Page 1

on

Sitting

program launched

Pilot

the throne

Helps international doctors re-enter medical field.

Tracy Biggar enjoys royal

treatment

Off to the races Conestoga’s varsity teams

‘Kingdom

in

of Mearth.’

Monday, September,

24,

2007

A

newsroom

learning

for

journalism students

Conestoga College, Kitchener, Ont.

taking off

the

in

OCAA.

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

39th Year

— No. 17

Lawsuit against Ontario colleges

moving forward By CHRISTOPHER MILLS The

between Ontario col-

battle

came

leges. Elliott said that figure

from careful estimates as to how much colleges have taken from

leges and their students over the

students in allegedly illegal fees

charging

during the period of the tuition

of potentially

ancillary fees

finally

is

illegal

moving

forward.

The lawsuit

scheduled to be brought before Judge Joan Lax of the Canadian Superior Court on Oct. 5. In order to continue, it must be certified as a class action suit. Prosecuting lawyer Doug Elliott said once the case is certiis

can take up to a year to go to trial. He hopes to have it comfied,

it

pleted sooner. filed

our materi-

on the colleges, so it’s just a when we can get the responding materials back from the colleges” he said. "We're aiming for the spring. We’re hopals

question of

ing we can get a decision before another school year rolls around.” suit

“It’s purely an estimate based on information that we have available, based on the types of fees charged to college students across

was

initially

Ontario college students

by

filed

Amanda

(Andy) Hassum and Dan Roffey on June 6. The two students claim the colleges were charging stu-

money

to

fund projects

or core academic operations covis banned. Immediately after the lawsuit was filed. Training, College and Chris Minister Universities Bentley ordered all 24 Ontario colleges to stop charging such

ered by tuition

Calls

fees.

to

Bentley’s office

were answered by his assistant, who said Bentley would not comment because he was too focused on his election campaign. Hassum, currently taking a year off from the advertising program at Conestoga College,, said she noticed in her second year that she was paying more than she had

will

ECE

A

A

strongly about

it,”

person, but for

some reason

I

She said she was ed to see

it

really frustrat-

occurring

at

all

the

colleges across Ontario.

“I’m prepared to do whatever I have to. to put a stop to it,” she said. “It’s like if they’re going to mess with single mothers who are working like five jobs; these are the people you feel bad for, and that’s why I have had such sup-

The lawsuit

is

seeking

$200

million in restitution from the col-

the students

part of the

Conestoga

continued to eat and talk and just

because they have a large child-

of

have fun. “We’re

care centre in the community.

Members of the program advisory

ilar

responses.

I’m not going

“Personally,

to

much of the gain,” Hassum said. “If we do win, I’m not get-

get

little

thrilled

ing,” said

it

stopped rain-

Goranka Vukelich,

main co-ordinator of the event

the as

YWCA

The

good because you get

“It’s

talk

involved

got

to

second years,” said

the

to

Kristie Johnston, a first-year

ECE

ting

the

well as the chair of child develop-

student.

more

that

ment and education studies. The students were served ham-

class,” said Janine Furtado, a first-

$200 million. This is That’s I want to stop it. really came down to is that

burgers and hotdogs

has to stop.” the government and those rules exist

said

Elliott

made

rules

for a purpose.

“The

rules are there to protect

students from being charged

than

is

more

in

the

ECE

“This was to welcome the students and to celebrate the recipients of the awards,” said Vukelich.

The awards

said. tuition,” he for "They're trying to get around that

Elliott said a

that

were presented

memo was

sent out

By FRANCA MAIO September

is

a stressful

time for

Education regarding the legality of such fees, and it went directly

buy, parking spots to

vie for and

to the college presidents.

headaches

by

dark

Ministry

the

“Any suggestion is

were something

that they

really

to get out of

make

Vukelich and a desire for education. There were to

said

it

a

it

success.

took enthusiasm

said.

Among those invited students, faculty, staff the

were ECE and some

community.

college

committee were also

invited.

“I think it’s fabulous,”

Vukelich

good introduction and helps make them feel comfortsaid.

‘‘It’s

a

able.”

At the halfway point the dents were

student.

than hamburgers and good friends

Elliott

making

still

stu-

their

way

through the playground gates to join in the festivities.

“We’d like to give the children a big thanks for letting us use their playground,” said Vukelich.

This year no Tylenol was needed

on time. Matresky, manager of financial aid and the student

leaves students with very

Paul

awards office, said everything has gone smoothly.

He

their

some

students

said.

force

him

to

stop

charging

issue,

saying

it

worked hard

deadline, still

Jolene

Brenner,

a

third-year

OSAP

So what kind of message would

The

A

very

strong one, according to Elliott.

Continued on Page 2

a

this year.

financial aid office started

hand out loans Aug 27. Matresky said the approximate number of students at Conestoga College is 6,800 full-time students

to

said.

stantially

ing

it

so

quite sub-

we

are see-

more and more

stu-

dents getting at least

some

still

of the federal

money.”

allowed

cannot get

OSAP

make more very

it’s

unfair,”

Scheeringa said. She said she pays for school with a student loan and has a part-

job which pays for the monthly interest on the loan. She does not get financial help from time

her parents.

•Matresky said the government has increased the amount a parent

can make before they are disquali-

from receiving OSAP.

fied

He

said possibly five or six years

would have been

limit

$60,000, but

now

they increased

;

financial aid manager

"The increased

federal it

government

quite substantially, so

more students getting at least some of the federal money,” he said. "The province,

we

are seeing

unfortunately, didn't follow suit.”

Megan

Scheeringa,

because than the

limit.

think

“I

ago the

Pan/ Matresky

loans

the limit to close to $100,000.

"The big word

is

access," he said

adding, "The government

was

matter that he couldn’t discuss.

more students can receive

increased

she

her parents

“The federal government

and have handing in

comment on a legal

OSAP.

OSAP, Matresky

to

nursing student, said she did not experience any problems with

them.” Tibbits declined to

ing so

paperwork. “It has been very steady the past two and a half weeks,” Matresky

not going

is

they

said

meet their

OSAP

are

OSAE loans.

choice but to proceed with the class action,” he said. “He’s not going to stop charging (fees) little

and the government

However, the biggest caused by late

bills to pay.

with

The federal and provincial government have increased their fund-

as the loans arrived

that can’t be believed.”

the

way

and out of those, about 35-40 per

college students, with textbooks to

to

ECE

cent receive

of

2004

the

a fun

No major problems

by charging for things that are supposed to be covered by tuition by backdoor fees.”

in

year

was

Hosting the barbecue took more

playground.

ment

in

“It

community,” she

permitted by the govern-

victory in this case send?

port.”

like

feel

Hassum had sim-

both Elliott and

“He

paying these (extra fees).”'

“It’s to

hood education barbecue. Sept. 12. Through the rain the students

not be registered with the college.

felt

some games. help make

also

WVien asked if the lawsuit was purely about financial restitution,

.

real-

kind of

wind and

were donated by members of the community, the Preston Rotary Club and the YWCA, to acknowledge the second-year students’ achievements in their field.

paid.

ized ‘hey. I'm not the only one

“I

she said. “I’m not a very political

MARKO

rain did not stop the eighth annual early child-

added that Conestoga President John Tibbits has been adamant that he will not stop charging such fees, and any student who doesn’t pay them will

in first year.

students bonding together

By JENNIFER

would

victory

mean each student would be reimbursed for any illegal fees they

this

additional

lawsuit

150,000 full-timers as well as

part-timers.

cumvent a tuition freeze in province. Under the policy of

the

the

certified,

If

move forward on behalf of all Ontario college students - rough-

all it

provincial government, collecting

Kristin

ered by the lawsuit,” he said.

dents illegal ancillary fees to cirthe

the

students

(Photo by Jennifer Marko)

Renshaw, clockwise from top left, Laura Carson, Desiree Walker, Nicole Haisman, Kristie Johnston and Janine Furtado enjoy an afternoon of food, friends and fun at the eighth annual ECE barbecue on Sept. 12.

number of college and amount of time cov-

Ontario,

ly

“We’ve already

The

freeze.

a

second-

year general arts student, said even with the increased funding.

to

help

is

more Canadians

trying

attend

post-secondary school. “The province of Ontario has introduced some grants, and the government as well has

federal

some

grants,”

determined

to

he

said.

give

opportunity to everyone

"It's

an

all

equal

who may

not otherwise go to school."


Page 2

News

— SPOKE, September 24, 2007

Now

deep thoughts

“It

...with Random

Conestoga College

questions answered by

random

students

If you could be any

which

col-

leges should not be allowed to cheat

and the government sit idly by

their students,

should not be allowed to

"Secondly, the message

that

is

themselves.

When

people

in

charge

don’t do the right thing and

would you be and why?

their college bill

each

fee.

amount

when

they don't respect students’ rights, students are prepared to fight to protect their

own

Hassum

pay the

just

dates

final

through and

it

away with charging

these

Elliott

he said. “If

illegal ancillary fees.”

you

is

get a chance to ask. whether

it

s

benefit

the premier or Mr. Bentley or one of

that are

the other candidates,

them

aiding our education are illegal because they are supposed to be in

government was

are standing for office in

Cambridge area what they’re going to do about the problem of

You never go saying ‘what

"These fees

said.

in

election to ask candi-

the

‘how does

and

me?’” she

is.

start

who

election.

encourage students

to

upcoming

the

know how expensive

post-secondary this?"

and examine

you should ask

they plan to do anything

if

about

these

ancillary

illegal

fees

being charged by colleges. And it their answer is no, then you should-

with our tuition.”

rights.”

said the

They

want

"I

they're given.

"All students

while colleges cheat students.” he students are prepared to stand up for

fruit

don’t usually take the time to break

down

upcoming

fire in the

fees for so long because students

Continued from Page 1 would send a message that

said.

fruit,

restitution for fees

Students seek

wants to challenge students

to hold political candidates to the

vote for them."

n't

“Probably strawberries

able to get

be really cool to see what it’s like to be ” turned into jam

Television lab nearing completion

...

it’ll

Bv CHRISTOPHER MILLS

Michelle Rogaiski,

a

much

New first-year

broadcast journalism

The new radio and

renovations

last-minute

“A banana, because

being taken care

everyone

at least

likes

television

wing

Conestoga College is finally getting up and running. Three weeks into the school year, at

are

of, but the

still

wing

is

classroom ready.

Steve Pan co-ordinator for broad-

,

bananas.”

cast-television,

said

it

hasn’t

had

effect on the program, as 70 to 80 per cent of the work is pre-pro-

much

Chancellor Boxes, third-year

“Planning, script writing, organizing as groups; nothing has changed,” he said. "We’re on the same track in

terms of delivery of the curriculum

“A

they’re green

little,

and they

said a

into the

pack a punch.” Ziw//

Mark ies,

Derro, chair of liberal stud-

We

the condition of our

expected things to be

done by the time we got back, con-

Parr's sentiments.

“I’m excited that we have (the equipment); I’m viewing the glass as half full,” he said. "If I had the choice between waiting a couple

sidering we’re paying lab fees," she

weeks and not having the lab. wait two weeks. We have great

get back.

dents and this

is

going

I’ll

to be great for

Derro

every department

“And

uled

TV

if

we

miss three sched-

labs, that’s

And

petitive the

stu-

the school.”

said

said.

semester wasted that

is

facing challenges.

area is hampered or missmore than any other,” he said. Annelise Thompson, a third-year journalism print and broadcast student, was not as enthusiastic. ing

"All of the broadcast students I’ve

as last year.”

lime. They’re

studio.

“No one

duction.

marketing

Godkin echoed

we saw

ed when

better learning experience."

journalism co-ordinator Paul

talked to were extremely disappoint-

a

considering

field

is,

of the

fifth

we

will never

how com-

that’s a

scary

thought.”

Derro said the construction should have no bearing on the final outcome of the semester. But he was quick to

compliment the students.

“We things

wouldn’t be getting these our students weren’t work-

if

ing extremely hard,” he said. “These

things are a direct reflection of the quality of students

we have

here at

the college.”

two-week delay in getting facility was initially

new

anticipated.

yv/g/trr/jga/e,

"Students are working on theoretiaspects for the interim period until the labs are commissioned,” he

cal

first -year

genera! arts and sciences

said.

With regards to any further delays, Derro said the college recognizes that there might be some short-term pains to obtain long-term gains.

“Strawberries!

"This is a huge step for the college and the programs (involved),” he said. “It really moves us up to state-

They

can be really juicy or sweet or tart.”

of-the-art facilities”

Parr said

it’s

ty to get all the

Tahitha Fretz,

a fantastic opportuni-

programs together

one place. “As a result, the students

general arts and sciences,

(Photo by Christopher Mitts)

in

As will

have

still

17 the broadcasting/journalism television studio was not completed.

of Sept.

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News

SPOKE, September

2007

24,

— Page 3

Facebook takes over students’ spare time By JACKIE

ALLWOOD

1

Facebook is a new trend that is monopolizing many people’s spare network that took the Internet by storm has more than 24 million current users around the

that help

by building things

this

people use their real con-

30 days. users we count on here,”

one of her friends was in a bar when a strange person approached her and gave her a hug.

“It’s real

said Zuckerberg.

He

said roughly

knew

the

(Facebook) an inva-

There

is

lege has one for

Students can also use this group

CSI

to contact

when

in the office

up

setting

a

their

first-year

accounting student, said he likes

how you can

limit people that

add or what they

students to join.

all

Conestoga Students Inc. uses theirs to keep in contact with the students and list upcoming events.

a privacy option users

Facebook account. Shadoe O’Dell,

broadcast journalism student, said

active users in the last

it

effectively,” said Zuckerberg.

based on

is

“I just find

can select

Center that the number

the

she

sion of privacy,” said Gilmour.

nections to share information more

Facebook developers, was shown in a video on the site telling 800 students at the San Francisco Design

Mark Zuckerberg, one of

if

her from Facebook.

With that many people around the world on Facebook and how open the developer wants it to be, how do they ensure people are safe? Carrie Gilmour, a first-year

world, according to the developers.

she asked

adding they are pushing to make the world a more open place.

“We do social

When

person they said no but recognized

time.

The

0 per cent of the Canadian popucurrently uses Facebook,

lation

you

as

most of the

checks

for convenience. “If

it

Facebook also has an application that you can use to start a group. Students have started a group for people in their programs to join

nitely

while Student Services

who

in the col-

good

to have,”

is

he

For some, Facebook kill

time and for others

of staying

in

laughed and said they doubted

it.

O'Dell, while

his friends continued to laugh.

Zuckerberg said everyone has and connections, and through the connections you can come to understand your friends, acquaintances

CSI group)

(the

long time.

O'Dell said he finds Facebook has no value and could drop it at any time and not miss having it, although friends around him “It kills time,” said

O’Dell said he is not part of any group but might add the CSI group

way of communicating,

see.

staff

daily.

it

in a

their best is

it

defi-

world.

said.

is

way

a

it is

a

to

means

contact with people

they haven’t seen or talked to

“We (the developers) have always thought Facebook was a tool that everyone he

world could use,"

in the

said.

CAMPUS CHIROPRACTOR Students covered by the CSI Health Plan only pay the 20% co-insurance fee (Initial Visit $10,

Subsequent

Visit $5)

HEALTH SERVICES Student Centre - Lower Level

748-5220

Ext.

3679 Di

Wu

miss

and Hai Hua Cao, both

their families, but

(Photo by Marcia Love) students from China,

ELS

first-year

are enjoying their time

in

Canada.

'i ;

ELS

students love Conestoga College

ONTARIO COLLEGE

TUDENT ENGAGEMENT

By MARCIA LOVE

He

SURVEY]

Conestoga’s reputation as the

number

not only drawn in students from

Canada,

across

WIN, ~$ 1000 00 ~ ru APPLE Ipods Nano ru SONY PSP PLAYERS .

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also

from

are a big group of internation-

students.”

year.

countries, including China, Korea.

Samantha Murray, manager and student adviser

at

the international

come

office, said students

here to

receive their foundation in English

because the Conestoga Language Institute has a fantastic reputation. “If an English language student requires English upgrading or is here to learn English, they'll go

through

the

Conestoga College

Institute

DSL

program,”

she said. “There are also support services in place. Students can take

advantage of many of the support services here on campus offered through Student Services’ Learning as well.”

a first-year English as second language student from Shenzhen, China, heard about Conestoga through his cousin who a

lives in

Canada.

“He

taught

may

Murray

Conestoga

be the best college

in

sister.

He came thought

to Canada because he would be easier to learn

it

English here.

He

he

said

is

happy

“So

far so

the winter

is

When Cao

good,"

Cao

other colleges or uni-

"But

said.

finishes his

program

he would like to

this year,

come

back to Conestoga for a mechanical program. Di

Wu.

a first-year

ESL

student

from Suzhou. China, came to Conestoga to improve his English skills.

easier to study here,"

Wu

chose Conestoga." He said he likes Canada, but wishes there were more events for

said.

“So

I

because

many

in

so cold."

nice weather.

about

be

to

Canada.

international students.

mates have made his experience at Conestoga more enjoyable. Conestoga was Wei's first college of choice because he didn't know

to

different

Latin Arabia, Saudi America. Europe and Russia. Hai Hua Cao, a first-year ESL student from Guangzhou, China, heard about Conestoga through his

Wei said he loves Canada because of the friendly people and said his teachers and class-

come

students

said

Japan,

“It's

me

Ontario.”

He

Last Chance to Enter!

“We

Conestoga from over 30

College

Universities

have a nice teacher and very classmates,” Wei said.

friendly

students attend the college every

Zeyu Wei,

^Sponsored by the Ontario Ministry of Training Colleges and

happy with the pro-

al

Commons,

http: / / www.wincollegetuition.com

“I

is

is in.

around the world. Approximately 325 international

Language

The Part 1 survey will be available at midnight (EDT) September 1, 2007-September 30, 2007

but

said he

gram he

college in Ontario has

1

Canada.

versities in

"Sometimes we get very bored

we

don't have a lot of

activities here."

Murray said there are about two weekend activities offered a month aimed at international students. The last event was a trip to Canada’s Wonderland on Sept. 22.


.

Political parties

aid students

must

tuition average college student pays somewhere around $3,000 in of textbooks and worth $500 to $300 that to Add year. school for a paiking. Then you school supplies plus $189 to $365 for a bus pass or

An

need to factor

isn't

housing and food. All working full-time can be

to start focusing

on reducing post-second-

normal living expenses

in

who

these costs for a student

probably

like

financially crippling.

The

political parties

need

that financial burden. ary education fees in order to help students lift post-secondary attending What's more, with the number of students

education increasing, quality of learning

classroom

in the

do something about

dive, and our political leaders need to

taking a

is it.

of Students — Jen Hassum, chairperson of the Canadian Federation

Newswire Ontario, said in a Sept. 6 press release by the Canadian and unicollege (CNW) Group, "The Ontario Liberal platform fails versity students.” to the press release, last year the

According

cancelled the tuition fee freeze es that for

many

has also allowed

and replaced

it

McGuinty government with tuition fee increas-

He students are as high as 36 per cent over four yeais. of dollars of community colleges to charge hundreds which some believe

ancillary fees to students, In a Sept. 15 article in

to be illegal.

The Record McGuinty says he won’t

roll

back

an upfront tax tuition but will instead give post-secondary students credit at the start of the school year. to a Sept. 5 article in

According

The Record,

NDP party

the

said they

We

would restore tuition fees to 2003 levels, saving the average undeiUniversities graduate university student about $460 a year. College and Minister Chris Bentley said the

NDP

costs hundreds of millions of dollars

plan was unrealistic and would

in its first year,

and even more

CNW

Sept. 7

press release reports that on Aug. 29, the revised and released the salaries of Ontaiio uni-

versity presidents in the

2007 disclosure

report.

The

report

shows

that

presidents was over the average annual salary of the top 10 university

According

to the article,

Hassum

They don

said.

t

care about sky-

don t rocketing tuition fees and massive student debt because they Ontario famishare the same financial reality as the vast majority of

common

seems as though everyone has

a daily to-do

list

This year 3.650 first-year students began classes College. This

By 2009

is

600 more than

at

Conestoga

as long as their

arm Between checking messages,

or 2010. enrolment at Ontario universities

is

projected to

by an additional 46,000 students, according to a Sept. 6

grow

Group press

release.

Over

CNW

the past 17 years, the student-faculty ratio

has gone from 17-1 to 26-1, resulting in Ontario falling further behind the U.S. and other jurisdictions regarding student engagement with their professors

The

need to look

political parties really

and university

fees.

Conestoga Students students

who

at the

breakdown of college

At Conestoga College, students can opt-out ot the

$210

Inc. health plan, saving

never use the recreational

a recreation/athletics fee for

choices for the students

example?

who

facilities

Why

in ancillary fees.

need

to

Do

should be able to

use? Parking permits can cost up to $365 for a school year. That’s a

ridiculous

Two

We’ll get together soon or call

you next week

Opinion

With

all

things are for certain, the political parties need to focus on solv-

ing the financial hardships of students and students must make

their

we pack

Memories

are not

made by

ting chatting to friends ly

sit-

and fami-

real

are

made by

sharing

experiences with the people

in truth

have a barbecue or

hit the

newest

life.

many

health prob-

lems related to the stress of our

everyday

it's

life isn’t

is

if

it.

a precious and delicate

away

moment. So make

that

the time

too long to-do

on

to

list

in a

way

spend quality

time with the ones you love.

You never know,

the choice

may

not be there tomorrow. Life isn't complicated,

probably creating

health problems for you.

live

worth living

thing and can be taken

lives.

matter what your career

choice

Life

insignifi-

these are the

things that will lead you to live a

No

you care about.

work, work to

you’re not enjoying

There are so

Facebook.

live to

ble bath.

long and happy

through Messenger or

Don’t because

cant but

it,

enjoy yourself for once.

the dog for a walk or have a bub-

These things may seem

and yourself.

on

strain

body and mind. So take a break, you deserve

haven't had time to pick up, take

spending time with friends, family

move around

the

Try reading the book you

we begin putting off the that make life worth living,

are not taking

momentarily reduce the

equally important, everyone

needs time to rejuvenate them-

into

we

or chat with fellow co-workers to

selves.

the things

Call up friends or family and

voice heard on Election Day, Oct. 10.

is

I'll

way

well,

breaks to get up and

town.

Spending quiet time by yourself

lives

things

in

to getting colds

or flus that are going around.

As club

too often.

Memories

amount of money.

are said

immune system making you

more vulnerable

e-

for themselves, family or friends.

pay $117 for

more of these fees be decide what they want

can't

Eating unhealthy also weakens ihe

chores and going to work and

our

and quality of learning.

go.

Jenn Sprach

school there seems to be no time

last year.

tracts are

today because people

often eat unhealthy food on the

become clouded.

mails, running errands, doing

lies.”

to

Troublesome digestive

Today’s world has become so fast people’s true priorities have

It

2006.

in

...

moment

Group

Ontario government

$370,000

have a different flavour, You pick your favourite

Enjoy the

in

subsequent years.

A

all

it

that

we make

way.

Spoke Letters are

welcome

Spoke welcomes editor. Letters

is

letters to the

should be signed and include the

and telephone number contacted

No unsigned

name

of the writer. Writers will

be

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College

Editor: Christopher Mills Advertising Manager: Jenn Sprach Spoke Online Editor: Alex McNanney Production Manager: Holly Featherstone Circulation Manager: Sarah Jaynes

Photo Editors: Leanne Mountford, Vanessa Butler Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

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be published. than 500 words. longer no Letters should be edit any letter right to Spoke reserves the letters will

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acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed: a Letters must not contain any libellous statements.

to the editor are subject to

MS Word

Conestoga College for file

the space. Letters

would be

helpful.


News RIM

GRT fare

to host

career

fair

SPOKE, September

By KERRY REED

GRANT

Conestoga College students have pay a little more this year for a four-month bus pass. to

Over 280 employers will woo prospective employees at the annu-

would be $2.50 per admission and

when

only gives the rider a 90-minute transfer before they have to pay

“College students should have to pay less for a bus pass than high

again.”

school

Suad Yassin,

have

I

students,”

Ryan

said

Randall, a first-year electrical engi-

The Grand River Transit pass $189 whereas last year the price was $185 said Linda Smith, a

arts and health option student at Conestoga College, said the col-

neering student at Conestoga. "We have to pay a lot to go to school; we should not have to pay a lot just

RIM

customer service

the largest fair of

“Bus passes increased this year because the population in the

adding it is a whole lot cheaper then driving and, is more economically friendly. High school students don’t get it any cheaper. They pay an initial $5 for photo ID and $48 a month for a bus pass, said Smith, which works out to be about the same as college students pay for two four-month

Career

costs

Fair.

The

event, which will be held at Park on Sept. 26, will run from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. This is

kind with an

its

estimated 5,000 alumni and current students attending.

held

is

partnership

in

Conestoga

College,

Laurier University,

Guelph

The event

and

with

Wilfrid

University of

University

the

of

The career

growing, there

more

and the price of everything

has gone up," said Smith. “In turn the price for bus passes

and bus

fares had to increase.”

GRT

website states a college

bus pass gives the user unlimited

on all GRT routes for the four-month period. “Any college student with a GRT student pass,” said Smith, “can use the bus as many times as they want

lot

of students don’t care,”

said Cruikshank. “But this

the

is

thinking about a job."

start

Entrance

and

is

cars on the road,

an opportunity

fair is

adviser.

time to

traffic

free to

is

alumni

who

all

have

students

a

lege bus pass

reasonable

fairly

is

in

price,

assistant.

what's out there says Tao

Cruikshank, student/grad employ-

ment "A

more

The

Waterloo. to see

Kitchener area are

— Page 5

to.”

a first-year general

al

2007

increase reasonable it

By KAYLA

24,

to get here.”

According

Waterloo included

They

students’

the

but what

really don’t like

any day of the week whereas they were to pay as you go

up high school students,” said Ashley Corbett, a second-year early childhood education student at the college. “There are way too many high school kids on the bus, sometimes I can't get on

I

are

tuition.

offer unlimited use during the

The website

also states Wilfrid

Laurier University

think the price for the bus pass

is fair

full-time

stu-

in their

tuition.

Conestoga

think

“I

is

the bus picks

it

and

$50.58

are in

dents pay $41 .58 for a pass

travel

if

website,

entire school year.

terms. “I

GRT

to the

bus passes for the University of

College

should include- the price of a bus pass in the tuition.” said Kyle

think the price for the bus

reasonable.”

Mall.

a

firefighting

first-year

student at the college. “Other than that,

1

pass

is

(Photo by Sarah Jaynes)

Conestoga students wait for the 110 express bus to Conestoga at Fairview Park

Defazib,

valid

school/alumni ID card.

“Bring a few Cruikshank.

“It

resumes,”

said

generates discus-

She also suggests that stupick up the guidebook, which was available on Sept. 18. Career service employees will be at Door 3 today handing out the guidebooks or students can pick up a copy at the Student Client sion.”

dents

Get chatty chatty with your mahi mahi.

Service Building.

Because employers

of

the

number

of

Cruikshank

present,

make

suggests that students

a

list

of booths they want to visit, as they will not have time to visit them all. “Go through the guidebook,” said Cruikshank. “See

who

is

com-

choose a top 10 or 15.” She also suggests students do research on the companies they are interested in so they know what ing,

they do.

“Come up with well thought out questions (specifically ones on the industry),” she added,

and “be pre-

pared to talk about yourself.”

A bus will pick up students from Conestoga College’s Doon campus at. Door 3 at 9:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m.

experience,” an “It’s Cruikshank, “(although) a

says little

overwhelming. And there’s tons of free stuff.”

My

For more information and for on what to bring and what to

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W FUTURE SHOP TELUS STORES & AUTHORIZED DEALERS Kitchener - Conestoga College Conestoga Mall (519) 885-2600

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availability and pricing may vary Prices are subjectJo in-store discount or credit on your future TELUS monthly bill Phone agreement until September 30. 2007 Phone effective net ptrce based on a 3 year service agreement after loi clients with a valid student D card. Clients must activate m stoie to be eligib e and monthly enhanced 91 1 emeigencv service access charges are etna Offei available Tates long distance additional airtime toammg, pay-pei-use charges, monthly system access fee oi received horn clients mobie own TELUS mobile phone number, the voice mail retrieval number, toll-free or 900 numbeis Local calls must be made to Clients eight numbers must be Canadian domestic numbers and must not include the client's

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Online activation’ is nil available lecerved phone, roaming and/o, long distance charges ate etna Text messages can only be sent to and lot this oiler

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www mytelusmobility com

m a 3 yea? service agreement

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SPOKE, September

24,

2007

— Page 7

Wo ive ever

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i-

Feature

— SPOKE, September 24, 2007

Page 8

become nurses

Foreign doctors By CHARLOTTE PRONG PARKHILL

professionals

health-care

back

into

to

get

Lois

said

field,”

their

Gaspar, chair of the nursing proEight doctors, three dentists, a

gram.

Program applicants had

pharmacist and a midwife walk

No,

not the beginning of a bad

it’s

joke.

the

It’s

track

fast

new

nursing program, a

practical

offering at

Conestoga College this year. This pilot program is the first of its

to

kind

in

give

Ontario.

health-

care professionals an opportunity

diploma instead of the two

to get a practical nursing

one year,

in

years normally required.

The

dermatologist from Nicaragua are

submit

transcripts

knowledge

relating to

health care,” said Gaspar.

Proficiency

in

English was anoth-

er requirement, because of the need to

communicate with

patients.

clinical

placements

homes

October.

in

The

begin their

fast track students will

who

students are immigrants

had a medical career in their home country - a dentist from Mexico, a family physician from Cuba and a all

pre-existing

was designed

It

foreign-educated

to

and documents. “We could compress our existing practical nursing program because the candidates had educational

their

into a lab.

nursing

in

Shore, co-ordinator of

Pauline

the English language studies pro-

gram, worked with the students for eight weeks over the summer, focusing on medical terms. She said the students are highly moti-

part of the group.

According to the website for the and Physicians of College Surgeons of Ontario, foreigntrained doctors must pass a series

vated and have an amazing spirit. “They've created a great network

of exams and do a residency before they can qualify as doctors here,

Shore said foreign-trained profes-

and there are a limited number of spots available.

“For a variety of reasons,

it’s

not

always easy for foreign-educated

within

classroom,”

the

“They bonded

she

said.

really well.”

(Photos by Charlotte Prong Parkhi,

coming to Canada for years, and the government does little to help them get into the healthsionals have been

care system. “But the need

she said.

“What could be

is

here,”

better than

Thirteen students from around the world are taking part

educated health-care professionals coming to your bedside who’s also a doctor?” Camaraderie and a sense of a nurse

to

be

humour

pilot

program

that trains foreign-

practical nurses.

work

nursing

a classroom

in

break, like

head straight for Tim Hortons.

Margaret

instructor

And when they go for many Canadians, the

Holden.

are clearly evident while

the students

with

a

in

Practical nurses, personal stories Yin Ban

William Alvarez Alvarez wants people to

more

there's

know

Colombia

to his native

“We

have

many

problems

Ban

have very good

to

we

weather, very good food, but

works

crime and

political cor-

ruption are the main reasons Alvarez decided to

move

here with his wife and five children five years ago.

While

his wife

is

going to the University of Waterloo

worked as a personal support worker in a nursing home. He also writes for Spanish language newspapers and magazines, to obtain an optometrist licence, he has

Mohammadion and

Farah

Ali Ahrari

focusing on naturopathy. “I believe cine,” he says. “That’s the best

Ahrari, an

emergency room doc-

in

holistic

medicine -

medi-

listen to the

patient.”

tor,

and Mohammadion, a dentist, husband and wife team who immigrated to Canada from Iran

ly will

are a

to live based partly

just over a year ago.

culture, children live with their par-

Canada is professional discrimination. “I know a Cuban doctor (here) who is working cleaning offices, yet some Canadians are going to Cuba to get (medical

ents until they marry,” says Ahrari.

procedures),” he says.

“It is

we

very difficult for us because

is

a different culture here,”

says Ahrari. In Iran they were very close with their extended family, but

now

it’s

just

them and

their

two

Mohammadion guage as a

barrier.

municate,

we

also

cites

lan-

"We

can’t

com-

express

our-

can’t

she says. “And also,

we

good job like we had in our country.” She says after their first year here, Ahrari wanted to go back home. “Now, all are satisfied.” “Canada may be the best country in the world for education and a good life,” adds Ahrari. “We decided to come to Canada for my can’t get a

children because

I

think there are

good opportunities.” Like proud parents

everywhere,

they

brag

a decision about where

on where she

After they graduate from the prac-

nursing program, Ahrari hopes

tical

continue her education

a dentist here. “It’s not

depends on me, how determined I can be,” she says. Between the two of them, they have over 30 years of experience, and impossible, but

it

they’d like to be able to help people.

Though difficult,

right

the adjustment has been'

they feel they

decision

“This country try,”

is

for

made

their

a very

family.

says Ahrari. “There are a

lot

in

her high school courses.

are hoping she will be eligi-

ble for a scholarship.

Mohammadion, daughter will

all

Ahrari and their

be graduating

of

cultures and they live together very friendly and lovely.”

They say their daughter believes that the government here really cares about people and their prob-

“We had we had

average

the

good coun-

lems, and gives them freedom.

They

It

“Why?

People are the same. doesn’t matter what language

a house,

we had money,

everything,”

adds

Mohammadion. “Here, we don’t have anything. But, we get something else that’s more valuable for me.”

obstetrician

in

who

her husband,

computer technology,

in

decided he wanted to

come

to

Canada.

It’s

a

fairl

easy process to emigrate from China to Canad; “They don’t care about us. It’s a big population,” say Ban.

It

was a

more

little

difficult for her.

“Becaus

they have a shortage of doctors in our hospitals, the

want

didn't

me

to leave.”

Ban is taking the becoming a nurse

fast track

program as a

practitioner, “if

I

first

step

t

have time an

energy for further study,” laughs this mother of two “I like Canadian's health care system because it very supportive.” she says. “China has a big popuk tion.

They have no chance

to take care

of every

pei

son.” In the four years that

Ban has been here, she’s bee She and her fam

able to visit family in China twice.

ly belong to a Chinese cultural society that meel every two months to share food and information. Sh

cooks

Chinese food at home, but her so Canadian food. “And like cheese!” she say: “No one eats cheese in China.” traditional

prefers

Biljana Marie

hopes of

in

demic achievement -

97 per cent

Bodies are the same. you speak.”

in

work in an emergency department again. Mohammadion may

about their oldest daughter’s acaa

Alvarez says the only discrimination he has faced

to

becoming

daughters.

selves,”

make

decides to go to university. “In our

haven’t any family here, and

there

T

around the same time, and the fami-

trained for nearly 10 years

become an

China. Then

social problems.” Social

that lead to poverty,

says,

changed.”

very good country,” says

the surgeon.

a doctov “but things

would be

I

Ban

forever,”

than guerilla warfare and cocaine. “It’s a

thought

“I

I

“If you are coming as a doctor to Canada, you have to be ready to be frustrated,” says

really

Ashraf Hazraty

Marie. She

had

10 years of experience as a physician before coming to Canada

there,” says Hazraty.

with her husband and two daughters

to

when

education of

“It

civil war broke out in the former Yugoslavia. Marie has been working as a personal support worker in a nursing home, and is glad that in this fast track program, students are being given some credit for the medical knowledge they already have. “This should have been done long ago.” She says many foreign-trained doctors are working outside the health-care system. “In Toronto, you see doctors driving cabs.” Marie points out that 40,000 people in Waterloo Region don’t have a family doctor, and waiting times in emergency rooms are unbearable. “At least we can do something. We can

help a

little bit,”

for

my

safety and the safety of

my

“We

decided

to this

country for the

my

children and the

my

life.”

He was an orthopedic surgeon in Afghanistan for 25 years before coming to Canad with his wife and six children two years ago. Hazraty has passed two of the required medica exams, but

it

will take five

more years

to get a licenc

to practice here. In the

meantime, he's happy to be the practical nursing program. “It is a good opportu nity for me to be in my field and to work in a hospi tal

she says.

high price.”

come

safety of

ii

with patients.”

Hazraty says he is happy with the Canadian militar presence in Afghanistan, though he hopes they will bi

Marie left behind a career that she wa* passionate about and worked hard to attain, but she still thinks it was worth it. “Oh definitely. That's the price I paid “It’s a

was war. The Taliban was

come home soon. “They are great people an< appreciate they are helping,” he says. “Hopefully

able to

we

kids,” she says. •

one day peace will come to our country and I will ‘.badpjo work as a, doctor." *• .«• ’

gc


Entertainment

SPOKE, September

— Page 9

2007

24,

Faire volunteer rules By HOLLY FEATHERSTONE While meandering through a medley of lords, maidens, squires, a madcap herald and a host of eclectic dance troupes, a particularly distinctive lady of fairness and

merrymaking included dressing communicating with the actors while in character and embracing the “chivalrous” customs of the time. Biggar’s role as queen included opening the ceremonies and knight’s tournament.

Kingdom of

This year, however, she also aided

the

the part,

roams

finery

Mearth,

the

greeting

favours to

distributing

and awestruck

attendants

the

25

royal

court

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: Mature Students

Biggar said her involvement with

admirers.

Tracey Biggar, formally known as “Queen Charlotte of Mearth,"

and embellished bodice and speaking donning

scripting

in

actors.

a scarlet cloak, skirt

is a journey of exploration; one that stretches comfort zones and embraces diverse ways of thinking and doing. Returning to school after years of being out in the workplace or raising a family can be intimidating, exhilarating, challenging, and

Post-secondary education

the fair did not stem

from a particular interest in anachronism, though she often studies the cultural and social aspects of the period to sup-

with an assumed English accent,

plement her understanding of her

throne as “Queen Charlotte,”

presided with “King Bertram" over

fictional role.

Sept. 15.

the royal court actors at

Waterloo

Park’s 10th annual Royal Medieval Faire Sept.

15,

which lured 5,000

“Most people involved have an

certainly

interest in history, but

no

who oversees

Biggar,

promotional

four-member

the event has garnered a great deal

of continuous support from local

involved since the faire’s

no exception. Karen Lucas, artistic director and co-ordinator of the cast, said the devotion of the volunteers and actors, combined with the city and greater community’s espousal, has kept the fair an ongoing success. “The City of Waterloo has supported the fair from the first meet-

actively

inception in 1997, said earning the

exalted role of the

Queen

community of

Bertram,

Charlotte in

actors

known and

Charlotte

as

the

Pretenders, wasn’t her intention.

done quite a bit of acting, didn’t want to be queen,” said

“I’ve (but)

Biggar,

who

organizer

initially

but

helped as an

auditioned for the

on a whim. The Royal Medieval

role

Faire,

an

volunteers and she

ing

we

is

(had) with the recreation

and leisure department,” she said. “With all of the wonderful and tal-

who return year we can make

annual non-profit, volunteer-driven

ented volunteers

event, engages

after year to help us,

active

its

patrons in inter-

games and

activities remi-

niscent of the medieval era. Part of

Many mature students are apprehensive about returning to school and are concerned about how they will perform academically. Their challenges are different than those of younger Students, including but not limited to: balancing parenthood and home life with school, and

The

right:

tournament prevails

re-learning and re-developing study and research

before the royal court.

this incredible

skills.

It can take time to adjust and an

important part of that adjustment includes developing competence skills,

in

learning and study

from peers.

a willingness to utilize resources, and an openness to learn

ings for adults and children alike,

Biggar said the unique appeal of

board of directors and has been

efforts for the faire’s

Above

specialized (study) in (any) historical period.”

patrons.

knight’s

sometimes unsettling, and despite a wealth of life experience from work, home, or prior training, adults feel unsure of what is expected of them in the college environment.

by Holly Featherstone)

(Photos

Top: Tracey Biggar on the

event exist.”

With a myriad of games and mus-

Here are a few observations about mature students that might ease some of the

Biggar said the community regards

uncertainties about returning to learning:

the fair with great fondness.

“(The effect

fair) has such a magical on people. (They’ve) grown

_s

up attending the fair (and) feel it’s like coming home,” she said, recalling last year’s bestowal of “queen’s

FEEL APPREHENSIVE ABOUT RETURNING

KNOW THAT MOST ADULTS LEARNING. The truth

is,

that most adults do very well

before, and they actually enjoy

if

TO

not better than they did

it.

THINK ABOUT WHY YOU ARE RETURNING.

Don’t be surprised

if

you find

reasons other than the ones you had anticipated to continue your learning.

favours,” bracelets given to select

“maidens” who demonstrated personable manners and chivalry. Lucas said the prospect of

DO WHAT IS RIGHT FOR YOU. what =>

increased plausible

community with both

interest visitors

is

is

important to you and how

There

it will

MAKE YOUR WELL BEING A PRIORITY. keep you physically, emotionally, and

and

is

best

no right way to do fit

your

life

Think about

this.

circumstances and goals.

Don’t compromise on the things that

spiritually well.

Make sure you

build

them

into

your schedule.

actors alike in anticipation of the =>

continuous whims, woes and wonders amid the vast realm of Mearth. “I think the ‘pretenders’ in all

us enjoy being whisked

kingdom

away

DISCUSS YOUR PLANS.

Think about how others

in

your

life

might support you.

Mature students are also sometimes concerned about fitting in socially. The Counselling Services Office can help. For more information, contact Counselling Services.

of

to the

A Message from Counselling Services,

for a day.”

1A103.

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70-12


Page 10

Sports

— SPOKE, September 24, 2007

Cycling

is

a great way

to

go green

Sales tax exemption on bikes and helmets helps consumers reap the benefits By VANESSA BUTLER Cycling has many benefits. It is for your health, promotes healthy lifestyles and reduces the number of cars we have- on our roads thereby reducing green-

good

house gas emissions. The Ontario government is proposing a sales tax exemption on bikes and helmets for those con-

sumers interested

many

in

reaping the

Usman

idea

is

great,”

said

Valiante, director of advo-

Trade Association of Canada (BTAC).

cacy

for

the

Bicycling

motorists on the roads.”

Valiante said it is important to have the infrastructure in place in order to make people more comfortable riding a bike. This infrastructure includes dedicated bicycle lanes and secure parking as

key factors

well as the ability to take bikes on

sories will provide a direct incen-

and off of public

T would

definitely

encourage

cycling,” said Valiante.

BTAC

The

to

4

two increase the popu-

has

transportation

Reducing taxes

on

as

investments

by

bicycles,

safe

ments

such

they are out there. People

secure

parking

need

to

in

both bicycle

that

cycling has an important role to

govern-

and

buy and ride bicycles as

to

well

and send a strong message

play in improving health, the environment and reducing traffic congestion, said Paul Nielsen, president of the Bicycle Trade Association of Canada. Bicycles have many proven benefits. A bicycle is the most energy efficient vehicle on the road. A bicycle can cover the same dis-

recreation

bicycle helmets, parts and acces-

when

have the confidence to ride their bikes and not have to worry about vehicles and other

mode of

leisure.

infrastructure feel

identified

of cycling as a

larity

tive

transit.

“People also need to

benefits of cycling.

“This tax

people a financial incentive to buy

is really going to encourage people to buy.”

“It

cycling lanes;

tance as a car, but uses zero fuel

and secure

and omits zero greenhouse gases.

hopes the tax relief on bicycles and helmets will give

Bicycling reduces the risk of serious conditions such as heart disease, high blood pressure, obesity

as

lots

cycle storage.

The

BTAC

Varsity By ALEX

and diabetes. Bicycling also reduces urban and rural congestion, as well as

which contributes

pollution

The

BTAC

in

www.btac.org or

in

is

on the

a well-known

professional sports. But for

the Conestoga College men’s out-

door soccer team, there was none present on Sept. 15. The Condors lost

3-1

against

perennial

league

Hawks on

rival

“We

have a good balanced team-

have responded well to our coaching strategies and if we continue on the

said

same path like our chances.” The Condors host rival Humber I

on Sept. 26. In

women’s

were off

fastball, the

to a great start,

Condors

holding a

starting lineup.

spotless 3-0 record as of Sept.

Johnstone said he was pleased with the team’s play overall.

The Condors defeated Mohawk 5-4 on Sept. and then pounded

a work

in

progress,” he said.

The Condors took

I

Seneca 4-

1

17.

1

and

1

1-6 in back-to-back

a 1-0 lead into

games.

Mohammad

on the strength of a goal by Yousufi. But a series

against

of mental mistakes lead to three

The women’s outdoor soccer team battled to a 2-2 draw against Sheridan on Sepl. 15. Renee Blanchard and Jasmine Campos scored for the Condors. The team next travels to Humber to take on the Hawks on Sept. 26.

the half

unanswered goals by the Bruins. Johnstone said he was impressed with rookie well

Andrew

as central

Sirio’s play as

defenders

Marko

Miskovic and Michael Werchola. The team heads to Humber to take

and Learning

likes his team’s chances.

Head coach Geoff Johnstone

“It’s

Life

Fleming- Peterborough. Head coach Joel Hussey said before the game he

with no holes,” he said. “The players

game, the Condors’ inexperience was on display. Sheridan had the benefit of having most of their team compiled of returning players, while the Condors had seven rookies in their

Connect

Sept. 26.

Conestoga varsity sports, the men’s rugby team suffered a tough 24-12 loss against in

powerhouse, the Sheridan Bruins. after the

CONESTOGA

toll-free

call

1-866-528-2822.

teams underway

MCNANNEY

Beginner’s luck

the national voice

is

Canada. It advocates, promotes and seeks to motivate, unit and inspire Canadians to make bicycling a primary form of transportation and recreation. For more information on the proposed tax relief or general information on cycling, go to of cycling

Elsewhere

phrase

to

smog.

The team plays next

Mohawk on

in

Hamilton

Sept. 25.


_ Entertainment

Slasher

There was no doubt

Soundclash at the Kitchener on Sept.

Screams were expected to be heard from movie theatres after the

After closing the

I

Aug. 31 release of Halloween. However, they've been silent as release

leaves

most movie-goers yawning

in their

long-awaited

horror

with

film

made

“The whole

mock

classic

director

known

better

becomes very predictable after the first few scenes. As the movie progresses to Myers in the insane asylum, it becomes unclear as to whether this movie is a horror and

Rob

the camera. After

releases such as.

horror

movie

House of

a 1,000

Corpses and The Devil’s Rejects,

1

show with

trio

their

My

couldn't resist

way back to the two more encore

their

Halloween would be one of the better of the nine that have been

overdone blood and gore that are more shocking than horrifying.

released over nearly three decades.

movie begins the plot takes you back to Michael Myers as a young deranged and slightly the

disturbed child.

It

takes the viewer

30 years ago when

to nearly

John Carpenter originally released the biggest horror film of our time.

Zombie shows

us the

The

we

all

include a few

we

nothing that

your

it

With fans yelling compliments each song the energized band constantly danced around to a mix of

cliche after cliche.

with a twist of hip-hop had the fans

is it

newest album. Street Gospels. Zaki Ibrahim and her band opened

tie

So

if

Her catchy on

up

It

you’re a hardcore fan

For

now

it

ciative

the perfect

fit

ready for Bedouin

of the audience.

“Wow, tion,”

2007 release Michael

Myers should be put

haven't seen before

seemed Zaki was

Soundclash and she was very appre-

pretty safe to say

is

music

and dancing to the

to get the fans

be answered.

that after this

is

feet

their

soulful reggae

beats.

from the '70s, you can finally put your mind at ease, your questions will

Soundclash and Zaki’s powerful

voice did not disappoint.

came

that

does

(Photo by Aaron O'Connell)

after

loose ends from the past eight ver-

know and

seat, but

fans weren’t singing along.

are

for

moments when you

in

parts”

and again and again. This 110minute movie seemed like an eternity as it dragged on and on with

sions.

film are fairly informative and even

might flinch

The atmosphere was full of energy and there wasn’t one song where the

older songs as well as songs off their

out of Halloween 9

45 minutes of the

first

Soundclash fan Tim Lalande said show.

However, if you are a sucker for a good ending, you'll love this movie because it comes again and again

The only good thing

man behind

the mask, his family and what triggered Michael Myers to become the serial killer

the “scary

acting,

effects,

just an overall great show,”

after the

Besides the boring plot and horrible

was

it

or a drama.

it

performance was

live

phenomenal, the music, the

it

almost seemed like this remake of

love.

rocks at the Element

songs.

Zombie behind

back

1

that the fans

the Night Feels

stage to perform

ninth

be somewhat of a

As

— Page

screaming of over 850 fans

the loud

as they

and hopefully final remake of Halloween was expected

The

his

When

song.

Song, the talented

seats.

to

2007

of

By SARAH JAYNES

hit

24,

Bedouin Elements in

songs

the

felt

this

SPOKE, September

AARON O’CONNELL

By

sleepy review

.

H

nets Soundclash

film

1

.

.

I

can’t believe this reac-

Zaki said following one of the

songs.

“You guys

are great, thank

in

The young Toronto-based with her backup

vocalist

of

play for 850 fans

singer/guitarist

lead

Jay

returned to the stage about halfway

Malinowski, bassist Eon Sinclair and drummer Pat Pengelly, have

through the Soundclash set to sing

toured with the legendary Vernon

along

singer,

back up vocals.

Buckley from the ’70s reggae duo, Maytones, and have played with

The show, presented by Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI), was moved to the Elements from the campus because CSI needed a bigger venue. “We know Bedouin Soundclash is a popular band that just put out an album,” CSI events programmer Lindsay Silva said. “So we held the show at the Elements to sell more

the

tickets.”

a couple of

The

you.”

to rest.

Eon Sinclair and drummer Pat Pengelly downtown Kitchener, Sept. 1 1

Bassist

three-piece band, consisting

Ben Harper

as

well

as

Damien

Marley, the son of reggae legend

Bob Marley. They formed

while

Queen’s University

in

attending

Kingston and

have already released three albums since they got together back in 2001

The

trio is

now

off to the U..S. for

shows before they take

their tour to the

UK.

I*** plpdiliSig::::: .

CtlONAL POLICE SERVICE WATERLOO REGIONAL

| S

IT

... ,

1

possibilities... A career Science

in in

policing

seems

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molecular biology and genetics. But

would challenge

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to impact

my community. My

my career

in policing.

I

way from my Honours Bachelor of I

wanted

a career that

~ more than

that,

I

wanted

degree provided a solid foundation for

Becoming

a police officer

is

the best decision

ever made!”

- Constable

The Waterloo Regional door to a

fulfilling

Police Service

and challenging

Alison Curran

opens the

career.

www.wrps.onxa people helping people

x

4


.

.

— SPOKE, September 24, 2007

Page 12

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