Page 1

New GM

It’s

‘great asset’

that time again

Students prepare

CSI president

upcoming

to vote in

provincial election.

says Christopher

Graves was exactly what they were looking

for.

A

learning

newsroom

Life-threatening injuries Are professional sports becoming too dangerous?

journalism students

for

Him Monday, September

17,

2007

Conestoga College, Kitchener, Ont.

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

Guelph

39th Year

Pond Party

tops for

makes

trade,

big splash

By SARAH JAYNES

apprentice

The sun was blazing

because it avoided complicated setup and the danger of running

hundreds up for hamburgers and hotdogs at this year’s Pond Party on Sept. 6. The free event, hosted by Conestoga Student Inc. (CSI), included a barbecue which students appreciated since money can be so tight the first few weeks of school. of hungry students

programs By VANESSA BUTLER

as

lined

Conestoga College’s Guelph campus has introduced four new

tical

co-op programs, two of which are

Party

for students interested in putting the

get to

pedal to the metal.

said she liked the free food and free

Lisa Buchholtz, a first-year pracnursing student, said the Pond

a great

is

way

know each

for people to

She also

other.

Motive power fundamentals truck and coach technician, motive power fundamentals automotive

giveaways. Other students liked the option of having a beer for only $3

service technician,

had

basic

machine

millwright

designated area.

the

in

operator and mechanical techniques

Students

are

is

a party,” said

first-year

apprenticeship training. "Guelph is the centre of excel-

shade and enjoy a drink. Not only did the event provide the students with lunch and bever-

for

nursing

student .

stu-

Conestoga

College's Guelph campus. "There is

a strong labour market

for students

who have

demand

the skills and

meet the hands-on requirements order to succeed

(Photo by Leanne Mounttord)

in

at their job."

r irst-year

Gilmore said these courses are very competitive for students. In order to qualify for millwrighting or

general business student Justin Poetker rides the mechanical bull at the Pond Party on Sept. 6. For additional pho:os,

2,

ing.

Conestoga Student

events.

CSI

Stanciu,

said

change

for

Roxy CSI made the

president, that

feel like they're getting value,” said

Conestoga College students are getting

long-awaited

their

many

bar and bistro along with relationship Inc.

and

served

it

be

will

run

Chartwells with a healthy

other new- food services this year.

The

Mike Dinning. “The bistro is going to run like a regular restaurant. Food will be

between

tive,”

(CSI) and

floor

Stanciu.

said is

"The Dooner's area

“The bottom

going to be used for the is going

The main

cafeteria

is

also under-

going changes which are about 85 per cent completed. A major change in the cafeteria is replacing Harvey's with Coyote

college certificate and two levels of

thing in there as quickly as possi-

hours yet but there will be alcohol served in the bar,” she said. Dinning said the bar will be oper-

cept

will receive an Ontario

agreement signed and we're just working towards getting every-

apprenticeship training which per-

ble so

opened and

ating on a special events basis to

fast offer,” said Staveley.

successfully completed the set currequire-

trade as

programs

began

in

September. Gilmore said the Guelph

campus is expanding by getting more post-secondary students interested

in

fully

pursuing a trade

in

the

machining and motive power sectors. She said students enjoy the opportunity to get a co-op industrial,

placement and apprentice training and develop marketable skills fn For more information on trades or apprenticeship programs, contact Brenda Gilmore at 519-824-9390, 122 ore-mail trades@conesto-

gac.on.ca.

it

Roxy

said

and bistro: the alcohol policy, bar and bistro agreement and the retail space agreement.

start.

to do is to walk before we run,” Dinning said, adding they want to “get it set up, get it running and do some speevents while we discuss cial expanding the time usage.” Besides the bar and bistro, which

“We're definitely working

in

a

try to

will

“It’s a

haven't fully set the alcohol

“What we’ve agreed

CSI had been feuding with the college for over a year on three main issues concerning the new bar

away. Joe Sciammarella,

a

first-year

aviation student, said the activities

were a

of fun.

lot

"I tried riding the bull.

ty

"Our event planner did an excellent job;

we

received a

lot

of great

feedback."

officially

known

be

as

the

similar burger-based con-

but

change

is

the that

advantage of the Coyote Jack's actual-

comes with

ly

a very strong break-

"That is something that Harvey's dropped 2 months ago.” 1

drinks and salads there, and you will

pay there directly." Sanctuary's dining

The

offers students fee,

new choices

smoothies and

salads,

operate

early

in

the

“At lunch time, that area will conbar concept

called

Wild Greens which

areas.

“One will be called Baja Flats (which serves wraps, salads, etc.),”

dients.

has also been

branded into two

“And next

said

Staveley.

area,

which used

to

that

to be a deli bar.

is

the choice of choosing

ture in the dining area.

into the dining area so

in

Doon campus) will not reopen," said Andy Staveley, adding it has

the bistro and students will start to

been replaced with the Sanctuary’s

added.

a

much

greater sense of optimism.

“Events will

start

to operate

The its

deli bar

has been relocated

own fundamental

it

becomes

station,

he

your ingre-

"Students will also get a different choice for coffee. We’re bringing in a local company out of Guelph

wish, said Staveley.

not at the finish line yet but there’s

will

allow students to have a freshly made salad,” he added. "It's not a self-serve salad but you still have

Staveley said the main cafeteria

changes happening there as well. "The Dooner’s cafeteria (at the

Conestoga College's vice-president of student affairs said they're

options

food

said

vert over to a salad

will also

moving

other to

day,"

Staveley.

gives Chartwells flexibility to work with any kind of entree that they

definitely

forward together,” said Stanciu.

are

said

“Students will get the option of having a smoothie from a smoothie bar going in there which will

although Conestoga's food service director says there are a lot of

now and we’re

there

available

area

for cof-

Staveley.

being turned into Menutainment." It’s a fairly open concept that

Sanctuary,

deli

wraps, your deli sandwiches,” he said. “You can always pick up

students

partnership with them (the college)

order to enter their desired trade.

ext.

functional,”

Stanciu.

an apprentice.

These

we can have

Jack’s.

be like a lounge.

"We

be given

back to the college and will be used for academic purposes,” he said.

by

initia-

will

to

in their

to their post before

it

competitor could pull them

their

“There you can get your

dining area.

360, said the president of CSI. "We finally got a majority of the

mits them to -work

and

convenience

the college has taken a complete

After students in the motive power or millwright programs have

ments they

Sheila

s-tay in the

restaurant and the top floor

the

make

tried to

10 and 11.

By HIEN DINH

finally

all

harnessed tug-of-war game. This activity tested the students’ strength as they

12

academic math and English courses or equivalent. She said the most popular programs in Guelph are industrial maintenance, welding, mechanic/millwright, automotive service technician, truck and coach technician and precision machin-

riculum and met

bull riding activity or the

Students’ dining options expanding

motive power, the applicant must have an Ontario Secondary School Diploma or equivalent and have successfully completed Grade

see Pages

After students enjoyed a bite to eat they could try their luck at the

issues,” said Stanciu.

the weather

four-month paid co-op placement. some programs include

recruiter

she said.

door entertainment for different

"The beer is great, good day for

great,

In addition,

Gilmore, employer liaison and

"The reps from Jam Van were all very interactive and entertaining, we were glad that we hired them for this event,"

ages, but it included entertainment. This year’ CSI decided instead of having a live band they would hire Jam Van Inc., a company that has a travelling van that provides out-

photo ID to

valid

older.

lence for motor power," said Brenda

electrical wires outside.

He's prettough to beat,” he said. Other students wandered around picking up their free 2007/2008 planners, while some looked through their free grab bags which included discount cards from Future Shop and the Stag Shop, chocolate bars and Fisherman's Friend cough drops. Alliance Fitness, 91.5 the Beat, Rogers and Breakaway Tours all had booths on-site. "Overall we were very pleased, quite a few students filled up the back area and there were no major

show

to

prove that they were 19 years or

hands-on programs that include 32-48 weeks of post-secondary training including a

dent

No. 16

called Planet Bean."

Staveley said

“I

at

some

point there

be a change to the furni-

think

when

that's

completed,

from all the users be a complete 'wow,'" he said. going to look really great." the impact

will “It's


Page

— SPOKE, September

2

Now ...with Random

17,

News

2007

Learning

deep thoughts

Conestoga College

questions answered by

random

By

If you could choose a celebrity

They

AARON O’CONNELL are beneficial, easy to use,

and are

accessible

who would you choose and why?

for a friend

College

,

Conestoga

at

this year.

Three new software programs are being made available by the Learning Commons to help students with organization and plan-

“Anthony Hopkins, because he would

ning

skills.

They

scare away people who annoy me.”

Jud Tofflemire, second-year electronics

are also providing a

service

this

year called

where students volunteer

I

new Can

to assist

other students with technical disabilities.

"The

new software programs

help you recognize your learning skills

and

them,”

1

essentially,

One

improve on

Can employee Marcin

Czajkowski

said.

of the editions

is

Kurzweil

3000, which benefits anyone with visual disabilities by recording text

“George off Grey’s Anatomy, his character

seems

offers

software, programs

new

students

Commons

on a computer so you can listen to it on an audio file later. Another is Dragon Naturally Speaking, which has a microphone that helps students who have trou-

genuine.”

Rebecca Palmer, second-year

ble using a

/unsing

mouse

or keyboard.

Inspiration,

which can be used as

software

is

an organizing tool for planning and

technology

studying purposes.

and

good

have something to

p.m.

O 'Connell)

the adaptive technologies

in

is

located in the adaptive lab

in

Room 2AI07

open from 8:30

Monday

a. m.

to 5:30

to Friday as well as

“When you speak phone the words record into the computer and show up on your

student said.

help us plan or work,” a Conestoga “And it’s really easy

10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday. Room 2AI03 also has the

screen,” said Czajkowski.

to use.”

software

into the micro-

“Mike Myers because

(Photo by Aaron

A staff member works with a student lab in the Learning Commons.

The

last

new program

is

called

"It’s

The

Can

I

to

service and the

new

and

is

available

new

to

all

Conestoga students.

just has the type of personality you want to

he

hang around

with

and

he’s Canadian.” Ashley

Little,

second-year practical nursing

“Jessica Alba because she’s hot.”

Greg

Girling,

second-year

LASA (Photo by Jenn Sprach)

Pond Party perfumes Vijay Mittal assists students flocking to the

Perfume Gallery booth at the Sept. 6 Pond Party. Mittal more Pond Party photos see Pages 10

said students received a discount of 50 to 80 per cent. For

and

“Owen

1 1

Wilson,

because he looks like he needs a friend.” Jennifer A iderdii e,

second-year electrical engineering

COUNSELLOR S CORNER:

you are here from out of town; some are living away from home for the first are doing and when. time. What a change! There’s no one to report to about what you your day?" “What time was “How ask, to one no Curfew - what’s a curfew? There is also you.” love “I and to say would you like to have dinner?”

Many

of

The excitement “MacGyver, because he’s

awesome.” Amber Phelan,

Loneliness

of

may be tempered by homesickness and community. Slowly, you'll get to know some of your

new freedom and

opportunity

-

missing your family, friends in classmates, faculty, roommates and other peers. Perhaps you’ll get involved student through the intramural activities at the Recreation Centre and clubs and events familiarize to Life Student visit government. Read Spoke, your school newspaper, and yourself with happenings

on campus.

second-year (i

oodn orking technician

You can meet with a counsellor in Counselling Services to talk about adjusting to your environment and to do some problem solving about getting involved in your college and your new community.

A Message from Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!

Counselling Services, 1A103.


News

new general manager

CSI’s By LEANNE

SPOKE, September

MOUNTFORD

‘a leader,

17,

— Page 3

2007

a mentor’

Every single person he’s crossed with universally has been

paths

Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) is have Christopher Graves

thrilled to

new GM.

as their

Roxy

“My number

Stanciu, president of CSI,

she thought Graves was an

said

excellent candidate from the day he

walked in. “He’s an extremely intelligent man, very well-rounded, I believe, and has been a great asset to us so far,”

she said.

“He

instead of

in a

GM,

in

terms of

making us think

or forcing

us

a certain

his

way

way, he

delivers the options. He’s a leader,

mentor;

direct

you

he doesn't control or he feels is

in a direction

best.”

Graves came

to

Conestoga May of development 1

after being director

kidsLINK foundation in St. Agatha. Before applying for the

tor the

to

people

different

in

the

community and decided the job would offer some great opportunities and challenges. He decided Conestoga was a place he wanted

to

make

“My

a destination.

life

is

and history major, has worked in legal publishing as an editor and in the development world over the years. He said this job is a great opportunity to use his skill set to help CSI accomplish its goals. He

hopes to help continue to build a community in terms of relationships and strengths in serving great

students.

can be

“Hopefully, that will continue for a long time,” he said.

Graves said from a staff perspecit's his job to keep CSI, the corporation, legal and safe. He wants to be accountable and tive,

as

able to be successful and significant.

the

CSI board of

here was the fact that

the

information

Tim Hortons

was across

the hall,” he joked. Graves said from day one it has been fantastic, and not just on the side.

"John Tibbits (president of Conestoga) has been extraordinarily kind and very accessible,” he said.

He

The new general manager

of CSI,

(Photo by Leanne Mountford) Christopher Graves, wants to help build a great community.

where people are

create a culture

summed up

golf and coffee and working and so what sealed the deal for me coming

CSI

personal goal

I

Graves, who graduated from Trent University as an English

general manager position. Graves talked

1

want to build and be a part of a great community. CSI is the best of all worlds, because we’re part of Conestoga which is a fantastic community, and Conestoga in turn is part of Waterloo Region which is also a great community,” he that

said.

what we were

exactly

is

looking for

a

nothing but very positive, encouraging and a lot of fun.

also wants to

make

sure

directors has

they

all

need and

when

they need it to be a great CSI board and a great team who effectively represent students.

From a corporate stance. Graves wants to make sure the CSI office and operations staff have the tools and resources needed and the information available so they can deliv-

er the value added services to stu-

said.

helping find cool solutions to peo-

dents that they are offering.

Graves has four children aged six to 14. He said they think Conestoga and CSI is his coolest job. He said they like the setting and hearing about the cool events and fun stuff that happens at the college. “They think I’m in school every day too.” he said. Graves, who wants people to know his office door is always open, said the fun part of his job is

ple’s needs.

He said at the end of the day he wants to be certain that CSI is maximizing every dollar that each student contributes to CSI. Outside of work. Graves is involved as a volunteer in hockey and youth development. “Other than that, I just divide my time between running around after my kids and being (at work),” he

Stanciu said she thinks Graves is an amazing gentleman and is very excited to be working with him.

been great thus far,” she adding there have been a lot of changes and many are accredited to him. She said she’s excited to see “It’s

said,

where they go. “I think

he has a great future

Iwe

Conestoga with CSI.”

at

Construction beginning on masonry building The

exhibition will

and

lecture hall

some

incorporate

basic math principles By JOHN LINLEY

in its

came from

the idea

between

The masonry trade has recently some important steps in attracting young and talented taken

OMTC

is

working

about

a discussion

college the

and

the

shortage

of

and how the college can heip. “They actually came to us and

ry,

said

they

would

like

to

design.

mixing stations, classrooms, outdoor work areas, break areas and change rooms, as well as the exhibition, lecture and administration

on the site. White believes existing masons are eager to be a part of construction because the unique methods

areas.

work on, and because it will be huge for the masonry trade in rais-

will use the idea of the

“golden

which “defines the underlying order found throughout the world in both natural and manmade structures” and can be seen everywhere from the pyramids and Stonehenge to seashells and flower

work

front foyer will also have

sections

made

entirely of glass so

with the Ontario Masonry Training Council (OMTC) and The Walter

together on the construction of a

natural light can flow into the shop

masonry

area,

Fedy Partnership on the construc-

“Of

tion

of a

new masonry

training

at Conestoga’s Waterloo campus. Greg White, chair of the trades and apprenticeship programs, says

centre

all

training centre,” he says.

the areas in the province,

were most impressed with Conestoga and how committed we

they

are to the trades.”

The most interesting part of the new building will be the exhibition

which can be seen from outside and will have the design principle of the “golden ratio” etched into the floor.

The

facility

itself will

used as a learning the

will be exposed, revealing

they work.

strong,

The 900-square-metre

facility

The

innovative building will not

follow the design plan of a regular

releasing their apprentices to

make

structure

tool, as

and

also be

many of

construction

inspire tradespeople, both

new and

it

work

an impressive structure to

ing the profile.

Dick Kappeler, a former mason,

college building in an attempt to

petals.

The

how

will include a training shop,

ratio”

tradespeople, especially in mason-

apprentices.

Conestoga College

the

methods

It

design

Support for the project has been with many companies

and lecture hall area which will use some of the basic math principles of the original masons in its

will

be coming out of retirement to

serve as the project manager.

old.

will have a place; where can gather and talk about masonry,” says White. “It’s not just apprenticeship training, it’s a working building that will be uti-

There

“They

they

is

even more support comwhich, along

OMCA

ing from the

with

its

partners,

is

donating a

lot

of the supplies and materials which the college could not afford on

its

demonstrate and teach architects and engineers, people

own. Along with the

traditional block

involved with design.”

apprenticeships,

the

lized

to

school

will

eventually offer pre-apprenticeship

programs so

that the students

enter the trade with a lot

can

more back-

ground, and be better prepared. The current timeline for construction

is

for partial

occupancy

January if the shop area is ready for it. and more students coming in in

when

the building

is

finished in the

spring.

White says

it

is

an optimistic

timeline, but hopes they can follow it

as the building

was needed four

years ago.

"The masonry trade

is

changing,

a lot of the beautiful buildings in

(Illustration

The new masonry

training centre at

Conestoga’s Waterloo campus, shown

in this illustration, is

expected

courtesy of Walter Fedy Partnership) to partially

open

in

January.

Canada need restoring, and good masons will be needed to maintain our heritage."


Page 4

Commentary

— SPOKE, September 17, 2007

Dealing with start-up stress College services help alleviate the anxiety The ment.

of a new school year almost always breeds exciteThe adrenaline rises as students contemplate the fresh

start

and impending challenges before them. Unfortunately, any is almost instantly overshadowed by the many poteninconveniences that come with the opening week - and even

start

excitement tial

month - of the new school year. Here at Conestoga College, students lineups for books, parking passes, there

tion,

the

are

its

come

and coffee. In addiand last-minute

construction

inevitable

timetable changes that

are familiar with long

OSAP

as the college attempts to

maximize

space and time.

For returning students, these things can be aggravating and For new students, it's additional stress piled on to that which already exists from adjusting to a new school and stressful.

new city. The most important

Keys to making through nc ude res t and smart

possibly a

it

thing to

|

;

realize in times like these

inconvenience and

that

is

time

line-

managemen

Feeling at a navigational loss? Don't hesitate to ask for help.

.

ups should not be confused with inefficiency.

When

deal-

it is impossible to serve everyone at always room for small improvements, the college manages to do a good job overall. Short of offering free parking, building a bigger bookstore or students no longer wanting coffee, there are no immediate improvements that are

Second year has own stresses

ing with certain services,

once.

Although there

is

being ignored.

The college does take steps to help alleviate wait times and hassles during orientation week. Students have the option of Lineups for online order pickups are much shorter and more convenient. Timetables are available online as well, so students can log on at

When

my

started college

first

I

had a pit palms were sweaty, the bottom of my stomach and I

my

like

felt

What

This year

my

returned for

I

because

sadly the reality of the situation has

needed regarding classes, These services are free and career paths or life in general. should be taken advantage of by all students should the need arise. The first couple of weeks are crazy for everyone, so no

kicked

The

have

feel like they

inconveniences are necessary the year runs in a

in

go it alone. do is accept

that these early

order to ensure that the rest of

smooth and organized fashion. The keys

making to

to

best thing for students to

to

smart time management

it through these times allow for everything to be taken care of, and a constant self-

are rest,

reminder

that the best

yet

is

- and soon -

to

come.

I

At

have gotten myself

first

away away

the very

Opinion

all

the

throwing

math and science

I

ever

This year

it

is

almost hard to have

any joyous thoughts about returning to college.

I

around the school

my own was

my

I

a blissful thought. But

same kind of anxiety I felt in the first few weeks of school and when the reality of the whole situation finally sinks in you student feels the

either have to rise it

to

Fortunately

1

ing and fought

crowded ed

above

it

or allow

swallow you up.

all

halls,

the

my way

means

ly

through the

met friends and

way through

last-

the three-

1

am

world.

when lege if

It is I

real-

a step closer to grad-

a scary thought. At least

was

my my

in

my

first

year of col-

biggest worry fake ID

would

seemed

to

get cut

up

the thought of graduation

weighing down on me and dreading

all

the

am

I

and

work

I

that has to

to scare

should only be

week

thinking a

when my

growing up way too

really

I

next

advance

in

visit

to

to the bar

is

want

to

going to be or what party

1

attend the following weekend. All the college years are really

similar

many ways. You

in

The one

things.

ferent that

seems

are

is

am be

similarity

the

stay

to

same

throughout the years of post-sec-

ondary school

what

it's

may

College

and for

is

unknown and

the

going to bring your way.

me

it

is

only happen once

coming

eight short months.

outside a bar.

Now

enough

looking forward but dreading dif-

hours.

uation and being a part of the real

be

rose above the feel-

last three

Being a second-year student

really think that every first-year

I

a scheduled three-hour class

does not always

second time.

I

Most importantly,

friends.

know

know my way and have made

step into uUuU-

first

that is

silly.

feel

1

fast

learned in high school and being on

in for the

anyone

hour classes.

idea of going

finally

to college,

I

into.

me

hood. To

know

Life Centre, offers students assistance in dealing with hectic

what

and taking the

second

year unexcited and with no nervpartly

college or university you

start

are leaving your childhood behind

Reed

a difference a year makes.

ousness,

one should

Kerry

to that point.

could just enjoy college

1

cannot help but worry. Once

I

you

me

to get

wish

but

it

knees were going to

any time to check for last-minute changes. There are also many services available to help students deal with any stresses during the first week, as well as throughout the year. Health services, located in Room 1A102, has physicians available at various times to assist with any health concerns, as well as chiropractic care, which helps students relieve stress and stay relaxed. Counselling services, located in the new Student is

I

buckle.

ordering parking passes and books online.

times, as well as any advice that

done

in

I

to

an end

to really

enjoy everything about

while

lasts

it

in

have decided

because

I

know

it

it

is

not going to last forever.

Spoke Letters are

welcome

Spoke welcomes

is

Editor: Christopher Mills Advertising Manager: Jenn Sprach Spoke Online Editor: Alex McNanney Production Manager: Holly Featherstone Circulation Manager: Sarah Jaynes

letters to the

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

editor. Letters

contacted

No unsigned

Photo Editors: Leanne Mountlord, Vanessa Butler Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

for verification.

be published. be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter letters will

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 1C29, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 519-748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 519-748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca Website: www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

Letters should

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The

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College

Address correspondence to: Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 1C29, Kitchener, Ont.,

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The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. Spoke shall not be liable lor any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed: a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.


News

SPOKE, September

Bookstore has something ALLWOOD

By JACKIE

now

comforting voice or just a quick top

bookstore

up.

the place to go.

However, Conestoga's Doon campus bookstore has much more than just program necessities.

anyone who needs

for

Students might also want to check out discounted hoodies and

name

T-shirts that have the college

on them.

year’s hot school items.

gram names on them but don't worry if you don't see yours.

try

and order the items and

we

Andraza, manager of

opera-

retail

Some

of the apparel have pro-

Starting

real-

Mary

show," says

ize at the trade

program

to

week bookstore

next

be sending an e-mail out

staff will

co-ordinators

that

how

to get

tions.

includes information on

This year the bookstore is offernew items such as fun margarita mix gift bottles and comfortable pyjama pants as well as some new services such as textbook buy-

your

clothing but would like something

backs.

a

ing

It

new

also has a

security system.

Andraza says retail stores have something called shrinkage which refers to inventory that

received

is

and then disappears.

“We

the shrinkage

new

(the

how

are not sure

extensive

says Andraza.

is,"

“It

security system) will cer-

tainly deter people.”

own

sweater.

The bookstore

also currently

is

exploring a line of wear for teach-

who

ers

little

more

who want

buyback system. be put on the book-

will

list

store’s website (http://conestoga. bookware3000.ca.) where you can

register

your textbooks as available

for buyback.

we

a time

identify

their textbook

needs to be bought back they will get an e-mail notification,” says Andraza.

your

in

Instant

messaging

comes

to the

By ELIZABETH BATE

While some

seemed

students

While students were getting a much-needed break this summer, the staff at Conestoga College’s Learning Resource Centre were experiencing a new way to com-

saw

municate.

The program is only Monday to Friday during

access a librar-

ian through instant messaging. For

many of

LRC, the new program was

the staff at the

training for the the

time they had used an messaging system.

first

instant

“We can even IM each other at the desks.”

potential in the idea.

“I think

it

would be

seems a

messaging

Instant

new The

thing at

think

“I

library

some of them

it

technician

“It

used

at

just

gives

option,”

Cyr

are

still

LRC

are

another

She hopes the

education students. Students can add the lists

Yahoo!, or

on

AOL

LRC

Gtalk,

instant

to their

MSN,

messaging

the

Macs

Currently the bookstore’s

list

is

small because they have stocked up for the fall semester.

“We

will

be definitely buying back

for our winter semester towards late

you need a special textbook or are living in the area and are taking an Ontario Learn course you can order a book and pick it up at the If

bookstore. Or, if you waited too long to buy your textbook and it is sold out or you would like to use the optional resources for your course, don’t worry, the bookstore can get it for

you by special order. “Sometimes we realize we sell out by the end of September and, if no one asks for it we are not necessarily going to reorder it,” says Andraza. “We might get a student who

comes the week before exams or two weeks before, saying I didn't buy the book and I need it now so

we

will special order

it

for them.”

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units will be given to stu-

dents for up to three hours

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time, for use inside the library.

The

a

http: / /www. wincollegetuition.com

LRC

hopes that students who' need a computer for group work will take advantage of this service. While the LRC is gearing up for the still

new

semester, the staff there are

having fun learning the new

programs, but an instant messaging account isn’t needed to use the fea-

features.

ture.

the desks,” says library technician

Students can access a librarian through the chat box provided on at website LRC the

Susan Lee. For more information students can check out the LRC website or go into the library.

http://www.conestogac.on.ca/lrc/.

in to

October,” says Andraza.

use them on a regular

available for loan.

after see-

students

says.

who

LRC

will

buddy

available as

basis, or to give students

units,

be especially useful for continuing education and distance tool

semester.

this

20 new computers for student use, six of which are Macs.

who proposed

other institutions.

it

only

library has received

never used a

says Jen Cyr, the

it,”

the. tool be used at

ing

isn’t the

students

getting used to

students can bring

in the future.

as possi-

intimidating.

is

regular

many ways

little

it

hours for now, but Linda Schneider, manager of the LRC, isn’t ruling out extending the hours

being provided to accommodate

some, the new program

If

LRC

of offer-

for

10- or 13-digit code on the back of your textbook on the website and find out if your book is on the list for buyback.

offered

staff like the idea

ing help in as

that are avail-

home.”

assignments on. Schneider says

ble,

BSCN

nursing student, “especially from

open access computers for students to do homework or research

library technician

While

helpful,” says

Kate Shultz, a level-two

Most of these

Susan Lee,

pyjamas

LRC

unlikely to use the feature, others

now

Tiron, both first-year marketing students, look at

able at the bookstore.

the cash register and receive cash.

She says you can punch

iety.

get

to

extra cash the bookstore has

started a

A

Sheena Sahadat and Roxy

professional.

For students

some

school-crested

the

like

“If at such

Another new offering will help students who are away from home and suffering from separation anx-

Students can

everyone

hear a

to

Every February bookstore staff attend a trade show and preview the

“We

— Page 5

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2007

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News

Get ready By CHARLOTTE PRONG PARKHILL If

you don’t

you can’t com-

vote,

plain.

That’s the old adage about elections. “I think it’s

people

to

important for young

vote,”

Tyrone

said

to

vote in the Oct. 10 provincial election.

"We're the next generation that’s up, and we want to do what we can to make our province

coming a

better place

to

live,"

he said.

"But our ideas compared to our parents’ ideas, and their genera-

much

are

tion,

different.

So

it’s

important for us to do some type of research and understand what’s

ing less than half the tuition you are today.

who

voted for the

first

in last year's

tion,

plans to pay close attention to

television

municipal elec-

news and newspapers as to help him

well

as

make

his decision prior to this elec-

advertising

tion.

Conestoga

student

Jackson, 19, voted al

Spencer

in the last

feder-

election and relies on a different

most of his political information. “Family influence,” he said. “I think it runs in the family most of the time.” Spencer Wilton, a 20-year-old Conestoga student, disagrees. He lives with his parents in Waterloo source

for

If

young

voters were

about the candidates.

voting, political parties

ly

care of them.”

“I went largefrom the advertising the candidates had put about,” he said. “In a

municipal election,

it’s

a lot of sig-

nage and things like that. Obviously it's not the best way to get informed.”

Wilton

And

hopes

vote

to

in

the

provincial election, but will only

do so

to

When we go we

may

be

spike

60 per

cent.

to the polls this

in a

among young

voters

when

Trudeau ran for prime minis“There used to be people in

Pierre ter.

that could stand up and mesmerize a crowd,” he said. People here may be more complacent than in Europe, where 85

politics

.

figures available by age, but in the

2003 provincial election, there was 56 per cent turnout. Conestoga professor Michael Dale of the School of Liberal and a

per cent of voters turned out for France’s recent national election.

most, such as health care, licensing

Dale attributes this to the fact that in Europe may have more understanding of how easily a democracy can be stripped away. “There’s an old saying. Don’t worry about your rights. If you ignore them, they’ll go away,” he

and

said.

Media Studies thinks everyone should vote. “It’s a civic duty.” He said students need to think about the issues that affect them particularly, education.

“The reason you’re paying the tuition you have today is because you don’t vote,” he said. “If the political parties

ID.

may only handful of student votes, said Dale. He adds that there was a

Canada, 25 per cent of young votcame out to the polls in 2000, but at the 2004 federal election. 38 turned out. That’s still lower than the total voter turnout of

Bring

www.electionsontario.ca

to

cola,” he said. “But there no ginger ale on the ticket.” Candidates who use cute ads and

bring

per cent

Go

Crown

increasing. According to Elections

ers

Not sure if you’re registered to vote? Don’t know where to vote? Don’t know the candidates?

really

cartoons on the Internet

1

more

info. Click on Youth. on Post-secondary Student FAQs. There will be a voter registration drive on campus Sept. 17 and 18.

for

Click

are choosing between Coke, Pepsi or Royal

fall,

among

8 to 2

— Page 7

blame. “What’s to get excited

ain't

1

would take

while Dale said some stu-

if he feels he is well informed about the issues. Figures are elusive, but turnout

voters aged

2007

dents are apathetic, he feels the candidates themselves are partially

about?

Elections Ontario does not have

time

Wednesday, Oct. 10. Polls are open 9'a.m. - 9 p.m.

and voted

going on.” Tavares,

to vote

in last year’s municipal without talking to them

17,

PROVINCIAL ELECTION 2007

election

Tavares, 19, a first-year student at

Conestoga College who plans

SPOKE, September

knew

that

80 per

cent (of students) were going out to vote every election, you’d be pay-

people

(Photo by Charlotte Prong Parkhttt)

Tavares blames the indecision he on a lack of trust. “I find that

Checking for

vital signs does an abdominal assessment and Debbie Santos checks the blood pressure of a mannequin in the nursing lab. The lifelike mannequins have an actual heartbeat and can simulate breathing and abdominal activity.

feels

governments agree with different things. Sometimes things are not done either way, no matter who’s in government.” different

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Page s

News

— SPOKE, September 17, 2007

Pay for school with a personal line

Jenny Watson, a business foundations student, walks by the Ontario Students Assistance Plan office. For

OSAP

students the governinterest while

ment covers the the student

personal

is in

school.

line of credit

In

OSAP

of credit or

a

students

are responsible for accumulat-

ed

loan (Photo by Franca Maio)

The Ontario Student Assistance

(OSAP)

Plan

not the only option

is

tor assistance to pay for post-sec-

ondary school.

A

student line of credit, which

you can apply

a type of loan

is

for at

a bank, could be another way of paying for tuition and books.

bank

The

assess your may ask for

will

OSAP

the interest on the covered by the government while the student is in school," said Paul Matresky. Conestoga College's manager of financial aid and the student

"With

By FRANCA MAIO

interest.

is

awards

He

office.

said

months

OSAP

interest

gives students six free

after school

finishes to begin paying their loan.

This also applies to students

who

financial history and

stop attending school.

a co-signer for the line of credit, said a financial service represen-

ning of the seventh month, accord-

tative

who

did not want her

name

The

interest starts at the begin-

ing to the website.

used.

However,

just

because you get a

mean you

co-signer does not

Students have up to

will

10 years to repay

receive the line of credit. The co-signer must also pass a

OSAP

their

loans.

check before the line of credapproved by the bank, said the

credit it

is

Matresky said

representative.

“The student on a debt and

has to qualify credit check,” she

still

If

various Canadian

According bank websites, a student must pay the interest on the amount of money they have used from their line of credit, and are required to pay the loan back after graduation within one year. OSAP also helps students pay for and books during their postsecondary education. According to the OSAP website

tuition

(www.osap.gov.on.ca), they do not require a student to pay back their loan while

CONESTOGA

in

school.

gives stu-

loan.

said to

OSAP

dents up to 10 years to repay their

the

they are unable to pay within 10 years, there is a program

set up to help them which they can access by contacting the National Student Loan Centre

(NSLC). According

to the

OSAP

website,

a student is unable to repay their loan within nine and a half years, the student should contact the

if

NSLC

and they will assess the

sit-

uation.

The National Student Loan Centre can extend the re-payment period to

1

5 years.

RIM Park Waterloo •

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Waterloo

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-

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2007

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IMstumped got a question?

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the Learning Resource Centre

www.conestogac.on.ca/lrc (Photo by Kerry Reed)

Nose

to the grindstone

Christine Threndyle, a second-year financial planning student,

studies

in

the cafeteria before her classes start.


News

SPOKE, September

17,

2007

— Page 9

Walk funds Parkinson research and services By HOLLY FEATHERSTONE

disease

A

sense of isolation

among

those

take

by

caregivers in local clinical settings

research.

with

when

patient

services aren't available, but this

SuperWalk

annual

year's

Parkinson’s,

organized

local

Parkinson Society Canada, helps participants “mobilize” their concern and support for Parkinson

the

research and aid initiatives.

Sapsworth said in the meantime she is looking forward to seeing a bustle of support at the SuperWalk in defiance of the seemingly quiet

The SuperWalk,

be held

to

at

various locations across Canada, includes walks in

Kitchener and

on Sept. 29 and Chatham, Kincardine, London, Sarnia and Windsor on

proper

Parkinson's

administration treatments,

Sapsworth, who will oversee the tulip bulb campaign table at the

walk

in

pride

said

a cause

wide event. This year's proceeds will be directly tunneled into Parkinson's curative research and - as a new and ever-imperative endeavour this year - service and support programs.^ Last year $227,000 was raised in southwest-

renewed her appreciation she said,

in

to

for

because

of

last

they

aren't

in

students to

always a challenge typically

diag-

number have

previous years.

like this

because of a personal con-

who has "When there

nection (with someone)

someone) who has

Parkinson's,” he said. that connection,

younger people

offer an incredible

amount of sup-

is

port.”

co-ordinator offund

Motuzas said

de\ 'e/opment

"We've always used

lesson

a

Parkinson’s has taught her.

that

despite most

this

event as

springboard for research,”

to offer.”

Motuzas, who has participated in walk for six years, said what he enjoys most about the annual event are the

teams supporting diagnosed

members as well as taking a moment to savour his surround-

family

"At the walks

always try to once and look around," he said. “To see ... everyone together to recognize our community of people affected by Parkinson's, always makes me feel like all the hard work was worth it."

pause

I

least

at

The Kitchener SuperWalk

for

Parkinson’s will be held Saturday.

tary contributions,

young support-

Sept. 29 at Victoria Park with regis-

ers have a vibrancy

and energy

tration beginning at 0 a.m. To offer your support, contact the Parkinson

that

pervades the event.

he

“(Students)

said.

personally

mone-

students’ inability to provide

life.

those

that

affected with the disease are unable

ings.

“Usually, people support a cause

be patience,”

valuable

is

nosed, a surprising

Andre Motuzas,

response to a question

asking her what

Though encouraging

toward

a personal connection

(with

that

uations, but they have a wellspring

of energy

the

volunteered like this

confident the

is

surpass

year’s.

“Usually people support

of

said he will

funds

improving programs,

to

clinical

participate

her husband's condition has

have

turnout

since

Kitchener's Victoria Park,

ern Ontario “leg" of the nation-

“1 think it’d

donating

in

allocated

Motuzas

southwestern Ontario claiming participants

Parkinsons.”

nature of the disease.

part of the southwest-

proceeds,

pated this month.

Brantford,

all

overall

this year's addition.of

national

walk raises a significant portion of the

antici-

is

With being

of

Stratford

Sept. 30,

Andre Motuzas, co-ordinator of fund development for Parkinson Society Canada, said Kitchener's

for

affected

Parkinson’s disease

and exchange

discuss

programs as well as those areas seeking improvements. Sapsworth said a forum discussing the newly integrated Parkinson's education program, which teaches

typical

is

to

regarding the efficiency of

ideas

give

may

money due

not be able to

to their present sit-

1

Society Canada or

visit

at

1-888-851-7376

www.superwalk.com.

ern Ontario. Sufferers of the disease, which

has

progressively

debilitating

symptoms, often succumb

to bouts

of depression and forlornness local treatment

Corral your Fave

when

and caregiver serv-

8 friends

programs aren't readily accessible, according to www.hopeforice

parkinsons.org. Parkinson’s

on

toll

physical motor capabilities merely

exacerbates this problem.

Norma Sapsworth, for

facilitator

treasurer and

Kitchener

the

Parkinson’s support group, said she can attest to a lack of public awareness regarding services for those personally affected.

“The information isn't out there much as (we) would like (it) to

as

be.”

Sapsworth, whose husband has

20 years and must use a wheelchair for lived with Parkinson's for

accommodate symptoms of muscular rigidity, mobility purposes to said though

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Student Life

— SPOKE, September 17, 2007

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SPOKE, September

17,

2007

— Page 11

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News

SPOKE, September

17,

2007

— Page 13

Early childhood education students bring fresh outlook By JENNIFER

MARKO

requirements for running a day care. The kids are split

provincial

When you think of the early childhood education program, better known on campus as ECE, do you think of students sitting class learning from a textbook? so, you are only half right.

The students enrolled

in

ECE

iri

categories:

child

staff to

If

adult, but the

Horst said the children like havsaid the students bring a fresh outlook.

“They can

practise

“I

forward to

also

my placement

the most.”

the

skills

new and parents

seem

to

students looking

Ccmclace Leis, first-year

Conestoga’s Doon

is

enjoy having the

of

supervisor

The

love kids. I’m looking

said

Horst,

their it

exciting.”

semester the students are mainly Lisa

She

ing the extra adults around.

and

first

observing,”

one

at

children

varies.

do

their sec-

their

stays

ratio

number of

ond semester. "In

infants,

JK/SK, school

age a.m. and school age p.m. The

in

spend their first semester in class with their textbooks and notebooks in front of them. But they get a lot of experience working with children

several

into

toddlers, preschool,

ECE

after

their

chil-

dren.

The

par-

ents

campus

understand

the centre has to

Child Care Centre. "They observe

meet certain

one day a week in the centre to watch the interactions between the

with their staff and they explain to the

kids.”

teaching

parents

the

centre

a

is

facility.

semester, the staff at

said Horst.

the centre take care of entertaining

Students

first

that

“The parents

While the students are completing their

requirements

legal

(Photo

First-year

ECE

student,

ing with the children in

are glad to see

program do

many

her

cousins.

Her

the

not get to plan activities with the

experience was not the only factor in her decision to enrol in the ECE

kids have a balance of indoor and

kids until their second, third and

program.

outdoor activity, which is provided daily, and two snacks and a nutritious lunch for which menus are provided. They also provide rest

fourth semesters. But that does not

“1 love kids,” said Leis.

mean

There

the children.

They make sure

in the

they do not have any experi-

ence when they walk into the centre.

and sleep times.

First-year student

Currently there are 67 kids who attend the centre with enough staff

comply with the Day Nurseries Act (DNA), which outlines the to

by Jennifer Marko)

looking forward to setting aside her textbooks

and

interact-

Child Care Centre.

it,”

include

ECE

Candace Leis, is the Doon campus

Candace Leis

does not have any experience in a day-care centre but she has been a babysitter and has looked after kids from ages four to 12. Those also

is

one specific child,

cousin. lot

of

fun,” she said.

Being

in a

program

can have its ups and its downs. However, Leis seems to see

placement. She said her teachers have shown the students what kinds

only the good things about her pro-

of activities they can do, through the use of their textbooks. The program runs for two years and after that there is the option to

gram and is excited about what is to come. She could not come up

however, that made her decision a lot easier. Leis has an autistic “He’s a handful but he’s a

sibility

that results in

students having such great respon-

with anything she is not looking forward to. “Em looking forward to my placement the most,” said Leis, “but

1

haven’t started

attend university to learn more.

For now Leis

is

thinking only of

the present and does not

She said she does not yet know what kinds of activities she will plan for the kids once she is in her

know what

going to do after her time at Conestoga is complete. “Teaching might be fun,” she she

it.”

is

said.

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Page 14

News

— SPOKE, September 17, 2007

away from home an adjustment

Living By MARCIA LOVE

“In a day or so

With the beginning of the fall semester at Conestoga comes many students who are

new

For some of them

may be their home a time

this

has been long awaited. -

dence

that

school.

a time not to

It’s

bedroom floor For some first-year

as a closet.

students, living

from family and friends can be adjust

away

difficult to

to.

Conestoga Residence life co-ordinator, Ryan Connell, said it is important for stu-

own

dents living on their

home. “Don’t be

ed

to

still

feel

ground-

afraid

Connell said. "A to cure

to

lot

their

make those

calls,”

of people think a great

homesickness

people back home, and site.

was

I

alright," Vivian said.

just kind of weird

on the

first

day

in.”

will

it's

is

to not talk to

quite the oppo-

They should kind of build them into new routine ... and still stay connect-

ed."

prepare him for

outside of

life

“It's like she’s right here,

Jamie Vivian, a student living

first-year

in rez,

woodworking

doesn’t find living on

own to be too difficult yet. “I’m pretty good right now,” he said. "I’m “just starting to get used to it, but it's not much different than at home.” his

However, he said he didn’t find

it

easy to

“You have

here,” she said.

want

to be able to live

on

my own

time, so

better

and be able to cook better." Tasks such as grocery shopping, preparing meals, doing laundry and cleaning are common challenges students living on their own must face. Connell said these students soon realize they are the ones who have to do the day-today work with no one there to make the “They’re the ones

who have

always

is

to

except she’s not

move

out some-

might as well be now.”

it

Connell said first-year students living in

in

activities

and events. Christina

Brajak,

a

first-year

hearing

instrument specialist student, said she doesn’t

know anyone

residence yet.

in

had someone else to help me meet new people it would be easier, but don’t usually walk around by myself,” she said. “I haven't gone out to any of the events yet "If

I

I

do the dish-

to

mom

residence should get involved

choices for them.

either.” if she went out to more of the provided at the residence she might

Brajak said

said.

“Those who don’t clean up

themselves right away are really realizing what an adjustment it is to not have their parents around. They're the ones responsible for their

back home because her

ly

calling her.

es and clean up after themselves,” Connell

at

way

“I

I

said he hopes his experience in resi-

first

worry about doing the dishes until there are no clean plates left, to let the garbage pile up until the smell becomes unbearable and to use the

was moving “It

He

to the college scene.

time living away from

more self-dependent, because if don’t do it no one will.” Reansbury said she doesn’t miss her fami-

adjust to living in residence.

own

after

activities

get to

“A

they’re

Jamie Reansbury, a first-year print journalism student living in residence, hasn’t done laundry yet, but said living on her own part

being

is

to

a

in

tell

me

to

go

to bed or have to be

“I’ll

Making

j

SS

a

instrument specialist,

important for students to

es.

that

She’s

first-year is

on her own

living

hearing

doing her dishfor the first

time.

Register and attend the

September 2007

m v

. .

is

take advantage of all the opportunities have been set out before them.

j

55

it

Brajak,

the

Grade

eg

(Photo by Marcia Love)

Christina

residence.”

the

Connell said

“There’s no one to

are in first year are

"Be involved and get engaged with the campus. “There are so many things going on within

responsible one. anything,” Reansbury said.

who

meet other people because new surrounding,” Connell

said.

should be easy.

She said the hardest

people.

of students

shy

very

rules.”

know more

lot

j

Learning

Making

Commons’ the

Grade

sessions

-Tips fur Success-

No Time

There’s

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the learning

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how

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improve


News

SPOKE, September

Former sex trade worker By ALLISON STEINMAN

An

was a

Violence

instructor in the police foun-

dations program at Conestoga College wanted his students to be

business to escape a difficult child-

able to put a face to an issue after

hood and also discussed what

hearing the story of Natasha Falle,

sex trade

a former sex trade worker.

who

drug addiction and an abusive relationship and finally getting out and

be treated with

reintegrating back into mainstream

“Street people, regardless of

they are, should dignity," said

He added the “1

minds of wanted

about

the

all

Andy

that

to use that

Knetsch.

his students.

make them

to

think

power they have and power to treat others

who worked

in

age of

at the

gave three

14,

She said she got

lectures.

“You

why

putting

justify

why

it's

how

surround myself with people

two Conestoga

I've learned a lot in the past

spent

I've

at

but also through can't determine

ing to take

it

experiences.

life

1

why

all in

it is I'm startnow, so I'm just

going to assume I'm really starting

grow

to

I've learned people are let

me down. Not just

es,

classmates or teachers, but

best friends as well.

decision to dwell on

my

can make the

I

it

and give up

on people, or I can leave my heart out there and move on. I've learned who is worth forgetting. I will also hurt people and let them down. If I can apologize, forgive myself and learn from those mistakes,

I

will

become

a stronger

I've learned

trust

who my

true friends

who

They're the ones with

my

life.

1

when I learned when

my

heart.

I

I

can

constantly

put others

first.

1

has

1

ribs,

two broken cracked teeth

can help

me

recognize

was

street

story

will

make

people differently during her

“She made

all

the stereotypes

didn’t start out

H

in

career for me.

Sociology

- and

on

a career path to

the restaurant business

it’s

I

I

- but

was what made her want to be a She now works for a program called Streetlight and

Swartzentruber. “She was one of

counsellor.

be a Police it

the

best

speakers

I

heard.”

••

didn't

decided to go back to school

Officer.

seem

like

- with

I

started

the right

a degree in

applied to the Waterloo Regional Police Service

been

a great career!" --

Constable Howard Mark

Police Service opens and challenging career.

The Waterloo Regional the door to a

fulfilling

my

faults.

learned

to

live.

It’s

so

make the most out of every moment. I will regret it if important to

I

ever held amount to nothing,” said

out

said

her treat

career as a police officer.

• i *

1

affected

Swartzentruber

Brittany Falle's

definitely

story.

Falle’s short stay at a rehab centre

to.”

suffered

1

by her

I've

I should do this. Although sometimes it is hard to accept, not everyone is going to like me. These people are just as important as the ones who do. They will challenge me and keep me strong. I need people

who

like

As

There are going to be times when need to think of myself first and

times

was

Explore the

who

helps to

it is, sometimes people change and eventually grow apart. Although I've wanted to hold on.

I've

person.

are.

in

it

go through recovery. knew what 1 wanted and knew didn’t want to go back,” she said. “I was on the road to recovery and knew wanted it really bad.”

and has had her nose broken three

hard as

going to

acquaintanc-

Falle

had

“Validate their jobs but don't encourage them," she said. “Reach out to one person." A student at one of Falle’s presentations

what

1

I

as future police officers, will

WATERLOO REGIONAL POLICE SERVICE

I've learned to let people go.

up.

be soldiers.”

People will play important roles different times

a healthy rela-

“1

keep a positive attitude when times

at

sex

“These girls are war and they are trained

are rough.

Not only academically,

College.

in the

to

“Because

violence

it

Falle,

“1

lessons

care about me, because

years

Natasha

former sex trade worker

arms, cracked

Falle talked about

in

Falle spoke about

OK

you're different from the next

who was

fighting a to

wouldn't think twice to pull a knife if 1 had to," she said.

and

never knew anyone

tionship,” she said.

soldiers.”

condoms

person," she added.

life

BY SUMMER MCPHEE

Falle then spoke to the students,

daily basis.

are putting

practising

trade

be

dealing with violence

sex trade.

abuse, and she isn’t the only one.

trade

“These girls are fighting a war and they are

on makeup and going to the mall and there 1 was, 14, with two girls who had already been involved in the sex

into the

Learning

life

in the

deal with people on the street on a

“1

trained to

“Most teens

sex

the

trade industry for 12 years begin-

ning

the

women

helps

times as a result of violence and

really like, dealing with

on'cucumbers," she said.

equally," he said. Falle,

is

had been a big part of her life as it is for most girls involved in the trade.

— Page 15

tells all who

society.

he wanted to open

big part of her

2007

17,

www.wrps.on.ca people helping people

I

don't.

always looking for story andphoto ideas. Ifyou have a

hot news tip, call Spoke

at ext 3691.

have

ever


— SPOKE, September

Page 16

17,

News

2007

Nights out can

be easy to afford By JENN SPRACH *

School

s

is

back

in,

domestic beer and shots and half price burgers on Monday nights,

leaving stu-

dents struggling to pay their

with

time and

little

money

If

'

and half price nachos

faji-

bar

Here’s where your student

ID

instead.

Waterloo Region offering deals

in

sick of

at the

tas

perfectly suited to a student's lim-

you are

wings, they have two-for-one

for

themselves. Luckily, there are various places

Brown. Tuesday night

said bartender Brianna

bills

comes in handy. Wednesdays students

card

ited wallet.

receive 30

Crabby Joe's on Fairway Road offers weekly specials as well as

per cent off with their identifica-

half price appetizers after 9 p.m.

Thursdays pitchers are $6.99. The Still Bar and Grill has the best deal on Friday nights. It’s beer bong Fridays which includes a beer bong and two pounds of wings for $15.95, said manager Tom Bourbonnais.

everyday.

On Mondays they have $3 domestic beers, Tuesdays 29 cent wings and on Wednesdays discount Coronas at $3.25 each, said employee Chris Williams. For cheap $10 pitchers students want

be there on Thursday and ladies, it’s $4 martini night on Fridays. Students can also check out to

night,

Molly Blooms Manitou Drive

Pub

Irish in

on

Kitchener for

discount deals.

Mondays

tion,

she said.

kind of like an extra large pitcher,” he said, adding, “It gets “It’s

$2.99 or a Blue and a burger for $6 .

centre that it

is filled

cold while

at

get

a

free

pound of wings with their student ID Friday nights, said Bourbonnais.

Everyday from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. they have 25 cent wings, and the offer also applies Monday and

pub.

Thursday nights. Also on Mondays they have $2.99 Caesars and Coronas. Sometimes students just want to get out and dance without the high prices gouging their pockets. Elements Nightclub in downtown Kitchener on King Street has

“Thursdays is college night,” she “We have $3.25 domestic

said,

bottles,

$10

pitchers,

half price

appetizers and a deejay.”

Sundays

Sexy

offers

$2.99

Caesars and half price wings.

Need

a taste of Italy? Eastside

Mario’s on Highland Road in Kitchener has half price appetizers and pizza everyday after 9 p.m.,

manager Priya Anand. Hungry a little earlier? Sunday

said

through Thursday from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. pizzas are on for half price.

McNasty’s on Westmount Road North has $2.25 Philthy

College clubs can be fun if you organize them right

table.

also

drinks Saturday nights for $2.75.

The Wax,

By WEI-LON LEE

open

Bourbonnais said. “We have a $3,000 student prize giveaway coming up on Sept. 29.” will include a laptop, a digital

camera and other goodies students would find useful.

to

any Conestoga College

student, and there are no restric-

Have

TV show? Or

a favourite

perhaps a special

would

like

to

you

interest

share

with

tions prohibiting the joining of a club.

the

world?

If

If

that

want

to

is

you might

the case,

pay Lindsay Silva a

Silva

is

the events

visit.

programmer

Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) and is the person you have to see for all club-related events and Joining a club

make new

a great

friends

who

people

is

share

and

way

to

to

meet

common

a

interest.

clubs and associations are

own

club,

go to the CSI office in Room 2A106. Very few clubs have yet been approved, but

is still

it

early in the

more

semester, so you can expect

clubs later on, said Silva.

During the 2006/2007 school Conestoga had a total of 10

activities.

All

you have any questions about

joining or creating your

at

also on King Street,

has $2 domestic beers and shots,

It

Student Life Centre a popular place

Students relax in the new Student Life Centre on Sept. 10. In addition to providing students with a spot to rest and socialize, the centre is also home to CSI and health and counselling services. The centre is open for any Conestoga student to use.

with ice to keep

your

wings are the craving it’s Tuesday nights for 34 cents, said Lauren Kinney, a bartender at the If

New

set up at your table and you pour your own.” There is a hollow column in the

Students can

they offer Coronas for

(Photo by Christopher Mitts)

year,

clubs, including the Latin club, a

Christian

fellowship

club.

way

connect with the rest of the student body, but creating a club of your own requires a little more than just enthusiasm. Anyone who wants to create a new club has to fill out the CSI club application form, which is great

to

available for pick-up at the

STTAtmas

CSI

office.

A EXCLUSIVE

GROUP BUYING POWER to

Conestoga College

few

things

to

remember

for a no-obligation

Local

Your

Ext.

quote today

1

519 743 5221

Free 1-800-321-9187 jwestman@staebler.com

means

year.

All clubs

must also have a min-

A ttutcrmu ot

sne

ImaB^ot? Group

t-acivarr.

to

how

successful the club has

been over the semester. Once you receive approval, you will be given

some

start-up fund-

about $300.

After that, any

money

spent on

year to help out with CSI events

and

activities.

To remain

fundraising or any other events,

in good standing, all clubs must organize at least two events or activities related to the

remember

club,

when organizing club

that alcoholic beverages are not allowed, since only

the

new

licensed

Sanctuary to

serve

be alcoholic will

drinks.

Waterloo Insurance

ing

must be given

the club president detail-

tures can be reimbursed in accordance with CSI clubs policy. All clubs must also contribute a minimum of five volunteer hours over the course of the academic

in

Toll

Ernail

a progress-report

CSI by

first, everyone your club must be students attending Conestoga College this

bers for your club;

Lastly,

214

officers and an events schedule for the year. After a club has been approved,

elected

club-related activities or expendi-

gathering

of 10 students during the school year to maintain itself in good club standing.

Judy at

programmer.

mem-

start

imum

Contact

Lindsay Silva, CSI events

ing, usually

before you

Offers

(Photo by Wei-Lon Lee)

8

Count (dance team), Conestoga Pride club, as well as a Conestoga Young Liberals club. Joining a club is easy, and a

such

exchange

as

fundraising events or an educational event.

For any other fundraising or donation questions, you can con-

Before your club is approved, you must prepare a mmion statement of your club, a plan of oper-

tact Lindsay Silva 5131, ext. 10.

ations, an annual budget, a

ottice and ask a staff

list

of

intercultural

events,

at

519-748-

You can also drop by the CSI member.


Entertainment

SPOKE, September

17,

2007

— Page 17

Western remake ‘simple but also compelling’ By JOSHUA

KHAN

like

any other western, simple but

also compelling.

Remakes of a movie can be a good idea and the new western film, 3: 10 To Yuma, proves that point. The newest version of the 1957

The

seem like the duo for a western fiick, but both Bale and Crowe fit their characters and do an astounding job. of adding some realism to the movie.

film of the same name stars Russell Crowe and Christian Bale, two actors

who

The ending

blend perfectly into the

played by Bale.

The charismatic Crowe plays Ben Wade, who is the

Evans

Wade

outlaw

gang stumble

War

Wade and

into trouble

veteran,

looking for a

his

moving

and Civil

Dan Evans, who

action

journey If

is

full

you're

and constantly movie, then this

fast

film isn’t for you. 3:10

is

3:10 to

the task isn't

of dangerous obstacles.

century Arizona. After implementing another attack,

then assigned to escort

to a prison train, the

that easy, since the

19th

in

is

does

Yuma. Unfortunately,

of a gang that has been

behind over 20 robberies

isn't

anything spec-

tacular or visually-thrilling, but

“wild west" atmosphere.

leader

lead actors don’t

perfect

To Yuma

is

leave

modern

it

you thinking about

society and yourself as an

makes

individual. This

it

different

from any other film that has been released this summer. Overall, 3:10 to ful

Yuma

is

an event-

story full of heroism and villainy

that proves that

you don't need

laugh or cry to enjoy a movie.

to

(Internet photo)

3:10 to

Yuma

and Christian

is

a fast-paced western

flick

starring Russell

Crowe

Bale.

CAMPUS CHIROPRACTOR Students covered by the CSI Health Plan only pay the 20% co-insurance fee (Initial Visit $10,

Subsequent

Visit $5)

HEALTH SERVICES Student Centre - Lower Level

748-5220

Ext.

3679

Volunteer

(Internet photo)

Russell It

was

Crowe

originally released in

written by

2007 remake, 3:10 to Yuma. 1957 and was based on a short story

plays an outlaw

in

the

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— SPOKE, September 17, 2007

Page 18

Sports

Head-to-head Don’t blame the league or players for accidents

someone

until

Bv Alex McNanney the

In

wake of Kevin

Everett’s

likely

NFL

career-ending spinal injury, the

and all sports like it have once again come under fire for being too brutal and violent. Everett,

a

reserve

tight

end for the

Buffalo Bills, should walk again, but his career as a professional football player is over. It is a sad case, but the NFL and more

specifically Dominik

Hixon,

the player Everett

was attempting

to

NFL

has

one of the stricter drug and alcohol abuse policies in sports. Players get fined and susbe

to

ty.

primitive

last

“Who

the physical compet-

is

stronger,

it’s

one

domains in our socieme or you?” It’s that

is

I

it

UFC

not the only person, because the the fastest- rising sport in North

is

America.

And

“Most players

W

the P h V S| cal competitive-

-

e,

sands of dollars worth Of equipment. The league does all it can to prevent injuries. But

it

...

cannot play God;

they

First,

.

two

who

say the fighters aren’t

things:

it

know

exactly what they’re get-

head.

knows

it

means

a

grinding,

pounding,

16-game schedule, plus potentially three to four more games if your team wins the Super Bowl. If you take that hard-hitting

into

the referees step in and stop a fight the person is knocked out. They don’t

down. They are so diligent in their work that fans complain they are stopping the fights too early. But their response every time is that er

it’s

bad

their duty to protect the fighters, so too if

the fans, or even the fighters them-

selves, don’t like

One also has to consider that the players know what they’re getting into. Every ^'player who makes it onto an NFL team

account,

the

fact

injuries are rare should

life-threatening

show

the respect

By ALEX

.

MCNANNEY

league

at

Yes,

some

happen, like Everett’s,

and the players enjoy

it,

and not just because

their livelihood.

Don’t take

it

If

you want

is

My biggest issue toil in

money, yet

is

making

risk their lives

relatively

every

bit

if

but

it’s

especially disturbing

Athletics in the first

Association

“It’s a mystery and an enigma,” Geoff Johnstone said with a laugh. "It’s

played

in

a Sept. 8 exhibition

game

“There’s no substitute for playing

hopes the team can the

the year

favourable.

The Condors College and

Humber

of the premier teams

Sheridan

College, two in the

Ontario

would-

ments and create a more exciting game for the fans.

And something definitely needs

to be done Kevin Everetts of the world the financial and physical protection that they to give the

it

so richly deserve.

and new Lambton Lions

“They’re just stable, hard-

who make

GeoffJohnstone,

my

team.”

“He’s told

me

he's going to be an

excellent player for us,” he said.

he’s going to

But he in

is

glad to have two players

particular

returning,

play the Lions on Sept.

captain

1

8,

then to

St.

Clair to face the Griffins on Sept. 23.

They wrap up the first half of the season against archrival Humber, in Toronto, on Sept. 26. at

head coach

Surej

best player,” he said.

“You know what you get with two really hard workers.” The team travels to Lambton to

those

seemed to understand each other so well, and they never have,” he said. Johnstone said his assistant

"He (Baines) says

Nate Drury and Nick Pandeirada. “They’re just stable, hard-working guys who make the backbone of the team,” he said.

8.

the backbone of the

be

to

an incident like this and realize something needs to be done. NFL Commissioner Roger Goddell needs to find ways to make his league safer. That will protect his invest-

story to

working guys

Baines, has been one player who wasn't with the team Saturday.

far

Johnstone also said Aldo Krajcar, women’s outdoor soccer team head coach, has been touting another player who wasn’t with the

praising take on

I

"I actually asked them after one of the exhibition games if they had played together before because they

coach,

could be done. Better

equipment? Rule changes? Less emphasis on killing opponents and more

at

the

against Sheridan.

together,” he said.

I

what

no regard for the safety of their oppoand even themselves. don’t have all the answers, but I can look

little

of old

team Sept.

...”

honest;

know

nents,

Sept. 18 against four games.

me

be

I’ll

don’t

on finesse and there fewer injuries. The irony of today’s new equipment technology is that it inherently encourages players to dish out big hits with

were

as

when

taken.

football players relied

inspire people down the road. Heck, he may even write a book. But is all of that going to help feed his family? It’s never enjoyable to see an athlete get

Returning veteran players include

mesh together quickly, but

I

good

Sure, he’ll be a feel

left

hockey,

steps need to be

on beating them with skill? Heck, maybe even less equipment. Back in the days of leather helmets and nearly non-existent pads,

little

much

as

more

ever

paralyzed

with players like Everett

obscurity,

crazy,

potentially

giant life insurance policies.

Shane Ditchfield, the team’s standout goalkeeper from the indoor soccer team last year. Johnstone is also high on two defenders who

start

played

knock the players making some logic to that. However,

team mix (OCAA),

team’s schedule to

I’ve

and

ball

but no ‘game’

happens to an athlete who’s out there for the

game

me

“Call

most of these players have nothing to fall back on should they suffer a career-ending injury. Consider their million dollar contracts as

who

it

aggressive

lent sports like foot-

to

millions, there

to

due.

when

and potentially vio-

cooler the next day.

hurf,

away.

College

Johnstone

comes

make obscene amounts

athletes

don’t

their

Especially

into retire-

he hadn’t broken his neck?

Condors’ next

isn't

me

back-ups

get

age 25.

n’t have.

it’s

tecting their stars, but

the

revealed that Everett had suffered cracked vertebrae and a dislocated neck. Call me crazy, but no “game” I’ve ever played left me potentially paralyzed or forced

Teams

guys.

spend countless time and money prowill

Hixon on a kick return. He lowered his head and collided awkwardly with Hixon, immediately dropping to the ground. Everett would lay motionless tor almost 20 minutes before being taken away by ambulance. It was later

of him

accidents

more needs to be done to protect the

- starting just his second year - attempted to tackle Dominik

ees did nothing.

When

for millions of dollars, that's

in

selves in

please don’t try to banish a sport because of one freak occurrence. We enjoy it as fans

life

certainly his choice. But

little

Denver Broncos

Broken bones do occur, as well as cuts and scars, but it could be a lot worse if the refer-

season will be tough.

talent, but is missing one key ingrediverrr thaLcan’t be taught individually.

in the

I

was

whose jerseys we adorn oureach week. Would you have heard

With only four returning players, the Conestoga Condors’ outdoor soccer team head coach says predicting his team’s performance this

going to unfold as the season "goes on, it’s kind of fun actually.” The lack of returnees is a point of pride for Johnstone, however. “I’m glad to say we had 12 guys who have graduated and two firstyears who went on scholarships to the (United) States,” he said. The team had 68 players attend the Sept. 4-6 tryouts and Johnstone has narrowed his team down to 22. He said the team has a surplus of

Playing against the

9, football

me wrong, enjoy a bone crushgood (hockey) fight as much as the next sports fan and if a guy wants to risk his Don’t get

health or his

than

less

the superstars

it.

Varsity soccer —

He makes

weekly basis so that the fans have something to cheer about and talk about around the water

allow the opponent to keep beating the fight-

and accidents like those, so when I hear people calling for the league to outlaw hitting, it makes me shake my

Bills.

of 70,000 screaming

fans.

ing hit or a

or was rather, a back-up tight end

the referees in UFC are very concerned and considerate of a fighter’s well-being. If you’ve ever watched a UFC fight, you

extreme example of what can happen during a football game. There have been

injuries

is,

Buffalo

of money. But most of them do earn it. They spend countless hours training and working out and they put their lives at risk on a daily or

know when

trol

for the

They know their objective is to inflict enough physical pain on the other person to get the win. But more importantly,

can’t protect the players from freak accidents. What happened to Everett is just an

countless other similar plays where the players weren’t hurt. The NFL cannot con-

it.

Everett

ment

ting into.

ness {hat sports bring

to those

protected,

,

to

Mills

to get out there in front

your opinion, you’re more than entitled Just don’t tell Kevin Everett.

that’s

gets hurt

pure joy of the game, itching for every chance

You

know, because they make millions of dollars and get paid to play a game for a living. If

Buffalo, Everett

UFC

UFC. I’m

..

of whining these days about

Championship.

tap out to a submission. very entertaining, and I think it’s because of the primitive-esque style of

a

lot

ungrateful professional athletes are.

$500,000 per year and on Sept. no longer “just a game.”

make someone

weekly basis. They wear thou-

There’s a

how

competitive nature that is responsible for the popularity of not only the NFL, but other sports like Mixed Martial Arts, or to be specific, the Ultimate Fighting

find

pended on what

~~seems

Most players enjoy

itiveness that sports bring, because

under extreme scrutiny because of its violent nature: two men trying to either knock each other out, or to

blame.

The

the players.

The

tackle, are not to

By Christopher

the players have for one another, and how the league is doing all they can to protect

of the

and games

fun

It’s all

The team then home, with

finishes the season

the

first

game

at

Conestoga on Sept. 28 when the Niagara Knights come to town. The Condors invite all students, staff and faculty to come out and cheer them on as they battle for the OCAA championship.


SPOKE, September

17,

— Page 19

2007

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Page 20

— SPOKE, September 17, 2007

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Digital Edition - September 17, 2007