility

www.conestogac.on.ca/stu-

every year. dent

more

individual logs.

September,

in

or projects that require

services

"Students should expect to see a very small increase in their tech fees

think that that

this year, there

Richard Gibson, chief information

By CHARLOTTE PRONG PARKHILL

ent printing

used

New CSI

actually 1,500 sheets.

"There aren't many assignments

Erie Schuclcr, Conestoga's soft-

number may

is

dents,” she said.

paper every day.

ware support

cap

amount of paper more than (enough) for stu-

"I

Students

more than

print off

SPOKE,

us.

We'll help


— SPOKE,

Page 4

Commentary

2008

April 7,

Permits costly are ridiculously overpriced so cost of parking permits at the college They don’t purchase one. some students have found a way to save money. and see how many tickOne student, said she decided to take a chance

The

she would get this school year. The math shows that she would have apiece to equal $365, the median cost of

ets

at

$15

which has received three tickets totalling $45,

far this year she

So

about 24 tickets

to get

the college’s parking passes.

means she saved $320. you

others,

more often than

Certain lots are ticketed

have

just

to

pay

she said. attention and hope you don’t get one.” tickets this year, but the colparking The college has issued about 5,700 John Anderson, a college said money, the of any keep lege doesn't get to of Kitchener. representative. The money goes to the City security

a lot

protect the people college has to enforce the parking rules to

who

of parking

The

That

s

was shocked

I

number of

at the

tickets issued,’

he said.

tickets."

follow the rules, said Anderson.

Other students

college have

at the

made

counterfeit permits but this

is

counterfeit passes are a big strongly discouraged. Security services said issue here

and they take

"You can

seriously.

it

a forged document, lose your college career for displaying

said Anderson. It is

can be

document and students a criminal offence called uttering a forged Criminal Code. kicked out of school and charged under the

"If you're willing to

what

you willing

else are

However,

do

that you’re taking

to steal,

money from

a big issue at the college

if this is

the college

and

said Anderson. it

makes one wondei why

Saving our planet, one

these students are taking the risk. It all

comes back

Many

to cost.

students feel

it

sons.

One

is

that the college lots are a

prime target area for

back

cai thieves.

including one involving Also, there have been instances of vandalism, the winter paintballs. and the lots aren’t always plowed properly during

Another reason

the college is located at the outskirts of the city, thereto school. They must take a bus or drive. Many

is

walk

fore. students can't

who have

their first class to

Another point

to take the

make

it

bus have to leave

an hour before

at least

on time.

needs to be taken into consideration

that

the college cost a lot

more than other post-secondary

is

the permits

at

institutions in the area.

The University of Waterloo charges $114 per semester which equals $228 a year and Wilfrid Laurier University charges $210 for their annual Fanshawe College in London charges $3 1 and Mohawk College Hamilton charges $275 a year for a permit. Humber College, located downtown Toronto, is the highest, charging $545 for the year 1

still

for parking

in in

a

campaign

saving energy has been added to Earth Hour took place on the to According www3.earthhourus.org,

from

all five

making global

to security services, 13 per cent of all cars parked at the col-

During the hour everyone was asked to turn out their lights

If the

resources

in

an

just the cost

is

a

to reevaluate the cost of parking permits,

comparing

surrounding institutions instead of increasing the cost each year. college continues to up the price,

and gamble they won’t get caught

The college needs

more students

will park illegal-

to be part of the solution instead of

ronment/05 220_bottled_water, bottled water sales are around $10 1

excess energy spend-

“Just

little

more

the lights out

vigilant.

like

turning

when you

leave a

things

little

classroom," said Milner.

However, energy conservation

Another small change you can

remains a continuing challenge

conservation. According to the

Cloth bags can be used as a school

aging people to adopt more

bag, lunch bag or grocery bag, to name but a few uses. You can

cient,

year

in

million

site,

Sydney, Australia,

people

started,

turned

and just from

that

2.2

is

one hour

durable, so the likelihood of walk-

down

ing rip

open

At home, there are things we can do without turning off the lights for

bag.

an hour.

College

the street and having is

it

far less than a plastic

Closer

to is

home,

doing

its

Conestoga part to con-

serve energy and give our beloved

the long run and help

cutting back on our lighting

It

will save

refill

planet a

is

for the college in terms of encoureffi-

energy-saving practices.

There

are

many

changes

that

can have a positive

small

other

impact on the environment.

But

first

we have

to get out of

our comfort zone. ourselves

force

welcome respite. “What we’re doing at Conestoga

with tap water. in

are

you

purchase a reusable bottle and

money

more

wash them and they

saved energy equivalent to taking

it

saying no to plastic bags.

off their

Instead of buying bottled water,

being pail ot the

www.livescience.com/envi-

down on

ing by being a

make

that often.

problem.

web-

billion annually.

48,000 cars off the road.

in the teeth.

cut

to live science’s

worthwhile

very

a

cause (energy conservation) for us to participate in," he said. You can also help the college

Earth.

According

at the college. is

For years there have been people trying to raise awareness about

lights it’s

Mother

as

of our facilities," said

Maio Opinion

site,

history.

our Doon,

Barry Milner, director of physical

website,

people

all

"This

March

continents took part in

lots at

Franca

29.

last

The college needs to

well as

awareness about

where the campaign

similar-sized cities.

not that students don’t want to purchase a pass

major kick

ly

Now

when comparing

According

them

raise

leaves Conestoga College students paying the highest price

lege at any given time are parked illegally. It’s

to

effort to reduce energy use.

passes.

That

in the ’90s.

hoping

parking

in

Guelph and Waterloo campuses

the mix.

months.

students

usage

Reduce, reuse, recycle was a slogan etched into everyone’s psyche

leaunfair to charge such a high rate for several

is

a time

light at

store

and

we do

We

have

walk

to

to

the

to turn the heat

down

more

often.

and turn off the If

to

lights

not begin to take part

in

trying to save our planet, in the future, there

might not be a planet

to save.

Spoke Letters are

welcome

Spoke welcomes

is

letters to the

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should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be contacted for verification.

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reserves the right to edit any

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Feature

SPOKE,

April 7,

— Page 5

2008

Dogs often mistaken for coyotes By JACKIE oyotes don

C

usually

t

ALLWOOD come

to

mind when you

think of animals living in Waterloo Region and the surrounding area.

However,

many people have seen sometimes dangerous creature wandering around streets and parks. According to a July 28, 2007 article in The Waterloo Region Record, a Cambridge woman and her dog were attacked by a coyote and a cat was killed in Kitchener two days before. winter

this

the beautiful but

Coyotes, while beautiful, are feral animals and and young children.

will attack pets

Although they look

like

domestic dogs, there

are differences.

The Hinterland Who’s

Who

website describes

male coyotes as slim and small, weighing from nine kilograms to 23 kilograms, having an overall length of 120 cm to 150 cm and standing about 58 cm to 66 cm tall.

The females are usually four-fifths larger in size and weight than the males. Coyotes' ears are wide, pointed and erect, the nose is tapered with a black tip, their eyes are yellow with black round pupils and are slightly

The

between the coyote (above two animals are like night and day. differences

slanted, their canine teeth are long, the neck is covered with a lot of tur which gives them an oversized look and their tongues are long and often hangs down between their teeth. Their tur is similar to a dog’s but it is generally grey, the back of their ears are yellowish and their throat, belly and

usually torial

coyote

fur

s

they are in search of a mate, food or as a

terri-

claim.

built for the

Who’s

Who

describes the coyote’s habitat as

streams and rivers.

and is long, soft, summer. They have a distinctive sound, the most notable being their yelping and howling cry. They can also bark, growl and squeal. Most of the day they are silent but can make themselves heard at any time. They use their howls and cries as means of communication.

The

are minimal but the temperament of the

right)

15 kilometres for food and they usually build multiple shelevade hunters.

ters to

Hinterlands

elements and surroundings light-coloured in the winter and dark in the is

and a domestic dog (above

semi-wooded areas. However, the City of Kitchener’s website says urban coyotes, which we know them as, are living in parks near

the insides of the ears are white.

A

when

(Internet photos) left)

city says

Coyotes can be seen on their hunting large prey.

of the animals can be seen travelling near ravines, hydro corridors and highway thoroughfares, which are the grassy and sometimes wooded areas in the middle of the highway. Coyotes are creatures of habit and will frequently return to the same area to hunt and eat. They can swim, run up to 65 km/h, cover a range of 10 to

or in small groups

when

Males and females remain together most of the time and are

monogamous

Their

many

own

creatures.

are usually three to seven pups, the den for three to four weeks. litters

which

stay in

When seeing a coyote, the No. rule is do not approach them. Coyotes have been mistaken for other animals and recently one that was hit on the highway had previously been mistaken for a cougar. Urban coyotes have to live in the same places we do so the 1

best thing to

know

is

how

to stay safe.

Coyotes are a misunderstood creature Bv JACKIE

T

ALLWOOD

and misunderstood creatures and we need to respect their area and learn to live with them as we

tiful

he number of coyote sight-

Leaving any type of food

welcoming

sign

nals like cats,

some people. The Waterloo Region Record reported dog own-

tats.

even birds.

Cambridge worried about a dog park being relocated from

population changes every year and

is

on the

rise this year,

sparking fear in

On March

ers in

RiverBluffs Park to a site near the Toyota plant on Maple Grove Road because of coyotes. In the article Rick Cowsill, in councillor one Cambridge, said he has had many calls about coyotes from residents in that area who were concerned that the coyotes were vicious and

ward

would

they

anything,

attack

including people. However, according

Ministry

(MNR).

to

the

Resources

this is untrue.

The City of

Kitchener’s website even states that

coyotes

are

would prefer Phil

normally shy and humans.

to avoid

Dechene, director of public

works for the City of Cambridge Animal Control, said the city traps coyotes that pose problems in certain areas like schools and areas that

Murch. communications spe-

cialist for the

is

MNR,

said the coyote

currently very healthy.

“At this point

in the

year they are

on the high end of the Murch.

cycle,’’ said

Murch

rabbits and

said even though

and

own

they are not

should

be

left

alone.

The

City

recomKitchener mends people keep their

of

indoors,

pets

store

sealed

some young coyotes may seem abandoned and on their

a

garbage

in

containers,

never

compost

meat

products,

build

fencing feet

wood

solid

at least six

tall

and.

if

people are walking in a park that i

s

known

coyotes, they should groups and carry anything that can make noise or an umbrella to open and close to frighten the animal away. It also says if approached by a

walk

for

in

coyote stay calm and wait until the moves on or even make loud it noises to scare

it

away.

The OSPCA says it is important to know that any lethal interference does not solve the problem. Coyotes are important to the ecological system and killing the animals is only disrupting the natural

order of the coyotes

in

the

area.

Hinterland although

it

Who

Who's

says,

sometimes causes prob-

lems, the coyote has

its

rightful

place in the animal kingdom. In

Natural

of

Bill

19

is

coyotes,

especially food for small ani-

are slowly taking over their habi-

ings

for

areas occupied by people and their domestic animals, local control

should be sought rather than a ban on the species as a whole. If you see a coyote posing a

Cambridge animal con519-621-0740. KitchenerWaterloo animal control at 519threat call trol

at

570-6986 or Guelph animal control at 519-837-5628.

young children may frequent

but they haven't had too

many

calls

of sightings or any types of incidents.

"We

have trapped four coyotes

in

the past three years in three differ-

ent locations," said Dechene. The Ontario Society for

the

Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (OSPCA) website states that coyotes are one of nature's most beau-

(Internet photo)

Coyotes are important to the ecological system and removal of the animals means overpopulation of rodents. If approached by a coyote, stay calm and wait until it moves on or make loud noises to scare

it

away.


Page 6

— SPOKE,

April 7,

2008


Feature

and dealing

By MARCIA LOVE

stress level?

Trying

to

remember where you

put a valuable heirloom?

Maybe hypnosis

is

with personal

Bender says her hypnosis program begins with a confidential

Need a little help kicking your smoking habit? Looking for a way to reduce your

the solution to

consultation

with

the

client,

in

their history, their goals, find out

over,

what they have been doing

client out of their hypnotic state.

to try to

solve their problem, find out what

Hypnotherapy provides a relaxed and focused slate of mind, under which memory and awareness are

they

improved.

if

Faye Bender has been interested health and hypnosis since she

was a teenager. She manages Golden Triangle Hypnosis out of her Kitchener home and says business is steady, with about 15 clients a week. I

also try to help people dealing with

phobias or childhood fears."

solve a problem, but generally

After the

first initial

it

tized.

“Most people can be hypnotized they want to be. Some might feel

too uncomfortable, so

work.

It's

past events.

setting alone with

remember

where they misplaced something valuable or find out who they were in

a past

making

it

life.

It

seems

up, but at the

feels real (to them).

like they are

same time

People

may

not

someone.”

During the actual hypnosis sesBender tries to make the client feel as comfortable and relaxed as possible. This includes covering them with a blanket as

it

stall

crying as they are remembering.”

down and

CDs

playing with calming,

natural sounds. “It. feels

sleep,"

to

may

it

easier in a one-on-one

(the client)

you're

like

Bender is

says.

in

begin offering

going

“Once

I

to

feel

a relaxed state, I personalized sug-

gestions to them to help their situation

and improve

it."

The suggestions may be confidence

change

in

to instil

the person

or

to

their routine or habit.

hypnosis session

the

is

Bender slowly brings the pleasant feeling,” she says.

“It's a

may want to take a nap afterwards because they feel so comfortable and relaxed.” Bender says after the session “(The

client)

may

a bit groggy, but

feel

the hypnosis also gives

them more

energy.

“Hypnotherapy works maybe 80 per cent of the time, but there are no guarantees,” .Bender says. “If the client follows what was suggested during the hypnosis session it should help them.”

Elaine

Struyk,

second-year

a

early childhood education student

Conestoga College, took one sesBender to help destress and improve her sleeping pattern. Struyk says she was a bit nervous and didn’t think hypnotherapy would work on her. at

sion with

hate

"I

the

unknown, but

it’s

always good to give something new a try, even if you don't think it will work," she says. During Struyk's first session. Bender says she had to find out the reasons for Struyk’s stress and

(Photos by Marcia Love)

Elaine Struyk, a second-year early childhood education student, Golden Triangle left, took her first hypnotherapy session at

Hypnosis with Faye Bender, right. Struyk says the session helped her relax and sleep a bit better.

sleeplessness in order to help.

“The more people open up the more 1 can help them," Bender says. “The first hypnosis session is to help with past issues.

It's

means accepting given (while

HYPNOSIS FACTS

like

reprogramming, but not erasing.

It

1Y

suggestions

the

hypnosis).”

in

Struyk did a 20-minute hypnosis session with Bender, but says it lose track of time while in

“You

hypnosis,” Bender says.

“You

just

put your thoughts aside and sort of sleep."

Struyk says the session was very relaxing, and she felt like she was in a

is

It

There

state. >Y

not possible to is

conscious sleep.

always a way

was

I

Afterwards,

pieces.

little

in

my

hands and legs

tin-

out of

it.

People are not put “under” hypnosis, but rather hypnosis.

“into” >Y

People can generally remember what was said

and what happened while they were

in

hypnosis,

unless they are told by the hypnotist not to remem-

gled.

some teaching

Struyk says she slept better the first couple nights after her session.

It

felt really

made me more focused and

“It

'<

Someone can

wants

>A

good."

There are many books available on hypnosis and hypnotherapy,

It

distraction,

is

Struyk says

it

would help

to take

)<

of

Police

may use

habits and stress levels.

ness.

my

s always good to give it a shot. Bender says the most rewarding

part of being a hypnotherapist

is

being able to use her experiences to give people compassion and non-

judgmental support. like

to)

see

them happier,

more successful whatever success means tor them, she say s. “The fact that people trust

healthier and

me

as

hypnotists to interview and quesit

improves

doubts before going

(to the first session)," she says, "but

•‘(I

state.

possible to hypnotize oneself.

tion witnesses,

had

and open up with

very rewarding.

their

It's

problems

an honour.

;<•

he or she

such as a loud noise, would bring

a hypnotic

more than one session to see a significant change in her sleeping “I

if

to be.

one out '<

only be hypnotized

relaxed."

is

a hypnotic

I

like

The Galaxy Brainwave Synchronizer uses flashing lights, which some people find helps them during a hypnosis session.

come

to

in

ber.

could have woken up. but didn't want to," she says. “It felt “I

it

become trapped

minutes.

felt like five

only

self-hypnosis.

easier through hypnotherapy

to say or

Even after one session she says people can notice a slight change.

about being hypno-

first

— Page 7

hypnosis.

doubtful at

they are lying

client begins to

in

clients

relaxational past-life regres-

does not have

ing with the program they will book their first hypnosis session. Bender says many people are

improve an issue. Bender also does sions. in which the

may want

consultation,

clients arc interested in continu-

takes four to 12 sessions to fully

“People

to

client

When

sion,

She says some people may only need one session of hypnosis to

remember

do and just gel

know them."

if

“The majority of people that see have the goal of destressing, losing weight or quitting smoking, but I

The

do anything while

I

like to

2008

Bender says hypnotherapy works through repetition. As the client hears the suggestions over and over, they begin to feel a change.

your problem.

in

made

problems

which she explains how hypnotherapy works. “I tell them what hypnosis is and what it isn’t. Then gel some of

would

April 7,

and Hypnosis

J-CeaCtfi Destressing

SPOKE,

People can be put

into

memory and aware-

a hypnotic state doing

anything they are passionate about, such as reading or painting,

in

which a long period

of time

passes

unnoticed. ,Y

Children can be hypnotized using objects such as

pendulums

or pocket watches.

Hypnotists and psychics are completely different fields of practice.


Page 8

— SPOKE,

April 7,

News

2008

Union drive By KERRY REED time. That

is

not only the

name of the Ontario

Public Service

It’s

Employees Union bus but the feeling of everyone

who

of the Organization of

in

Ontario with the goal of finding part-time staff and getting them

to sign a card.

to

“There are so many reasons

asked

a fraction for the

information sheet that was handed out

at the

sessional

teachers

in the

province.

same work

as

no job security and no bene-

ness,

are

fits.”

amongst the lowest paid academic professionals

getting

are

full-time staff, the issue of fair-

campaign, college, part-

time and

The colleges

card.

cheap labour, they are getting paid

an

to

why

the part-time staff need to sign a

OPSEU

According

membership.

of

and

all

union. All part-time teaching staff staff are being

Arts

atten-

gather part-timers’ support for a

to sign an application for

Sessional

Colleges

at the

ongoing campaign

and support

and the

Technology (OPSECAAT). "We will visit all 24 colleges and about 125 campuses

It’s

to the

tion

said

president

Applied

attend-

Time campaign. The It’s Time bus arrived college on March 27 to bring ed the

Lisa Nequest, support staff presi-

They

dent, said, “It takes a lot of

work

to

also don’t have any benefits, pen-

sign up part-time workers. People

sions or job security.

want to be a part by signing a card and it is nice to see all the full-time

The colleges

assert

the

that

provincial average salary for part-

time teachers

is

$40 per hour, but

with each assigned teaching hour there

is

an additional 2.17 hours

of work. The additional hours are put in preparing the course and

marking which they do not get for. Breaking down their

members here supporting them. “They are fearful of job losses. Full-time employees are disgusted with how part-time employees are treated. They work beside them day in and day out and they could be gone tomorrow. staff

“Colleges have nothing invested

paid

means they

salary

paid

get

actually

$18.43 an hour. Full-time

teaching staff receive a

minimum

hourly rate of $87.70 to a maxi-

mum

them.”

said Couvrette.

Two

is

the largest

membership

and geographic spread

years,

part-time service staff with

sions

to remain for fear of repercus-

Along with

spring,

Ontario

ing

Employees

members of

Public

Union

Service

rolled

their

membership

president of the Organization

faculty

Employees of Colleges of Applied and Technology, the union its tour around Ontario. OPSECAAT is a democratic organization made up of part-time and sessional faculty and support staff from every college. Since launch-

“We

We

do the same work wages are not equal. There is too big of a difference between the wages and you would think part-time staff would be paid more because they do not receive any benefits. “At any given time I will have to (as full-timers) but the

drive

in

ple

know about

do the same tasks co-workers.

ed because

same

It I

my

as

full-time

makes me

am

frustrat-

not getting paid

of

OPSE-

Conestoga College puts in the same effort and we all pull togeth-

make

er collectively to

No

this col-

them so I try and distance myself from full-time duties by keeping myself as busy as I

For doing that full-time staff members get one extra paid day off and part-time staff does

can.

not get

the

as

“The best example to illustrate

so

is

why

can think of signing the cards

important

is

I

everyone

they’re going to join our union,

that.”

Couvrette compared the presence

meaning when one worker resigns another worker

comes down

of

said,

of part-time workers

Conestoga College on March 27. Led by Roger Couvrette, the Sessional

loss,

time and sessional workers wherever they go.

and

and job

the issue of union rights for part-

into

Part-Time

by Kerry Reed)

to

signed up a long time ago with ho

2006, the organization has raised the

Time bus came

Conestoga on March 27. Left to right: Roger Couvrette, president CAAT, Lisa Nequest, support staff president, and Dave Cushing, campaign co-ordinator. It’s

at

lege

1

.

it.”

Couvrette said, “This is really a matter of turning the insecurity to job security for all part-time staff.”

time’ for part-timers to organize

‘It’s By JOSHUA KHAN

who wished

anonymous

in

(Photo

The

hesitation.

Conestoga College has been great and has not put up any roadblocks,

an accumulated employment of 13

“This drive

in

of $143.24 an hour plus ben-

efits.

a stop at Conestoga

Roger Couvrette,

Ontario,”

Part Time Employees of

was

it

rolls to

Couvrette said the campaign

all

instantly hired.

The

and the public about the

theme

rights of part-time workers.

“We

is

Arts

time workers,” he said. “They work

continued

the

same amount

ers

and put

as full-time

in the

work-

same amount of

effort.

“But they get paid less, which is why we’re here so we can let peo-

to

hop on board

we

the bus.”

vehicle can be very motivating

numerous slogans paintHowever, the one that real-

as there are

ed on

it.

ly stands out is the union’s slogan:

campaign’s

bright

blue

“It’s

time!” Couvrette said the union

picket

chose that particular saying because

and even in the decor of a bus which is currently

have a chance to support themselves

touring Ontario,

and other part-time workers.

is

reflected

in

the

signs, staff T-shirts

are here to support the part-

them

The

colleges to

a revolving door,

informing college

to

in

tell

bringing aware-

it

lets

individuals

know

The support seemed

ness to the union drive.

to

they

now

be strong as

“The bus has been very helpful during our campaign drive,” he said. “It's an excellent form of motivation,

representatives from the college wel-

because when people decide that

teacher

comed the union with open arms. Dave Cushing, a part-time at

the

college

and local

campaign co-ordinator, said he’s happy the union drive made a stop at

Conestoga. “Their campaign

cause because tant issue

it’s

is

for a

good

about an impor-

and people need

to

know

more about it.” The union couldn’t have picked a day to visit the college as the sunny weather encouraged a lot of people to venture outside and learn more about the campaign drive. “It does seem unusual that we show up on one of the nicest days better

of the year, but that’s just part of our plan,” said Couvrette.

(Photos by Hten Dinh)

Young imaginative minds shine

at local art exhibit

Expressions 33 is a collection of artwork on display at the Kitchener-Waterloo Art Gallery. The collection consists of work from over 200 students across Waterloo Region. The exhibit runs until May 4, and entry to the gallery is free. Left, Gabrielle Starodub, 9, and her younger brother Michael, 6, toured the gallery and liked Eric Van Giessen’s Perspective photography piece. Right, Liam Good stands below his sketch entitled My Hand.


Sports

Condors lose By

AARON O’CONNELL

semifinals

the

of the provincial

Flewwelling said. “There was a lot of work put into both our outdoor and indoor seasons and so it was really nice to finally see our efforts making an

You have

score to win and

to

Conestoga’s women's indoor

soc-

cer team couldn’t put any by the

Fanshawe Falcons’ goalkeeper they lost 1-0

in

March

on

provincials

as

20

in

After exiting both exhibition tour-

their chances,

season Conestoga had something to

naments early

Vaughan.

The Condors had but

Falcons’ defence

two goals games.

The

prove when they headed

in tough against a solid

were

who allowed

tournament

all

Humber

who

in the

into

effort.

lost

Flewwelling said because a large

it

back

was

the

gave

still

all

games, but healthy

it

could

we had 1

tell.

to

how

We

team captain Ashley Flewwelling and the Condors were not hanging their heads and were pleased with the team's effort all year. really exciting to

start-

we came

really

chances

all

For a team with a

come

Carnachan

our

first

together in an

common

goal.

it was a major accomplishment to make it to the provincials. Flewwelling gave credit to Krajcar and his coaching staff. “1 think that our coach, Aldo, and our assistant coaches Jen and Becca had a lot to with our overall success this year,” she said. “Aldo

very educated

in

played

excellent

the

means our team needed in order Our coaching staff

succeed.

to

gave us

all

the tools

we needed it

was

just

to

up

%tetent IJte team eml sp««d

to us to use them.”

Krajcar was extremely with the Condors' effort

all

pleased

He encourages

students to

1||§| Initiative!

come

may

to talk

it

if

limit

over

with him.

know

“1

were some great

there

Forward Carmen Carnachan said Conestoga has to work on creating more chances to put the ball in the back of the net.

team,” Krajcar said. "If they have an issue they can come and talk to me.”

make

vixen*! material ter

onships.

some

our

isiers, br»cfM»res «imF ether

He wants nothing more than to get back to the provincial champi-

onships, you have to score.

is

en

season.

soccer players

our offence

HIRING!

game of

the

saying that defence wins champi-

"If anything,

ire

soccer and his coaching provided

them from playing,

season and despite the

www.workforstudents.com

they did

they have any issues that

all

519-569-7989

together quite well as a group

out to tryouts next season and

team

nec.,

of rookie

lot

said

I’m really excited to see what the to bring to the field

no exp.

and that

is

— Page 9

conditions apply sales/svc,

to learn

year.”

he a great team, and in

need

Condors have

defence

Despite leaving without a medal,

was

well

The

would have made a big

difference,” Krajcar said.

"It

a

next September.”

two we were

if

was only

chemistry and

effort to achieve a

in the last

think

it

I

end. 1

players

think our two tournaments and team learned a lot from that experience,” she said. “As the team captain, it was really rewarding to see

and head coach Aldo Krajcar said that fatigue caught up to them "‘We were tired.

September,

built excellent

injury

in the

in

ed clicking as a team. “We did pretty poorly

Hawks who

tournament

indoor

matter of time until the Condors

tourna-

came out on top with a 1-0 win. The Condors lost some key players throughout the

the

played on the outdoor soccer team

ment. the match was tight as both teams battled back and forth all game, creating several chances to score, but

defence and an all-around team

number of

to

other semi-

in the

the

regional championship with excel-

match.

Like most games

March and they captured

in

five

medal game against the

Hawks,

Fleming College final

early

to regionals

just

lent

Condors

loss forced the

the bronze

in

beginning of the

at the

We

point.

2008

S15.05 base appt., flex.sched.,

how to get the ball up the field more efficiently, and shoot more, but we also did miss a lot of

players,

impact.”

the semifinals at the

weak

April 7,

STUDENTS

semis

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1

Page 10

— SPOKE,

April 7,

News

2008

Horoscope Week of April

2008

7,

Libra

Aries March

21

September 23

-

October 22

April 19

spending

with

Careful

week. You tend expensive

but

bills

you’re not

if

you may not be able

careful

Be

-back the debt.

this

up very

to run

to

-

pay

cautious about

who you borrow money from. may be the wrong person.

It

You will need to be decisive week to create balance. If you don’t make a decision when it needs to be made you will tip this

what is being weighed and the decision will be

the scales and spill

made

Go

for you.

for

STOP

it.

Scorpio October 23

November Don’t

let

your shyness get

in the

way of speaking your mind this week. You have to learn to display your feelings openly

some

gain control of

order to

in

situations. If

you don’t speak up it may negatively effect your current project. Take a chance.

May

A

21

and provoking violent behavmost calm individuals. Remember a secret can be a dangerous thing. It can eat iour even in the

the person holding the secret or

destroy the confider

you

issue

will

November 22 December 2

someone

to be solved

with emotions rather than mind. If logic is applied to an emotional

come

across as

and close off communication.

patronizing,

all

You

and opti-

are very likeable

You will interact with someone this week which will incite jealousy in another. Be careful, jealousy is a dangerous emoDon't be too friendly with this week. It may be interpreted in the wrong way.

tion.

new people

Capricorn

July 22

-

-

mistic.

Cancer June 22

if told.

Sagittarius

close to you will arise this week.

The problem needs

21

ers

June 21

situation involving

AT H&R BLOCK

Watch your mouth this week. You have a way of angering oth-

Gemini -

IN

-

December 22

-

January 19

START You

need your tough exteto protect your vulnera-

You have your eyes on

will

rior shell

Someone

ble side this week.

is

your weakness and ready for an attack. If you are prepared your opponent won’t know what hit them.

assessing

and must run

full

get there

If

come

first.

you by someone to

it

question

is,

-

advantage

Remember

of

January 20

this

taken

You have

week.

firm opinions.

The

best

way

to

iour in those close to you.

skills for

is

strong

It

could be the one thing

you from getting your way. Use your analytical

way around

a

Virgo

You

are an

puts too

ization.

intelligent

much

faith in

You always

try to

come

today or

call

H&R BLOCK

March 20 You

person

have to make some

will

organ-

very serious decisions soon.

organ-

let

when displayed in the forms. Open your mind

If

your mind wander your

ition

kick

will

in.

Follow your

correct

regrettable

it

Go

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intuition to the correct path.

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February 19

ize everything in your life. You have to remember chaos can be

and

in for

that will prevent

August 23 September 22

who

come

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and

dislikes

and

disagrees.

stand

Students,

-

Be careful about where these are expressed because someone else

who

by keeping your friends close and your enemies closer. Watch for unusual behavtake a

The more?

it

February 18

things aren’t always

as they appear.

to

Aquarius

August

be

will

it

Take a chance

who wants

22

Your loyalty

for

be snatched up

competition.

is

Leo July 23

SPENDING

speed ahead to

you wait

will

else.

because there

the prize

Deep

best.

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»

News

SPOKE,

April 7,

— Page 11

2008

Nursing students teach through poster projects By JENNIFER

MARKO

Eichler said her group chose this topic because

people

Conestoga College’s

first-year

dents took part in a role-reversal

BScN

nursing stu-

"It's

other Conestoga students about their

The displays were wing and stretched

HPV (human

germs,

included

mavirus) and stress,

among many set

The group agreed

all

the

to the

Student Life

did a survey of random people in the library and showed that most people we surveyed wanted to learn more about marijuana,” said Martin.

about their

This group also agreed that creating a poster helped

them

to learn.

personally found

“1

visual learner,” said

pictures and

items from various food groups.

ing about.

a poster display

it

research.

"We

a display consisting of a plate loaded with healthy

Eichler, Natalie Klein

because

more

it

chosen topics. They gave presentations in the halls using their posters, both of which were graded. One group, who talked about proper nutrition, set up

Monika

helped them

ijuana.

first floor.

Students flocked to the displays to talk to the nursing

who seemed quite knowledgeable

“They

Victoria Chekov, Carolina Aldana and Lindsay Martin created a poster on the recreational use of mar-

others.

way down

many

this.

said.

that creating a poster

forced them to go more in-depth and do

papillo-

up on the second floor of the E-

Centre, where displays were also set up on the

students,

because of their workload,” she

to learn better than just sitting in a lecture

poster displays.

Topics

high school and college experience

can’t keep up and end up losing sleep."

week, leaching health through

last

in

“We

and Becky Voisin had

on sleep deprivation.

facts

titles

so

it

more helpful because I'm

Chekov. “To

we know

me

it’s

a

easier to have

exactly what we’re talk(Photo by Charlotte Prong Parkhitt)

Maura Walke and Krishna Khetani show

and that helped us with the before putting them on the board.” created an essay

first

off their

(Photo by Jennifer Marko) Voisin P roudly display

(Photo by Jennifer Marko)

Victoria Chekov, Lindsay Martin and Carolina Aldana learned a on marijuana, and shared the info at the health fair.

lot

by working on

display about

sexually transmitted diseases.

Monika

their poster project

Ei cNe _

^^ on

their poster project

sleep deprivation.

Conestoga Peer Helpers 2007-2008 Amber Abbott

Scott Burrows

Ashley Abetson

Maggie Chapman

Kayla

Sana

Stefan Ctwry

Chris Fray

All

Jason Choquette Zach Clement Sarah Cowbrough

Cinthya Ayala

Emily Aytoo

Dan

Baillargeon

fierce

Susie Frisson Joel Berber Kathryn Gerber

Hoity tebcid

Mark Panagapka

Aiyssa Lowers

Stuart Parsons Patileen Payne

Christine Gfavin

Chits Lucas Chris Lynar

Lindsay Croft Marcm Czajkowskl

Anthony Sarah Gurney Jon Hamel

Anna Czarwfnska

Laurie

Xiang Dong (Brian) 8i Ainsiey Danbroott Melissa Davy Brooke Bllttz Konrad deKonsng Maria Bisslg Neil Dignam Evan Bieumer Paid Drake Brian Bogdoo Haley Dugal Megan Bos Johanna Eby Trevor Boss

Claim

Sorina Baianean Jesse Barrette

Morgan Craig Nathan Crawford

Rebecca Beech Holly Beer Debbie Bens

Michael Brennan Stephen Brtckman

Hm\kk

David Henry Brock Howie

Pamela Hulst Eric Humphreys

Brian Stewart

Den McNeteh

Shawn Ramnanan

Jonathan Stoner

tynsey Medrie Cote Migvar

Roxana Ratlu

JennTaun

Cheyenne Wocker Andrea Wolff Ken Wrenn

Zac Thomas

Colleen Wright

Christine Threndyte

Denise Young

Ryan Tltemans

Ryan

Trlsh Morris

Leanne Mountford Andrew Murdoch

Nicole Savage

Monica Van Maanen Wendy Van Wyk

Amanda Schwartzentruber

Connie Vanderknyff

need to conquer it all in the first couple of weeks, 1 worked very hard and continued to ask for help when f needed It. realized that

I

0

I

did not

I

l

would not be successful

end of my first year of college. was approached my Learning Skills Advisor regarding a new student

At the by

I

position, within the Learning I

was

tote

Stephanie Van Dinther

Thank you!

going to take the risk and walk through or let it close «n front of us. As an ileam. 1 have been able to help students who reminded me of myself when fust have shared my personal experiences started college. and study strategies with the hope that 1 might help I

one person.

Commons, called Hearn.

hired to support students bving in Residence to

develop and/or Improve their study

skills

workshops and drop-in sesslons-rlght

through

in Rez,

moved from being a person seeking help In my first year to a person offering help to others during my second year. 1 was worried that would not be able to manage being a fuH-ttme student, Resident Advisor, the Learning and an Hearn, but 1 had supervisors I

m

Reside noe that believed in me and cheered me on every step of the way. life opens doors for us arte we have to decide d we are

Commons arte

me to meet with a teaming Skills Advisor m the teaming Commons to develop my study strategies.

Ziegler

Vicky Ulrich

I

I

ECE program

few weeks of school someone

Sharis Williams

Lyndsey Ross

was 18 years old when here at Conestoga was so nervous because did not know what to expect arte was scared that

first

Alex Steward

Neville Morris

you never Imagined,

During the

Robyn Wiebe Jake Willemse

Rob Jackson

that 1 refer to ( carry this great quote around with me often: “Ability is what you ate capable of doing Motivation determines what you do. Attitude determines how well you do it," • tou Holtz. During my time at Conestoga College, t have teamed that tt takes strength to ask for help and that having someone believe In you can Inspire you to do things

I

Michelle Sowinskl

Chris Jones

Little

I

Melissa Whitelaw Chad Whittington

Mieheai Mooney'

Nablt Kanji

I

Mark White

Milton Moffett

Leanrte Fenney

started the

James Walz JeffWemp

Meaghan Sincten Sarah Skye Rob Smith Dan Boeder Vanessa Somos Jeff Senear

trida Hyde

Pamela Bums

Ben Vanteeuwen Jonathon Voli Shawn Vos Grayson Waechter Sonia Waind

EdytaSlkorska

Pmmt

Slobodan Misifenovlc

Jessica Hath

Holly Featberstone

Support Can Go A Long Way By Kayla Hoto (ECE program)

Sahil

Stephanie Relley Kristy Rice Bethany Rigby Austin Robbins Francesco Robles

Sam Bunting

*A

ShaMa Sharma

Filina

Stephanie Mackenzie iessta* Pninean Forced Quralshi Matey Mackenzie Bre#*Anrte Radtke Jon Martin Anca Radu McDougafcj Meghan Bme Ralph Heine McLaren

Hanke

Steven Kaiser Paul Kalnlns

Nicole Snider

Tammy Scott

Steven Rachel Pepping

Ale* Mackenzie

Peter Hendershott

Newton Edmondson leeAnne Fairbairo Ashley Faugh Karim Fawzy

Beverly Soutane

Courtney Schwerlng

Eleanor Namuddu tanner Kerr MeezNay&ni Crystal Kraor Heather Kroesbergen Thanh-Yen Nguyen Haytey Norton Steven Kun

My goal as a

student helper has been to motivate and I support to bebeve in themsetves

inspire the students

and their ability to be successful. have teamed from them Just as much as they have teamed from me. 1

as a student helper has allowed me to grow never thought could be. am graduating this spring and I wli be attending Brock University next year to study linguistics. My experience at Conestoga as a student helper has helped me to see

My role

into a person that

I

”1 can" do anything I set support can go a tong way.

that

I

I

my mind

to

and a

Write


Page 12

— SPOKE,

April 7,

2008

fV

m 4\\v«jy

'I

n

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