Issuu on Google+

Sugar and

Internet users

so many young people are online.

News 5

business that

her

Monday,

Special ceremonies held to mark

talents.

2007

April 9,

Remembering Vimy Ridge

showcases

many

A

learning

newsroom

Conestoga College, Kitchener, Ont.

for

journalism students

the 90th anniversary of the historic battle.

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

Radiothon music to KidsAbility and

beware

Predators have an easy time because

spice Flamboyant Texan opens Kitchener

39th Year

— No. 13

ears

their

CHYM FM

partner to raise $122,441 By SARAH JAYNES

KidsAbility

an

is

organization

that provides services to children

More

than 100 children partici-

who

are coping with different dis-

pated in song, dance and crafts at

abilities

the KidsAbility Radiothon recently

Down

Conestoga Mall. The

at

12-hour

event raised $122,441.

air

fundraiser,

Kids Can’t Wait, was

CHYM FM

on

and autism. “This event

The second annual titled

and illnesses such as syndrome, cerebral palsy

live to

with on-air per-

really out of our

is

we spend most

element because

our time Connors.

the

at

George Michaels and Tara Connors, from 6 a.m. until 6

FM

p.m.

awareness and money

sonalities,

in centre court.

featured free entertainment and

It

Mad

including

activities

Science,

Kids on the Block, Blue Vale Jazz Quartet and face painting. A silent

was held with various

auction

prizes available such as Raptors’

and a day donated by various tickets

to raise

money

the spa,

at

all

local businesses for the foundation.

“This event is well worth it for because it is done for an incred-

us,

ible cause,” said

Michaels, adding

year there was an

this

amazing

turnout and the kids had a lot of fun.

“We

love

really

these

live

KidsAbility partners with for

radiothon

the

of

said

station,”

CHYM raise

to

support of

in

the children. This year the centre

must

approximately $800,000 programs and servic-

raise

to support the

more than 3,500

es they offer to

children in Waterloo Region.

“Good

thing

wore waterproof

I

mascara,” said Connors, adding she is touched by the children and parents who donate every year to the foundation. “The radiothon is such a minuet

amount of support and attention that should be drawn towards this foundation,” said Connors.

“We

how

com-

events,” he said.

hours, just imagine

People could make donations to KidsAbility via phone or the web.

pares to a whole year of helping

that

Award

Darling’s

bright

smile

and caring ways made her a ray of

strates

caring

who

communicates shows enthusiasm

friends and family.

program.

died after a sudden heart attack

during the strike

in

2006.

On March 26 Conestoga

students

best

one,” says Layte.

friend

nursing colleague

Marg Tupling.

“It

and

was

a

wonderful goodbye ceremony, her Dther and best friend Linda even

U

me.”

Darling was one of the picket captains during the strike. She also an avid

of

was

dog lover and breeder

many champions,

a passionate

Tupling.

remembered nursing teacher. Nursing colleague Kathy Layte says Darling had a wonderful laugh; she was extremely intelli-

“During graduated

and called her

gent, full of mischief

“Ardelle didn’t have any children life

so she

made her

that

time one of her

who

had

nurse,

Gail

students a

parish

Noble, heard of her death and in her honour came back to the college to say a prayer with us on the

students her children.

over her

become

says

stu-

picket lines,” says Tupling. “It a painful time but

dents her legacy,” she says. “At the

grateful

memorial one of her students won an award in Ardelle’s honour.” The Ardelle Darling Memorial

Ardelle.”

Linda

for

we were

Gail’s

Fitzpatrick,

was

all

very

love

of

a

friend of Darling, says she

30-year

remem-

all

now

to

know

a student

award

for her and also to

know

mom

is

settled

miss her and think of her so

“Whenever I walked by her

“Ardelle and

I

we both when we met at year,

both turned 60 lived

in

last

Toronto

nursing school,

we

“She always made

Darling was also remembered as ball

“Ardelle was

full

petence and love,” says Tupling.

Layte added Darling was always enthusiastic, caring and intelligent.

“Ardelle will always be a ray of light.”

Our

all

bare

listen closely

our joy of

still

here

memory

laughter and our tears

It’s in

the students’ faces

they’ll

remember through

the years

She of energy, com-

during the World Series,” says

“Anyone who knew Ardelle knew her to be the kindest

It’s in

you

of energy even though

she was very small.

were huge fans of the Blue Jays Fitzpatrick.

we must

loss

As

laugh.”

being a

friend in Toronto.

office

she would have a pleasant word to

me bers meeting her dearest and best

seems was broken

resting heart’s

say,” says Layte.

as beautiful.

it

Her

her old cubical.

just

Her heart if

who

was

always knew

But

Conestoga

life

that they

A

College professor

for

She loved us all with gusto Her work a passion too Her students were her children

often,” says Fitzpatrick.

Ardelle Darling, a

had a personality as and her love

She left us without warning Without even goodbye No more that raucous laughter That twinkle in her eye

and well.

Both Tupling and Layte say they miss her most when they walk past

bright as a flower

of Ardelle

There is a void in school now No one can fill her chair This year has been a long one She was beyond compare

We

died

Memory

the hardest, says Tupling.

that her

last year,

gardener, a loving daughter and a well

shock,

In

But

named

by Becky Sharpe)

onto www.kidsability.ca

who is now in her 80s. Her mother took her daughter’s death

that there is

(Photo

Darling’s death during the strike

when we went.”

“She would be so happy

gious.”

tribute, log

ray of light

Darling had always lived with her

was

ed and genuinely concerned for our children,” she said. Organizers are still accepting donations. If you would like to con-

mother,

always smiling and she had an outrageous laugh that was very conta-

devastating

program with

people interest-

“It is great to see

be with us

knew her one-on-

students,” she says. “Ardelle

a

attends a

KidsAbility.

Barbados and Martinique,” she says. “Our mothers would always

Tupling says Darling was never one to sit around. “She was very proactive, she was a wonderful teacher and loved her

was

who

autistic

over the countryside in places like

Second-year Lauren Ernewein showed these qualities and was the first to win the award. “The award will mean more to her teacher, she

support KidsAbility,” said Frances

Grode, the mother of an

and most caring individual; she loved working with her students.” Fitzpatrick and Darling also loved to travel the world in their younger days with their mothers. “We would head out and poke all

for the nursing

closure.

says

to

demon-

Lauren because she had Ardelle as

“More than 20 people showed

very impressed with the

prize buckets that

remembered as a

and faculty held a memorial in Darling’s honour as a way to bring

up,”

am

“I

were given to children at the 2007 event raised more than $100,000 for the foundation.

child

created.

and compassion, effectively and

light for her colleagues, students,

The Conestoga College professor

were pleased with the and hype that CHYM FM

given to any second-year

is

nursing student

Ardelle

activities

amount of people who came out

these children.”

Ardelle Darling By BECKY SHARPE

KidsAbility Radiothon. This year’s Parents

are here at the mall for 12

by Sarah Jaynes)

(Photo

George Michaels and Tara Connors hold

A

left

loss

us without warning

still

hard to bear

Her memory stays amongst us To laugh, to rejoice, to share From your colleague and friend Kathy Layte


Page 2

News

— SPOKE,

April 9,

Now

deep thoughts

...with Random

2007

New

random students

By STEPHANIE IRVINE

What are your plans

for

summer break?

more ways than one.

The proposed addition in

friendly features to earn

in

Toronto.”

Joel Gerber, second- rear architecture project facility

management

a gold

it

"We

community

50 per cent

of the same will

It

as

in

the

and meet the intended purpose. and foremost the buildings

“First

have to operate,” he

how

“If they

said.

don’t do that, the project regardless of

size.

be the second building

when designing

they have to be function-

is

is

a failure

energy-efficient

is.”

it

Feldmann added

The nearby ambu-

people aspect to building a green

environmentally-friendly options.”

lance

facility,

completed

building.

summer of 2004, was

April

in

had

ft.

"The region’s

to

LEED silver rat-

minimum

of 33 out

we

They do

Prno.

“The

intent

design to

LEED

are

to

silver,” said

way

there.

Certification

is

we be

are

first,

different things,” said I

must take

only

ers

Kari

cific areas:

guess the thinking it,

is

how

into account six spe-

sustainable sites; water

efficiency; energy

Feldmann, senior regional project manager of environmental and corporate properties. “To go through and design and build (to that standard), you're already 90 per cent of the

do

“And

like to

a government won’t do

if

marching

of our

like to

a lot like

- we

is

also a

“Productivity levels go up, staff

and atmosphere;

he

feel better,”

to

work

He

said.

“People want

in

those kinds of buildings.”

said

those are factors they

number on, but are critical when it comes to sustainability. Feldmann added the region hopes

can’t put a

by taking a leadership role with the environment, other municipalities will follow suit.

"By

building

energy-efficient

materials and resources; indoor air

buildings now, we’re building for

and innovation and design

the future,” he said. “We’re future-

quality;

proofing our buildings to compen-

process.

EMS

received an award from the

Federation

just

there

absentee levels go down, people just

can you expect a citizen to do it?” Under the LEED system, design-

however.

orders from council

EMS

here in

not require the buildings to be certified,

the

in

the first gold-

rated building east of Alberta.

new, occupied regional

all

ing. requiring a

Falls.”

buildings

things.”

most important

said the

thing to consider

al

as a standard building

way you do

Feldmann

LEED.

of a possible 70 points.

Niagara

native

planting

ments,” said Prno. “You have to rethink the

under

be designed to the

“I’m going to

and eliminating

almost a way of thinking,

the region to attain a gold rating

buildings over 5,000 sq.

second-year nursing

toilets;

use by

“It’s

facility.

Waterloo Regional Police Service (WRPS). “We’re always exploring

2005

Trussler,

low-flush pesticide

much energy

and it’s great,” Bryan Larkin of the

Regional council decided

Heather

rather than individual design ele-

will use less than

leaders,

said Inspector

windows and windows that open; more roof and wall insulation; rain-

Designers expect the addition

we’re natural

believe that

innovative steps wiih their

plants and grass.

under the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) program. rating

many

Municipalities for taking so

gy-efficient lighting; triple-glazed

water collection to reduce runoff and using it for toilet flushing; water conservation measures like

to police

Cambridge, a project totaling $11.6 million, will include enough environmentallyheadquarters

bike racks; ener-

features such as:

Waterloo regional police are leading the way, in

“Working

#

LEEDing the way

Conestoga College

questions answered by

HQ

police

Canadian

of

sate for scarcity of resources

and

the cost of those resources.”

that last step.”

And

Amanda Bright,

“It

second-year early

childhood education

an expensive one, actually

amount of money

LEED

to

certification

at that.

a

costs

significant

go through the process,” said

John Prno, regional director of services medical emergency (EMS). “We’re basically supporting the cause in saying we want our buildings to be at least

“I’m

but

going to Vegas,

we

through that certification process.” Larkin agreed with him.

then Arizona.”

“The

Adam

LEED silver,

don’t necessarily have to go

at

Quigley,

most

third-year

true goal, really,

how we can do fiscally

is

to look

(Photo by Stephanie

from the responsible mechathis

nism,” he said.

marketing

Irvine)

planned for police headquarters on Maple Grove Road in Cambridge. The facility has attained a gold rating under the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design program (LEED). It’s only the second building in the region to do

A

The new police headquarters on Maple Grove Road will include

$1

1

.6-million addition is

so.

Now What??

Graduating? “I’m

going to be trying

to find

a

job.”

Too busy to Job Search? As a Conestoga alumni you can register for our

Pre Register for the Resume Referral Service

Jessie Houston,

Door # 4 18 & 19 10 00-12:00

Graduate Resume Referral sen/ice and

second-year ojfice administration

April 17,

we will send

your r6sum6 to busi-

:

nesses

in

your field of choice. This

free seivice for the first three

is

a

months

existing

after graduation. “I

get to work for the

Region

of Waterloo.”

Bring along a copy of your

resume

& cover letter

be critiqued or arrange an appointment with the Student/ to

Resume

Referral

Grad Employment Advisor Brian Huber,

Submit electronic version of

r6sum6

first-year

& cover letter to

career

services.

civil

engineering •

Complete

registration

location preferences.

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!

form

(519) 748-5220 ext: 3340 tcruikshank@conestogac.on.ca

listing

Career Services—SCSB -Room 220


-

.

News

SPOKE,

$500 for top agenda

Party for *

Parkinson’s By NATALIE ANDERSON

Weaver

design

was amazed by

said she

By ALLISON STEINMAN

the generosity and instead of a reg-

A

50-50 draw, they added a twist. “It’s a 45-55 draw because it’s

Newfoundland Club in Cambridge kicked off Parkinson’s awareness month on party

April

the

at

ular

my

but the real reason for the

1 ,

pizza,

Weaver

who has had

all.”

Parkinson’s

Cambridge. thought,

money

they

well,

for that

and

need

said.

Donations were accepted door

in

Several

exchange for companies

donated

gift

a

Weaver

ed a

said the best

way

was opened to all students to get them involved with

Zehrs, located

“The more you help

Cambridge Centre, donated and another company donat-

others like yourself, don’t get so depressed.” if

DVD player.

it’s

ner,” she said. “Students interest, that’s

As of

order

the

took an

what triggered

April

jf

Variety of rental units to living

'4

Humphries said it was still early and they were just starting to come in.

(Photo by Natalie Anderson)

a new Parkinson’s support centre in Cambridge. Party organizer Shari Weaver, shown above, said she was very happy with the turnout of approximately 150 people on April 1 raise

money

addition

In

to

having their

design used, the winning student will also receive a cash prize of

$500.

for

good

a pretty

“It’s

prize,” said

Humphries.

The contest deadline

is

April 13.

d

different

you

apartments that prov

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home, allowing you to focus on your

Conveniently located dose to universities

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Steps to shopping

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rest

For healthy food choices, food safely and 100% smoke-free seating, choose an Eat Smart! restaurant Contact the Waterloo Region Community Health Department at 883-2253 or visit www. eatsmart, web.net IZrtt f SocwfY'

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day

only a handful of entries had been received, but

Terry Dieter, an Elvis impersonator, helped entertain at a party to

you

in

“We always have a lot of comments and ideas about the plan-

to

others, even

it

timers.

far.”

is

in

graphic design students,

for the

for her

cope with her Parkinson’s keep busy.

is

was open as far as the design goes. “The sky’s the limit,” she said. Humphries said designing of the planner, which used to be a project

me

understands

draw and have

Conestoga’s logo and the year,

be able to talk to

will

to

the

TV

I

who

a contest inviting stulike to

charge of promotions, said that as long as the design included

in

without having to travel very

area

baskets and gift cer-

tificates for prizes.

by

the

“Now

someone

at the

raffle tickets. in

new

the house, let alone the city," she

I'd like a party,

like music,” she said.

I

who

by April 6. Bonnie Humphries, who

to Parkinson’s.

1

1

"I

go

Condor’s artwork will cover of Conestoga

creative ideas to submit their ideas

Cambridge. “A lot of the coping you have to do on your own unless you know of someone else who has (Parkinson’s),” she said. “You need someone to talk to on the phone. You can get really depressed. Dark days are the worst and you can’t get your spirits up no matter how hard you fight.” Louise Hazelton has been fighting her own battle for 7 years and is happy to hear there will finally be a support centre in Cambridge. “It’s been hard on me and my family. I don't even like leaving

0 years, said she heard a support centre was being established in

CSI held

55 per cent of

excited about the

is

support group

from our area down to Windsor,” said Shari Weaver, who co-ordinated the party. “Because the population in Windsor is getting so big Weaver,

the proceeds

all

only a London office to look after

for

that

the

Student Inc’s 2007/2008 planner. dents

means

also

It

noon festivity, and raised $2,254. “The Parkinson's community in Waterloo Region is getting bigger and bigger and right now there’s

it

what you think of it. It’s I’m going to be a

five so

perfect 10!"

Delight, and live music at the after-

can't handle

and

five

provided by Pizza Hut and Pizza

London

A creative grace

55th birthday,” she said. “Fifty-

five is just

was to raise funds for the new Cambridge support centre party

opening April 12. Close to 150 people enjoyed

— Page 3

2007

April 9,

toil sii

f cc

Ext.214

quota today!

519-743-5221 1 800 321 9187

jwestman@staebler.com


Page 4

— SPOKE,

Commentary

2007

April 9,

Province needs

pony up

to

The recent provincial budget released by the McGuinty government is promising $390 million in funding for post-secondary institutions. Sounds like a lot of money, doesn’t it? But when only a third of that is

going to help Ontario’s chronically under-funded

colleges, it makes you wonder where colleges sit on the government’s list of priorities ... or if they even make the list. On average, Ontario college students receive $2,000 less in grants per student than college students in the It’s time for the rest of Canada, ranking us 10th. provincial government to put funding for Ontario college students’ on-par with that of their peers across the

country, and to

make post-secondary education

acces-

sible to everyone.

Provincial governments have been slashing funding for post-secondary education since the early 1990s. In an attempt to reduce public spending, the government seemed to find the path of least resistance to spending cuts in the college and university systems - all they had to do was force massive hikes in tuition fees. This allowed them to save money without having a disas-

'

trous impact on the quality of programs offered, or so they said. Official statements were made about the need for students to pay an appropriate share of the but who decides how much costs of their education .

.

provincial

Epitome of consumption

.

an “appropriate” amount? Shouldn’t we encourage and facilitate our population striving to better them-

government - slashing post-secondary funding since the 1990s - it’s time they anted up

The

is

We

live in

we could

almost anything

selves?

The president of the College Student Alliance (CSA), Matt Jackson, said he is pleased to see Ontario colleges receiving some recognition in the budget. He added, however, the money is long overdue and

probably won’t do

make up

for

much

more than

to

want It’s

time for the provin-

cial

government

to put

funding for Ontario with that of their peers

across the country, and to

make post-secondary

over into dangerous

everyone

$20

streets;

about the vehicles

With global warming becoming utterly impossible to ignore I

see the

world approaching an environmental

and economical

crisis,

me

running their

it

moms

alike

in at

Hummer

H2.

almost three met-

Hummer H2

tonnes, the

is

in the city

money could go

one

is

or suburbs to

vehicle that

no reason

makes such

own

running out

tional to tell

it

a

frivolous

use of a resource the world ally

is liter-

of.

people

who

can afford

they cannot buy whatever they included.

So

want, a

able and street legal vehicles on

where does one find a solution?

and stands as a

It’s

symbol of wasteful consumption.

The monstrous H2 -

the civilian

simple - tax the pants off of

Hummer H2 In an age

owners and buyers.

when

way

The

to

helping the environment.

Hummer ownwake them up to

But will robbing ers blind really

the

problem? Sure, we can drain

their

bank accounts

fuel-saving

them

really cause

in the

name of it

to get their gas-

guzzlers off the road?

Wouldn't

the almost $70,000 price tag that

of the largest commercially-avail-

the road today,

a long

in gra-

tax.

teaching them a lesson, but will

would be unconstitu-

Hummer

consumption

tuitous fuel

whatsoever for anyone living with-

be easier

it

drivers of

if

such vehicles were more logical? If

your daily commute involves

clearing two-meter gaps in the desert, then a

Hummer

is

probably

for you. But to drive to and from the office and drop

little

Jimmy

off

soccer practice, please consider

version of a vehicle originally

hybrid vehicles are becoming

at

intended for military use - gets

commonplace (and almost neces-

the pollution your tank

approximately 100 kilometres per

sary should environmental safety

the air that

17 to 24 litres of fuel, with reports

be considered a priority), those

day

welcome

Spoke welcomes

thousand dollars per month

bad urban driv-

in

ing conditions.

However,

daily errands from

behind the wheel of a

Weighing

and so

to see busi-

ness suits and soccer

ric

they should be charged an extra

I’m convinced there

and

and then use

month

Opinion of 29L/ 100km

drive.

their vehicle

gasoline for their daily

paying an extra $2,000 or so per in insurance, or perhaps

Schwab

avail-

I’m talking

we

in

commute should have no problem

Aaron

territory.

drugs in our schools or

guns on our

pains and angers

community colleges has

ever

I’m not talking about the

decide to spend $70,000 or

more on

practically at our finger-

fuel prices skyrocketing,

education accessible to

This constitutes nothing less than a crisis in a time when more Canadians than ever before are attending college and university. Investment in post-secondary education pays off not only for those who attend college or university, but for society as a whole. We must remind our government of this fact - that we want an educated, skilled, well-informed, cultured and prosperous population leading our country throughout the 21st century.

Letters are

is

who

a convenience that has spilled

ability of

college students on-par

15

years of under-funding in the college system. In the past decade alone, the total provincial government transfer per funding unit to dropped by 40 per cent.

tips,

-

an era of abundance

I

is

causing -

enjoy breathing every

isn't getting

any cleaner.

Spoke is

letters to the

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

editor. Letters

contacted

No unsigned

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

for verification.

letters will

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14. Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220. ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca Website: www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

be published. 500 words. to edit any letter

Letters should be no longer than

Spoke

reserves the right

for publication.

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

N2G 4M4

Dr.,

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.


7

News

Danger By CHRISTOPHER MILLS

supervise or limit their

use

is

dreamed communication, obtaining news and finding enterBusiness,

of.

tainment are easier than before. But is it safe?

ever

show increased

risks

Statistics

for

young

online

to

today spend more time in front of the computer children

of the television. In this day and

predators

Another problem predators

a g e

sites

more than ever

where

a sociology

,

major

at

Queen’s

before.

I 99 per cent of people 17 and under have used the Internet I 80 per cent of people 7 and under have accessed the Internet from home I 50 per cent of people 17 and under use the Internet daily 1- to 12-yearI 50 per cent of old instant messaging users say they have friends they only know through the Internet

puter use

to 17-year-

is

ly,

and 60 per cent

addressed

Internet

growing exponentiallegislation

being

is

constantly and the media reports daily on children

private or

rooms

43 per cent of 15-

legislation

Internet

is

who have been taken advantage of over the Internet, how is it that

to 17-year-

old Internet users have been asked by someone they met on the Internet to meet in person. One in

these statistics exist?

five said yes.

gest,

First of all, just as the stats sug-

parents

enough

I 67 per cent of Internet users and under said their parents do not 1

are

paying

not

attention to their children

and the content they’re viewing on

University,

has

studied

Internet

law and, through her own studies, has experienced some of these Internet dangers first hand. “It’s disgusting, some of the things people do,” she said. ‘They prey on young girls and try to

may

all

time,

but the

increasingly difficult to

Because everything it

so

is

not easy to

is

separate the adults from the youth.

The government is cracking down though, establishing legislaintended

to

The Kitchener

introducing

is

the

public and open,

light

money on energy bills, but they've also become a cause of concern for some save

Kitchener residents

The government

prevent people

has

received

a

Fire

Department

number of

calls

from residents reporting that their energy-saving compact fluorescent light bulbs have been producing

smoke when burnt out. The lamps sometimes

emit

smoke, an odour or a popping noise along with a base which may

when

look discoloured or charred they have finished their Certification

life.

agencies

have

issued statements that this failure

of children online.

does not present a shock or fire hazard for approved products. However, improperly installed or unapproved bulbs have been found to be the cause of several small

officially

fires

start,

but in the end, the responsi-

bility

comes down

to parents.

The

bottom line is that children cannot be trusted in such a dangerous forum. All it takes is one wrong click or one chance encounter with

old Internet users visit chat rooms

I

she

Since it was launched in 2005, the number of reports has skyrocketed. All of these measures are a good

1

visit

be safe

national tip line for the exploitation

1

adult chat

to

sites,”

from things like impersonating someone else online and even having basic chat communication with someone who is underage. Another useful tool has been the founding of CyberTip. is www.cybertip.ca Canada’s

Council:

72 per cent of 15-

family-friendly

ALDWORTH

Energy-saving fluorescent bulbs

“These are supposed

tion

The following statistics were compiled by the Media Awareness Network and the Canadian Safety

I

online users.

sites,

— Page 5

alarm

By ROSS

public gaining sites, where people can congregate to play games like checkers and chess against other

regulate.

a given.

These predators have such an easy time these days because young people are using the Internet

that

Jenifer Schut,

when A

well.

is

targeting

are

young people on safety seems

-

for

said. “It’s scary.”

parents.

than they do in front

from the technology as

benefit

and cannot be expected to always follow' regulations given by their

Canada,

Statistics

Internet users because,

unfortunately,

the dan-

adolescents

finally,

according

possibilities never before

know

gers that exist online,

And

offering

Children cannot

be expected to

way

With ever increasing volume and popularity, the Internet

the Internet.

any

in

2007

April 9,

No cause

on the Internet

lurks

Internet

SPOKE,

the

wrong person

vulnerability,

in

moment

a

and your child

of

is in

a

world of unprotected trouble. The message needs to get out nothing online can be that

assumed safe or taken for granted. For more information and tips on

intimidate them.”

how

Schut said she has found predators in places where people likely wouldn’t even suspect it, such as

children

safe

when

Internet,

visit

http://www.cyber-

to

keep yourself and your surfing

the

tip.ca/en/cybertip/safer_inet_tips.

the area,

in

says Kitchener

Department public education officer John Coish. Fire

The Electrical Safety Authority (ESA) has advised consumers to replace compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs at the first sign of failure or aging. The early warning signs to look for include: flickering, a bright

orange or red glow,

popping sounds, an odour or browning of the base The ESA also stressed the importance

of

following

the

bulb’s

instructions and making sure that the lamp or fixture it is to be used in

is

compatible with the bulb.

CFL

bulbs should never be used with dimmer switches, touch

lamps, lamps with timers or outdoors.

With age comes beauty my

celebrated

recently

I

COUNSELLOR'S CORNER: Community Resources

21st

For weeks prior to the special occasion I thought about my birthday attire and finalized plans. It turned out to be a birthday week rather than just a one day celbirthday.

ebration.

As my

I

ing the age question,

was

I

often

asked if I was feeling sad, excited, nervous, worried or a little of everything to be getting, wait don’t say I

it,

look

I

at life differently

than most people.

am

I

so excited

for what’s next and what’s to I

look forward to battling

life’s little I

felt

am

I

many

all

of

way.

sad or upset about

the milestone that

accomplish.

come.

my

wars that come

never once

I

was about

thrilled to

to

have

more

achievements under my belt. I learn something new every day and amaze myself that

with

all

that

I

365 new things since

my

last

have done. That’s that I've

learned

milestone. Bring on

another 365. I

think with

number of style,

all

maturity

attributes:

grace,

comes a

confidence,

consideration,

and appreciation, along with being developed fully, in perfect condition and ripened. I would say someone who is mature thoughtfulness

issues that students face on a daily basis, but we’re also here to

Butler

help you connect with the

Opinion

your area.

When

me

I

say that

can’t wait to get older.

I

am

people ask

ed about aging.

I

out.

I

think with age

think

I

in

contacts with

employment, housing, counselling and other

Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge, Guelph and other

communities.

inside

have a

will

appreciation

stronger

agencies

available in

excit-

comes more beauty, both and

I

many resources that are

We have information, brochures and

social services,

of these qualities.

for

life,

Especially as the school year draws to a close for graduating

relationships and really appreciate the values

older?

think

has

Counselling Services are here to help with

Vanessa

big day drew clos-

found myself having to often answer the big question, “How old are you turning?” I have been told that I look and act rather mature for my age; I take this as a compliment. After answerer

The counsellors at

an

building

myself, where I

I

hold

my

about

excited

true.

incredible will

I

am

I

and

future

for

life

go and what

students,

it's

important to make a connection with people and

places outside the college. These resources can help you find an

affordable home, find a car seat, baby clothes and toys, connect

will see. I

would never wish

years old again,

I

to

be

just think of

12

knew compared to what know now and what I have experilittle

I

enced. live

I

I

in

never have nor will the past. I don't

I

to counselling groups and workshops, or give a

how

ever

hold

a

crisis.

number

to phone

Specif ic professional support can be provided for

pregnancy, alcohol and drug counselling, single parent and family supports, credit counselling, legal aid, and many other services.

grudges or have any regrets about anything. I take knowledge from every experience and tive that

I

am

apprecia-

got the chance to experi-

ence it at all. I’m only 21.1 have the life to look forward to. Life seems so

much more

of

my

fulfill-

you look at it as a gift, something that you are not just expected to have, but rather something that you appreciate and cherish. ing

If you're not sure where to go for help, just ask us. We'll help

you get connected with the right people, rest

in

A Message from Counselling Services

if

Visit

our website h ttp://www. conestoaac, on, ca/isp/stserv/index. jsp


Page 6

— SPOKE,

April 9,

Feature

2007

A real sweet spot

r

Thousands take in Elmira’s annual maple syrup festival By LEANNE

MOUNTFORD

to the

1993 event.

Phillips said she enjoys the festival because

The aroma of pancakes, sausages and barbecued chicken tilled the air in Elmira on March 31 as thousands of people attended the Elmira Maple Syrup Festival.

Vendors sold

all

crafts to delicious

kinds of goodies, from homemade food and many maple syrup prod-

ucts.

Aside from the many vendors, people could watch MegaMutts dog show or go on a sugar bush tour to see how the sap from the maple trees is collected and the

turned into maple syrup. Judy Phillips, who helped

sell maple syrup and maple candies for Maple Tap Farms, said she doesn't

remember how many years they've attended the festival but they have proof of their attendance dating back

it's

fun

and busy. Wally Sallans, who makes the Maple Tap Farms brand maple syrup, said he usually sells a tew hundred litres of maple syrup at the festival. According to the Elmira Maple Syrup Festival website, the proceeds from the festival are returned to the community to support local charities and non-protit organizations.

According to a March 30 article in The Record of Waterloo Region, festival organizers expected 70,000 people at the festival this year. Despite the cold windy weather this year. Sallans said they have had worse years.

That type of weather is expected for this time of year, he said, adding at least there’s no rain or snow.

Above left: Thousands of people attended this year’s Elmira Maple Syrup Festival on March 30 and 31 The event began on the Friday with an antiques and collectibles show and sale and a toy show and sale. On the Saturday, a pancake flipping contest was held, along with the Friday sales, a quilt and craft .

sugarbush tours, Old MacDonald's farm, theatre shows, a dog show and, of course, lots of pancakes. Brisk weather forced people to dress in warm clothes while they checked out the many vendors selling food and crafts. Maple syrup was the obvious must-have item. sale,

Left:

Josh Hooper, Jamie Waddle and Ryan McKlay found a

quiet spot to enjoy

Above

right:

some beef

The Pancake Guy greeted people

while promoting the fast.

souvlaki.

New

with gusto

Apostolic Church’s pancake break-


Feature

SPOKE,

April 9,

2007

— Page 7

•The queen of beads Flamboyant Texan opens business that showcases her many talents

AMY MEADOWS

By

W

you get when you mix a flamboyant Texan with a personality as big as her home state and a hat do

newly renovated hydro station? You get Gay Isber and Sugar Beads & Co. Sugar Beads, nicknamed the Sugar Factory by Isber, is a showcase of her jewelry designs, cooking skills and artwork. From intricate crowns to beaded bracelets, and

modern artwork

to

cooking classes for kids,

found many ways to make money from the business. Based on Duke Street West in Kitchener, this extremely unique building encompasses architecture and art and design. Having made an immediate impression since arriving in Canada, Isber’s success has not come without many trials and tribulaIsber has

der,

was but

tricky, it

is

Canada

is

just over the bor-

totally different,” she said.

“People are always reminding I

moved

first

here

I

was

me

in the papers, writ-

ing editorials that incensed people, so

f^>me a long ask,

who

way

when

that

I

have

Everyone used Texan and why won't she

since then.

is this

kids

were like ‘mother, grow up,’ but I wanted to do this. After the divorce I didn’t want to uproot them, or admit defeat, and Kitchener has really grown to be my home.” And what better place to start the Sugar Factory than a place Isber calls home. Despite many obstacles on the road to opening the business, she succeeded because of the speed she works at. “If I had stopped to think,

maybe

it

would-

have happened,” she said. After finding a derelict hydro station she

thought would be perfect for her business and new home, Isber put in an offer. “Other people thought I was crazy, but I

and saw it completely finished,” she said. “I needed lots of natural light because I’m dealing with colours, and there are great windows here, and I can live above

walked

in

business.”

A

workaholic

total

the decision

space

made

her to get up at

all

to

She explained they helped her out when the business was in its stand what she

doing.

is

early stages.

“And then they were replaced by

a $10 per

hour homeless guy,” she laughed. On moving day, after being let down by

move in, Isber needed heavy things moved. So it was down to the local soup kitchen to hire some down-

who were

people

her

in

create

own

words,

a live/work

perfect sense.

It

allows

hours to work on current

“They are “I tell

said.

kids they love

me more

than

me, of course, because I’m paying them 10 bucks an hour.” Isber said it became addictive to have

they do, and they

tell

workers and on her first day in the building she came back to find they had set up table and lit candles for her to have her first dinner in

everyone brought something different Passionate about her

design

art,

something

is

that has

dang good.”

halves.

until the business venture.

words

Her second marriage was to a Canadian. Once the two divorced she knew she did not want to return to Texas. “We met on the Friday and were married

“I

had to get rid of a son who was taking up the basement and making a huge mess,” she said. “He needed to grow up a bit."

resented

Despite this she said both her sons under-

The police showed up and took the saying to be more sinister than it was. "They took it to mean there was a bomb,”

to date her

was so determined her new home: the enough for one. “I

needed

my

hydro station be

that the

living area

kids to go

was only big

away

really,”

she

whispered.

Her 19-year-old son was

living at

home

rise to the

challenge, and focuses on what she wants from her business. “I want people to come away from being here with a sense of joy and happiness, so they know there is a place where you can let go, that is my gift,” she said. “I want people to

open

their hearts

and have

frickin’ fun."

assignments.

The

Isber leans in to reveal another reason she

the pressure

After being inspired by an artist who conveys her artwork through words, Isber took over the university campus for one of her

back home. “He (Isber’s late husband) was well-known and respected in the community and no one wanted to follow that act.” Isber laughs. Energetic and excitable, Isber doesn’t appear to have let the setbacks in her life stop her from living life to the fullest. It is clear this is a lady who doesn’t do anything by

wanted

“1 didn’t think it imagine?” Isber asks. would be so hard to do though ... it’s pretty

when

mount, Isber continues to

been with

Region

most unique thing you could

ideas difficult, but

Isber said her abil-

her from a young age, she was even arrested for her art back in her university days.

the

I

sber doesn’t seem like the kind of person who finds coming up with unique

to the

After pleading with city council officials she became the first person in Waterloo

it

said.

table.”

ity to

to create a live/work space.

was what got me arrestkids and my godson.”

love with them,” she said. “Six months later most of them are still here and it turned out to be quite a surprise,

and upcoming designs.

“Isn’t

that

my two

her new home. “By then I was in

go home?” Married for 10 years, Isber faced many battles after her husband died. When the time came to re-build her life she said no one

just

“And

She did escape without a criminal record and became famous in her class. “It’s all they wanted to talk about,” she

starts to

replacement children,” she

like

my

she said.

ed, along with

to help her

on-their-luck men.

n’t

my

tions. “It

“My

the following Saturday,” she said.

rary

artist in

artwork

question that

made

people

a

lot

of tempo-

would stumble

across and their reactions to the artwork

would be filmed. On the campus, everyone wore their

shirts

with

own words/phrases and artwork was

up around the campus. Emblazoned on her own

shirt

“tick tick.” Isber said these

how

husband’s

put

were the words rep-

time was running out during her

illness.

Gay

owner of Sugar on Duke Street West in

Isber, top photo,

Beans &

co.

her latest designs

Kitchener,

shows

The

crown is made with and lots of beads.

butterfly

butterflies

off

real


1

Page 8

— SPOKE,

Feature

2007

April 9,

Week of April

9,

2007

Aries March

Libra

21

September 23 October 22

April 19

do not become you. You

Lies

hate deception and avoid all-fraud

whenever

possible.

usually the plish

things,

sometimes

While lying

wrong way

shun

don't

is

accom-

to

them,

are the only truth

lies

people can handle.

Fairness life.

You

key

is

May

aspects of

in all

hate injustice and can't

Your emotions and

make

their voice will

when you

a destructive

are upset.

Scorpio 20

October 23

November You

are not an actor and can't

ond look

something you aren’t which makes it impossible for you to convince those who know you that you have changed. You may need a change of scenery.

don't have a readable face

fill You

'

at

your personality. You

at

times mysterious. Don't

ers

and are oth-

let

be fooled by your exterior,

while you enjoy keeping people guessing, don't hide the real you.

Sagittarius

Pgg|

,line21

1

N ovember 22

1

-

December 2

are like an ocean, always

moving, never able

to settle.

Your

energy keeps your

life

exciting and

you on your

Be

careful

toes.

much energy you you

-

21

People often need to take a sec-

fool others into believing you're

May21

who

Partner yourself with those

are very vocal.

Taurus -

-

stand to see others taken advantage of.

pair

April 20

f

will get tired

how

release, in time

and

will

need to

accept the option of settling.

A cage would be your prison as you love the feeling of freedom. You

down

also hate tying others

and are the

to

first

end anything

that doesn't allow for flexibility.

Capricorn June 22

-

K

July 22

December 22

w

-

J3.nu 3.ry 19

Like a sixth sense, you have the ability to feel

others' animosity

and are in tune with how others feel and how they are affected.

Keep your sense times feel

people

in mind, someneed others who

what they're going through.

Umu

*.

ecome

succumb to another's wants, if you do you truly will be caged. Don't

%

Sf:

en guru

Your passion and stubbornness you get so wrapped up in what you’re doing that you forget all other things. When people shun you because of are your downfall as

this

don't hate them,

want you

to

miss too

\

f.

H

y-

V

?

*&;%>>

By JENN SPRACH

they don't

much of life. made

There’s nothing like a salad

Aquarius January 20

-

February 18

When

comes

said Lombaert.

bles

include

came

spinach.

directly from the garden. However, creating a garden which produces a plentiful crop

warm up and

throughout the year can be a chal-

frost,

lenge.

Lettuce,

seeds can be planted and

(law and expose

how

always need to be

in

like their

ting others pitch in

makes things

control; leta

them thy,

Virgo

flaws

make them unwor-

you too have flaws, your

world with

set

everything has logic. Don’t

Pisces February

1

9

-

you see only what you'd

always judge things by your stan-

like to see.

dards, not everything has a text-

world you have created. Reality,

book explanation.

although

it

have. Try

to.

Don’t get lost in the

isn’t

perfect,

make

is all

the best of

are they planted, are

preferably

is

we

it.

a third-year

journalism student holding fate in the

palm of her hand.

with

a

minimum

hours of daylight, the

of soil

“You can

start to

prepare the

shouldn’t

or

will

be heavy and

muddy

com-

pact again. If this is the first

garden

cow

it

is

good

usually

time creating the

to use

composted

or sheep manure, black earth

and good composting. everything to the

mix the

and,

soil

While some vegetables are

around

mid-May.

some can continue

radishes,

parsley

beets,

and chives do well planted

at this

time.

Stage three occurs

May

producing

in

to produce until September to early October, so read the packaging for guidelines. Be sure to re-fertilize the garden late

to

during the year to ensure quality vegetables. Compost can be placed around plants and the nutrients will

planted

at this time including rosemary, thyme, tomatoes and cucum-

be released

bers.

ers such as Miracle-Gro

“New the

in late

gardeners should stick to

basics

like

carrots,

“It’s

radishes,

and corn," said

one of those things

when

rains or there

it

are granular water soluble fertiliz-

which can

be purchased.

Any uneaten vegetables

bug-attacked

or

should be put

into

Herbs are great for beginners because they can be purchased early, kept indoors and used for cooking before transplanting out-

a nutrition-rich fertilizer for next

side.

year.

A

turn

it

leftovers

wide selection of potted herbs can be purchased for $6.99 at

or

Belgian Nursery.

makes

Weather plays a big

regularly.

Add any

In the

eggshells, fruit

and foliage

peels,

to help create

event of bug infestations

fungicide natural

problems

Safers

insecticides

dening; certain crops will taste better

cides or there won’t be a crop

soil preparation.

if

but only use

soil

Different vegetables need to be

planted

at different

packaging

times and the

will identify

when

it

can

be planted. Stage one vegetables are able to

a

compost pile; people can either buy a composter or just make a pile ai\j

and break up all the large chunks. Planting can begin 24 hours after rototiller.

fin-

August,

late

mid-June when there is no longer a chance of frost. Everything can be

that takes practice.”

it

at once the planting needs to spaced out and repeated

be

ished

Lombaert.

soil

the vegetables don't

only light

and

warmer weather.” The texture of the

frost expected.

is

all

is

there

beets, beans, onions

rain

there

throughout the year.

soil

once we’ve had some

These vegetapeas and

onions,

if

To ensure

Stage two begins once the nights

ques-

all

new gardeners ask. Once a spot has been chosen,

using a

McCormick

when and

tions

Add

Tiffany

prepared, what

the soil

is

needs to be prepared for planting, said Rosie Lombaert, from Belgian Nursery in Breslau.

You aren't an idealist but rarely do you see what is in front of you. Instead,

How

eight

March 20

opinions and are a firm believer that

embarrassing

Do not treat people

Tvp

August 23 September 22 the

it,

no end.

harshness being one.

lot less stressful.

You view

to

come

May,

You are a friend to many but when someone upsets you, you go for blood. You find their tiniest

to

cates

of fresh herbs and vegetables that

teamwork you usually get an F as it isn't one of your best skills. You can be bossy and pushy when things don't go your way. You don't it

withstand a heavy frost and can be planted at the end of April or early

part in gar-

and grow bigger depending on it is a wet or dry season.

The

ideal time to plant is before a

light rain but it’s

very hard to pre-

Lombaert said. The Weather Network’s website has a garden forecast which indidict.

and

fungicides.

Sometimes you have them

if

to use pestileft,

there’s a prob-

lem. “It's

amazing how

fast

get bugs,” said Lombaert. there’s

you can

“One day

no bugs and the next they’re

everywhere.”


Feature

SPOKE,

— Page 9

2007

April 9,

Reaching out to those loss fortunate spend time at St. John’s Kitchen, located on Victoria Street, to talk to and connect with the homeless people in the community.

Outreach workers are a dedicated group who help the homeless and

many

“A

lot

of this has to do with rela-

“We need

to

show

he thinks the project

who

for the

homeless and

is

beneficial

commu-

their

community

care and want to help them

homeless

said helping the

in

this

manner

the

immediate problem, but helpcommunity as a whole

is

not only addressing

ing out the

access the services they are entitled to," said

nity.

He

homeless

the

there are people in the

Chaves.

in the

long run.

tionship building, so being a regular

others

presence

said.

“Of

sees

us

very important,” he

is

course,

a

as

not everybody

access services

body

to tell

support,

reliable

because you have to

By

Cliff Chaves, a first-year business

student at Conestoga College, said

them your

trust

some-

story.”

He said the workers spend much time promoting respect

SUMMER MCPHEE

as for

do trying to homeless to respect the community. "That’s not always an easy thing, because when you’re constantly being disrespected by your community you’re not going to respect them very much." Smith said his experience with the business community in downtown Kitchener for the most part has been really positive. “Most people respond well to me

the homeless as they

Everyday they walk the

downtown

Kitchener,

of

streets

distributing

backpacks, socks, long johns and boots to those in need.

"We are

are a buffer for people

who

consistently

or

periodically

homeless and the community, which isn't always particularly tol-

Rob Smith,

erant of them," said street

outreach worker

in

a

down-

town Kitchener. Smith spoke about his experience with the

downtown

street

outreach

worker project at a political coffee house on March 26, which was open to the public. The outreach group is dedicated to providing direction to individuals

suffering from

mental

addiction

homelessness,

alcohol and/or drug

illness,

downtown

the

in

individuals

to

is

who

those

going

in to their

see

support these

are in trouble and

“I’m glad the winter

is

behind

us,

means some of the peodo sleep on the streets, they it

to less

extreme

ele-

ments,” said Smith.

Early on

they do like they

or her to need this kind of help.

“I’m not saying

that

everybody

meet someone in the kitchen and you can’t figure out for the life of you why that person is “You’ll

who

exposed

if

need help to give us a call.” He added the workers take the time to look at what has happened in the individual’s life to cause him

social services.

will be

business, introduc-

someone who looks

there.”

ple that

are

ing myself and asking

help them access the services they need, but are having difficulty navigating, such as medical care or

because

who

has a horrible story,” said Smith.

Kitchener area.

Their goal

get

in the

day the workers

However, he said there are those

now **

*Jf

are dealt such an unfortunate

a good thing

is

hand, with a series of traumatic

the SPC Card gets you exclusive discounts

events.

“You still

can’t believe that person

around,

still

day and trying life,”

is

to

work out

hundreds of Canadian

at

showing up every-

said Smith.

come

today or

in

call

1-800-HRBLOCK

§

hrblock.ca

(Photo by Peggy O'Neill)

Individual results vary. apply.

Entertaining the

crowd

Waterloo-based band, Shady, played to a large crowd in uptown Waterloo at the Fox and the Fiddle, located at 77 King St. N., on March 31. The pub regularly features local bands, singers and

*To

Usage may be

qualify,

Offers valid from 08/01/06 until 07/31/07. Valid at participating locations in

restricted

when used

student must present either

identification card. Expires July 3

Block products or services

will

1 ,

(i)

in

a

conjunction with any other offer or

T2202a documenting 4

2007. Valid only at participating

or

retailer loyalty

more months

H&R

in

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may

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not increase chances of winning. Begins 2/1/07 and ends 5/1 5/07.

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question required for award of prize. See www.rockwithblock.ca for Official Rules and

Quebec and where

Canada

h&r block

card discounts. Cannot be used towards the purchase of

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or 13 or older and were full-time students for four or more months during 2006 at a high school, college

in

musicians.

retailers.

their

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to legal residents of

university.

There

will

to play without purchase.

be

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or

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OR WIN.

Canada (excluding Quebec

1

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random draw

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award the

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residents)

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who

are

prize. Skill testing

of winning vary based on participation. Void


.

Page 10

— SPOKE,

News

2007

April 9,

Remembering Vimy Ridge was 90 years ago today

It

By

A

SAMANTHA SAECHAO

special

mark

ceremony today

Battle of

Vimy

at

Vimy Memorial, which

the

in

of the

site

2004 and Battle

More Canada

9:45 a.m.

April 9,

1917.

By PEGGY O’NEILL

Canadian

all

Incredible

bravery and discipline

overran

infantry

along

the

The

the

front.

when

killed,

their

officers

Golden

first

Horseshoe

Business Challenge has been set

May

for

allowed the infantry to continue moving forward under heavy fire,

even

31

15,000

than

Germans

than 5,000 students from

May

battle

5:30 a.m. on

at

More

on

as well as the Queen and Prime Minister Stephen Harper will travel to the memorial to commemorate the 90th anniversary of

The Premier of Ontario will be hosting the ceremony and the min-

stormed the ridge

Vimy

sits

of

Ridge.

The event is being held at the Veteran’s Memorial wall (which was unveiled last summer) on the front lawn of Queen’s Park in Toronto starting

Canadian

called

National the

Ridge.

Canadians fought the great

France,

was constructed

will

the 90th anniversary of the

that

.

Casa

Larga

in Fairport, just

outside

31,

Vineyards

at

of Rochester, N.Y.

were

The business challenge is one component of the LaunchPad $50K

according to www.civiliza-

tion.ca.

Venture Creation Competition.

$50K

of finance, Jim Flaherty, will

considered a major, defining event

However, Canada paid a heavy price, with 3,600 Canadian soldiers killed and 7,000 wounded.

be representing the minister of vet-

in Canadian history because the Canadian Corps played a key role in the attack in the First World War, according to www.wikipedia.org.

The Canadian National Vimy Memorial sits atop of Vimy

Conestoga College, University of Guelph, Wilfrid Laurier University and University of Waterloo students who have a business plan they would like to jump-start. At the end of the competition

Ridge

cash prizes are given to the top

ister

the battle.

The

Canada. The lieutenant-governor of Ontario, the eran’s

affairs

premier of Ontario and the mayor of Toronto are also scheduled to

battle

of

Vimy Ridge was

Attacking together for the

speak.

There

is

also

a

memorial

first

in

France.

time, the four Canadian divisions

in

Founded

(Internet photo)

TEST

little anxiety before a test improves concentration and alertness, excessive worry, or test anxiety, will lower your test scores.

The brain is like a computer in that it contains a great deal of information, and this information is useless if you're not able to access it when you need it. Having test anxiety is a lot like not having the password to your computer: the information is there, but you can't get to it.

I

common

of the best, if not the best strategies for coping with test anxiety is preparation. Study enough so that you feel confident that you know the material. Then try to replace the worry and negative thinking with thoughts that are positive and relaxing. Some of the following suggestions may also help.

The

LaunchPad

designed

to assist

competition, and support the

creation

of businesses

western

Ontario,

south-

in

takes

place

in

Waterloo on May 9. The top two teams from LaunchPad $50K will

compete in the Horseshoe Business Challenge on May 3

Golden

1

University

partners

Start studying early. Students who are amply prepared for tests almost always perform better Than unprepared students. The night before a test is not the time to start studying, rather, it's the time to review because cramming just increases

relaxation techniques:

tension.

Start at the top of your head, flexing

and then

anxiety.

Get a good night's

sleep.

Buffalo,

in

N.Y., Ithaca, N.Y. and Rochester.

N.Y. have teamed up with the partners of LaunchPad $50K to make

Golden Horseshoe Business

Challenge possible

them along with the

The challenge

this year.

targeted toward

is

New York

entrepreneurs in Western

and Ontario. The will

first-place

winner

receive $100,000 in cash to

implement

their business plan.

This challenge

an opportunity

is

and support entrepreWestern New York and

to reach out

relaxing each part of your body.

Don't talk to others before the test,

warm sunshine washing over you, melting away the tension and relaxing all of your muscles. Close your eyes and visualize

as their anxiety

will

increase your anxiety.

neurs

in

southwestern Ontario and provide the

competitors

with

the

one

resource they need the most, the

access to start-up funding.

Mentally prepare yourself for the test. Know what to expect on the exam

your arms hang down at your sides. As you relax, visualize the tension from your head, neck, and shoulders flowing down your arms and out your fingertips. Close your eyes and

teams totalling $50,000, which goes toward launching each team’s business plan. Each team must consist of two students from two of the four institutions and they must play a meaningful role.

the

Take deep breaths, hold them, then slowly release

for

get the chance to

One

ANX ETY Try these

2005, LaunchPad

three

While a

MANAGING

in

a great opportunity

is

let

(which topics, chapters

etc.).

Close

your eyes and see your material.

Duncan Moore, entrepreneurship

vice provost of

at the

University

of Rochester, said the challenge

is

recognizing the potential for eco-

nomic growth in a broader region. “The Golden Horseshoe If noise distracts you,

Think of a place where you feel very relaxed and calm. Close your eyes and visualize being in

wear earplugs. If

that place. front

images

and turn your desk to face the

The more you practice positive thinking and relaxation techniques, the better you continue to have problems with test anxiety, talk to a counsellor.

Good luck on

distract you, sit at the

get. If

you

wall.

Business Challenge

is

the perfect

example of that ongoing cross-border collaboration,” he said.

Conestoga’s spokesperson

for

LaunchPad $50K is third-year management student, Keith McIntosh. His job is to make sure Conestoga informed about this opportunity by doing things such that all the students at

are

finals!

well

as organizing information booths,

Register for our

up signs and attending

putting

preparation workshops.

Learning

McIntosh

Making the Grade

Commons

Room 2A103 Hours of Operation: Monday & Wednesday 8:30 am— 5:30 pm Tuesday, Thursday & Friday 8:30 am— 4:00 pm

the

Golden

years.

Golden Horseshoe chal-

lenge,” he said. “I have high hopes

'When

in

Doubt, Pick

Website: Email:

the

exciting to be involved in

the first

'Tips for Success -

C

Http://www.conestogac.on.ca/jsp/stserv/learningcommons/index.jsp|

learningcommons@conestogac.on.ca

upcoming

“It is

Telephone: 519-748-5220 extension 2308

thinks

Horseshoe Business Competition is a great opportunity because it will help the expansion of the LaunchPad $50K Competition for

Tuesday, April 10 12-1 pm Thursday, April 12 12-1pm

for the competitors that advance from our LaunchPad competition." For more information on either contest, contact McIntosh at

organizer-conestogac@launchpad50k.ca or visit www.launchpad50k.ca.

(


.

News

SPOKE,

2007

April 9,

— Page 11

(Photos by Angelo Mazziotti)

Students gather,

right, for

the third annual Relay for Life cancer

March 31 at the University of Guelph. Above, two stustay warm. Below, Alyssa Vasko, vice-chairperson of holds up one of the T-shirts that were given to all partici-

fundraiser

dents

try to

finance,

Relay for Life shatters goal

pants.

By ANGELO MAZZIOTTI

$78,000, which is enough to run a highly productive cancer research

ties as well.

wonder of people helping people in Guelph on March 3 Upwards of 500 people, most of them students, walked, jogged and

is

skipped around the University of

Guelph track the

Pulling

for

1

2 straight hours.

ultimate

all-nighter,

they took part in the third annual

Relay for Life, benefiting the Canadian Cancer Society. Firstyear agriculture student Jared Tyler

was

all

smiles after the overnight

event.

“I’m going on adrenaline and about a half dozen energy drinks,” said Tyler while jumping up and down. “When can I do this again, sign me up right now.” It wasn’t all laughs and caffeine,

able to raise over

Vasko.

shed during the evening’s

The freezing cold temperatures and threatening rain clouds could not put a damper on the magic and 1

“We were

however, as quite a few tears were

Holmes

Elizabeth

heart-rending

a

story

everyone what a

relay

real threat

my

for

told

remind

to

and what a big role many of our lives. “I

festivi-

it

lab for a

whole

cancer

every

has

difference.”

in

The amount

grandfather,

I

year.

bit really

little

that

does make

a-

raised surpassed the

Students

of $65,000.

goal

shows

It

also

said

completely shattered last year’s total of $57,000, something that

tion.

Vasko says

relay for hope,

I

relay for a cure,”

Holmes, overcome with emoThere was not a dry eye in the crowd. Candles were lit and placed along the inner edge of the track as a memorial to the souls of lost loved ones students wanted to remember on their relay. With the candlelit

a real testament to the and students

is

heart of volunteers alike.

“We in

have surpassed our

set goal

years to date,” said

three

all

Vasko. “The students that come out have a passion and want to

really

any way the^ can. It hours by

backdrop, the evening was underway. Vice-chairperson of finance,

do

Alyssa Vasko, had nothing but

thankless

praise for those in attendance.

something like this possible. We wouldn’t be standing out here

truly

“It

is

amazing how much

money we were

able to raise in

such a short period of time,” said

their part in

also

countless

takes

volunteers

make

to

freezing our noses off

if

it

wasn't

for them.”

ROGERS

Club hopes to raise AIDS awareness

Your World Right

Now

10.

By HOLLY FEATHERSTONE The far

surreptitious spread of

exceeds efforts against

its

AIDS

“There are powerful steps that Conestoga (can take).” HIV/AIDS is the most prevalent

trans-

humanitarian crisis today, responsi-

mission, though four enthusiastic

ble for 28.2 million deaths since

Conestoga students are striving to increase awareness of the global

discovery.

epidemic.

on the individual, the family and the economy in terms of employ-

Second-year

BSCN

students

Amy Howard

and Stacy Crown hosted an Acting on AIDS meeting March 26 in hopes of launching an on-campus club to both raise awareness and funds for AIDS relief efforts.

The

disease takes an adverse

its

toll

ment, education, health-care services

and productivity. of children

Millions

are

left

orphaned, women affected are often enfeebled and therefore, unable to pursue employment

H«uard and Crown, along with pe^Panelle Berg and Maria Good,

opportunities, and

ran with the notion of starting a club

poor health.

men

are often

absent from the labour force due to

with the support of World Vision

“That’s a lot of people affected,"

and inspiration from other Christian

Howard. “We have the power do something about it.” She said they will try to increase

missionary

AIDS

relief

and devel-

opment campaigns in the U.S. The meeting featured a slideshow presentation of startling statistics

and information regarding existing

World Vision-backed campaigns against AIDS, complete with host Amy Howard’s aspirations for the club. Free pizza and beverages were provided for “I just

all

attendants.

heard about (AIDS

relief)

chapters starting in the U.S. and realized like

we could do something

that

here,”

said

Howard.

said to

awareness of the club’s existence around campus, in the interest of

gamering members, before engaging in any major fundraising activities. “We’re hoping to dive in through the fall,” said Howard. Tentatively, the club has planned a T-shirt campaign and fundraiser for the fall term entitled, I am Not a Number. The campaign is intended numbers of to represent how orphaned children have increased

AIDS

STATISTICS

Day, Dec.

Currently,

hopes

There are 9,000 new HIV infections every day There are 14 million I orphans in the sub-Saharan region, where AIDS is most

I

to

said the club

who want

to entice students

make

becoming

a difference by

members. “We do need the support,” she said, “and if we can’t have that, we

dream

said her

is

“that

HIV/AIDS causes 8,200 deaths a day (the equivalent

come and do something about AIDS" as well

on the World

as the advent of facilitating greater

I

of three attacks

over the years due to the losses of

women

to

Howard.

AIDS

relief

subsidize

the

cost

better

health-care

services

event to deliberately have only a

percentage of students wearing the vivid orange shirts early in the week and once the

tion

increase.

representa-

begins with a student

able for purchase on campus, the

number of wearers will “It’s more of a visual tion of

how orphan

increasing,” said

The club

also

populations are

Howard. has plans for a

at Stake event in the fall term as well as promoting World

Lives are

campaigns within AIDS-affect-

ed countries.

lizes a

campus

to

who mobi-

awaken a com-

munity to change the world.” For further information and club

membership

inquiries, contact con-

estoga.acting.on.aids@gmail.com.

Fergie

4.

Irreplaceable - Beyonce

5.

On The -

6.

7.

My System

(feat. T-Pain)

Bow Wow

Poppin' Chris

Brown

Rock Yo Hips -

9.

Hotline

Pretty Ricky

Outta

Crime

This -

Is

Mob

Why

I'm Hot (Chorus)

MIMS

You -

Such changes begin with us, the more affluent societies. As stated as part of the Acting on AIDS campaign branch of World Vision, “It

readily avail-

Glamorous -

of such

things as drilling water wells, pro-

ing supplies and hastening preven-

become more

3.

8.

for children, distributing food-grow-

shirts

Don't Matter

can

weeklong

certain

2.

-

viding

help

of

through World Vision

funds

the intention of the

Cupid's Chokehold - Gym Class Heroes

-

acquisition

“(Orphans) are kids that have lives and we want to promote that said school,” throughout the It is

of April 2

1.

involved as well.

The

AIDS.

Week

students have a place to

awareness throughout the commuhaving K-W citizens nity by

Trade Center)

RealTrax™ ring tunes

can’t continue (the club).”

Howard

threatening

1.

Howard

Lloyd

Text "PLAY” to 4800 on your Rogers wireless

phone to download your favourite

ring tunes today.

^


|

Page 12

— SPOKE,

April 9,

2007

lost chance for

CradPhotH You have one

last

chance to get your Grad

Photos taken at your Graduation Ceremony.

No

up required,

sign

CSI

Visit the

room 2A 06 1

office,

for details

CONEST O G A STUDENTS INC

I

th

June

th

and 14

13

/

301*1 tttg

BH TEAM

Sow HIRING F0R PAU. 2007 SEi-P

serve supervisor

The CSI

5-6 part-time individuals for September 2007 to May 2008 serve area. This position pays $9.29/hr and be between 5 -24 hours per week.

is hiring

to assist students the self

hours

will

Requirements

DyiiesJjoelyilei

Handling Cash Selling event tickets Assisting students with binding, photocopying, laminating and

• • •

Customer Service Experience

Experience with handling small amounts of cash Familiar with photocopiers, binding machine and laminator and faxing an asset Experience with computers and all Microsoft software programs an asset Must qualify for work study.

faxing.

Responding

to general inquires

The hours

:

be Monday to Thursday 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Friday 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Extra hours during the day may be needed during peak times throughout the semester. These extra hours will be flexible around your timetable. will

RECEPTIONISTS The CSI

requires 2 receptionists starting

September 2007 - May 2008. The

pay for this position is $9.29/hour and you will receive 5-24 hours per week. These hours are flexible and work around your class schedule. rate of

Duties: •

Respond

Collect

Photocopying and faxing Input data into excel spreadsheet

to

and

walk

in inquiries

distribute mail

Filing

Requirements • Accurate typing per minute •

skills

of

60 -70 words

Knowledge with Microsoft Excel a

definite

asset •

Ability to file alphabetically

Must

qualify for

work study

TECHNICIAN CSI is seeking a sound technician for events and nooners in the Sanctuary. Candidates should be familiar with sound boards, audio visual and microphones. The rate of pay for this position is $11. 19/hour.

Drop

off

your resume to room 2A106 or

email tojrenwick@conestogac.on.ca by April 13 th

2007 or visit www.conestogastudents.com

for

more information


Spoke20070409