Page 1

.

.

A barking

Take a hike

good time

The pedestrian bridge over the 401

Buddy enjoys treats and attention

opens

after being

after

two years

of construction.

Halloween history

crowned top dog

Learn about the traditions

at Dogtoberfest.

A

learning

newsroom

for

journalism students

associated with

haunted

this

holiday.

mmmmasamm

Monday, October

22,

2007

Conestoga College, Kitchener, Ont.

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

Conestoga mourns death By CHRISTOPHER MILLS many

so

for his

was heartbreaking,

other

way of

contagious smile and "teddy bear”

said. “All

Conestoga College student Andrew Freake was much more than what was visible on the surface. “Andrew was a wonderful young man, full of humour, passion and sincerity," friend Courtney

the faculty,

hugs,

Mitchell said.

“He was

full

of love

and care and always put others

He was

before himself.

kind, con-

describing

of his classmates,

of

all

of our hearts went

all

out to his parents and his

A

Romer

sister.”

gifted songwriter and talented

Andrew was

musician,

rarely seen

without his iPod and guitar.

“When ...

said Carolyn Marsh, a

lyrics,”

ful

Andrew Freake

think of

I

think about guitars and beauti-

I

first-year advertising student at the

who

college

The 19-year-old advertising student was shot and killed in Clyde Park in the Township of North

High School with Andrew. “Andrew

1

1

over again.

who went

to high

school with Andrew, said she wasn’t interested

when

making new

in

Andrew

she and

friends

met, but his

outgoing and welcoming personality

immediately broke through.

met Andrew my mom passed away and Andrew made sure I was OK; he helped me through it,” she said. “He was on a “Not long

after

but he e-mailed sure

I

when

family vacation

make

me

it

happened,

regularly just to

was OK. He was an

I

the

in

spotlight.

Joe Romer, advertising co-ordinator at Conestoga College,

first

met Andrew when he interviewed program? He was instantly impressed. "Obviously, his work impressed us enough that he got accepted without any problem,” Romer said. "He was in the stages of just being

for entrance into the

able to really develop his creativity.”

whole class has bonded together since Andrew’s death and even attended his funeral said the

He always

was going to be famous, and given a little more time, he would have been. He was so talented.” In addition to his musical endeav-

Andrew was

also a national

He won

figure skating champion.

medal

the gold

in the juvenile pairs

Figure

National

the

at

Championships ner Caitlin

Skating

“This accomplishment, as Andrew and Caitlin had only trained (for) a few

months prior

to the competition,”

a fellow skater of

said Mitchell,

Andrew’s, from All

St.

his short time here on Earth, but no one felt that touch more than Katie Boudreau, his girlfriend of over a year. “He found true love with his fiance Katie and the best way to describe what they had was pas-

sion,” Taylor said.

John’s, Nfld.

accomplishments

of these

(Photo by Christopher Mitts)

Clyde Park in the Township of North Dumfries sits deserted on Oct. 16. Police closed the park after Andrew Freake a second-year advertising student at Conestoga College was shot and killed there on Oct. 1 1

2003, with part-

in

Coady of Newfoundland. was an unbelievable

Boudreau

how

of

told

she and

marriage plans. out

my

ring size. He even got all friends in on it to make me try

on rings explained,

to

going on to describe

he wasn’t really

living.

idea of

something outrageous and crazy we all knew that it was going

to to

do,

happen and

that

it

would be

a great

and sorrow at the realization new ones would be created.

that

no

he’d ever bought roses or

time,” said Lisa Taylor, a friend and

only

former schoolmate of Andrew’s. “I am finding comfort in the fact that Andrew lived his life completely

jewelry

and

she was done high school and the

to the fullest.”

Andrew touched many

lives

in

girl

for.”

Boudreau

Andrew had given

said

birthstone.

me more

by Oct. 26

her a “pre-engagement” ring until

two could begin making actual

ever met before in his

with

Conestoga College

determined.

will

be hosting

a pledge drive with various activities

from Oct. 22

Conestoga

is

to

Nov.

2.

hoping

to

raise

$45,000 to be divided between the and Kitchener- Waterloo Cambridge United Ways. This year’s goal

is

although the

last year's,

same as 2Q06 goal

the

If

which have yet

Organizers Paula Seidl,

human

resources information services coordinator, and Stephanie Krewski.

resources executive assis-

be

to

me

Utilised

many

pouring of support immediately

"Only when a tree has fallen can you take measure of it. It is the same with a man. ”

following Andrew’s death.

“My

best friends haven’t

house since

there

is

least,

“To be quite honest, a lot

of (United

Way)

of

it

is

“A

events for stu-

and

planning

at

Krewski

is

On

chased will

in

the

Doon

volunteers

who

over

to

the last minute

from

tioned outside the

working

at

cafeteria

$1

be donated to the United Way.

took

now

wrap pur-

Oct. 31, with every

Cash donations can also be made

dents were already planned.” Seidl

donated

to the organization.

nothing so elaborate. lot

dessert. Profits will be

and

the

will

be posi-

Doon

cafeteria

be handed

my

left

— Anne Morrow Lindbergh

haven’t

Way campaign

in the jar at the

end of the bills

add points to a community’s silver change will take

and any

These points

away

points.

added

to other points obtained

be

will

under

So

far,

nothing

Seidl hopes that she can begin

is

planned

at

any

other campuses.

in the

spring so that there

will be more activities, on more campuses, for students.

Students

who

more information students

For

living in

rez can contact their residence advis-

United Last

Way

get re-directed there.

year Cambridge received

$4,500 and Kitchener- Waterloo got

once

at least

“We

in their lifetime.

help such a diverse

live

in

in

residence this year’s

demo-

graphic of people," she says.

Cambridge

The hopes

campaign

this

Kitchener- Waterloo

Way

United

to raise $2.6 million

year, is

in

But Jen Locker of the Cambridge United Way says that every little bit helps in supporting local

communi-

looking for a

hefty $5.3 million.

“You know how

life

just

Locker reports

that

one

in

three

hap-

pens?”’ says Shelley Locche of the

"Anyone can As our community

United Way.

grows

it is important to strengthen our agencies so they can continue to address community issues and

enable us to see change."

For Krewski, all

the

Way

money

it's

important that

raised for the United

stays local.

benefit

our

college

that

community

too,” she says.

For more information on donating or volunteering with the United

ty groups.

its

while

“These are organizations

$26,590.

on those days.

penny fundraiser. Ajar has been assigned to each of the residence communities. All

will

I

he touched.

K-W

at

with CSI

Forms

that night;

lives that

face challenges.

year

can also participate

deductions.

nature will continue to live on in the

Most of the money donated will go to the Kitchener- Waterloo United Way. Only those payroll donations which staff specifically request to go to the Cambridge

this

on something

it.

of his charismatic attitude and kind

er or talk to staff at the front desk.

other donated items.

For students,

planning next year’s fundraiser

asked to contribute donations through payroll

did right in this world

it

Andrew Freake value, as the memory

piece of lasagna, garlic bread, salad

many

well as

sand dollars

be

spend

that will outlast

the residence rewards program.

Way

University of Guelph.

will

life is to

James

said the great value

by visiting the cafeteria on Oct. 24 and buying a lasagna lunch for $6. The meal includes a

who

Faculty

of

spirit.

historian

This year students can help the

United

in his

was to choose the best friends. This was evident by the tremendous out-

tally

“Every year there’s a little bit more made,” says Seidl. “Forty-five thouan attainable goal.”

Author and Truslow Adams

eligible for the

still

goal

is

nature and infectious

main prize draw which will include a pair of Maple Leaf tickets and numbered prints from local artists, as

deadline staff are

previous planner Sheila Hollidge,

achievable.

Way

Facebook group was created

achieved that

for the rest of his life.”

Andrew both

will

forms are returned by the Nov. 2

tant, are optimistic that this year’s is

that

Pennies, toonies, loonies and

var-

the timing this year, “says Seidl.

wasn’t achieved.

human

ious prizes,

and

fundraiser will be tallied for points.

staff are eli-

draw of

life,

Boudreau said one thing she and

change

they

if

than anyone he’s

he already knew he wanted to be

“Andrew was perfect,” she said. “He told me he loved me every chance he got and that I was the

care.”

Shortly after Andrew’s death, a

more than 1,000 members, a true testament to Andrew’s outgoing

he loved

felt as if

who

people

with diamonds and three opals, her

mixture of joy over the memories,

“Whenever he had an

but I’m so happy that there are so many

honour. Within days, the group had

charging head-on into something,

he

know what I’m going to do,

how Andrew eventually bought one

“When he gave it to me, he bent down on one knee and told me that

gible for an early-bird

The Doon campus

she

fit,”

her love songs. Her words were a

lived

Many

out to staff on Oct. 22 and

its part.

what

of his

Andrew

The annual United Way fundraising campaign is under way and doing

see

friends said if he wasn’t constantly

are returned

is

to figure

my

Fundraisers optimistic about United By ELIZABETH BATE

slept alone yet,” she said. “I don’t

weeks trying

“He. spent

Andrew would go on crazy road trips, and how he would always sing

serve as proof that

his life to the fullest.

excellent best friend.”

Romer

lived

also attended Preston

said he

ours,

Elianna Bartlett,

of student

no

there’s it,”

siderate and a joy to be around.”

Dumfries on Oct. The positive impact that Andrew had on people was echoed over and

— No. 21

as a group. “It

Remembered by

39th Year

go

to

Way

www.uwcambridge.on.ca or

people will be touched by the United

www.united-way-kw.org

Way

/section/view

or their

member

organizations


Page 2

News

— SPOKE, October 22, 2007

Now

Conestoga College

...with Random

questions answered by

Let’s get physical

CSI,

deep thoughts

college

What was the best treat you ever got on Halloween and why?

Physical resources

ment

said

paper.”

Brian

Wells,

third-year

telecommunications

ments

new school year and

a

maintain

new

between Conestoga College and Conestoga Students

getting

one

little

At a college council meeting Oct. 15, president John Tibbits and CSI president Roxy Stanciu began to mend the fences of what has been

first-year

second-year broadcasting television

candy

“We

pre-

my

on rebuilding relationships and on making students aware of the serv-

clients of the college, the students

to

"We

them.

lege and Jackson’s

over the bar

among

He

in

other

have

space and

Tibbits

of ancillary

issue

is

it

a legal

Conestoga

$200

in fees in

filed a

Two

students

$200-million lawsuit

against Ontario’s colleges, saying the fees are illegal.

Tibbits said contrary to earlier

Stefan,

second-year

newspaper reports, a letter he received from the Minister of Colleges and Universities was not a directive to stop charging ancillary

fees,

but simply a reminder

police

that there are guidelines in place

foundations

regarding the use of the fees. "We feel we’ve been following

adding on by the college’s board of governors and ignored directives by CSI. “If would have from the minister, the

guidelines,”

he

said,

that the fees are voted

“My son dressed up as

I

1

Elmo, learning to walk. I’ll

never forget

Mike Dinning, vice-president of student affairs, gave an update of

various

Delahunty, first-year

human

services

foundations

projects

including

a

planned renovation of the main cafeteria over the winter holiday

and construction of a new fullservice Tim Hortons which should begin in November. The next college council meeting is

Nov. 19

room of

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!

staff

posters.

“If paint keeps

are very dedicated

the other departments with-

means we have and

Some

of

things

the

physical

within

the

college,

costs

that

coming

off that

to repaint the walls

more money,” he

said.

Second-year business adminisAshley Austin said she has never heard of the physical resources department, but added the school is “always so clean and

tration student

con-

always see people cleanand the bathrooms.”

struction and

power

to the school.

kept up.

“One of the

things

we

ing the halls

will be get-

I

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been dragged out of here."

that.”

Stephanie

all

control

other things.

business,

recreation and CSI.

Andrea

more

that will not remove paint from the walls when putting up

resources takes care of include the locks on the doors, temperature

things as technology enhancement,

sweet.”

Milner

for

classrooms so faculty and

in the college.”

feel

addition to their tuition for such

“Cupcakes. They’re so

we

opinion

providing a good service to the

and

told the council

students pay over

marketing

first.

was a need

CSI wrestled

bistro, retail

issue he can't discuss.

business

third

the

and radio and fourth

from the combative relationship between Tibbits and former CSI president Matt Jackson. The col-

fees after warning that

first-year

to

TV

sive

also have involvement with

the Stratford location,” he said. "In

addressed the

Emily Di Reto,

all

Guelph and Waterloo.

rebuilding and bridges, maximizing dollars and being accountable and transparent are their main goals.

the world.”

“We handle construction as well so we have a number of areas that we look after,” he said.

of CSI activities. Stanciu said they want to focus

In

in

from the

down

said there

talking about

palpa-

re-engaging

favourite

floors

receiving, couriers and housekeeping are all a part of the department.

sented the council with an update

relationship.

my

facilities

the

physical resources by using adhe-

room was

Stanciu and CSI general

Graves also talked about the new

That’s

summer

big undertaking this

campuses, such as

relief in the

as

liquor licences

“A bag of cotton candy.

A

was moving

with the increasing student body. Milner said students can help

hated each other!”

Members of CSI will be meeting with Tibbits on a monthly basis to discuss issues, a marked change Visser,

staff.

Milner said the department has

munity.”

Eric

it.

very good staff and that when he talks about physical resources he is

CSI's job is to help the students, and to be a part of the college com-

I

handle

we

ices available

“One year got a comic book.”

who

“The world has changed dramat-

manager Christopher Graves

marketing

said they have staff

were moved upstairs and within the next couple of months there will be three more classrooms created in Room 1C29 to keep up

The

Michelle Haack,

they get a call about some-

thing that needs to be done, Milner

however,

for Spoke.”

Inc.

into the school very often."

When

the

Safety and security, shipping and

ble

thing.”

facility,

coming

For instance, if a toilet needs to be unclogged, they have plumbers on

equipment we do not maintain the academic equipment, such as the computers used

relationship

all

just

and depart-

the facilities

called

is

clearing you probably wouldn't be

He

that provide those services.

"We

ically,” said Tibbits. “Last year,

them. You’re not

if

an

said he oversees the operations and

a very fractious relationship.

“Those bags with pop and chips and candy in

is

it

Barry Milner, manager.

within the toilet

But

"Physical resources manages the college’s facilities and grounds,"

manages

“Eggs and

all.

noticed,

integral part of the college.

Bv CHARLOTTE PRONG PARKHILL a

a depart-

is

gets

rarely

that

they get noticed at

fences It’s

few months, in snow,” joked Milner. "Snow removal so people can get into the college certainly falls within the realm of what physical resources does. Without snow

ting into in the next

Canada,

mend

random students

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News

New

SPOKE, October

Go

bridge brings

By HIEN DINH

the City of

Cambridge and

the City

,

of Kitchener. After two years of construction

and almost $2 million, the new pedestrian and cyclist bridge over

Highway 401, The

of

east

Watson Boulevard,

is

Homer

“All

three

equally,”

parties

are

MacDonald. “The

said

The

total

ing

cost of the bridge

‘well,

where

is

going to a field ... you have a bike or hik-

shoes.’

much

is

ing they will

It’s

that’s fine if

ect manager.”

finally open.

going?

it

proj-

an online contest for students hop-

campus.

“You (could) say

funding

Region of Waterloo has led as

Miles Automotive Group, an company, is sponsoring

people are skeptical of the location for the possible

It

doesn’t look

like

but the college has a vision

we want

CEO

electric car

Cambridge

$1. 75-million project connects Kitchener to

green, win $1,000

By VANESSA BUTLER

new adventures

make

a difference on

on campuses.

partnered

with

NoGasRequired.com

a website

was

appealing,

more

accessible,

safer

crossing of the 401 corridor as a part

of the Trans-Canada

trail

network.

“The bridge is unique,” he said. “The centre line of the 401 is the municipal boundary so one end of the bridge is in Cambridge and the other end of it is in Kitchener.”

The bridge

is

a joint

project

other side (of the bridge) and

become a major

Tibbits said the college

Tibbits can understand

could

is

grow-

ing very quickly and will eventual -

need more space. “This year we grew in the first year by 17 per cent. Last year we grew by 12 per cent,” he said. “There’s a lot more people on the campus and we’re probably going to grow next year by another 10-15 ly

A

number of video

entries

be posted on YouTube.

Based on

typical driving, a col-

In the contest, students in

Students interested

all

should view the

Canada

and the United States will be encouraged to submit videos they have created and edited themselves about saving the environment, helping fight global warming and

Entries should be submitted to the

Upload area of the

demographic and have the power to evoke real change,” said

No Gas Required

site.

To

ential

contest

Revolution

video on YouTube. Students can then interpret it and create a video of their own.

reducing pollution. “Students are an extremely influ-

in the

MILES

enter,

visit

quired.com

or

www.nogasreMiles

Electric

Vehicles at www.mileselectricvehicles.com.

per cent.”

The bridge

is

only a 10-minute

walk for students who are at the end of Doon campus (the woodworking centre).

is.”

between the Region of Waterloo,

it

link for students.”

will also

with an all-electric car or truck.

of 2005. region’s

designed with the school’s logo and

direct action for positive environ-

college vehicles be electric.

the

The

of annual carbon emissions for each gas-powered vehicle it replaces

is

“Remember, 40 years ago the Doon campus was a gravel pit with a couple of portables - look at it now. The same thing can happen on the

Gary MacDonald,

tuition.

college each winner attends will also

dedicated to helping students take

Trans-Canada

head of transportation rehabilitation, said the main purpose of the bridge is to provide a trail connection over the 401 that is more pedestrian and cyclist friendly. “(We wanted to create) a more

each receive

towards

to put

lege can eliminate 5,443 kilograms

and a ribbon cutting. Construction of the bridge began in the summer

between the three parties of the region and the two cities.” John Tibbits, president of Conestoga College, said the bridge will come in handy because the college hopes to build another campus on the other side. “There’s 136 acres of vacant land on the other side that the City of Cambridge said they were willing to donate if we were to build another campus. “The new possible campus would be a part of the Doon campus,” he said. “It’s just that’s where the land

Five winners will

environmentally-themed videos.

mental change and encourages

got the grant and the balance

huge

colours.

like.

(then) shared equally

a

NoGasRequired.com to promote the MILES Revolution Video Contest, which encourages students to create

of what

“We

would make

sions which

difference on campuses.”

receive an electric car, completely

have

$1.75 million but the parties also Trail Foundation.

spread the message of zero emis-

lution can be reduced

They

received a $100,000 grant from the

look

MILES

“The

$1,000

opening ceremony

this thing to

Boyd.

Jeff

Revolution Video Contest asks students to use their creativity to

campus. The company, based in California, is dying to spread the word that pol-

took place yesterday with speeches

official

— Page 3

2007

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Page 4

Commentary

— SPOKE, October 22, 2007

China’s ‘diplomacy’ criticized Looking forward to the summer Olympics next year? Actress/human rights activist Mia Farrow certainly isn’t. other counIn fact, Farrow is actively campaigning for the U.S. and Games. Summer 2008 the boycott tries to The reason behind her displeasure? The Olympics are being held in

communist regime dubbing next year’s Olympic Games the

Beijing, China. Critics of the Chinese are increasingly

in

Beijing

genocide

Olympics.”

They said China, by not taking a firmer stance against the Khartoum government in halting the conflict in Darfur, is actually complicit in the atrocities committed by the Janjaweed, a pro-Islamic government

militia responsible for

many of

the attacks in the western

region of the Sudan.

and human-rights activists such as Farrow are walkinfluence ing a fine line: to suggest that China is uniquely positioned to President Omar al-Beshir because of its enormous economic leverage over Khartoum is absolutely correct; to suggest that China is morally

However,

critics

responsible for the crisis in Darfur, however,

is

categorically false.

For one thing, China is not the one bombing Darfur. Khartoum govIs China trying to maintain good relations with the it does not want to damage its ness in southern Sudan? Probably, just as former secretary of defence Donald H. Rumsfeld turned a blind eye to the gassing of the Kurds in northern Iraq when he visited Saddam Hussein in early 1984 and

cemented the friendly

relations

When you

us be the devil’s advocate for a moment, and put ourselves shoes of the Chinese government and ask: would we have done

let

any different? “One of the points that I try to instil in students is that a state’s first responsibility is towards its own people,” said Michael Dale, who teaches issues in world affairs at Conestoga. Dale also said a state has the prerogative to promote growth and prosperity for

its

own

China believes investing national interests,

in the

then that

arsenal of Chinese policy-makers. As a country which has been thoroughly humiliated by western

powers in the 19th century, China has been especially sensitive to This view was expressed by Chinese foreign ministry spokesman who said China does not impose its ideology and social

Liu Jianchao,

systems on any other country. However, this view should not be misinterpreted as the Chinese government condoning the atrocities which have happened in Darfur. What the Chinese are suggesting is that instead of adopting a hard-

anti-Khartoum stance and isolating Sudan, the international community should keep diplomatic channels open and promote diainstead of pressure. logue and negotiation But it would be a mistake to assume that Beijing has no interest in ensuring peace in Sudan. In fact, as a country which has pursued a line,

model of economic growth without western-styled democracy, China is pinning its hope for legitimacy in the international realm squarely on Sudan. And there are indications that its alternative diplomacy is working; Khartoum has agreed to a 26,000 African Union/UN peacekeeping force in Sudan and has also agreed to enter into negotiations it has agreed to all these with rebel groups this month in Libya measures without economic or trade sanctions. So to critics who say that -China is not doing enough or does not care about the people of Darfur, we say China is making progress, it

just

doing

it

what

TV

turn on your is

the first

you’re greeted by? For me, it’s usually

Mulroney saying

a break from Chances

at

reality

image

Ben

in his

Unfortunately, this

is

Marcia

change the channel as quickly as my remote will allow me to another exciting episode of House.

my

gener-

am

How many

more times

will peo-

ple vote for their favourite contestant or vote their least favourite off

a

show before they become bored

which doesn’t bother

me

I

am one

declining

of the

number

of

peo-

who the TV during primetime

actually turns on

ple

in the

to

see something which

least.

My

involves actors

friends have tried to explain

with little success me who Sanjaya is and what is

to

and

scripts.

so

want

know

is

to

watch a program

fake.

I

More and more

pointed to see a once well-loved TV drama or comedy cancelled

somewhat

famous actress broadcast every Wednesday night. It leaves me wondering what the world has come ify as

to for this to qual-

and replaced by a slightly different perspective of the typical cookiecutter reality show. I

this was anothwould die off with the same way bell bottoms

used to assume

er fad that

entertainment.

People are so excited when their favourite

often I’m disap-

I

don’t care to see

the everyday life of a

Why

do people enjoy watching

the 16-year-old boy break tears

time,

down

in

because he has just been told

he can’t sing?

them and wear?

My

and mullets Years

later,

did. I

now have my

doubts.

tell

them what not

to

avoidance of reality-based

programs is made even more difficult by the fact that I live with

someone who adores them. My roommate is addicted to reality TV. She watches So You Think You Can Dance religiously. Her fascination with The Biggest Loser and

interesting about his hair. I

televising their day-

lives.

Who would want to appear on TV oqly to have someone critique

it?

Yes,

Canadian Idol contestant wins, only to forget about them

behind the scenes.

to-day

actually

on the TV during primetime to see something which involves actors and scripts. I don't know who Jaydee Bixby

turns

is,

comeback by

following season.

one of the declining

number of people who

searching for their ideal

and cheer for another singer the

of

despise reality TV.

1

here to

former celebrities trying to make a

I

I

is

man, jittery teens waiting for their chance to step up and prove their singing or dancing abilities and

Opinion

not exactly

offence, Ben.

ation,

women

Love

I

Unlike most people of

TV

This leaves me surfing through channels of so-called average

exaggerat-

want to spend my evening TV viewing tiihe. No

way

are reality

stay.

ed voice, “Good evening, Canada, and welcome to Canadian Idol.”

Yes,

issues of sovereignty.

is

night,

the

people.

Sudanese oil fields is beneficial is what it will do,” he said. to its own One should also consider the argument of non-interference; a hands-off approach to policy-making that is becoming a staple in the “If

TV needs

between the United States and Iraq

during the Iran-Iraq war.

But

/

oil-importing busi-

ernment because

in the

-^AtKtET A‘-<-WC>cn)

People Big World

Little

my mind. Reality TV*s something

boggles

I

will

never understand. Nevertheless,

I

realize there are

many people who

can’t wait to

catch the next episode of

American Idol or America’s Next Top Model. My apologies, Simon Cowell. I’m sony, Tyra Banks. You guys don’t have my vote.

Spoke Letters are

welcome

is

Spoke welcomes editor. Letters

letters to the should be signed and include the

and telephone number contacted

No unsigned

Editor: Christopher Mills Advertising Manager: Jenn Sprach Spoke Online Editor: Alex McNanney Production Manager: Holly Featherstone Circulation Manager: Sarah Jaynes

name

of the writer. Writers will

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College

be

Photo Editors: Leanne Mountford, Vanessa Butler Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

for verification.

be published. than 500 words. longer no Letters should be to edit any letter Spoke reserves the right letters will

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 1C29, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 519-748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 519-748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca Website: www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

for publication.

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 1C29, Kitchener, Ont.,

N2G 4M4

Dr., College. The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga the space. Letters Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for written or typed: a MS Word file would be helpful. to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.


News

SPOKE, October

22,

2007

— Page 5

Conestoga students lend

FREE Drop-In

a helping hand

Relaxation Sessions

By FRANCA MAIO

Good

said the students

who

par-

ticipated in the first build in June

On

some

a site in Kitchener,

stu-

had a good time

the site

at

and

dents from the engineering tech-

helping with the build.

nology/construction

Habitat also booked two Saturdays in September so that students from the engineering tech-

architecture

program gained some hands-on experience while giving back to the

community. Glen Good, faculty in the program, contacted Waterloo Region’s Habitat for Humanity’s chapter last winter to organize a build for the students. Habitat planned to con-

townhouse condominiums on Cherry Street and invited struct

six

students to join them.

“We

co-ordinated a

week

for the

students to sign up, and to go and

help build,” said Good.

He

said the interest

most students had for their

was

left

summer jobs

there but

the college

or vacations,

and the build did not happen June, so the turnout

until

was small with

five students participating for the

week.

Good

said he

can be used to help othand give back to their commu-

their skills

nity.

He

construction

program

in the fall

wanted to give the students a chance to experience volunteering in the community, and said working on a construction site gave them hands-on experience in their chosen field and the opportunity to also

be a volunteer.

architecture

Between the two days, were 40-50 students involved, said Good. “It is a really good way to get

”'kt

the build.

there

first-year students connected.

Are you

You

feeling stressed?

work together, you sweat together, you laugh together and we had a lot

Would you like to try • Deep breathing?

of fun.”

He

said the icing on

the cake

would have been if the homeowners were there helping the students build the house, but due to other circumstances the homeowners were unable to be there that day. According to the Habitat for Humanity website, (www.habitat-

• Progressive

Muscle Relaxation?

Guided imagery?

home own-

have to complete sweat equity hours, which is done by working on the home. The first-year students had the chance to interact with the second- and third-year students during the build, he said. When asked if a Habitat build would be worked into the program. Good said it wasn’t out of the question and faculty has considered the ers

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yet.

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1+1

of

Canada

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Enrolled in a Red Seal trade? Then you may qualify for a $1,000 grant. There are a

lot

apprenticeship.

of reasons to pursue

an

We’ve added another. The

Apprenticeship Incentive Grant is a new grant that is available to registered apprentices once they

have successfully completed their first or second year (or equivalent) of an apprenticeship program in one of the Red Seal trades.

How to

|

could help with

waterlooregion.on.ca)

wanted to help the students get hands-on experience, but also wanted them to see that ers

nology,

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Page 6

By KERRY REED Drinking alcohol

may

“It

take back your empties to

if

you

Not only is it better for the environment but it also benefits you if you save up your change from returning the cans and bottles said Sarah Miller, the assistant manager

The Beer

Waterloo’s

clable.

A

many bottles and cans after having good night,” said Miller. a “Hopefully it can help make a dif-

more. “People need to realize that once

Beer cans, beer bottles and liquor are worth 10 cents each when returned and 630 ml liquor Liquor the bottles bought at Control Board of Ontario are worth

garbage

is

taken to a landtdl

there forever,” she said. to divert as rial

20 cents said Miller. “If you buy a 24 case of beer and return all bottles when you have finished with them you would get back $2.40,” she said. "If you save up $2.40 from every time you buy beer and return the bottles you would eventually have enough money to buy a case of beer from

much

as possible

it

is

“We need

recyclable mate-

from going

to land-

fills.”

Recycling does make a ence, said Kohlmetz.

buys

all

the plastic

recycled and burns

A

it

down

to

make

into a liquid

and cans but I do believe someone could make a few extra

bottles

man-

dollars

by returning

their

empties

every time they have them,” she said. “It’s a great way for college

ager of an area

Morris said not only can you

students especially to put a few extra dollars in their pockets while helping to keep the planet clean.”

recycle bottles and cans but you can reuse the paper and plastic bags.

.

Tim Hortons Bv LEANNE MOUNTFORD

“I do not think someone can make a living off of returning beer

can be returned to The Beer Store for deposit except for the 50 ml

Tara Herriot, a second-year marketing student, smiles at the thought of the

"

2

Every day, students, staff and faculty line up to get that desperately needed cup of coffee. These coffee lovers will be thrilled to hear that Tim Hortons is moving to a bigger

and better location at the Doon campus. According to Roxy Stanciu, president of Conestoga Students Inc.

... -

-

-Z&SSm

-

bottles

will

bring.

to relocate to Student Centre (CSI), there

is

a lot of unused space

y'

Mm.

space and more seating room, she

CSI self-serve area. A decision by CSI and the college has been made to split the area in half

said.

and relocateTim Hortons to where Shooters (CSI’s photo studio) used

ed service and

in the

W^ -

money her

which has been

recycled material.

LCBO

(Hhoto oy Kerry neeaj

differ-

third party

where the third party can make something new from the it

drinking beer."

the

pop cans, butter contain-

milk cartons, boxes, plastic bags, newspapers and so much

ers,

bottles

Tom Morris, LCBO.

household can recycle plastic

bottles,

ference.”

bottles, said

Recycling

department, said about 60 per cent of a household’s garbage is recy-

Store.

Everything- bought

Management

Waste

Residential

Division

great to see people return so

at the

a great idea to reuse the

few bags for a couple of months now and I think it is great.” Yvonne Kohlmetz, a customer service assistant at the Region of

The Beer

Store.

“It is

is

bags from the LCBO because it helps to save the planet,” said Morris. “I have reused the same

some

put

extra cash into your pocket

at

News

— SPOKE, October 22, 2007

to reside. Shooters has

moved

to an

Due to the new location

sell

soup and sand-

wiches.

According

move

adjacent room.

increase in space, the will also offer extend-

to

Stanciu,

the

new

will help reduce traffic in the

location,

hallways since the long lineups for

which should be open by January, will have more cash registers, more

Tim Hortons will be gone, leaving more room for people to walk.

The new Tim Hortons’


SPOKE, October

22,

2007

— Page 7

PHOTO STUDIO

D PHOTO \Ve have scheduled your program time

you sign up

at

the

CSI

office in

time for your program, we

Oct. 15

slot'

will

th

Community &

Health Services

OTA / PTA, LASA.

Liberal

th

fee.

-Nov. 2 nd

,

Nov. 5

It

the designated

waive the $25 sitting

'Personal Support Worker Sochi! Services. Rec. cation, Practical Nursing,

for graduation photos.

room 2A108 during

& Leisure.

Early Childhood Edu-

Paramedic, Police foundations)

-Nov. 16 th

& Media Studies

Conestoga

11" „ TSI-C1 OCTOBER THE ANUCTUARY AT NOON SION UP IN ROOM 2A1Q6 STU0 b

'

-rJ

IN

f

IHCNDAY MOVIES UPPER SANCTUARY ST 11:30m xi

STUDENTS INC

m

1

1

1

1

1

1

m

»

1

1

1

1

1

1 1

ii

October 29

COME GET S OME y I

1

I

1

I

I

1

I

^n—

j

‘Y


«

3

News

— SPOKE, October 22, 2007

Page 8

A DOGgone good Humane

Society-sponsored event hounded by frenzied fidos

By HQLLY FEATHERSTONE Paws down,

the

Committee

wag- worthy success, 350 people and around 250 hounds, despite the harsh wind and unsavoury temperature. A caboodle of canines in a copiosity of sizes, breeds and

The

tail

p.m.

socialize,

1

1

a.m. to 2

Bingemans, featured

games

esteemed trick to observers and This year’s judge panel included former Liberal MP Karen

10

judges.

including

bobbing for

treats

and

Redman

Hounds

Durrell.

Tryon, community relations co-ordinator for the K-W

Humane

themhave

some fun and meet other dogs,” said Rhonda McClennan, owner of a St. Bernard pup named Bradley.

Society, said the populari-

ty

of the fido frenzy

to

both the closeness of the

is

a testament

during the festive Oktoberfest season and the promotion of healthy alliances between

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

The

Manny

(Photo by Holly Featherstone)

old

Bradley sports an alpine hat.

contest,

Melissa

which encour-

owners and

their pets.

whose

Santos,

three-year-

blue heeler-collie cross

first prize,

said

won

Buddy has excep-

“He’s perfect for agility,” he said. Santos said Buddy is like a kid to him. “I spoil him nuts,” he said. With an admission charge of $10 per dog, Tryon said the couple thousand dollars in proceeds will

be allocated to the welfare of ani-

mals

in the community. “The funds go to helping unwanted and abandoned animals of the

K-W

area,” she said.

When

asked what the correlation between dogs and Oktoberfest, Tryon said it is merely a means of mustering fun for four-legged is

tional

obedience, having earned second place in last year’s pageant.

friends.

to

be part of the community during Oktoberfest because it’s part of our

He

Oktoberfest, there are events for

heritage,” she said. “We’re always

cessive training classes.

“We (K-W Humane

com-

munity

CTV’s

and

aged costumes, allowed the winning dog to have its picture taken with Miss Oktoberfest.

Amanda

selves.

to

The acme of the event, the DOGtoberfest pageant, featured dogs performing their most

show’s

Haus Cafe, where owners could purchase dog pretzels for their snack-savvy companions.

grapple their dogs’ leashes and par-

“We came

the

barrel rolling as well as the

and mirthful mingling while owners struggled to socializing

2005,

event, held from at

agility trials,

sniffing, yipping

some

in

carnival-style

excitability took part in concerted

in

looking for ways to strengthen the

owner-pet relationship.”

inaugural year.

1

attracting

take

the

first visit to

show, which was voted best new event by the Oktoberfest

Humane

Society’s DOGtoberfest on Oct.

was a

This was Bradley’s

annual

third

Kitchener- Waterloo

time

Society) like

also boasted of the dog’s accu-

mulated winnings

after several suc-

“It’s

a

fun

time.

During

adults and the kids, so why not dogs too?”

Relationships

Being a student and in a committed relationship can bring enjoyment and pleasure and also feel conflictual in terms of responsibilities and demands on time. A healthy relationship is more likely to withstand the pressures and that being a full-time student bring. A local Individual, Couple and Family Therapist, Barbara Pressman, developed a list of primary principles for a

changes

healthy relationship.

Here are a few paraphrased ideas: Respect for the other person — no put downs, no insults, appreciation of different needs and beliefs and recognition of the possible need for separate as well as together time. Safety

even

of

is

- no

utmost importance

fear, there already

is

emotional or physical violence.

If

there

is

hurt.

Caring behaviour and emotional support such as listening without judging or blaming and encouraging each other’s interests. Inclusive decision-making regardless of earnings,

compromising differences

avoiding a win/lose result.

Open communication

including the capacity to share feelings, to

be listened

advice (unless sought), and willingness to be assertive about expressing needs.

to attentively without giving

Communication includes affection and sexual expression. These need to fit the needs of each couple and be mutually

The counsellor

at

A Message from

your campus

(Photos by Holly Featherstone)

DOGtoberfest was a haven for hounds Oct. 13. Clockwise from top left: Buddy poses for the camera, Akya donned a lobster costume, an attendent dances with her dog to Oktoberfest tunes and Buddy

satisfying.

available to assist you with relationship issues.

is

Counselling Services, 1A103.

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News Parking

woes continue

Halloween origins a cause By JACKIE

By JOSHUA KHAN

in the daily lots,”

SPOKE, October

ALLWOOD

between the

If

Halloween is upon us and candy and costumes are on the minds of many children and adults. This is the second largest retail

to park

you calculate the $25 a week for

holiday in North America with the

their cars without getting a ticket.

eight months, the result is a lot more than what you have to pay

largest

With no parking passes for sale the first few weeks of October,

“Most of the time you can’t even find a parking space. “It costs me about $25 a week

Conestoga students were desper-

to park in the daily parking.

ately trying to find a

way

The new school year brought a more students to the Doon campus, which means there are more vehicles in the parking lots. lot

This year Conestoga has 6,903 full-time students, up 10 per cent

from September 2006. Pamela Sherman, a second-year law and security administration student, said when she went to pick up a parking pass on Oct. 10, she was told they were sold out. “They’ve never had enough passes for

all

the

drive,” she said.

students that

“But they

still

continue to ticket.”

Sherman

said she and other stu-

dents were told to park in the daily parking lots, but problems

keep forming. “It’s

way

too expensive to park

for a parking pass.”

John Anderson, a security repDoon campus, said more parking passes became available mid-October, and can resentative at

be

purchased

campus

the

at

administration office

located

Room 2B10-10. “We now have more passes but there

is

quantity,” he said.

on

a

first

in

parking

come, that

the

parking passes available

on

lot

ple are unfamiliar with.

based

depends on the number of spaces available in each parking lot,” said Anderson. “It all

that.

Halloween,

like

Eve celebration

Year’s

to

Celtic

According nel’s

to the history chan-

website,

www.history.com,

the Celtic festival

we now know

as

Halloween was actually a festival Samhain (pronounced sowin) that lasted for two days. Samhain was the Celtic New Year which was celebrated on Nov. 1,

called

which made Oct. 3

1

the Celtic

New

Year’s Eve.

Samhain was a day

that

Celtic

people thought brought the end of

summer and

thus,

it

was associated

things

fice

for

Celtic

deities

in

They believed ghosts and spirits of family and friends would come to life

use

and walk the earth and the

lines

This practice

fam-

pastries

developed into

later

neighbourhood houses for food, money and ale. Going a-souling was revived in the 1950s and the name was trick-or-treating^, to changed because children would play tricks on families who would not give them treats.

children

The

to re-light their hearths (a

it

visiting

jack

o’lantern,

another

was used for everything from cooking to heating

Halloween

houses by Celtic families). It was put out before evening cel-

townspeople called Stingy Jack. The myth says Stingy Jack made

fireplace that

com-

staple, originally started

with an Irish myth about a man, the

some bad

deals with the devil in

ing into the house, in hopes of pro-

lieu

of the devil not taking him to

long cold winter

hell

when he

for the

tection

Many

Celtic people also believed

would

they

have

they

left their

him

when

A

houses.

order to avoid these scary

In

into heaven. burning coal was given to Jack by the devil, to light his way as he

walked the earth

encounters people would put on masks to make spirits believe they

g°-

were fellow ghosts and therefore would leave them alone. Families would also leave food

it

on their doorsteps to feed the ghosts in hopes it would deter them away from their homes. ed

in a similar fashion.

Originally called “going a-souling,”

it

was a

practice poor people

died.

Because of the deals Jack made, when Jack died God would not let

unpleasant

encounters with the dead

Trick-or-treating originally start-

w'ith death.

would give the poor

called “soul cakes.”

ahead.

people.

In return for the prayers the

Bonfires would be built for townspeople to gather at and sacri-

ebrations to ward off the dead

New

actually considered a

is

atives.

ilies

When evening celebrations had ended the people would take a part of the bonfire back to the house and

long before

used to beg for food with promises of prayer for the family’s dead rel-

future of the Celtic people.

and heads.

first

served

is

to tell the

Halloween on this continent didn’t occur until 1921, in Anoka, Minn. However, many European countries have been celebrating the day

The

many peo-

counts.

would use

celebrated.

many

number of

This was also a day that Druids or Celtic priests

hopes of a good winter. The people were usually dressed in costumes made of animal pelts

brations, has a past that

first

and the dead had

Halloween however, isn’t something North Americans have always

as costumes and decorations.

It

said

as well

sales are

basis.”

He

amount of candy sold

other cele-

only a limited

“The

living

— Page 9

for celebration

disappeared.

she said.

2007

22,

To keep in

w'ith

nowhere

the coal burning Jack put

a carved out turnip.

After this he was

known

as Jack

which was later* what we know today

of the Lantern shortened to

as jack o’lantern.

Who knew we

an October day that

celebrate with

humourous cos-

tumes and sugary treats was actually a fear-filled day Celtic people celebrated.

Plan to attend the:

Transition to University: Transition

Planning Workshop

Counselling Services recognize that the process of choosing and applying to university(s) can be a challenge. This workshop is available to give you information and provide you with

Counsellors

in

an opportunity to ask questions about degree completion, search sites and the application process. Free.

Tuesday, October 23rd

@ 3:00 Room 2E06

or

Thursday, October 25th

to

@ noon Room 2D21


9

Page 10

Entertainment

— SPOKE, October 22, 2007

Libra September 23 October 22

Be open ing

the

new experiences durweek of Halloween.

Your

to

Maybe you can check

out a cos-

tume shop and try on a costume you wouldn't normally give a second glance.

|

May

-

in

Halloween

is

why

not try

on?

it

about having fun,

new

and refusing

to adapt to a

adventure

going against the

is

handy

if

m

20

Instead of resisting the odd looking costume,

able to

anyone will come you head out to cele-

brate Halloween.

Taurus April 20

talent for being

socialize with

Scorpio October 23

November

Your imagination

when

-

21

you

will help

you're trying to figure out

which

costume

Halloween. cash,

pick

to

you're

If

for

sometimes the best cos-

tumes are the homemade ones.

grain.

Gemini

GS

May

21

-

(Photo by John Lintey)

for

tight

Walter Ostanek plays

Canada’s polka king

November 22 December 21

By JOHN LINLEY

College Night returned to a more

favourite

anything

or

celebrity

your creative mind can imagine.

new

you

ideas, so

anyone who has an idea for a costume. Your energetic personality will work for you if you are hosting or attending a Halloween party. will listen to

German word

This

Prost!

You're open to

-

June 22

I

-

July 22

December 22

['IpisPFj

January

-

1

unlike last year’s event, where the

theme was Muchtoberfest and more modem music was played. O.J. Wilura of the Kitchener Lions Club said the change was because the attempt to lure more

Queensmount Arena on ing

Oct.

Oktoberfest’s annual

1

1

dur-

College

Night.

A

festive

enjoyed adorned

crowd of over 1,200

the

celebration

while

in their

German

music.

The event drew mostly college and university students, but there was a fair number of older attendees as well.

The arena was

Maybe

Have fun on Halloween and

a night with friends and

some candy

will put all that stress

from mid-terms

to rest.

a gathering for the

Organize

31st,

with candy apples and fun

filled

games

to entertain the masses.

not to be so reserved

if

try

you are

attending a party. Instead of waiting for

someone

sation,

you should

to start

find

a conver-

someone

to

year

this

for

tional

WBT%% Capricorn

atmosphere

cheers could be heard throughout the

decorated Bavarian fun hats, chicken dancing to tradi-

Cancer

hit

-

traditional

Halloween is a great time for you to let loose and put all those worries away. Go out as a

Night, Oct. 11.

College Night a big

Sagittarius

June 21

Queensmount Area crowd at Oktoberfest’s College has been performing since he was a teenager. for the

of an

fashion

set

up

in the usual

Oktoberfest event,

with

young people did not go

as they

planned.

“There was no difference attendance and on speaking to a of students,

it

didn’t

make

a differ-

ence to them,” said Wilura. This year all of the musical duties were left up to Canada’s Polka King, Walter Ostanek. Ostanek, a three-time

Grammy

traditional banners hanging from the ceiling and booths dedicat-

every

ed to food, drink, games and decora-

Arena, and he always stays

tions encircling the

wards

dance

floor.

in lot

winner for year

his at

to sign

polka music, plays the

Queensmount

who call him Uncle Walter. Conestoga Students Inc. works with the Lions Club in planning the annual event, and the money raised from tickets sold at the college goes back into the school. The Lions Club has one person who works with the student union and gets input from the school as to what direction they should take fans,

every year.

Aside from a few people being kicked out for drinking too much

and a couple of

was

and the

event went well. Justin Eccles, a 21 -year-old

works

in the area,

Night for the pleased with

after-

autographs for his

crowd

fights, the

just there to celebrate,

“It

was a

first

how

time and was

the night went.

of fun." he

said. "I

go back next

year."

lot

will definitely

who

attended College

chat with at the party.

Few Halloween movies

year

this

Aquarius January 20

-

By JENN SPRACH

section,

February 18 There are only two scary movies

You always love a Well,

Halloween

You

great party. the

is

perfect

are original and inventive,

use that to your advantage

time to attend one. Gather your

you're deciding what to

friends and head out to a local

Halloween.

bash for some fun.

your own costume.

Maybe

try

when

wear on to

make

that will be playing in theatres this

Halloween.

The newest vampire movie, 30 Days of Night, and Saw 4 are the only terrifying movies out right now,

Chris

said

Galaxy,

in

manager

Leies,

of

Waterloo.

30 Days of Night is based in a town of Barrow, Ala. where every j

Virgo

winter they have uninterrupted dark-

Pisces

August 23 September 22

•diC

A

February 19

-

March 20

ness. This year a

group of vampires and takes advantage of the

arrives

lack of sunlight.

It’s

coming out on

Oct. 19.

Your eagerness

to

know about who

the world and the people

inhabit

it

will bring

you

ent places, and invite ple into your

seeking,

life.

remember

to differ-

many peo-

While you're to take

Creative,

born will

all

passionate and stub-

In

help you create a cos-

tice

tume to remember for the Halloween party you might attend.

some

n’t

Saw 4, Jigsaw and his apprenAmanda are dead but that does-

mean

ters

maze

game

has died

the

deadly

are not drug addicts from the

bash.

Rigg.

It

“The brutal

palm of her hand.

deadly

moving through

streets

in the

their

with them. In this movie the charac-

time out and attend a Halloween

Franca Maio is a second-year journalism student holding fate

said Jessica Yabsley. shift

supervisor

SWAT’s Commander

but will last

be

in theatres

Oct. 27.

Saw movies had

violence

and

a lot of

gore,”

said

Leies.

is

for

males 17-

25, he said.

As

movies the closer it gets to Halloween the harder it is to get to rent movies from the horror for renting

Roger’s Video on

Weber Street in Waterloo. The new releases usually go

1408, 28

Weeks

and are followed by movies that are a part of a series like Halloween, Friday the 13th and Freddy Kruger

Later.

The Reaping,

Hostel part 2 and Rise.

To have first

the best

chance of renting

movie Halloween week, come

a

as

early as possible, preferably on. a

weekday, she

“We

said.

have no

late fees (so)

people

movies.

don’t really have to return movies by

“People will come in and rent a whole series or large chunks of them around Halloween,” she said.

the given

Also, anything based on a Stephan King novel is popular year round and especially hard to rent at

she said, adding people can also call ahead and save themselves the trip if the movie they want is rented.

Halloween as is the Saw series and anything by Rob Zombie. “Anything that’s really gory is

When asked what ommend she

she would rec-

“Recommending movies

replied, is

due date,” she said. However, this makes it hard for them to tell if something will be in,

New

a dan-

releases will be easier to find

because

the

store

has

multiple

copies.

A

especially popular,” said Yabsley.

Best

Buy employee

sales don't really

of

go up

said

movie

at this

time

year.

The box

sets

and the new releas-

gerous game.”

es are the biggest sellers for scary

Everyone has a different opinion of what’s scary and some people just can't be scared by horror movies.

supervisor of the

Some Days

of her favourites include 28

Later, the original Amityville

Horror and the original Omen.

The main age demographic these types of movies

at

"I usually like the originals

more

because they seem to have better plots rather than just being based

on

visual effects.”

New

video releases which should

be good Halloween flicks include

movies,

said

Balheim. media depart-

Crystal

ment.

new

This year,

releases in time

Halloween include the rerelease of Stephan King’s The for

Saw 3 special edition and Saw Trilogy. “When sequels have a movie Shining,

coming out

in theatres

re-release the

they tend to

movie prior

special edition.”

to

it

as a


.

Sports

SPOKE, October

2007

22,

— Page 11

Condors win one and lose one Bv

sure on in the second half and

AARON O’CONNELL

things

Korey Graham scored two second Condors to a

half goals to lead the 2-1

over the Redeemer men’s soccer action at

victory

Royals

in

home on

Oct. 10.

The scrappy

first

half provided a

scare for both teams the

with a Royal

at

was

player

regained

With only a couple of days rest the Condors were in a must-win sit-

selves down one goal heading

into

the second.

out the

controlled the play throughfirst

half but

we just

could-

n’t bury any of our chances,” Condors coach Geoff Johnstone said. “I told them to keep the pres-

until the bitter end.

Sam up

Johnstone. “I put him and

before

consciousness

when

hosted

they

%

e

I

Tearns

“I’m happy with the way we went we played hard the whole game capitalize,” couldn’t just but

just

Johnstone mtmzm

in

atom team played

the rec centre Oct. 13. Minor in

the rec centre every

gear up

for the playoffs

said.

>

-

By ALEX PH

nine-year-old minor

hockey practices and games are held weekend.

crushing the Condors’ playoff run.

out aggres-

—iW

heels,

their

Swarming the net

out,

up for another year. “We knew we had to win so

come

against the Flamborough Sabres

the Falcons and moved up field closing in on the Condors’ goal and with just two minutes left the Falcons found the back of the net for the only goal of the game,

cleats

to

desperation to score a goal.

On

guys

The Kitchener Rangers’

retrieved the ball

the

Fanshawe Falcons on Oct. 12. with a It was for all or nothing win the Condors would have a chance at making the playoffs, with a loss or a tie they would be packing their bags and hanging the

told the

(Photo by Marcia Love)

came down to the final five minutes of the game when Conestoga had their formation moved up in It

they clicked.”

uation

back and

making several good saves. The aggression continued in the second half and the refs were letting the teams play, calling few penalties in a game where the teams battled

were

three

together for the second half and

most of the first half, creating many chances, the Condors found them-

“We

all

The Conestoga knocked out, but

heading back to the bench. After controlling the play for

battled

both goalkeepers

“Korey’s speed was the key,” said

midfield, leaving

minutes.

The two teams

The Royals could not contain the speed of Graham, Sam Esfahani factors in both goals.

Johnstone

forth throughout the first half with

much-needed win.

and Mersad Balic as

both players lying on the ground for several

resulting in a

start,"

from the

said.

Johnstone couldn't have been right as the Condors pressured the Royals all second half

mid-air

in

sive right

more

when one of

Condors collided

good

would come.”

yf ,

MCNANNEY

\

|

It

for

was another up and down week Conestoga College varsity

sports teams,

as the road to the

Athletics Association playoffs gets paved. The women’s fastball team had a

Ontario

College

Women’s

fastball:

tough outing against Durham, losing 12-0 in the team’s regular sea-

Durham-12, Conestoga-0

son finale on Oct.

Women’s outdoor

1

1

The Condors ended

the

season

soccer:

Royals-0, Conestoga-0

with a solid 6-4 record, finishing standings and

OCAA

third in the

Men’s rugby: Conestoga-

qualifying for the playoffs.

The women’s outdoor

soccer

had a productive outing against Redeemer, earning a 0-0 draw against the Royals on Oct. 9. The team currently is waiting for their opponent in the first game of the playoffs to be named. The play-

38, Lancers-8

team

(Photo by Aaron O’Connell)

devastating collision involving two players on the Conestoga Condor men’s soccer team and the Redeemer Royals team left them both lying on the field for several minutes.

A

WHEN DATING TURNS DANGEROUS

offs begin Oct. 26.

And

lastly,

had one of

the

their

men’s rugby team best performances

of the season, spanking the Loyalist College Lancers 38-8 at the rec centre on

improved

Oct.

14.

The Condors

their record to 2-3

sixth in the

OCAA

and

sit

standings as of

Oct. 15.

The team next heads

to

Georgian

College on Oct. 26.

CHURCH?

Are you abusive? feel as though you must have control over your and behaviours? In other words, are you aware that abuse may be taking place in your relationship? You may be emotionally abusing your partner without understanding what you are doing or why you are doing it. Or you may understand what is happening, but not know how to stop.

Have you every wondered why you sometimes

Adult Recreational Center 185 King St. S Waterloo

partner’s actions, relationships,

Do you blame your

Do you

control

partner

www.thefathershouse.ca

whenever things go wrong?

what your partner does,

whom

they see and

talk to, the

use

of the

phone or

car,

lurposeitruttiirealityxhumourTfuniwordosa redosatisfacflani<learningsliope»prayer»ado rationvcreativityHcareirestBrationiundei

standiRgEPeaeeiioysfutureslomiielietfing (IHesdestiDyTvaiuesMlaughterEprayeritrainin

and where they go?

jinationsijoyfuiigendenessiabffltiesrhappir

ssshealingigrowcmiraclestiMsion Are your jealous of your partner's

friends,

male or female?

foHwJatioRfcarajconimanitysJrieirtslaitWam

!^rtstarfpgrtiaSi»asS»p$98&

Do you say Do you

hurtful things

put fear

Have you ever If

in

hit,

and then say you were only joking?

your partner by smashing things, or by using looks, loud voices or gestures? slapped, grabbed or pushed you partner?

you have answered yes to any of these questions, help is available. may be exhibiting abusive behaviour is the first step

Realizing that you

in

combating

it.

Doon Campus, Room 1A103, 748-5220 ext 3360 148 or Waterloo Campus, Room 1C04, 885-0300 ext 224.

Counsellors are available through your Counselling Office,

Guelph Campus, Admin Office, 824-9390 ext. Information on community support is available through your Counselling

Sponsored by the

Women's Resource Group

Office.

Sunday 10

am


Page 12

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