Page 1

Easter

Champions crowned

extravaganza

Humane

teams

Intramural volleyball

society’s

spike

it

up

at finals.

Barkfast fundraiser features dogs

shapes and sizes.

of

Monday,

April 16,

Athletes honoured MVP and coaches’ awards handed out at Conestoga Athletic Awards Banquet.

all

2007

A

newsroom

learning

Conestoga College, Kitchener, Ont.

for

journalism students

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

39th Year

— No. 14

CSI jumps on Facebook

bandwagon By CHRISTOPHER MILLS As

Conestoga

government, it is keep up with the lat-

a student

important to

STUDENTS INC

|

est trends in order to better relate

and communicate with stu-

to

dents.

speak for the entire population of students,” he said.

That is precisely why CSI has begun using Facebook to interact with students. CSI president-elect Roxy Stanciu recently set up a group on the popular social networking site to provide students with a convenient forum to voice their questions

and concerns. “Facebook allows the CSI to

communicate

with

students

something we have never been able to do before,” CSI president Matt Jackson said.

which

instantly

is

Jackson said CSI cannot force students to vote.

“In

a

to see

“That being said, CSI makes every it can to encourage students to vote using such methods as advertising in the Spoke, Facebook, mass e-mails to all students, posting on college computers

when

students log

by several students about using Facebook to open up the lines of communication.

to suggestions

a

is

very

their relationship with the students

posters around the

feedback

or

ideas,” he said. that

“This is an idea never been brought

to

not been

may have CSI had we

communi-

cating with students on Facebook.”

Another benefit to using Facebook is that it allows CSI to immediately address the concerns of environmentally conscious stu-

“By

communicating Fac^xiok there is no use of erl^w,

on paper,

Jackson said. “In turn, we’re beginning to help the environment.”

The

etc.”

site

has also been host to

questions regarding the recent CSI elections.

elections

For the

were

first

time, the

held

online.

According to CSI, 434 votes were cast from 5883 eligible students. One Facebook user, known as Steven C, expressed concern over whether such a small number of voters equaled fair representation for

all

students.

large

among

how

is always open from students on

improve existing process-

to

CSI and

alas

you

Conestoga No. Conestoga College

time

for 9th

1

“Facebook allows the CSI to communicate with students instantly which is something we have never been able to do before.” Matt Jackson,

Last

week

it

was announced

“Over the next year there will likely be lots of discussion around how we can have students more engaged in elections and the stuJackson said despite the low voter turnout, he and CSI feel the online elections were a success. “Since the online voting works so well and leaves no room for error, I online

we

of governors representative.

“These elections took place

week without giving

top.

the students

campaign platform, there was no option for students to even write a campaign,” he said. “The two students who ran simply their

mation on

Basically

students

to vote for their repre-

they

we

who

public college in

Key Performance

Indicator

(KPI) surveys, making it the ninth straight year. These surveys have only been administered for nine years,

meaning no other Ontario 1

position.

of 88.5, the best

among

the 21 col-

In the graduate satisfaction survey,

85.1

Conestoga came per

cent

Collegiale

La

after

(86.6

third

in

per

at

in

Ottawa

gy and the three institutes of technology and advanced learning.

(85.8 per cent) in North Bay. In employer satisfaction, Conestoga was ninth with 93.3 per cent of employers being satisfied, and in student satisfaction the college was

outside

professional

research firms conduct the

KPI

sur-

veys annually for the province’s Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities.

administered

Four independently surveys measure

fifth,

Canadore

and

College

with 80.6 per cent satisfied.

“These

results

commitment

flow from our

to quality,

said in a press release.

He added that the graduate employment numbers are especially significant.

“Preparing our graduates with the and determination

skills, attitudes

make the successful transition employment is why we are here. To lead the province in this to

into

area for three

consecutive years speaks volumes.”

Cite

cent)

leges of applied arts and technolo-

relevance

Tibbits also said he hopes that this record

of excellence will result

growth in facilities, enrolment and programming, in order to serve in

this region properly.

“We want

to be the best polytech-

nic institute

we

possibly can be for

students, employers and the

munity. If

we can

com-

obtain the sup-

port to help us grow,

we can

reach

that goal.”

Himmelman plans her retirement

they were,

running, etc.”

There comes a time in everyone’s when they encounter someone

why

During

they view

way

and makes them a better person. The impact they have is beyond description. Monica Himmelman, Conestoga College’s alumni relations and annual fund officer, is such a person. Himmelman will be retiring by the end of the calendar year. I had the pleasure of meeting her at the beginning of my second year at the college. I began writing for Spoke and was given my first beat

my

first

interview with her,

her energy was electric, her passion

life

special. This person alters the this

running a chance to give

up.

satisfaction.

the

and excellence, and are testimony the praiseworthy efforts and expertise of our faculty and staff,” Conestoga president John Tibbits to

will continue

Jackson compared CSI’s elec-

signed

On

pied the No.

the

voting,”

tions to those for the student board

were asked

and student

college or institute has ever occu-

1

Ontario, according to results from

he said. “This method of voting is also very environmentally friendly.”

who were

employment, graduate employer satisfaction

graduate

graduate employment survey, 95 per cent of 2005-06 Conestoga graduates were employed six months after graduation, the best of any Ontario public college or institute measured. This is the third consecutive year and the fourth time in five years that Conestoga has been at the

Two

dent union,” he said.

anticipate

that

again been

Composite results from the independent KPI surveys has Conestoga with an overall average

CSIpresident

use

nine for

satisfaction,

rated the No.

to

is

nine.

the college has once

es.

sentative without having any infor-

“7.4 per cent of the student population voted for

mouth,

school,

Jackson said CSI

would

dents.

Conestoga Students Inc. held its first Wing Off championship on April 11, with students competing $200 in prize money. Competitors had to eat as many wings as they could in 10 minutes. See Page 12 for the winners and more photos.

for

others.”

“One example of this is the suggestion made by students to put CSI suggestion boxes up around the college so that students could

(Photo by Leanne Mountford

These competitors weren’t chicken

notices on

of

banners about elections

themselves.

anonymous

in,

word

website,

cost-effective

method of communicating as there are no costs attached,” he said. Jackson said students have already started using Facebook to make recommendations to CSI about improving operations and

leave

CSI

effort

the

“It

the

100 per cent of

students turn out to vote but that is very unlikely to happen,” he said.

CSI to continually improve our communication with students and Facebook provided a new forum for us to do so.” Jackson said CSI was contacted goal of

“It is the

world,

perfect

would love

life

was encouraging and her attitude was uplifting. I couldn’t help but be

Vanessa

and

excited

Butler

thrilled

work and build a

to

begin

to

relationship with

Monica.

Himmelman

Opinion

birthday on

— alumni tion was, affairs?

affairs.

initial

what the heck

My

other than

Himmelman lege

My

beat contact

is

reac-

alumni

was none

Monica Himmelman. has worked at the col-

for eight

and a half years.

celebrated her 60th

March

17 and

was

eli-

of March 31. When I asked her when she plans on retiring, she said, “By the end of gible

to

retire

as

the calendar year, but I’m not in

any hurry.”

Continued on Page 2


News

Himmelman a Now ...with Random

deep thoughts Conestoga College

questions answered by

How do you

deal with

random students

exam

stress ?

volunteer for

located

office

is

floor

of

the

want

is

When Himmelman's

although she can’t play herself. “I’m not smart enough that way. I’m better at word games,” she said. She and her husband. Larry, to whom she has been married for

mother of two

teenage boys and very active in many community organizations. She is a native of this area, having

attended Wilson Avenue

“Find lots of penguins.”

Amber Thomas, first-year office administration

years, have a cottage on Sparrow Lake near Muskoka where Himmelman plans on taking up kayaking this summer.

31

Public

School and Eastwood collegiate and graduated from the social services program at Conestoga College in

“I'm a diehard paddler, took lessons a long time ago.” she said. I

1970.

Upon

From the moment you meet Himmelman you can’t help but

(Photo

Monica Himmelman,

ships.

annual fund attended high volunteered with the

she

YMCA

helpKitchener- Waterloo ing youth with homework after

Zach “Superman

school.

Her career

in social servic-

es started with the City of Waterloo in 1970, then with the Regional

by the end cle,” said

of the

the

hill.

calendar year.

the hill you walk around choose your

if this is

if

not,

You have

to

Himmelman volunteer

to

to

with a

new agency which supports

She

Himmelman. “You have

to die on,

retirement continue

plans

seniors.

and

officer, is retiring

to ask yourself

want

Butler)

the col-

lege’s alumni relations

When Himmelman

“Buy a case of Coke. Not Pepsi. Drink it. Oh, and eat and sleep.”

by Vanessa

notice her interest in working with others and building friend-

school

not volun-

you can find her enjoying one of her many pastimes. She likes to garden and she takes her mother-in-law to play bridge,

on the second Student Client

the

you

battles

to take part in.”

teering,

Services Building.

Himmelman

and the

battles

Continued from Page 2 You would never guess Monica’s age. She is a petite woman who dresses stylishly and carries herself with grace and class. She also has a smile as big as the sun. Her

life

will

be

missed and

will

always be remembered as a dynamic and compassionate woman dedicated to her family and friends. Her personality

inviting

whelming joy istics that

and

over-

for life are character-

make

her

who

she

is.

of Waterloo as an income maintenance supervisor in

Municipality

Thomas,

1973. “I

first-year accounting

said

loved

it,

it

was a

great career,”

Himmelman.

She worked with the Ministry of

Community and

“Kung-fu sparring or a punching bag.” Nick Raphael, third-year civil

engineering

Social Services in

Waterloo on a part-time contract while her children were little. continues to volunwith various organizations such as Conestoga College, United Way and RAISE Home Support. “Never underestimate the power you have and the impression you

Himmelman teer

make when volunteering, said Himmelman. Himmelman has had a long history of contributing to the commuShe has sat on the Kitcheneras a board memWaterloo ber, served as president of the neighbourhood preschool and

nity.

YMCA

“I

just study.”

taught pre-natal classes. She has also volunteered with United Way since 1988, working on their annufundraising drives, and is al

Jenn Bowman, first-year

presently

a

member and

board

of the grants committee which considers jtew agency

chair

accounting

requests for financial support. At Conestoga she has served as chair of the social services pro-

gram advisory committee, which provides

“Eat, laugh

and

enjoy.”

Vinay Kohoi,

first-year

accounting

a

link

for

faculty

to

employees in the community. In 1990 she formed the alumni association and served as founding

Claim

vow*

^ac

*'

president of the association until 1995. The association has raised

funds for program development

and scholarships for the current students of the college as well as providing alumni services and sup-

AVAfLAei£r

fU\AY& 6£rT

FOOJ&P-

iftZ&MOM*

porting the college in many ways. “Somehow was put here to do 1

something, someone guided me,” said Himmelman. “I’ve been so

“Drink a

lucky.

lot.”

I

ve spoken up about things

that weren't right."

has a theory about should be adopted by many. In her everyday life, Himmelman, like many of us, faces challenges. Things don't

Himmelman

Justin Barrs,

second-year office administration

life

that

always go as planned and sometimes she hits a bump in the road. “You have to ask yourself what’s going to happen if this doesn’t

work

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!

egy

you have to have a stratplace to overcome the obsta-

out,

in

Conestoga College Residence & Conference Centre 99 Conestoga College Blvd. Kitchener, Ontario

Phone:

N2P 2N5

(519)895-2272

Email:

conestoga@stayrcc.com


News

SPOKE,

2007

April 16,

— Page 3

Show me *the money Students can earn cold,

hard cash By

used books

for

CARA LICHTY

it.

although

it

be a smaller per-

will

centage.

Students are

being offered

Mary Andraza,

an

manager

the

at

excellent opportunity to get back

the college's bookstore, said

some of

be nice for the students to get some

the

money

that they doled

out on school supplies.

From

money

April 25 to 27 students can

any of their textbooks that they no longer need at the bookstore

hand

in

it

will

before the

right

summer.

sell

“This sale

win-win

a

is

situa-

tion,” she said.

and, in turn, receive cash.

“Not only can students get cash

Nebraska Books, a company from the United States, is coming to buy back students’ books. Some of the textbooks will be resold at Conestoga’s bookstore. Company

for their books, but they will have

the option on whether or not they

want

representatives will also be scouting out books they need for their

condition,

used book warehouse.

course.

you

back a book that will be useful to the college’s bookstore, on average, you will receive sell

50 per cent of what you initially paid for your book. If you sell a book that the college doesn’t need, you can still get back money if Nebraska Books will take

Pressure cooker

\_

During the sale the buyers will buy back your book despite its

If

(Photo by Aaron Schwab)

buy used books next

to

year.”

within

reason,

of

Dan Cook and Andrea Hunter practise measuring blood presE-wing on April 11. Cook said an optimal blood pressure reading is 120

First-year practical nursing students

sure at a over 80.

clinic set

up

in

the

Even if your old books look worn out or even have writing in them they will be accepted for

cash. If

you are interested

money

getting

in

your used textbooks, you can find the buyers booth set up outside the bookstore’s for

entrance.

Peer helpers make a difference By PEGGY O’NEILL

teer at Conestoga.

He wanted Have you ever been

become

to

a volunteer

helping out another student by peer

because he wanted to be a part of something special and be a college

tutoring?

ambassador.

who

Those

interested in

were

intrigued

attended a peer appreciation open

house on April 4. The event was held by the Learning Commons and had approximately 70 people in attendance. Drinks and light snacks were provided. During the open house, peer helpers and leaders received a certificate of recognition and peer volunteers

received

well as a small

The

first

a

as

certificate

in

know

lings first

when my older sibcame to Canada, it was that

contributions peer helpers

academic and student

make at

life

college.

Melissa Turner, peer services coordinator for eight years, said the celebration has been held for

many

port network to help,” he said. in

tant.

"Each year peer helpers assist hundreds of Conestoga students through tutoring, learning groups

way

a

I

know where

scenario of the year on April

Brown,

being a

to continue

tion he gets

from helping someone

else. “I

love being able to see the suc-

cess of the other students and the

smile on their faces after been of some help. Then I’ve

really

made an

I

I

have

Offers

EXCLUSIVE

know

GROUP BUYING POWER

impact,” he

said.

at

Tuner thinks that the peer tutors Conestoga are so important

because many students need help and support during their time at college.

“Peer helpers

at

Conestoga help

demic and personal success,” she

K

students achieve both aca-

Contact .

Local

tutoring

options for students

experiencing difficulty, such as peer conversation partners for stu-

said.

dents for

whom

English

is

a second

“Peer helping

is

about students

helping students, which

is

a

To

new

Samuel Toma, a second-year human services foundations stu-

the Student Life Centre in

a peer conversation volun-

519-743-5221 1 800 321 9187

iwestmani@staebler.com

mmm

get involved with peer tutor-

check out

ing,

is

Emeu

Ext-2 14

quote today),

ful learning experience.”

language.

dent,

power-

Judy at

for a no-obligation

Toll-free

ent

Kim Wideman

peer tutor because of the satisfac-

said.

differ-

T.J. Ball,

9.

“So

many

many

for their final

they are

and conversation partners,” she Peer services offers

for action

to right, Kelly Walkey, Christopher

coming from.”

the efforts students

help their peers are impor-

and Mark Brown prepare

left

they had a great program and sup-

to

the

Ready paramedic students,

hard for them to speak English, but

Toma wants April has been

designated as peer appreciation week, to recognize the significant

mai^to

“I

(Photo by Anne/ise Thompson)

First-year

learn.

gift.

week

yq^|because

He added he also wanted to become a volunteer because when he was young he had people who were there to support and help him

their

location in

Room

Waterloo Insurance & im<e&itsr of

2A103. Or call 519-748-5220.

f*w! jfieotss

yvsst&zfv# Ctfvyfpi

ext.

2308.


— SPOKE,

Page 4

April 16,

Commentar

2007

Lottery scandal

a rude awakening Lottery and Ontario residents are demanding the Ontario tetaileis dishonest Gaming Corporation be more vigilant, after winnings. their of cheated hundreds of lottery winners out paid out tens of millions of dollars It is estimated that the OLG in lottery

winnings to

retailers, hospitals

and social piograms

over the years.

A Game of Trust, provincial ombudsman than the OLG was “fixated on profit rather

In his report,

Martin said service and was rude and inept"

Andre public

dealing with complaints fiom

in

the public.

report also had 23

The

recommendations aimed

at

restoring

public trust in the lottery system. of the The most notable point called for independent oversight

OLG's

lotteries.

operaIndependent oversight of the OLG’s casinos and slots Gaming and Alcohol tions is already being done by the

Commission. all Premier Dalton McGunity has already voted to implement s to say the OLG will what but recommendations, of Martin's

come

clean?

Who

watchdog of the province now recommendations?

will be the

delivered his

More

importantly,

who

Martin has

that

can the people trust?

othei After news of the OLG s scandal made headlines, provinces began examining their systems as well. “province’s lottery British Columbia recently found that their the general pubthan more times corporation was winning six lic”

according to the Toronto

And

in

New Brunswick

the

to launch a

ombudsman wants

hand, it is crudely comforting to know our province the only one with a corrupt gaming system. the other hand, we, the naive citizen, have had a rude awak-

On one

are disgusted that our

gaming corporations

are turning a

deaf ear to the cries of outrage and frustration of our neighbours, friends and loved ones. Who knows which one of us will turn out to be the next Bob

Edmonds?

We shudder at the memory of the 78-year-old cancer patient who was cheated out of $250,000. Our massive distrust ot the retaillottery system and our disgust at the callousness of some ers

is is

It

more. Hopefully then they ing

our lifelong desires when the trade industry and ers,

to

may

oversee just be

its

an independent phone call or meet-

operations.

one drop

Each

letter,

in the bucket, but

you can create an overflow

with enough drops

who

its

fore,

we

one

dual satisfaction with what

do not have. Can't we

As

in the

always

which decep-

tively grants us happiness.

As

a North American,

and bred consumer, but

by the

fact that

1

am a bom am comam able to 1

1

seldom

I

do and

comfort-

Materialism seems to false sense

of sameness

greater society, yet

it

elicit a

among

propels us to

compete with our neighbours terms of size and quantity. simply refuse to submit

rapacity. If

to obtain every concrete item?

minimalist means to ensure

We need to slow ourselves down and determine whether we are

lifelong pursuits

hours

working long, ardu-

in

Canada

is

increasing by

one and a half per cent annually in the wake of consumer demand and

1

it

there are no

am

means

in

to

resorting to

come

bounds as

my

to fruition,

to

what

1

willing to sacrifice.

As we,

the consumers, are

engrossed by the unyielding lust for tangible possessions, it begs the question:

is

materialism the

trade industry growth.

new boundless epidemic, dividing families, straining resources and

hours escalate,

causing us to become estranged

how

it

As working we must recognize

will affect other important

welcome

Spoke welcomes

live

ous hours. According to Statistics Canada, the total average working

pursuit of

in

most products

ably and humbly, simply enjoying life, even if it means not being able

truly content

same, living largely in servitude to the avid plotting of omnipotent advertisers,

material

1

advertis-

identities.

are

am wary of the

1

when to deliberately avoid them. By doing so, have

our empirical dreams, have a stranglehold on

consumers,

of

a parent's lack

to his or her tamily, espe-

tailored to children

trends and

to

to

will not bridge a

encourage family interaction.

sub-

recognize myself as one, and there-

Letters are

Opinion

dictate to us our “needs.”

our lives and our

forted

that will require action.

we

it

chasm caused by devotion

video

temporarily satiate a

cially considering

all,

Fulfilling our superficial needs, as

the next material fad

will look into appointing

Featherstone

mit to the relentless pressures of

time to seek the justice

MP

child, but

Holly

obligation to ourselves in terms ot

seems

are entitled to.

the

our individual selves. our moral 1 believe we overlook

opposed

we

game may

needy and greedy in North America, but frankly, we are losing touch with the importance of

warranted.

Forcing Duncan Brown, CEO of the OLG, into retirement with a cushy severance package of $720,000 is not enough. or MPP and showing your By contacting your local support of the ombudsman’s report we can send a message to the OLG that says we refuse to be taken advantage of any-

body

now commonplace among

A new

spent with family.

SUV

the purchase of a tantalizing

namely time

facets of our lives,

acquisition of a cellphone or

family intimacy and, above

ening.

We

The are

probable.

On

materialism an epidemic?

Is

Star.

showed probe into Atlantic Lottery Corp. after an internal report statistically than more retailers are winning prizes 10 per cent

isn’t

the OLC. Ontario needs a watchdog with teeth to scrutinize

from our values and ideals?

Spoke is

letters to the

College published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

editor. Letters

contacted

No unsigned

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

for verification.

letters will

4M4. Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca Website: www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

be published.

be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter

Letters should

for publication.

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

N2G 4M4

Dr.,

of Conestoga College. The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views paid for the space. Letters amount beyond the advertising errors in of arising out damages for any liable not be shall Spoke helptu written or typed; a MS Word file would be to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly

Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.


:

News

SPOKE,

April 16,

2007

— Page 5

Pamper pour pet

#

dog wash perfect

Self-service

for fidos of all sizes

By BECKY SHARPE Have you ever just come home from walking your dog and he ends up shaking mud all over your floors?

Then you have

to

go

to

your bath-

tub and lean over the side awk-

wardly while trying to bathe him. Linda Frazao, owner of the Pet

Emporium 8 Queen

at

in St.,

Cambridge, located has a new and spe-

wash

to allow for

your

pets’ per-

sonal comfort,” says Frazao. “This

dog wash centre -opening up in a few short weeks where owners can come and wash their

way your dog won’t be touched by unknown hands and they can enjoy

own

The service costs $18. “Once you’ve cleaned, dried and paid for your dog you’re free to

cialized

pets.

The tubs

centre features three special small,

-

medium and

large

for the various sizes of dogs.

-

The

tubs are easily filled with clean,

warm water and

a handy side lad-

der allows for bigger dogs,

who

can't be picked up, to walk

up to their bath. Frazao provides owners with an all-natural dog safe shampoo.

After your dog is clean you’ll be provided with a blow dryer and brush so you can get your dog back

maximum

to

dryness before

he

leaves the shop.

created this

"I

new

style

of dog

their bath all the

more.”

and not worry about the “My customers are also my friends and it’s not mess,” she says.

home

business

to

come

hi all

types of pets.”

The shop

also offers

all

natural

pet food, toys, treats, pet attire and

leave

their

shop without coming in to say and have a treat. I welcome

into

my

or shop and clean up after

themselves.”

Frazao is an avid pet lover and wants her animal guests to come to

more than just a wash. shop is unique because I allow you to bring your pets into my shop even if you’re not washing them,” says Frazao. “There are some pets who can’t walk by the the store for

"My

Cats as individual as

other pet accessories. All toys sold at the

shop have been inspected for

safety and are non-toxic. It

would appear

business,

to

be a lonely

since Frazao works by

herself most days, but she’s always

watched and accompanied by the shop mini-bosses, Baccardi and Morgan, two very friendly cats. “I’m very partial to cats and having Baccardi and Morgan here makes the day all the more enjoyable,” she says. “The best part is they don’t have fear of new pets, especially dogs,

shop. They’re the

coming into most passive

the cats

I’ve ever met.”

their

owners

(Photo by Becky Sharpe)

The Pet Emporium, located at 8 Queen St. in Cambridge, is opening a specialized dog wash centre where owners can bring in their pets and bathe them there.

Attention Students!!!

Welcome home to TransGlobe Affordable Student Apartments

By ALLISON STEINMAN

>sS

The study of animal is still in its

early stages.

&

However,

apartments that provide you with ~ to focus on your studies

concerned; the personali-

si

Conveniently located close to

%S

24

ef

Steps to shopping

universities

apparent.

“Our

cat has a

somewhat blond

different

home, allowing you

grey and white striped cat is not only existent, but

is

ty of his

Riley

accommodate

& colleges

emergency contact number {peace of mind for the parents) hr.

'

*

& restauratj§§T

personality,” he said with a laugh.

“He runs

into things

things over, such as

and knocks

my

mother’s

antiques.”

who

Futher said that Riley, turning six,

also

is

known

very sociable and relaxed

is

to be a

cat.

"He’s very easy to make friends with,” he said. “As long as you’re sitting down he’ll come and sleep on you, he’s even warmed up to my

dad.” Just as

human beings

has his negative

do, Riley

traits as well.

“He meows like a crying baby to go outside, but then he always wants right back in,” said Futher. His owner also mentioned Riley is picky about his food and prefers Whiskas with meat pockets over

1

^Me also really ^Fers from my

(Photo by Allison Steinman)

Longtime cat lover Scott Futher appreciates the unique personali-

the plain cat food. likes the

ice

melted

ty of his furry friend, Riley.

cream bowl.”

Futher said he isn’t sure if his cat afraid of anything but that he always shares a bed with someone.

Dreveny agreed with Futher and cannot deny the existence of per-

tuna and shoes.

sonalities in cats.

said.

he likes to be alone

“Some are lazy some are hyper, some bite and some just cuddle,”

“He really loves shoes,” Dreveny “He lays on them and sometimes chews a bit.” Dreveny laughed when she said

she said.

hercat

is

"I don’t think

much.” After having time to

sit

down and

think about his feline friend, Futher said he has a greater appreciation for

who

Riley

is.

“I’d love to be able to read his

mind.”

At age

14, Michelle Dreveny’s black and white kitty Diamond is almost as old as she is.

fluffy

Dreveny said

that

Diamond

is

one of the lazy ones. “He’s too fat to clean himself; he basically loves everyone, doesn’t care what they do to him and just lies around wanting attention.”

Other things Diamond enjoys are

is

definitely unique.

Having grown up with Diamond, such a regular part of Dreveny’s life sometimes she forgets all about him. “I don't even realize he’s around most of the time,” she said. “But it will be weird not having him he’s

around.”

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News

College student has ‘Vision’ Bv

CARA LICHTY

Seeing visions doesn't necessarily mean having a sixth sense now that the independent Visions clothing line is being seen all over K-W

and beyond.

Ryan

Ritter, a 19-year-old electri-

engineering

cal

student

at

Conestoga, started his own clothing company in 2004 and is having great success.

Ritter was developing he co-owned Civilian printing and Arc clothing but even-

While

(Photo by

Visions tually

his

left

the

companies

The Family Fun Carnival held

to start

Ice Park last

concentrate on col-

own and

er.

lege.

Visions could have been considered a branding company, which takes a plain, generic label’s clothing and prints

a designer’s work on

them, but Ritter has raised the bar by learning to do everything himself.

In addition to printing all of the shirts,

stickers

and even skate-

boards that Visions sells, he has started to do everything from

making

designing the graphics to the shirts themselves. “I’m really

serious about this. I’ve even been going to sewing classes with 60-

women," he laughs. Sewing isn’t the only task for

this

designer; technology has inevitably come into the picture as it does

with any company. Creating an

week wasn’t much

Cambridge.

to Big Brothers Big Sisters of

Proceeds went

Summer McPhee)

the parking lot of the Cambridge fun, due to the snowy, cold weath-

(Photo by Cara Lichty)

Area residents sport Conestoga student works and hopefully be up and running

online store will

is

also in the

it

at

many

music

local

“Selling Visions at shows works he said. “I go to every

perfectly,”

show anyways and

I

know

the kids

and love the bands and am friends with most of the promoters,, so it

me

to sell

now

what he

is

Loop

clothing but went into a minor tus due to Loop’s relocation.

hia-

part social workers

doing right

but jokes about wanting to

eventually

move

to

Los Angeles

with friends and rock out like Entourage. “Really,

it

comes down

to

wanting to make sweet shirts for myself to wear,” he said. “It’s just nice that other people are into it too and I can actually make something out of this.”

is

all

about

at

www.myspace.com/visionsclothing.

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: Graduation the For many of you, the end of this semester represents end of your current studies at Conestoga College. You may be ready to begin a new career or ongoing studies.

You may be planning to move to a new city or to travel. This transition will be a welcome relief from studying, projects, late nights, and too-short days.

You should feel proud of your accomplishments. You have reached a goal that seemed so far away when you began. Sometimes, you may experience anxiety or doubts: the you aren't life you have known is about to change, and like. exactly sure what the next part of your life will look

There may be sadness as you leave behind friendships have and support systems. You might miss teachers who been mentors to you. If you remember back to your f irst semester here, you may have had many of these same

By

SUMMER MCPHEE

me

You can check out what Visions at

Police officers also

be sold again there

soon.

there.”

Visions was also sold

Ritter’s apparel.

will

Ritter loves

Currently, Visions clothing is sold through Ritter himself or at

kiosks shows.

Ryan

However,

soon.

only makes sense for

year-old

in

Police officers need to start looking at the root causes of crime and

what can be done to prevent it, before we have to arrest people, said Rob Davis, a Waterloo region-

“You get tired and haunted when you go and see these people who have fallen off the cliff on a regular basis.”

Davis said Waterloo Region has to practise community mobilization in the past five years.

started

Davis spoke about the role police can play in the community at a political coffee house on April 2,

“We have our front-line officers being taught how to be social workers in some ways.” An experiment was done where 44 street kids, ranging from 12-20 years of age. were taken from the

which was open

Out

al

police officer.

“It’s pretty traumatic for people to be arrested,” he said.

to the public.

He said society has to start looking at why people are slipping through the cracks of the system. “Enforcement can’t be the only answer.

I

know

that as a police offi-

of his ambitions

He added one

is

coming togethcommunity-involved

to integrate people

a

in

were going

fact that they

to a

camp

with police officers, but the pur-

pose of the

cer.”

er

of the Cold program in Kitchener and brought to a camp for three days. He said the kids didn't like the

camp was

to build these

relationships.

“Justice

Canada wanted us

how

hear their voice, about

to

the

Youth Criminal Justice Act was

approach.

working.”

Davis said they had workshops

ROGERS

I

1

TTop 10 RealTrax™ ring tunes Week 1

.

of April 9

A

Buy U

Drank (Shawty Snappin’)

T-Pain

-

with the kids to find out what they

how

thought and

they

“The way you by

isn't

felt.

this

learn

sitting in a

stuff

classroom and

saying we are going to learn empathetic behaviour today,” said Davis. “It’s by creating an environment where people could openly com-

municate with one another." He added there are a lot of stereotypes and myths people get about

2.

Cupid's Chokehold - Gym Class Heroes

police officers from television. had brought 12 officers "If

3.

Don't Matter - Akon

here tonight, you would see them

4.

Girlfriend - Avril Lavigne

5.

relationships feelings, but with time you developed new

7.

and opened up to new experiences.

8.

talking

He

A

- R.

Kelly

Like -

Remix

nity

Cara flow

said Waterloo Regional Police

on commuinvolvement and intense psy-

hires candidates based

A Boy

Outta -

Flirt

you had finished them. You would see

to

them as human beings.”

Fergie

I'm

in

differently after

Glamorous -

6.

I

chological testing.

My System Wow

(feat. T-Pain)

"We

only

hire

the

best,

said

Davis. 9.

Rock Yo Hips -

So, as you graduate, take away the gifts of a College diploma, new skills, and confidence in your achievements.

Congratulations!

1 0.

Crime

This

Is

Robert

Mob

Why

I'm Hot (Chorus)

MIMS Text "PLAY" to

major at the University ol Waterloo, attended the lecture and said those who have more social interaction with police officers will see them more as equals and less as tice

4800 on your Rogers wireless

phone to download your favourite

Novosel, a third-^^ and criminal jus-

political science

ring tunes today.

authorities.

“They’ll realize police officers are not out there to get them, but to

help them.”

'll A Message from Visit

Novosel

Counselling Services

our website http://mvw. conestoaac. on. ca/isp/stserv/index.jsg

said

experiences that

once

someone

interaction

they

be less likely, or think twice, before committing a crime.

may


Feature

SPOKE,

By LEANNE MOUNTFORD

Barkfast

$1,049,

raised

even though the weather was not

said

the best.

Bonkink.

was a day

It

On

April

More

for the dogs. 7,

Kitchener-

the

Waterloo

Humane

(KWHS),

located

Society

250

at

Riverbend Dr. in Kitchener, hosted

its

able

to

participate

events done

Easter

in

Amazing Race

style.

of dog food and owners were given snacks and coffee.

fast

In total, 145 dogs

came

the

KWHS.

out

last year.

It

Only

cost $ 10 per

1

dog

at

came

to participate

and the owner received a card which was checked after each event had been completed.

Say cheese! Dogs were able to have their photos taken with the Easter bunny at the Kitchener-Waterloo Humane Society Easter

The event is a fundraiser for the society, which uses the proceeds for

anjmal

care.

This

view the ani-

of

other

the

events

included an Easter egg hunt and

bobbing for bones. Melissa Ritter said she brought four-month-old puppy, a

her

if

Labrador

chocolate

purebred

j|

in total,

Zazu, out for some exer-

retriever,

jj

paw

painting and a photo opportunity

meet other dogs. Kristy Mcdonnell brought her

bunny, said Andrea Mayer-Padfield, a volun-

three-month-old Yorkshire terrier, Harley, to Barkfast because

teer at the shelter.

he’s a

including a cookie station,

with

the

Easter

Arleen Lannan,

out, said

who works 10 dogs

Some

society

cise

and

to

j

Pets received a healthy break-

Elizabeth Bonkink,

potentially

There were eight events

owners were

their

the

mals, she said.

annual Easter Barkfast.

Dogs and

importantly,

was able to reinforce the petowner relationship and bring more than 200 people to the shelter to

— Page 7

2007

April 16,

the

KWHS,

who works

at

ran the hula hoop

event this year.

Dogs had to go through the hula hoop to receive a cookie, and if they refused, the owner had to go through it for a “human” cookie. The owner also had to hula hoop dog could

for five seconds so the

Lannan

year

said

it

was a

great time,

i

puppy and she wanted to make sure she gets him socialized.

Mcdonnell said she was looking forward to the photo with the Easter bunny.

Tamara Welker

also

came out

j

to |

get

her

Finnish

spitz,

Grace, j

socialized with other dogs.

However,

with

the

snowy

weather, she was looking forward

receive his treat, she said.

j

to a nice

warm

jj if

coffee.

Barkfast April 7.

BSKiM

Above; Grace, a Finnish

dog

Spitz, takes

a ‘paws’ from a busy day to dive

into

an Easter basket

All

for

dogs

of

all

shapes and sizes

photos by Leanne Mountford

iu

during the day.

a

treat.

Below; The Easter Barkfast was a great opportunity enjoy a little extra-curricular activities.

Around the pylons and over the hurdles, pooches take part in the KWHS obstacle course, just one of the many events put on by

to find

to socialize

and


Page 8

— SPOKE,

April 16,

Entertainment

2007

Echo Weekly launches -

SAMANTHA SAECHAO

By You don't see obstacles

You

rather

ed by the emotions of others; when

come

with

they’re

Keep

strong.

enough willpower. As challenges con-

down

Keep

you.

or disgruntled so are

mind

in

that

you are

tinue to arise,

your own person and

strength to

others to have that persuasion will

you will need your overcome and perse-

vere.

turn

you

into

that allowing

someone

else.

Scorpio October 23

November

-

21

Echo Weekly traditionally holds an annual "best of’ survey that features tons of categories including

make

the best

out spot and the best

the ability to scare

people with your endless supply of personal information as you a watcher and a listener. Don’t misuse the information you learn, sometimes just knowing will pay off in the end.

are

and relaxation. Don’t let others’ remarks offend you, you know what you’re capable of. rest

May 2

No

1

-

June 2

November 22 December 2

matter what you do you

always

feel

like

Debating

love

move you make,

but one

that will never end. Perfection

skill

is

your best work doesn’t make you anything less.

just an illusion,

is

for

Neil

said

McCallum, weekly alterFounded in

A.

editor-in-chief of the

distributed

is

for free in the tri-cities.

confrontation,

Capricorn December 22

-

January 19

Even though your symbolic you do not

creature wears a shell,

have skin quite that tough.

Do

not

words of others get to you, they are only words that, with time, will leave your memolet

the harsh

ry-

You have

a talent for withdraw-

number of categories

McCallum

said

to

fill

for

out.

the

time, this survey must be filled out online to prevent ballot stuff-

egories.

Some

with

many

interesting

different cat-

of them include best

beginning. “I had just moved into my first house and the basement was immediately transformed into the practice room,” says Donkers. Donker's wife, Lisa, didn't mind the band practising in the house because she was the back-up

Their journey began

in the

Jeff Donkers,

vocalist. Jeff’s brother, Jim,

not those things so don’t allow

diversity allows for deeper thought

and makes what you think more

didn't stay with the band for

credible.

than a year.

to take control

ers the

and give oth-

wrong impression of you.

Virgo August 23 September 22

jji (/ > -

iZ ,

inates

the

>

February 19 March 20

microphone with lead

vocals.

Tim

played

Purcell

in

guitar

1992 when

started playing together

Pisces

V /V

but

more

we first we were

called Darkout, then, after Lisa and -

Tim

left,

we changed our name

to

Freehand and started fresh,” says Mitchell.

A

You magnify the smallest thing until it becomes so important that

tender heart and softie are two of your most amiable quali-

you feel everyone needs to know and care and are upset when they

ties

don’t.

The

little

things are just

those, while they should be con-

worry yourself sick over them, they’re not worth it. sidered, don’t

Tiffany

and your most memorable. People often turn to you when they need a shoulder to cry on, an ear to listen or a sound piece of advice. Keep these traits and you’ll never be forgotten.

McCormick

is

a third-year

journalism student holding

fate

Lisa got pregnant and

ed to

move up

Tim

decid-

palm of her hand.

and

store

the

usual,

best

male/female artist categories. There are a few categories that specifically mention the best of 2006 and for those votes to be valid, the

nominees must have been

Jeff

iPod Shuffle

is

one of the

won

for entering.

But for the ballots to be valid, at least 10 of the categories must be filled in.

The ballot can be found at www.echoweekly.com. The survey can be accessed by clicking on the music link located on the left-hand side of the page. Deadline for vot-

ing

is

April 26. Winners will be

May

announced on

10.

to evolve

(Photo by Sarah Jaynes) , band Freehand, practises a new the group’s summer CD release. “It is more fun thinking

Donkers, drummer

beat

for

The band mostly plays rock

“We have covered songs from Black Sabbath to Sarah McLachlan,” says Jim, who added the band usually likes to play songs Vanderwhiel joined the group they began playing local venues such as The Lane, The Circus Room and The Huether Hotel

in

Waterloo.

“We have

also played a lot of pri-

ed

from playing different venues over the

“We

good amount of money for each show we play and that money goes towards live equipment and equipment for our get paid a

weddings Jiffy

for

Lube's

2000 and since have been

Jim’s basement where they started their own recording studio with all they had saved

and

The band played

in

money

parties

to

play 'on

Vancouver for

“None of family

at

a

six

cruise

invit-

ship

in

months.

work and minute to go and

us could drop

the last

band

giving

when John left knew that he wasn't

upset

but his

it

all

anymore,” says

.

Mitchell, adding that Vanderwhiel

missed a

lot

of practices because of

other commitments.

year and

who

Jim,

new is

possibilities,"

says

excited that the band

has started recording.

“We

have started producing origand are almost ready to release a CD," he says. The band is currently working of new songs and ideas and hopes ttfe change their name from Freehand inal tracks

25th anniversary party on a ship, docked in Toronto’s Harbourfront

to

the

“We were the

“2007 brought the band a new

After

friends,” says Margot.

re-located

he says.

else’s,”

couldn't dedicate his time to the band.

that are really guitar driven.

Freehand, recruited close friend John Vanderwhiel to join the band and bring a unique sound as the player.

V

roll songs from the 1970s, the decade members all grew up in.

north to better his

also

someone

studio,” says Jeff.

vate

new keyboard The group

the

for

of original beats than playing

career in carpentry.

years.

in the

including best music of 2006, best online music

An

prizes that can be

the

lead guitarist and sings back-up vocals while his wife Margot dom-

“Back x

instructor.

best Canadian section has 10

DVD

McCallum.

has

is

them

down you

music

The

“Not only are the winners announced, but so are the runnersup and honourable mentions,” said

make

best recording studio and

big,

best

likely to

Protocol address.

base-

who

are

the first thing people notice

is

band most

host, best

cat-

1

karaoke

best

Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge and Guelph only. Also, you can only vote once from an Internet

music since 1992. Freehand has been producing music out of their homes since the early 1990s and say that they have been loving every minute of it. “We have always found a free place to jam,” says Russ Mitchell,

and and are often asked to voice your opinion. Don’t lose sight of how you see things, your

about you. Deep

including

that

from

be

get when you com40 year olds and a soundproof basement? The answer: A rockin' band that has been making

sometimes secrets are too much for

logical sense

best local section has 3

said

voting

must

What do you

others to keep to themselves.

situations in both an artistic

tal-

once,”

nominees

bine four

been the band’s drummer since the

a distinct ability to see

help out the for

Remember when

By SARAH JAYNES

ment of

You have

who nod

Freehand continues

the lead bassist in the band.

vanity

more often than not characterize you as your look-at-me persona

it,

from those you know and those you don’t. Keep your good name intact and don’t become a loud mouth;

January 20 February 18 Arrogance, pride and

angle to

a

categories,

first

ing even the most protected secrets

Aquarius

The

it

Although the survey has only two

get

egories

sections, each of the sections has a

your

verbal

ones

that the

Canadian.

expressing

remaining untongue-tied when needed is a crucial element.

local

scene,”

forte since you your opinions especially when you are passionate about them. Don't lose your

you could do

better. Striving for perfection is a

constant

-

release dates.

“The reason for this survey (having more of a focus on music) is so

McCallum. The two sections readers can vote in are Best Local and Best

The survey has an

Sagittarius

producer.

“This year is actually the first year Echo is going more in depth with more focus on the music

ing.

Gemini

released in the 2006 calendar year and Echo does do checks on the

best

hall,

ents,

newspaper. September 1997, it

You have

open stage venue and best record

restaurants in town.

native

You have a reputation for bring lazy when quite the opposite is true. You are able to work your butt off in a way that allows for

jam

radio station, best

are greatly and easily affect-

challenges that are easily over-

music survey*

‘best of’

Libra September 23 October 22

do that," says Mitchell. The band carried on with five members until late 2006 when Vanderwhiel realized he wanted to pursue photography, deciding he

to

something

"We

are

different.

now only

four

members

and are once again a new band, need a new identity.”

The group their

first

is

CD

we

hoping to release this

summer and CD.

begin working on a second

“We may be in our 40s, but we'll be rocking out until we’re geezers in the old age home, we don't plan on going anywhere,” says Jim.


Entertainment

SPOKE,

April 16,

2007

— Page 9

Club Ty-Chant celebrates grand opening NATALIE

y

Mo

ANDERSON Energy

Music and High

Events kicked off the grand open-

Club Ty-Chant on April 9. located on Collier is MacMillian Drive in Cambridge, in

ing of

The club the

building as the recently

same

opened Lennie B. The building will also house The Mirage, a strip club, which was previously located on Hespeler Road. Owner Len Black said he expects The Mirage to open

Facebook “friends” and

definitely got potential to be good."

things progress and

Although the turnout wasn't as big as the expected 300 people, Black said he understands that it

ple

will take time for the club to build

tor,

a reputation.

for the

and you grow and that's how it works in this industry. The first time you learn. The second time you improve. The third

Knight said he also plans to make use of My Space, another online website, to spread the word, as well

“You

mid-May. Plans are also in the works to start construction in May or June on three separate patios for each venue. Although the club has

system

installed.

“You’ve got

Mo Music provid-

approach

“It's really

But the ideas don’t stop there. Black is excited about the possibilprofessional bringing of ity wrestling, kickboxing and the Ultimate Fighter Challenge to h*s

peo-

I

Facebook

“We’re looking for local bands to into Lennie B and we're bringing in big tribp^^ands and touring acts to Ty-Chant,” said Knight, who worked alongside

to

Dookie spent the night spinning hip hop, while three other DJs took

establishment.

profile.

come

Facebook. A profile has been created under the name Lennie B to update people on events at both Lennie B and Ty-Chant. Lennie B has more than 100.

student.

night idea.

think as

as to find smaller entertainment acts.

spreading the word. They’re taking advantage of the latest online craze,

Conestoga business Cliff Chaves, said he was

1

we show

Black's entertainment co-ordinaDenis Knight, is responsible

taken an

First-year

taken off and

think it's what we can do, going to go right through the roof.”

ed extra lights and speakers for the Kenrick said grand opening, Dookie, the club's guest DJ.

turns playing mainly house music.

one night a week. Black said they are currently talking to Yuk Yuks about the comedy

entertain

people saying

they want a place to go and we’re communicating very well,” he said.

start

innovative

local

and holding a comedy

night or bringing in a hypnotist to

very, very quickly, said Black.

time you’re the best." Not only are they learning and improving, but the club has also

own

its

is

lacking,

growing

impressed with the look of Club Ty-Chant, named after the owner's kids Tyler and Chantel. “It's new so no one really knows about it yet,” said Chaves, who attended the grand opening. “But it's

Black for 12 years at The Mirage. The club will be hosting nights featuring April Wine, Helix and Trooper, as well as several tribute

bands for ACDC, Shania Twain, Keith Urban, the Dixie Chicks and

“Anything people (Photo by Natalie Anderson)

DJ Crayz, DJ Drang and DJ TRev, left, and guest DJ Tripp D, right,

along with the help of

we can do

(Photo by Aaron Schwab)

Emmure

of a cornerstone of modern metal and hardcore music and can be very effective when used in the

bit

not often that a full-time tour-

It’s

ing

painfully predictable

SCHWAB

Bv AARON

band stops by

play

to

right places.

in

seems

Kitchener, especially a band signed to an American record label. So

when one

does,

make

I

This was the case on April 7, went to see Connecticut's I

The Gig Theatre

ance,

in

was

Kitchener. had heard a lot of hype about Emmure so 1 had high hopes for the modern metal quintet. I

Unfortunately,

was sadly

1

Emmure's biggest downfall

let

isn’t

songs

predictable,

that, quite

simply,

generic all

sound

the same.

From

their

introduction

set's

to

minute-long the

encore,

Emmure powered through both old and new songs with painful mediocrity. Every song seemed to contain an unnecessary amount of breakdowns. The breakdown, characterized by one-chord riffs and heavy-handed

drum

lines at a

slowed tempo,

is

1

couldn’t help but feel like

listening to the

I

same song over

be a noticeable lack of melody to most of the songs, and just a little too much use of grinding, open D-

chords to

of catchy tunes or musi-

Ktl inadequacy - even the growled locals are tolerable. Emmure suffers from having painfully

riffs

and over again, with brief gaps between reprises - there seemed to

down. their lack

down

where a more melodic measure would often be easier on the ears and add some variety to the songs. Throughout Emmure's perform-

when

at

Emmure, however,

use them as a crutch,

to

placing chunky, slowed

a point of

seeing them.

Emmure

The Gig Theatre

a

fill

Don’t get

space.

me wrong - Emmure

is

what they do, and have absolutely no problem working their

very good

at

audience into an endless swirl of faces and hands mugging for the mic from the front row, but 1 can only listen to one-chord riffs for so long

my attention turns elsewhere. Emmure is currently on tour

until

across

Canada

with

Farewell to Freeway. record.

Goodbye

Guelph Their

s

latest

to the Gallows,

is

available on Victory Records.

on information more For Emmure, visit www.emmure.com or www.myspace.com/emmure.

he

it,"

“We’re just trying to bring entertainment back to Cambridge. said.

time.”

Lennie B is open Thursday to Sunday. For now, Ty-Chant will be open Fridays and Saturdays. Black plans to provide as

many

different

types of entertainment during those

Garth Brooks. Knight also said he is looking into bringing blues music into the club,

times. “If

something he feels Cambridge

building,

is

I

can cover

all

the angles,

the rock, the country, the strip club, if

I’ve got everything

covered

why would you

in

one

leave?”

ounselimg; services P resents the

Connecticut metal band Emmure performed at on Ontario Street in Kitchener on April 7.

draw some-

to

thing that’s unique, we’ll do

It's

Cambridge’s Mo Music, provided the sound for the grand opening of Club Ty-Chant in Cambridge on April 8.

that

to the area. If there's


— SPOKE,

Page 10

April 16,

Sports

2007

College athletes take By ALEX

MCNANNEY

At Conestoga College, there student population

full-time

of more than 6,000. Only a select few are

good enough

to

make

Badminton:

a college

Fewer

among their who do display

stand out

still

Golf:

Coach's award

MVP — Sam

strong dedication and leadership, a? well as athletic ability.

On

April

dent

Chase Amyot won award

business administration and

in

a pitcher on the

team,

the

at

women’s

notched an

36

team in the fall season. But she had more than just the stats. She attended every practice and was a strong leader on the the

He was

After receiving the award,

“I’m

in

showed

she

the

to receive

"I didn’t

in the fall,

graduating after

see

it

coming, but

this is

definitely an honour.” first award for Conestoga though. He was a league all-star in his second year, and also won the coach's

Parsons

she

fastball:

Vandyk

Women’s outdoor

Laura Matheson won the female athlete

soccer:

Coach

award

s

of the year award and women’s fastball MVP award at the Conestoga Athletic Awards Banquet April 10. Rich Parsons was named male athlete

the

Coach’s award Kelly Lewis MVP Holly Bristow Women’s indoor soccer:

of the year.

Jessica

MVP — Melissa DaSilva

Men’s outdoor soccer: Coach s award Rob Berger MVP Andy Ferreira Men’s indoor soccer:

at

Coach’s

award

Nick

Pandeirada

MVP — Shane It

was

also

quet that

This was not the

female athlete of the year. When asked it she would be returning to

Condors’ lineup

is

award. Parsons was also in disbelief. “I’m totally in shock," he said.

Matheson had not won any previous awards of this stature, but was very happy to have been named

the

He

year.

Women’s

Coach's award Melisa Voisin MVP Laura Matheson Men’s rugby: Coach’s award Adam Black Co-MVP Larry Stuart, Jake

Guidice

completing two diploma programs in his four years at Conestoga. When asked about winning the

it.

award.”

this

great team spirit along with

For his achievements, Richard Parsons was named male athlete of

shock,” Matheson said. see this coming at all.

honoured

on the men’s out-

strong play.

“I didn’t

But I’m very

the leader

door soccer team, as well as the men's indoor soccer team. He

team, despite being a rookie. For her accomplishments, she was named female athlete of the year. said she could not believe

my

The male athlete of the year also displayed the same great qualities.

the Condors, leading the charge for

studies,” she said.

39 innings pitched for

strikeouts in

the coach’s

for golf.

gave a surprising answer. “I hope to, but it depends on

fastball

impressive

— Chase Amyot

Bunting

Cross Country: Coach's Tiffany Taylor MVP Trevor Feeney

Conestoga Athletic Awards Banquet, two students in particular were honoured for their achievements this year. Laura Matheson, a First-year stu10,

Coach’s award Stacy Tilker MVP Brad McNeice

varsity sports team.

teammates. Those

the hardware

award that year. Other athletes from the various varsity spoils were honoured as well. They included:

a

is

home

fastball

named

Ditchfield

announced

Fawn Day, team

at the

ban-

women’s head coach, was the

the Ontario College Athletic

Association's coach of the year for varsity fastball.

For rugby, Jake Vandyk, from left, and Larry Stuart awards, and Adam Black won the coach’s award.

won co-MVP

Photos by Alex

Stacy Tilker won the

McNanney

coach’s award for badminton, while Brad

McNeice was named MVP.

Students, please note! Doctors’ hours at the college are changing.

A

In

be present on the following days with the new hours until June 27th, and will resume the doctor

week

of

will

Aug. 27th. The doctors’ office is located 1A102, Please note that visits are by appointment only.

Lewis won the coach’s award for outdoor soccer. Kelly

indoor soccer, Nick Pandeirada,

while

Shane

Ditchfield

left, won was named MVP.

the coach’s award

in

Room

New Monday,

hours are as follows:

April

30

12:30-3:00

-

May 4 - 9:00-12:30 May 8 - 9:00 12:30 Thursday, May 10 9:00-12:30 Monday, May 14 - 12:30-3:00 Thursday, May 17 - 9:00-12:30 Wednesday, May 23 11 :00-3:00 Friday, May 25 - 9:00-12:30 Thursday, May 31 - 9:00-12:30 Friday,

Tuesday,

-

-

Andy

The indoor soccer coach's award went

to

Ferreira

won

the outdoor

soccer MVP.

Trevor Feeney

MVP

Jessica Giudice.

was named

for cross-country.

-

Wednesday, June 6 - 11:00-3:30 Friday, June 15 - 9:00-12:30 Thursday, June 21 - 9:00-12:30 Wednesday, June 27 - 1 1:00-3:30 July/August

-

closed

Holly Bristow

award

for

won

the

MVP

outdoor soccer.

Melissa DaSilva was indoor soccer’s MVP.

named

Tiffany Taylor won the crosscountry coach’s award.


Sports

‘win or

many

with

title

onship crown.

students are gear-

It

a highly spirited, back and

was

teams com-

ing up for the playoff-like feel of

forth affair, with both

exams. But students

peting with a “win or go

who

More than 50 students were playing on finals

experienced a playoff atmosphere.

were held at on April 3, with six teams vying to win the champivolleyball finals

on

onship.

than 50 students were playsome with win-

But when

intramural

the

league, said she

Playing three games

in one night, had their fair share of adversity to overcome. But they persevered to win the title, which will be on the line when the intramural season returns

“This should be a really inter-

game

night.

Thanks blocked quick

to

unbelievable

and

volleys

strikes,

semester’s

this

the Over.Nets

that

evening. esting event,” she said on

and the

cleared,

intramural volleyball champions.

volleyball

was excited

game.

the dust settled

were

Over.Nets

committee

all

smoke

the

all

member, Tara Davidson, who also runs

minds, while

the love of the

ning on their minds, while others were there just for the love of the athletic

their

with winning

others were there just for

ing on finals night,

game. Student

some

night,

the rec centre

More

home”

attitude.

participate in

intramural volleyball at the college recreation centre have already

The

— Page 11

and the Over. Nets, emerged as the final contenders for the champi-

With the winter semester coming to an end,

2007

go home’ attitude

MCNANNEY

By ALEX

April 16,

champions crowned

Volleyball Over. Nets take

SPOKE,

saves,

Make

two teams, the 218s

(Photo

September.

in

lightning-

get in

sure to sign up in the

on the

fall to

action.

More than 50 Conestoga College students competed ation centre on April 3. The Over.Nets took the title.

in

by Alex McNanney)

the intramural volleyball finals at the recre-

1 TtieiSaueeze? (Photo by Alex McNanney)

Members row

of

The Cool Kids

team

intramural volleyball

are, front

Darcy Schneider, Megan Pick and Chris Ross. Dave Henry, Ken

to back, left to right, Brian Favero,

Castrucci, Kelly Bulley,

Team Bv ALEX

gets

A for

MCNANNEY -

attitude

The Cool Kids has not enjoyed h e best season statistically, winning only two games all season. But that hasn’t affected morale.

t

There was

lots

of intensity and

competition in the rec centre April 3, as more than 50 intramural volyball players took to the hardwood to compete for the league

championship.

“We came going to

in

knowing we were

lose, but it’s just fun to

play,” said Castrucci.

Henry added,

“It’s

more fun

team doesn’t show up,” generating laughs from his teammates. One of the team’s victories was because the opposing

While many took it seriously, one team. The Cool Kids, were out just to have a good time. “That’s why we come out, just to have fun,” said team captain Megan Castrucci.

when

Teammate Dave Pick added, “It's just something fun to do on Wednesday nights.” Another Cool Kids’ member,

because

team

the other

The other was

forfeited. of, as

Favero

said, “Really

bad play by the other team.”

Brian Favero, had a different reason

Regardless of their struggles this season, the team plans on playing again next year. Members said

for the team’s continuous turnout.

things will be different.

“Alcohol,” he said with a laugh.

Wmmmm

“We’re going

to

dominate!”

:

During Pinal

Exam Week,

24 - 26, 2007 WHERE: Door #3 All Day TIME: April

WHAT:

Display table with stress reduction information, goodies and viewing of a

humorous

video.


— SPOKE,

Page 12

April 16,

News

2007

Winging

it!

Conestoga Students Inc. held their first Wing Off championship on April 1 1 in the Sanctuary. Crabby Joe’s supplied the wings. Competitors had 10 minutes to eat as many wings as they could. Right, Miro Pallo, a second-year LASA student, chows down. Below, Ed Luu Van Hiem, a second-year recreation and leisure student, and Steven Callope, a second-year general business student, munch away, as do Zac “Superman” Thomas, first-year accounting, and Dave Scheerer, first-year management studies, rpphoto at bottom left. Thomas won the event, and $150 and a trophy, downing 30 wings. Scheerer came in second, eating 26 wings.

He

received $50.

Craft By

show has something

AMY MEADOWS

demonstrations.

Over

More "cfeative

than 80 of Ontario’s most

and

unique

artisans

attended this year’s 17th annual

Love Country

I

and collectible show, held at the Kitchener Memorial Auditorium, April 6 and craft

~Tr

The

was

a diverse event

with everything from hats and jewelry to chocolate

The show

and candles. featured

home

and garden decor, stained

glass,

also

woodworking, floral designs, gourmet delights and

'clothing, art,

Daniel

Poliak

who

acces-

everyone

ated for “stylish, urban, confident

tor

women and men”

Homemakers

for

Canadian Living and magazines, and Howard, the owner of

according to Alex Stojanovic, the owner. Stojanovic, who is originally

Toronto’s trendy

sories,

Poliak,

Toronto,

he designed and of the jewelry he had on

from Yugoslavia, has turned her

tage-style

The

home

guests.

made

all

display.

lives

in

said

vivid colours and designs are completely one-of-a-kind and when asked intricate

where result

at

for

his ideas

come

from, Poliak

laughed.

"You don't want to know where inspiration comes from,” he

my

joked.

into

living

room and

the

cre-

room

into

a

sewing

office.

show on day one.

Lesliville

vin-

were invited as

store,

They held seminars with tips on where to shop

the latest trends and

but

still

for the best selection.

(Photo by Amy Meadows)

had

to go.

The event was made more popuby its guests of honour. This year Karen Kirk, decor edi-

lar is

her business, making

This year's show was extremely popular - several artisans sold out of everything they had brought to

day two

Another busy stand was Hat

Mood, based in Guelph. The company's headwear

her

Steven

Love Country Memorial Auditorium could purchase a Visitors to the

show

I

at Kitchener

variety of crafts.

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