Page 1

Getting a Wii

The nature

bit

healthier The new Nintendo game console helps people maintain a healthy

lifestyle

and

have

fun.

still

Monday, March

5,

Criminals on campus!

LASA A

learning

newsroom

for

journalism students

at

students play cops and robbers annual consolidation exercise.

39th Year

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

Conestoga College, Kitchener, Ont.

2007

of political things

David Suzuki says Stephen Harper ‘doesn’t have a green bone in his body.’

Yvfi' f%\ fjf

Conestoga takes the plunge for Heart and Stroke By ERIC MURPHY Conestoga students braved the winter elements as they went for a quick dip in the college pond to

raised $4,700

dren’s pool

Kathy Gauci, the area co-ordinator and Stroke Foundation in Waterloo Region, said Conestoga

research

ence,” she said.

for the Heart

did an excellent job as usual.

Stroke Foundation Feb. 15. Even with -20 C weather on top

year 26th the is “This Conestoga has participated in this event,” she said. “While we’re

of the bone-chilling water, students made the Polar Plunge another suc-

still waiting for some outstanding pledges to come in, students have

raise

money

for

the

Heart and

Twenty-five brave souls participated Inc.

made

cess, raising $4,700.

in

which will go to and education in our community.” Lindsay Silva, the event programmer for Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI), which organizes the Polar Plunge,

said

the

students’

enthusiasm was amazing. “Having the plunge in the pond this year instead of a little chil-

the 26th annual Polar Plunge, held by Conestoga Students

on Feb. 15. They raised $4,700, with some pledges

still

to

come.

a huge differ-

“We had

25 out of were signed up bear the freezing water and everyone watching loved it. It wouldn’t have been such a success without all the help and support of the peo-

40 students

that

ple involved.”

Continued on Pages 10 and 11

Photos by Eric Murphy and Meghan Kreller

— No. 8


Page 2

— SPOKE, March

5,

2007

FTkTl

9 PM

i

Sanctuary HarchaliSJ


News

Now Random

questions answered by

random students

By CHRISTOPHER MILLS

If you could star in any

TV show

what would it be and why?

an opt-out?

Renwick Conestoga

summer,

Every

Julia Alvarado,

order to

was

fee

that

This past

plan.

$209.50

who

process, but there are glitches that

making students wonder if is a more efficient way to do Lichty,

second-year

a

a little tiring that I’m not back money that would really come in handy considering the disgusting amount of debt I’m "Not only that, but in,” she said. this is the time of year when I’m stressed out most with school work and the last thing I want to do is go “It gets

information

technology

support services

argue

“The OC, because they live soap opera lives just like me, so I’d fit in.”

Michelle Martelli,

second-year advertising

about getting the

...

money

I

definitely deserve.”

CSI

Janie Renwick,

man-

office

ager and interim general manager, said if a student switches from fulltime to part-time status, or provides the college with incorrect mailing information, then could be delayed.

“Other than

that,

their

I

cheques

don’t see a rea-

son for them not getting

it,”

she said.

Lichty’s issue raises a common question regarding the health plan:

would

be better

it

if

the college

used an opt-in policy, rather than

“Trailer

Park Boys, so

can be part

Andy Zippel, firstyear materials and

many people

you

are

on the plan?”’ she said. we need 6,000 students, so they give us a rate based on 6,000 students, regardless of whether they opt out or not. And it’s a cheaper rate that way. For a student to pay $200 for a year for health plan covputting

“We

say

erage, that

really cheap.”

is

Lee Evans, a third-year journalism student at the college, is on the opposite’side of things from Lichty. She had issues with opting her children into the plan. "I went down Feb.

the enrollment

we

tell

it

our students

"What when you put

is,

student gets a rejection

If a

mit. ter,

confirmed by

is

she said.

list,"

me

and the insurance company.

they bring

to

in to

it

timing issue, 'that's

Evans

a

was not long things

how

would take. "What really puzzles me do they hold on

It’s

all.”

she

said

informed about

let-

send

I

why

is

to all those appli-

cations? If that’s their policy, they

need

to let

said.

“I

know

people

opted

my

that," she

kids in so

I

could

and paid the pro-rated amount to opt them in at that point in the year and the gentleman from CSI said it would be a few days until it was processed,” she said. “I took them for an appointment Wednesday (Feb. 7) and the claim didn't go

take them to the dentist and get

through.” Evans returned to her dentist the following week and the claim still She was would not process. informed the information still had

processed

day the put

not been sent from the college.

plan, they’re covered.

went down (to the health office) this morning and the guy says ‘well, January’s have already gone in, they go in at the end of January. February’s usually don't go in until the end of the month there,” Evans

but until they receive that card in

1

“I

There

By STEPHANIE IRVINE

is

no funding linked

to this

area.

manager

Obviously; if it was an service. emergency, 1 would have gotten

them

treated regardless, but for a

routine examination,

it could have waited a couple weeks.”

Renwick

said

the applications

all

and

opt-ins

for

opt-outs

are

September, January and February, and all students are informed of that. students just assume the

"Some

the

in

They

everything

mail,

submit,”

family on the

their

Renwick

we

students,

is

pay and lot of

said.

“A

them

that,

tel!

are,

but

with everything that's going on. they just forget.”

is

Right,

so

I

can

spin the big wheel.”

Sabrina Shiwpershad,

can do

is

1,”

he said. “All you you can be."

KPI

administered

in the

surveys fall

satisfaction

and employer

tion data are all collected

were

want

satisfac-

nursing

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!

tool),

but

I

Mullan said typically this means anywhere from 3,800 to 4,000 students out of 6,000 at Conestoga's

Doon campus

take pail in the

surveys every year. “This is a very

number

accurate

reliable

Students

who don’t

take part in or

vice-president offinance and

do have other ways

administrative sendees at

Conestoga College

and

said.

don't qualify for the

'

KPI

(for results),” he

Kevin Multan,

surveys

KPI surveys have their

to

voices heard.

"This

is

just

back tools Mullan.

at

one of many feedthe

college,”

said

“That way, students can take a holistic view of things,” said Kevin Mullan, vice-president of

“KPI is the most formalized and encourage comprehensive, but

KPI are used to distribute government transfer payments amongst colleges, also known as

finance and administrative services

come up

at

Conestoga College, and also a founding member of the KPI steer-

ordinator or chair.”

performance-based funding. The fourth, student satisfaction data, is collected through college-administered surveys and calculated by Forum Research.

ing committee.

ference between

Mullan said students may feel pressured to give positive feedback about their school if they knew there was funding associat-

third place in the

Association of Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology of

first-year practical

ships, etc.

though

to the

Melissa Richardson

continuing education, apprentice-

comprehensive

or chair.”

conducted by Compustat Consultants. According

telephone

formalized and

of 1998 and

focus on four separate areas. Graduate employment, graduate

eli-

Students must be full-time, beyond their first semester and cannot be in

the most

encourage students to address issues as they come up with their program co-ordinator

be the best

first

is

(feedback

surveys that just took place. “It’s hard to say if that will have an impact, but we don’t go out try-

The first-year nursing

“KPI

between college administration and CSI over the past few months won’t affect the outcome of the Key Performance Indicator (KPI)

ing to be No.

ed with the survey. He added not all students are

gible to participate in the surveys.

Conestoga College president John Tibbits said in a recent interview he’s hoping the issues

“Price

I

they say ‘how

actually a student

is

Conestoga, which

College hopes to stay on top

of the big

“House because to be a nurse.”

we have to con-

I

dirty.”

operations

February opt-

in until after the

your family on the plan, until you receive a card from the insurance company, everything is pay and sub-

getting

second-year

ment

out deadline because

offer this service to our students,’

cheque.

Adam Degier,

student.

opt-in

money back. On the surface, would seem like a simple

their

journalism student at the college, said she opted out of the health plan well before the deadline and still has not received her first

with Jesus.”

To wait for students to would take time that isn’t

a wait.

is

can’t send our family enroll-

at

Cara

got to do

"We

firm the student

don’t

things.

It’s

but sometimes there

receive a discounted rate for each

“One of the reasons they do that is because when you go to an insurance company and say ‘we’d like to

there

cartoon.

up the plan and

set

1

available.

Traditionally, students

arise,

“David and Goliath, the

prior to the start of each year in

when I paid?”' Renwick said everyone gets reimbursed for the money they spend,

Feb.

want the coverage, or who are covered elsewhere, can opt out of the plan by a set deadline and receive this

second-year nursing

number of stucompany

ing year and discover a fee for the

($104.75 per semester).

can be a nurse and not have to actually do the job.”

in a fixed

dents to the insurance

year,

I

send

to

“So I’m thinking to myself ‘why wouldn’t you have said that on

said.

said the college needs

College students look over their tuition statements for the upcomschool’s health

“ER, because

— Page 3

2007

5,

Student health plan source of frustration

deep thoughts

Conestoga College

...with

SPOKE, March

Ontario

(ACAATO)

website, these

three

more

I

students to address issues as they

with their program co-

Tibbits said there isn’t first,

much

dif-

second and

KPI ratings. “Even when we've been rated it’s like you’re always lookNo. 1

ing over your shoulder," he said.


Page 4

— SPOKE, March

5,

Commentary

2007

ads

Anti-Liberal

are a joke, or are they? When

saw

first

I

Liberal party.

I

they aired, and

the Conservative

thought

was

it

realized that this

I

TV

ads attacking the

But time and time again slander was supposed to be

a joke.

considered legitimate political advertising. On a show like This Hour has 22 Minutes, these ads might have been construed as humorous. Airing political mudslinging masquerading as political advertising is not, and should not be acceptable. or permissible. According to Stephen Harper. Stephane

Dion

is

“not a leader." Whether or not this

is

true is not really

the point here. It's

sad the Conservatives have so

little

political

ground

to

stand on that they feel the need to

degrade their

maliciously

opposition.

The

time

last

checked, the

I

purpose of political advertisements was to advertise your party’s political campaign. ads Therefore, a party’s should be centred on their ous policies and platforms. Crazy idea, I know.

My

It’s sad the Conservatives have so little political ground to stand on that they feel the

need to maliciously degrade their

vari-

opposition.

campaign repeatedly shows Dion saying that the Liberals must “get back into power as soon as possible," interspersed between sections of anti-Liberal propafavourite ad in this

ganda. I

The Tories should

ry tool, but this

The same

is

is

a powerful and effective

memo-

Despite the tardiness of

Dion

is

used no

less than four times in a 30-

second ad. This vain repetition takes away from the seriousness of the piece, as it makes it seem like something you would see on a comedy show like This Hour Has 22 Minutes, instead of being part of a legitimate advertising campaign. Try as we may, we haven't forgotten about you, so why must you shove your anti-Liberal mudslinging in our face? The only thing this campaign will accomplish is wasting taxpayers’ time and money. It is situations such as these which would seem to justify the implementation and enforcement of laws which control when parties and candidates can launch advertising campaigns. Perhaps these kind of laws could have stifled the insult to democracy that is the anti-Liberal ad campaign. Or, perhaps Canadian politicians are just doing what their American counterparts have been doing for years. The Americans might call this kind of unprofessional advertisements, “freedom of speech,” or even “fair,” because other American parties also air these kinds of ads. Whether or not something is fair does not make it right. Canadian politicians need to return to some sense of decency and honesty.

and

playful pastimes,

full

of potential

piles

of frozen precipitation as annoy-

ing

as

my

winter woes could

fill

a

football stadium, the following are

my

minutes

cold brushing, scrap-

in the

ping and chipping away the ice and

muck

off your car before

out

no walk

is

9.

Wet

feet

it

8.

Whether

snow bank,

affect both

to be as sure-footed as a

well-being.

mountain goat when walking on Canada’s ice-covered 5.

ice,

only to

and then

in the

it

house or

too hot.

is

car,

not count on

Mother Nature in the

iris

we

can-

snow - This backbreaking burden is far more difficult Shovelling

endure than

its

would make even

summer

cousin.

is

letters to the

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

editor. Letters

contacted

for verification.

letters will

be published. 500 words. to edit any letter

Letters should be no longer than

Spoke

reserves the right

for publication.

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

N2G 4M4

most delicious

handsome hunks look like five-year-old kids. Guys, good luck

trying to pick

up

a

honey while wear-

ing a toque and a pair of mukluks. 4.

to

Driving

in the

snow - Compared

our neighbouring Hamilton and

less era 1 .

the season indoors,

outside to

hoping heat up

anticipating it

will

my

are

arc usually hastily hustling

our next heated

roads

any

we

spend most of

and the time we

habitat.

For these reasons and more.

main

have

work or

In order to avoid

we

the winter weather,

cleaned off before noon. Not to men-

to

home

With spending

of the dark ages.

Being locked up -

left

seems

leave the get

school, the winter seems to be an end-

never

regions,

in the dark.

We we

the only daylight time at

Waterloo

Halton

I

am

global

warming,

my

rescue and

come

to

winter blues.

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College Editor:

No unsigned

the

that

-

the dark and

from work

divas and

to set the

winter months.

number

of winter clothing

in

a breeding

our physical and mental

Left in the dark

house

terrain.

Bundling up - Talk about what

articles

2.

is

of diseases which

all sorts

Spoke

welcome

Spoke welcomes

and then some, winter

face-first in a

the

day and even Seasonal Affective

ground for

end up

we have

flu.

from being inside

Disorder (SAD), for these ailments

- Unless we want

not to wear. There are quite a

a puddle incognito.

to get

in the cold.

Slipping on ice

of

temperature 7.

6.

you head

The temperature game - First

too cold,

done

we have

the lawn, and

- Stepping onto what

really

is

it

Getting sick - Colds, the

sniffles, allergies all

mowing

in the park.

appears to be a sheet of find out

removal on the property. 3.

to

Cleaning the car - Spending five

0.

Richmond Opinion

top 10 reasons for despising the

snowy season. 1

haphazardly due to a lack of snow

pimple on prom night.

a

Although

no parking spots

BJ

see the plentiful

1

is

since everyone else had to park so

left

beautiful, clean

getting to the college

finally

tion.

only to find there

finally arrived.

to

Letters are

this sea-

snow has

While some people see snow as

ridiculous.

clip of

to the pros

Hurry up global warming son’s winter weather, the

understand that repetition

comedy

stick to legit advertising and leave the

Dr.,

Meghan

Kreller

Advertising Managers: Adam Hannon, Tiffany McCormick Spoke Online Editor: Brandon Walker Production Managers: Adam Black, BJ Richmond Circulation Manager: Kristin Grifferty Photo Editors: Jessica Blumenthal, Nick Casselli, Jon Molson, Eric Murphy and Tara Ricker Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca Website: www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed: a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters must not contain any libellous statements.


News

SPOKE, March

2007

5,

— Page 5

X-rated bingo

draws a crowd Safe sex promoted at event By TARA RICKER

participate.”

Bingo X-rated? Some may view as so, especially

it

when

sex toys

Other than the one complaint, was nothing but positive comments from students around there

are involved.

the college toward the event, she

Conestoga College students had a chance to spice up their Valentine’s Day thanks to Sex Toy Bingo, an Conestoga event hosted by Students Inc. (CSI), which took place on Feb. 14 in the Sanctuary. “The event was a great success and we could not have asked for a

said.

better turnout,” said

Roxy

Stanciu,

CSI's vice-president.

“CSI puts on a wide

vari-

ety of activities that

may

feels that

our activities

one

of

then they don’t have to participate.”

vice-president

Committee

ject

everyone was

in support of the event, after they from a stureceived a complaint dent's parent prior to the event.

Stanciu said the parent stated that she thought the event was inappropriate

may

that

activities

variety of

not appeal to

everyone,” said Stanciu. “If some-

one feels is

one of our

that

activities

offensive then they don’t have to

CSI

flips

Some

is

to

become educated on

is

by talking about

Mena,

Kristina

(Photo by Meghan Kreller)

Susan

Mena

shock when they attempt to use their student cards to pay for pho-

CSI has changed the method of payment, opting to return to the coin-operated system. students thought the

Himmelman,

vice-president of the Alumni Association, and Monica

By

Hundreds of days were ened on Feb. 14 thanks Alumni Association’s Alumni with Sealed

ACCKWA.

because

it

is

beneficial

able to discuss

is it

annual Kisses

of love 300 cellophane-wrapped

an open man-

carnations were sold to Conestoga

to

and ask

in

in

and

this to let

director of

the price of flowers has

staff.

know Monica

people

said

here,”

Himmelman,

the

important to be

everywhere it

to

director of develop-

ment and alumni relations. “It’s way to do it.” Customers paid $2.50 for a red, white or pink carnation, which were sold just inside of Doors 3 and 5.

just a fun

(SWAK)

who

shy,

questions. is

“We do we are

bright-

today’s

out of their shells

“Sex

students, faculty

flower sale. For more than 10 years, SWAK has been a Valentine’s Day initiative in order to raise awareness of alumni services. On this year’s day

allows individuals

would normally be too

society and

MEGHAN KRELLER

said

community edu-

Bingo

Himmelman

said that in years

used to make money from the event. However, now that past they

gone up,

they either break even or will put

some money

into the initiative if

necessary.

“We wanted to keep it affordable for students,” she said. “It's not about raising money, it's about raising awareness.”

Even when

the event turned a

money always made

profit the

way back

to the college

its

and the

students, via student bursaries, for

example, said Himmelman.

ner,” she said.

was more convenient,” CSI president Matt Jackson said. The student card system that was used was like a gift card. Students could put

|Q &sgg|

to coin-operated photocopiers

and the photocopying

money on

then swipe

tocopies.

left,

Alumni flowers bring smiles

said holding an event like

Toy

Sex

Milton,

development and alumni relations, sold carnations inside Door 5 on Valentine’s Day. Three hundred red, pink and white carnations were sold to Conestoga students, faculty and staff.

a sub-

it,”

coin system

students could be in for a

“We found

a

cation co-ordinator for

back

MCNANNEY

By ALEX

of

important because the only

break

and offensive. “CSI puts on a wide

AIDS

Cambridge, Kitchener, Waterloo and Area (ACCKWA) were also present at the event promoting safe sex. They quizzed students on their safe sex knowledge and were sell-

way that not

was bro-

tie

by applause and Griffiths ended up winning the game and went home

sex

CSI found

The

ken by the two students vocally reenacting their best orgasm. The crowd voted for the winner

ing packages containing condoms and lubricants for $1. “Getting students to talk about

Roxy Stanciu, CSI

shouted out bingo

simultaneously.

Representatives from the

If

offensive

is

who

students

with a handful of X-rated goodies.

not appeal to everyone.

someone

Some of the prizes that were handed out consisted of lubricants, sexy dice and vibrators. Keshia Griffiths, a first-year accounting student, was one of two

it

at

their card

machine

to pay the fee. Jackson said there was another reason why CSI decided to make

“Our revenues from the photowere down from where they were when the coin-operated system was in place,” Jackson said. He added they put up flyers to warn students who had put money on their cards, and have been flexible with people coming in to ask

copiers

about their money. Janie Renwick,

the change.

CSI

office

man-

ager and interim general manager, said any students who haven't

claimed their money can still go CSI, and they will talk with them try

and resolve the

But,

she

feels

to to

f Top 10 RealTrax™ ring tunes

issue.

students

have been able to get

in

should

before the

Feb. 21 deadline. “We put up signs two weeks in advance, so students

have had ample time."

Week 1

.

I

-

2.

Akon

Ice -

3.

of February 19

Wanna Love You Box

Omarion

Irreplaceable Beyonce

-

4.

Lips of an Hinder

Angel

-

program lends a hand

IT

to

women

low-income

5.

-

6.

By

PEGGY O’NEILL

in

an entry level position

in

the

information technology sector. In

a

2002 Conestoga College began the

Ontario

Directorate,

which

with

partnership

Women's

allows the college to run a 42-

week,

funded

program

IT

women. The Information Training for

Women

designed to help

Technology program is

women

obtain

number of including Windows, Word,

fundamental areas

for

skills in a

Connie Boyd, program co-ordinator, said the program is strictly for low-income women who are entering or re-entering the workforce,

unemployed

or

under-

employed. “For women to apply for funding, they must provide me with their 'total family gross income’ from last year,”

From

Boyd

said.

there the Ontario

Women’s

Excel, Access, PowerPoint, health

Directorate has an income eligibil-

and safety, electrical/electronics, customer service, networking, job search and technical documenta-

ity criteria chart

tion. It

provides the students with the

skills

needed

to

become employed

which determines

whether a prospective student qualifies or not.

The program has a capacity of 1 women and Boyd said the next intake will be April 23.

“We

also hope to have a Sept. 10,

2007 intake

“For me, this

means can I

buy a house eventually rather than wondering

how am

I

going to pay

next month’s

to

bill?”

mother of three

A+

emerge with

8.

computer hardware and the promise of a $40,000-a-year job on a computer desk, in administration

spend 32 a classroom pushing

18 students will in

Promise

who

three,

is

a sin-

has

been

through intense Internet training, customer service and computer hardware. After that they head out on a 10-

September.

McNichol has a lot of enthusiasm and drive, which are imporprogram and reach

through their set

goals.

“For me, this means I can buy a house eventually rather than wondering how am I going to pay next

month’s

-

Rich

bill?” she said.

D's

Boy

Money

Text “PLAY" to

enrolled in the IT program since

the

Bow Wow

Throw Some

- Lil'

Jodi McNichol, 31,

mother of

Ciara

Shortie Like Mine -

9.

10.

or in an office.

tant if students are to get

The weeks

7.

accreditation

in

gle

Jodi McNichol, single

is

Poppin' Chris Brown

-

an industry-wide

Hotline

Pretty Ricky

-

week job placement. Their end goal

as well.”

On The

In

The Bank

Scrappy

4800 on your Rogers wireless

phone to download your favourite

ring tunes today.


— SPOKE, March

Page 6

5,

News

2007

Students rewarded MEGHAN KRELLER

By

encouraged students

for beating the blues

to visit their

booth.

lucky

Thirty

received

students

prizes after visiting the atrium

on

Feb. 14.

Counselling

second

services’

annual Beat the Blues event attract-

shake things up a may be feeling a little down,” said Casey. “We have a lot of great information to help students get excited and up

“The event

is

to

time. where people

bit at a

ed visitors with catchy island music, information on self-care and a chance to win one of many prizes sponsored by various areas

again.”

in the college.

nizing signs of depression and sea-

Counsellors encouraged students hand-outs on subjects such

to take

as

ways

to nurture yourself, recog-

“We were just thrilled witlj the we got from the school

sonal affective disorder. Casey said

Rick Casey, Conestoga counsellor and member of the Beat the Blues com-

event, around mid-terms and right

response for

the

raffle

prizes,”

said

mittee.

“Everyone was very supportive.”

Prizes from the raffle included

it

was a perfect time

to hold the

dead of winter. “People can react negatively to things like stress and lack of sunin the

he said. Beat the Blues was held in the atrium this year to try and get stulight,”

more familiar with

new

gift certificates to

Chartwell’s and

dents

Tim Hortons, two

extra-large piz-

area of the college and counselling

new

the

Casey

from O.T.’s sports bar, two movie passes from CSI, 2 Maple Leaf tickets from alumni services and T-shirts and water bottles from

“Anything we can do to get students down here and become

the bookstore.

he said.

zas

The

however, wasn't the reason three counsellors raffle,

only

services'

facilities,

familiar with the

new

“We want

area

is

said.

great,”

our serv-

to get

ices out there so students don’t feel

awkward

(Photo by Meghan

down.

feeling

asking."

Kretter)

Rick Casey, Joan Magazine and Lynn Robbins White are all counsellors at the college and on the committee for Beat the Blues, an initiative that focuses on self-care at a time when students may be

Forgiveness the theme of Amnesty Day By VANESSA BUTLER

tre.

"The students have so much on minds;

their

Around this time of year, things can get pretty hectic. Tests and essays need to be written, exams need to be studied for, projects need to be completed and library books need to be returned. During the hustle and bustle of the school day, a student can easily forget the due date of their borrowed library book. To help out the learning resource centre held Amnesty Day on Feb. 14. "Things are stressful around this time of year, and we want to show

how much we

students

them,”

works desk

Sue

said at

in the

the

think of

Czubak,

who

circulation/reserve

learning resource cen-

this

is

our way of

Day took place on Feb. 14. When asked why Amnesty Day

material that

was held on Valentine’s Day, Czubak said, “Everybody deserves

appreciating them.”

on Valentine's Day.” you missed returning your overdue items on this day, you can avoid fines and renew borrowed material in the future by going

to be spoiled

“The students have so much on their minds, this is our way of appreciating them.” Site Czubak,

learning resource centre staff

The word amnesty means forgiving. On

traditionally

Feb. 14, students could return their overdue

books and not pay

library

This year, the

fines.

Amnesty

ever

first

$2, depending

on the type of was loaned out. The LRC is also open on Saturdays from 1-4 p.m.; if a student has a book due on the weekto

end,

If

it is

expected

“Overall, there

response,” said library

technician at the learning

do with the lack of publicity the event was given, but we’ll definitely do it again next year.” Macfie said just over 12 students

different activi-

one hefty fine of $ 8 being forgiven. She said it is important students bring back their borrowed material on time, so other students have

ties so that there is something for everyone regardless of what kind of workout you are looking for.

and you tend

And

Conestoga student, you're automatically equipped with a free membership so you might as well

collegiate

take full advantage of

minton for intercollegiate athletics, and flag football to co-ed volley-

as a

The

it.

centre holds special classes

on each day of the week. Monday through Thursday, to give as

much

equal opportunity and access to

many

to

For those of you

who

work-

own

pace,

and members. Classes range from an intense hour-long Cardio Pump workout to a core strengthening workout like pilates. The centre also offers open skating on Mondays from 12-2 p.m. Katie McCartney, who works at the front desk in the centre, said that despite the availability of open skating there are not an over-

there are the centre’s cardio, weight

whelming number of

www.conestogac.on.ca.

and Nautilus rooms and the college even has personal trainers available

you if necessary. Conestoga College’s recreation

to help

much more

to

offer

most students know. For more information and the centre's

than

hours line

call their at

information hot-

519-748-3565 or

it.

poses in front of a Valentine’s Day card written to the students on Amnesty Day.

Job!

FIELD OF STUDY

AND SECURE YOUR DREAM

JOB!

Positions Available -

1:00pm E WING

-

1:00pm E WING

& March 22, 2007

@ 10:00

Job

Fair Preparation Tips

Visit the Career .Services office to pick up an like to

your

the

bad-

out after a class

at

YOUR

H7T71 @ 10:00

inter-

ball for intramurals.

centre has

IN

Summer & Co-op

March 21, 2007

and intramural sports you can join. Sports range from

women's indoor soccer

in

learning resource centre,

JOB FAIR

have a more com-

variety as possible to the students

participants.

Graduate,

skating really isn’t your thing

petitive streak there are

(Photo by Vanessa Butter)

Sue Czubak, who works

1

at the

it would be really great to see more students coming out," she said.

to

to

Need a Job? Get a

but

If

it

took advantage of the day, with only

EMPLOYERS WANT YOU! MEET WITH BUSINESSES

many

had

from a home computer with a PIN number. Students can receive their PIN from the circulation desk in the LRC. Students can also leave a voice message with the LRC, or renew their material in person as long as they have their student card. For every day that a book is overdue, a student will be charged a late fee that ranges from 50 cents

“There are a few regulars who always come out Mondays to skate,

Conestoga College’s recreation

a lot of

Macfie, a

resource centre. "I think

at rec centre centre offers

Mandy

online. Students can access the site

Diversity offered By CARA LICHTY

to be returned.

was not

visit

Employer Guidebook and get available positions

&

Have your Resume and Cover and have

lots

the inside

scoop on

businesses attending

'N

cA

CONESTOGA Connect

Lite

and laammfl

Letter critiqued,

CAREER SERVICES

of copies on hand

Dress for success to make a great

first

Network on your ow-n instead of in stand out from the crowd

impression

a group, and

Your 1st Step To Employment Success! Career Services is located in the Student Client Services Building - Room 220 748-5220 ext. 3756


News

SPOKE, March

you were prime what would you do?

Suzuki asks,

if

5,

2007

— Page 7

minister,

By STEPHANIE IRVINE

the

solution,

you're

of the

part

problem.

“You may be

one drop in the “But with enough drops, you can fill any

A passionate David Suzuki appealed to a packed house at Hagey Hall in Waterloo to change environmentally-damaging their ways. ‘This

is

the defining

moment

bucket.”

He said he is asking Canadians to make small changes in their daily lives that will have enormous

in

the history of our species,” said the

70-year-old

impact on climate change. Give up meat once a week. Don’t drive your car one day per week. Get educated and stay informed. “We’re challenging Canadians to

“Humans

scientist.

have incredible foresight. We can deliberately choose today to avoid the dangers (we face) and exploit the opportunities.”

sign up and

The Feb. 13 lecture was just one many stops across the country in his latest road show. If You Were Prime Minister. What Would You Do? Nearly 700 people bought $5

do

of

have

this

ment) has finally percolated into

"We’ve got the

critical

arena,”

said

Suzuki.

and now keep that

is

to

was

part of his

If

for office accountable for action in

at the University of

attention.”

Suzuki said the only reason Stephen Harper is paying any attention to the environment is because the public is making him.

to

ask him

(Photo by Stephanie Irvine)

Waterloo on Feb. 13. The lecture You Were Prime Minister, What Would You Do? road show.

David Suzuki addresses a sold-out audience

their attention,

thing

commitment

of the 10 things

do, I’m just one person?

moment where

public concern (about. the environ-

the political

a

on davidsuzuki.org) in the year,” he said. He added he wants one million Canadians signed up, and has more than 250,000 already. "I figure if Rick Mercer can get a million and a half voters to vote to change Stockwell Day’s name to Doris Day, we can get a million people signed up to take the Nature Challenge,” he said. Suzuki said he hopes this will be the beginning of a conversation that will go on, not just for weeks or months, but for many years. “Please carry on the conversation, and hold every person running

locations across the region.

“We

make

least three

(listed

gave a standing ovation at the end. Others watched via a live broadcast at

at-

coming

sold-out show, and

tickets to the

just

bucket,” said Suzuki.

"There

isn’t

a green bone in his

He

challenged governments

to

body,” he said of Harper. “But he’s a politician and he hears what

put the plight of future generations

we’re saying.”

tion will affect

on the agenda, and ask

how

legisla-

them before passing

anything.

He

said

what can

He

I

many people

said simply if you’re not part of

the

coming

years,” he said.

Lose weight while playing Nintendo By JESSICA BLUMENTHAL The days when playing video games was merely a leisurely activity are

Now

now

gone.

gamers

are exercising

and

losing weight while spending time

playing with their

Luke Brake,

game

consoles.

23, of Guelph, has

dropped out of the gym club and joined the Nintendo Wii club. Brake added 30 minutes of play-

Nintendo came out with

ing one of the sports games, such as boxing, that comes with the console to his daily activities and has

interactive

seen positive results.

sensors

The Guelph resident said he got the idea from a U.S. resident, Mickey DeLorenzo, who decided to

The

try losing

weight by playing Wii.

I thought it was all just a rumour that you could lose weight by actively playing Wii, but it actu-

“At

first

game

their

console, Wii,

at

end of 2006. Wii operates with in a bar that goes on top of the TV and in a hand-held remote.

the

remote are registered by the sensors on the TV which are then mimicked by the character in the

game. Brake

game. “The beauty

player’s

playing

movements with

the

ice skates

and takes Aikido

it

to lose weight,

it

was just

So

far

he has

pounds

lost five

in

four weeks without changing any eating or exercising habits.

Wes

Hodgson,

manager

of

Popeye’s Gym in Kitchener, said any form of physical activity is good but questioned whether we want to be teaching people to play

games versus

getting involved in

the actual activity.

“We ple to

should be encouraging peoout, socialize and partake

go

the real-life version of these games. Instead of playing a boxing game, why not go out and box?” in

Hodgson

sees a few flaws in stay-

ing inside to lose weight instead of

getting out of the house. "If

you play Wii instead of going

to a fitness club you’re losing out

on

the

social

advantages,

expertise and support.

When

to a

club you will learn

the

activity

properly

how in

a

the

going to

do

well-

rounded environment.” The other problem with choosing to lose weight with a game console is that person might not be losing the right weight.

Guelph resident Luke Brake, 23, has weeks using the Nintendo Wii.

lost five

pounds

in

four

Hodgson said you don’t build any muscle when playing Wii and all factors in the weight loss must be

There aren’t any other systems As technology got more advanced, it was harder to play games because the controllers had a lot of buttons. Nintendo planned on making a game that people could just pick up and play without having to learn what each out there like Wii.

button did.

The company’s hope

a positive side-effect.”

(Photo by Jessica Biumenthai)

Farjab Iravani, marketing manager for Ninetendo Canada, said

Nintendo isn’t involved or endorsing the weight loss plans of their consumers. However, Iravani said the system does break down the barriers between the physical self and the

lessons every week for exercise but he enjoys playing his games. “It’s a lot of fun and I didn’t start

ally works.”

assessed.

is

that

game play. You can

it

sit

is

that

peo-

flexible with

ple will play and enjoy the system.

on the couch or

They don’t have any plans to sponsor players.

is

stand up and get into the game.”


Page 8

— SPOKE, March

5,

News

2007

Promising changes predictions using astrology meth-

By HOLLY FEATHERSTONE

ods.

The Chinese year of the which began on Chinese

fire boar,

New Year,

will be a productive year for every-

one on an individual and joint basis,

according to an information held at the Kitchener

session

professional

Trussler,

lunar calendar,

zodiac, based on the is

among

Western astrology, it is that people inherently

believed

possess specific qualities associat-

Western zodiacs and host of the

ed with the animal representative of the year under which they are

of both

Eastern

2007 will be an industrious year which embraces the exemplar traits of the zodiac fire session, said

“Generally this kind of year will be easier for everybody, regardless of your (zodiac) element,” said Trussler.

tioners

is

the

sought omens for future

again

Trussler said the boar

work, relentlessness and purpose. People born in the

tasks.”

year of the boar tend to bear these

are

traits

and those who weren’t can

indicative

Trussler

enjoy the benefits the boar will

commence

deliver for 2007.

done

changing

of the

said

the

year

in a disorderly

will

fashion

helpful animal and the least likely to retire.”

figuratively denoting chaos.

lot

in

a

One of

the

five

Chinese

The mid seasons

ele-

(fire,

earth and

see

will

political

a climactic

year

though

career,

unknown whether

will

it

the happy ones,” said Trussler. “The (outer) two are the frustrating

Haiper’s favour or not.

ones.”

Trussler.

With regards

to annual forecast-

2007 will be the year of change among global

ing, Trussler said final

wood

before a stalemate period until

2024, the year of the

dragon.

peaceful

year to

make

real

changes before things

any major improvements in free trade, environment and peacekeeping efforts for the next 17 years unless changes are imple-

mented

this year.

In addition, he said the conflict in

Iraq will likely continue

if

“It’s

thing in the will

it

In

a

his

in it

is

be

in

Stephen Harper’s year,” said “(There) will be some-

news (about him), but

be good or bad?”

addition,

this

year Liberal

leader Stephane Dion, born in the

year of the

sheep,

may

expect

change to surface in his career. “The sheep is a friend of the boar (Stephen Harper), which

may

freeze into place,” said Trussler.

Trussler noted there won’t be

because the first seaspn, represented by the element wood, is not harmonious with the fire boar,

“The boar gets a

sense," said Trussler. “It’s a very

In Canada, Trussler said Stephen

Harper, born in the year of the boar,

“It’s the last

seasons in a lunar year.

logical conclusion isn’t reached.

end of the lunar year when water, the concluding season, will douse the fire boar. “The middle three (seasons) are

ensues

Furthermore, the five elements

plausible, yet

at the

means) we’ll this year’s

more

may become

apparent

affairs

be able to (carry) out

identi-

is

metal) will be

year for everybody,”

said Trussler, “(which

born.

still

most primal horoscope system, dating back to 2637 BC and founded by Emperor Huang Ti, according to www.chineseastrology.com. Ancient practiEastern zodiac

teristics.

"It's a fire

fied with hard

boar.

disruption

conducive in generating yearly predictions. This year, the fire boar could evoke dynamic changes, since fire is symbolic of energy, competitiveness and vigour, according to www.wikipedia.org.

the cycle.

and

astrologer

ments is also applied to each animal to further establish its charac-

The elements include metal, wood, water, fire and earth. Elements are additionally

a 60-year cycle in

which every year is comprised of 12 symbolic animals, the boar being the 12th and final animal Parallel to

Public Library Feb. 12.

Bryan

The Chinese

the year of the boar

in

benefit

(Dion),”

said

Trussler.

He

said though

2007 may be

a

pivotal year for change, boar years

typically

do not have

repetitive

qualities.

“There aren't strong patterns in boar years,” said Trussler, “but

2007

will be a

good

year, enjoy

it."

Eating out tonight?

Make

a smart choice.

For healthy food choices, food safety and seating,

100%

smoke-free

choose an Eat Smart! restaurant. Contact the Waterloo

Region Community Health Department

at

883-2253 or visit^

www.eatsmart web.net

mrimsr #EHLRP003

the learning

commons

Peer Services %%: Learning Skills Services

'

Writing Services

Peer Conversation Group For:

Any ESL Student

Where: Room 2A111 Commons)

(across from the Learning

When: Mondays ll:00am-12:00 noon & Wednesdays 10:00am-ll:00 am Beginning: The week of February 12/07 Ending: The v/eek of April 2/07 ’‘Free

*No sign-up required •Practice your conversational English skT $ with a trained peer vohmtee? (Photo by Holly Featherstone)

c

Yummy treats for sale Third-year

engineering technology students from left, Carlos Argueta, Adam Dickieson and Corey McPherson, oversee a bake

CONESTOGA _

~

Learning

sale on Feb. 13 to raise funds for their awards banquet.

Commons

Room 2A 03 1

Hours of Operation: Monday & Wednesday 8:30 am-530 pm Tuesday. Thursday & Friday 8:30 am— 4:00 pm

civil

^ gmg ^

Telephone: 519-748-6220 extension 2306 Website: F^:/Awnv.oortestogaoon«i/jsp/8teew/learningcommon8Andex.jsp Email :LeamingCornmon>s@conestogacon.ca

CLASSIFIED Engineering Technician/Technologist required for Brampton Consulting Engineering Firm specializing in Building Science, Restoration and Material Science Please e-mail resume to ldixon@davroc.com

Civil


News

SPOKE, March

LunarFest celebrates the Chinese By ERIC

MURPHY

Wang.

said

“Everyone

really

Waterloo Region residents were to an evening of music, dance and theatrical performances at the Mandarin LunarFest Feb. 15. treated

The held

the

the

to see

people of many different cultures enjoying the evening.

“Having cultural interaction and sharing in one another's her-

Humanities

at Theatre University Waterloo, was

the

of

itage

in

the honour of New Chinese Year. The occasion was cele-

brated

with

ditional

said

Wang.

“Events melt this

cultural difficulties.”

tra-

Wang, who

Chinese

also

music, traditional

Chinese New Year is based on the lunar calendar in which days, months and years are determined by the circulation of the moon.

how Christmas

is

cele-

brated in western cultures, Chinese

people celebrate the Chinese

New

Year with large traditional feasts, friends and family. The 2007 Mandarin LunarFest

was co-hosted by the Mandarin the Student Union (MSU), Taiwanese Student Association the Chinese Student

Alliance of Conestoga (CSAC). a second-year prac-

to

reach

it was easy to estabnetwork of support and

friendship because school adminis-

and the entire school community at Conestoga provide a very warm and welcoming atmosphere for us and other international students to- adapt to Canadian culture and keep our own heritages at the trations

same

Brandt, a first-year general

student at science and Conestoga, and an extreme martial arts

artist

for

Team

Raize, said he

was

Conestoga, and the director of the LunarFest, said he was happy with the night. “After two months of organizing everything like lighting, sound,

approached by members of CSAC to audition for the LunarFest after their performance at Conestoga in

background projections and

and honoured of something

tical

the

nursing student

at

acts,

night turned out beautifully,”

we

much

do."

1

viewed

it

from

a different cultur-

perspective.

al

I

learned

more

about myself the more I learned about other countries and cultures.”

As

far

as

LunarFest went,

the

Brandt said the fun and friendly atmosphere of the Chinese New Year carried from the performances

January.

“We were

Team

Raize, who perform extreme martial arts, were also in attendance at the Mandarin Lunarfest held at the University of Waterloo on Feb. 5. Much of their performance consisted of fight sequences, kicks, flips and jumps which promote an alternate way to keep fit.

to the backstage area.

Kuilin Wang, bottom centre, a second-year practical nursing

from everyone from one performance to the next,” he said. “Everyone was so warm and giving and treated us so well. The whole night was amazing.” but

encouragement

student at Conestoga and the director of the LunarFest,

poses with Team Raize.

The team

to

delighted

be asked to be part

like the LunarFest,”

eral arts

many Conestoga students like the all give should LunarFest Conestoga students a sense of pride

programmer/analyst graduate Conestoga, Dylan Dombroski, left, a 16-year-old gymnastics coach with the

of

“The ability of Conestoga clubs being able to grow to the extent

Cambridge

community just shows that the amount of support Conestoga provides is phenomenal,” he said. “It shows how great they have in the

Kips,

and Aaron

Cardoso, a Brazilian martial artist.

our international student program

and

that

Conestoga

is

about more than just academics which just adds to being the No. 1 college.”

Attention Students!!!

Welcome home to TransGlob d

fable

Student Apirtroents;

Variety of rental units to accpi

arrangements sfe,

The

University of Waterloo Chinese Dance Group performed several traditional Chinese dances at the Mandarin LunarFest held in the Humanities

Theatre at the University Waterloo on Feb. 15.

affordable aparfir * allowing you

if

Conveniently located c universities

&

colleges

rgency 'mind further *

shopping &

sail H Hi

SI!

res

of

Affordable JPijP

Ilf

irs

of the

group

Gao, Elizabeth vlg. Emily Chan

Photos by Erie Murphy

Norm

gen and science student and computer

Successful events that involve so

is

absolutely

consists of

Brandt, centre, a first-year

said Brandt.

time.”

Norm

New Year

Brandt also said getting involved and learning about other cultures should be a mandatory thing. “I lived in Japan for awhile and the things I learned and experienced can’t be compared to anything else,” he said. “I didn't realize just how big the world is until

ing

“In our case a

has had so

“There was a strong feeling of

their

port.

lish

that

influence on what

family and community with noth-

to

— Page 9

loved the idea of

and communities for sup-

out

2007

an event celebrating

at

schools

The

Wang,

it's

of different

ethnicities

ances.

(TWSA), and

said

important for students

traditional perform-

like

is

a culture

of

part

CSAC,

ern adaptations of

Kuilin

how we

is

learn,”

like

dance and mod-

Much

representa-

from Conestoga involved in concert, said he was also happy

which was

concert, at

Wang, one of the nine tives

“We

said Brandt.

performing

enjoyed everything.”

5,

and Jane

Cui.

1 - 888 - 310-7000 www.GOtransgIobe.com

m

TronsGlobe Property

Management Services

t


Page 10

— SPOKE, March

5,

News

2007

Bearing the at the polar plunge! Continued from Page

The plunge to

1

also provided an opportunity for participants

win a few prizes for themselves

in a contest for the

most

colourful outfit, most creative and most risque plunge.

Troy Brundle delighted the crowd with his bright sombrero and poncho, winning the most colourful costume prize. Miro Paulo won the award for most creative pond entrance with a skin-stinging belly flop and Deb Murray won for the most risque plunge. The judges included Monica Himmelman, director of development and alumni relations, Carol Gregory, the director of student life, and Bert Last, of audio-visual in the Learning Resource Centre. “This event is so appropriate for such a good cause,” said

Himmelman.

“It pulls the

college together;

it

raises the

awesome.” Troy Brundle, a third-year broadcasting student and the winner of the most colourful costume for the plunge, said

profile of

it

Conestoga and our students.

It's

just

wasn’t hard to show his support.

had to do it and my fiance thought up in a sombrero and poncho,” he said. “It really felt good to do good.” As far as the actual plunge went, Brundle said the thought of getting into the freezing water was scary at first “It’s

it

Above: Kathy Gauci, the area co-ordinator of the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario for Waterloo Region, receives a cheque for $4,700 from pledges. It was presented by Matt Jackson, president of CSI, and

Roxy Stanciu, vice-president

of CSI,

Below:

A Conestoga

edge

pond as she prepares Heart and Stroke.

of the

dip for

Feb

to take

way her

last

but

it

was a

“While think

it

I

year so

I

ironic to dress

great experience.

was

on the bottom of the pond I didn’t it’s when you start coming up when he said. “It’s hard to keep your compo-

sitting

was too bad

the shock sets in,”

but

when you’re getting out of the water but all made it really great and I would do it again.” Erik Must, a second-year woodworking technician student, did his initial jump and then thrilled the crowd with an sure

15.

student tippytoes her

my

would be

to the chilly

the support

encore show-stopping plunge. “My toes were pretty cold after but it was all for a good cause,” he said. “1 sure would do it again. The Heart

Above: Peter Benson, a first-year general arts and science student, gave his rendition of a Nestea commercial as he took the plunge in the icy water.

Foundation does great things and hopefully not, but they might

and

save

Stroke

my

Derek Yaremy, a mechanical engineering student, a splash at this year’s polar plunge with a

Left:

life

made

someday.”

cannonball.

Below: There’s no backing out for this student as she falls into the freezing depths of the pond at

Conestoga.

Photos by

Meghan

•••* v-s

Eric

4 .

' '

:S-

v

'

'

"

'

'

,t

Kreller

Murphy

&


News

Above: Conestoga students watch as Miro Paulo, winner of the

most creative pond entrance, stretches out

for his

daring belly

flop.

Top

right: Troy Brundle, a third-year broadcasting student, shows why he won the most colourful costume as he takes a plunge in his sombrero and poncho.

A Conestoga student takes a dive into the freezing pond money for the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

Right: raise

Bottom

Bottom plunge.

The Conestoga crowd looks on as a student makes her way to the edge of the pond.

left:

tentatively

right:

Troy Brundle celebrates after surviving his icy

to

SPOKE, March

5,

2007

— Page 11


— SPOKE, March

Page 12

5,

Feature

2007

of the 48 Field Engineer Squadron and 31 Combat Engineer Regiment brave the cold at this year’s ice dog’s festival. Kids had the opportunity to try on army gear and sit in the trucks as part of the army’s recruitment drive.

Members

Members

of

were hosting Sparky the in

dog meets and greets young friends

fire

at the fourth

annual ice dog’s

festival

squadron and regiment supervise

activities they

at the festival.

on Feb. 17

Waterloo.

It’s all By

gone

AMY MEADOWS

"Although we are busier into the

Chilly dogs are not happy dogs

festival in

Waterloo.

Despite

the

Toof said the shelter can hold approximately 150 animals at a time and said the cost of buying a dog

is

"It

temperatures people and pets

cold

reasonable.

costs between

dog,”

she

said.

dog

$215-250 for a “That does

and snowfall many showed up to be treated to live sled competitions, dog sled rides, army displays and children's activities

microchipped, spayed or neutered and

on Feb.

at the festival

17.

Families huddled around a tent serving hot dogs and warm drinks

and watched the

festivities.

Jennifer Toof, for the

who

has worked

Waterloo Region

Humane

Society for five years, said there

more

are usually find

homes at this

is

to

being

health insurance.”

The humane

society

“They were almost going she said, “because

n't

have enough snow

this

time of

the weather,” said Toof.

festival since

it

began.

(malamutes) at home, and they are from the same family as the huskies," said Waechter. “I

have

six

She said be a big

hit

the festival continues to

and said

festival that she

this is the

only

devotes her time

to.

"People love coming here for the There are still

rides and activities.

usually people lined up when it is time to go home,” she said. The malamute is large, with a

heavy, double coat, plumed tail and wolfish appearance. It is also the largest of the sled dogs.

Partners at this year's ice dog's

year.

has one big

time of year.

featured

every year.

it,”

still

is

Also at the festival was Janice Waechter Waechter, of Baden. breeds Alaskan malamutes, and says the festival is always a big hit. but nearly didn't go ahead this

cel

“Our biggest concern the year

dogs

the

for in the spring, but

the organization

worry

cats and

include

breeding Alaskan malamutes since has been to the ice dog's

J993 and

spring.”

according to the humane society, but you wouldn’t have known it at this year's fourth annual ice dog's

dogs

to the

in

to can-

we

did-

January.

Nobody knew if it would be able go ahead.” Waechter has been dedicated

to

to

festival

included the

UpTown BIA.

the City of Waterloo, the

humane

Waterloo Community Arts Centre and the 48 Field Engineer Squadron and 31 Combat Engineer Regiment.

society, the

known to work and live in temperatures as low as -60 C. They were originally bred by Chukchi tribes to pull Siberian huskies are sleds.

Photos by

Amy Meadows


News

SPOKE, March

5,

— Page 13

2007

Healthy heart care starts at

young age There are steps peqple can take to prevent heart conditions By

SARAH JAYNES

volunteer journey

More than 73,000 Canadians died in 2003 from a heart attack,

and

this

number

is

increasing every

year, according to the

more than $54 million

to donate to hundreds of hospital- and university-based teams who depend on the money to continue their research. is

startling to see that

many

Canadians are unaware that even when you are younger you have to taking care of yourself,” said

start

Suzanne Kienaple, a local volunand campaign team leader for

teer

the foundation.

I

15 years old, said 18-year-old

Meghan Meyers, who

still

collects

only takes an hour or two out

"It

of your

Last year, the foundation raised

age.

when

for the foundation every year.

Heart and

Stroke Foundation.

"It

was

young

at a

volunteering

started

“I

life

making a Meyers

but you

know you

are

difference,” she said. said

it

was important

to

be aware that heart disease and strokes affect not only the elderly

young people as well. "There are over 15 different heart conditions and if you catch the but

conditions early enough

it is easy medication or surgery where necessary,” said Meyers.

obtain

to

While some heart conditions are beyond our control, there are others that certain steps

can help pre-

vent.

“(Volunteering) only takes

an hour or two out of your life but you know you are making a difference.” Meghan Meyers, Heart and Stroke Foundation volunteer

Some

of these steps include not

smoking, not consuming excessive amounts of alcohol, maintaining a healthy blood and cholesterol level and, most importantly, being involved

in

carded a good thing

regular physical activi-

ty-

“Even if it means taking a 15minute walk or doing half an hour of pilates,

it

is

>

important to keep

yourself in shape,” said Meyers.

Many Canadians who

Kienaple is one of thousands of Heart and Stroke volunteers who

rienced heart attacks in the past

recruits other volunteers to collect

few years have had a

around

donations Waterloo.

am

“I

Kitchener-

committee who campaigning kits

part of a

puts together the

for volunteers,” she said.

The foundation tions

collects

dona-

and campaigns year-round,

but in the spirit of Valentine’s Day,

February

is

Heart Month

at

the

at

chance new advances

hundreds of Canadian

retailers.

better

of recovery thanks to in research and technology, however, many still continue to suffer a

second heart attack.

“The good news is that we can expect to see more advancements in the

next few years, however, the

cost of research keeps increasing,” said Kienaple.

“More funds

foundation.

“We do campaigning in schools with Jump Rope for Heart and we get

the SPC Card gets you exclusive discounts

have expe-

our volunteers active in the

community, handing out flyers and collecting money,” said Kienaple. Canada had 140,000 volunteers this year, most of them high school and college students

who

start their

is

to continue research extremely Critical.” This year K-W is hoping to raise

at least

$320,000 locally

to

donate

to the foundation. If

you are interested in becoming making a donation,

a volunteer or visit

www.heartandstroke.ca or

come

call

1-888-HSF-INFO.

in

today or

call

1-800-HRBLOCK hrblock.ca

a jfa

rj l‘];l Jr [4

Individual results vary. apply.

*T0

Usage may be

qualify,

Offers valid from

restricted

when used

student must present either

identification card. Expires July 31,

(Photo by Sarah Jaynes)

Meghan Meyers, 18 has been volunteering for the Heart and Stroke Foundation for three years. “I go door-to-door every

(i)

08/01/06 in

a

until

07/31/07. Valid at participating locations

conjunction with any other offer or

T2202a documenting 4

2007. Valid only at participating

or

retailer loyalty

more months

H&R

3 or older and were full-time students for four or

more months during 2006

Canada

only. For

Cardholder

only. Offers

of full-time attendance at a college or university during

Block locations

at a high

in

in

may

card discounts. Cannot be used towards the purchase of

Canada.

Block products or services will not increase chances of winning. Begins 2/1/07 and ends 5/1 5/07. 1

n "NO

Open

2006

vary, restrictions

gift

or

(ii)

a valid high school

PURCHASE NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN.

to legal residents of

school, college or university.

There

will

be

Canada

1

(excluding

may

cards or certificates.

Quebec

random draw to award the

H&R who are

Purchase of

residents)

prize. Skill testing

,

February,”

she

said.

question required for award of in

Quebec and where

prize.

prohibited.

See www.rockwithblock.ca

for Official Rules

and

how

to play without purchase.

Odds

of winning vary based on participation. Void


Page 14

— SPOKE, March

5,

News

2007

Snow removal

involves

Cancer

patient optimistic

By ALLISON STEINMAN

more than By ROSS

ALDWORTH

With the snow

finally piling

Fire

up

snow or

might be overlooked. While most people take the time to clear their driveways and sidewalks,

there

are

other

areas

to

some might not even

think of.

deputy fire chief high efficiency water heaters and furnaces can

According

Tim

ice.

Carbon monoxide is a colourless, odorless and tasteless gas that is poisonous and potentially lethal. Beckett also asked homeowners to ensure that snow is cleared away from fire hydrants on or near their property to keep them easily accessible to emergency fire crews. “You need to act fast in an emergency,” said Beckett. “Having to

Department are

reminding residents of important snow-removal precautions that

clear that

sidewalks

cause a buildup of carbon monoxide gas in the home if their outdoor vents become blocked by

outside, the City of Kitchener and

Kitchener

just

to

waste time digging a hydrant out of a snowbank could cost someone

Beckett,

their

home

Not

or even their

life.”

sidewalks and hydrants of snow can have other clearing

consequences as well. According to Kitchener bylaws, sidewalks must be cleared down to bare pavement and full width by 24 hours after a snowfall.

They should also be kept clear of snow and ice that may accumulate from drifting or thawing. For those who fail to keep the way clear, fines averaging $160 are invoiced to the property

complaint

leads

clearing the

snow away.

to

March

National

is

for me,” he said.

Colorectal

Cancer Month. According to the Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada, 20,000 Canadians will be diagnosed with the disease this year. Twenty-year-old Waterloo resident, Paul Charles, feels for them,

was diagnosed

since he

late last

Charles said he doesn’t know how long he’s had colorectal can-

which

cancer of the large bowel. Doctors discovered it duris

appendectomy two

ing a routine

months ago.

owner if a works

bay.

“At

first

was

it

now

hard, but

it’s

normal thing to me,” he said. circumstances Despite the Charles has adopted an optimistic

just a

attitude about his illness.

“For the longest time

year.

cer,

On a bad day Charles said he experiences bleeding, cramps, diarrhea and fever and takes eight pills daily to keep his symptoms at

was

I

in

pain,” he said.

now

thought

also

“I

what’s wrong and

know

I

need to fix it, being down won’t help me, I have to be strong and fight this.” Charles listed staying strong and positive as advice for other people I

dealing with cancer.

“At

city

first

now

was

it

it’s

hard, but

“Never doubt yourself and take one day at a time,” he said.

a normal

just

A

thing to me.”

close friend of Charles,

it

Amber

Rooney, 18, said she was shocked upon learning of her friend’s ill-

Paul Charles,

ness.

cancer patient

“He

didn’t

me

tell

at first,”

she

ended up hearing it from a friend of his and then he admitted it and said he was really scared.” said. “I

“For three days I just sat at home my room,” he said. “It was a hard thing to take; I had to give up playing hockey and my snowin

boarding

comes

B.C.”

trip in

Charles said he gets a

of sup-

lot

port from his friends and family.

“My well,

parents are taking

and

of

lots

my

Rooney

is

when

it

“I

to being sick.

him support,” she

give

just

said.

friends have

sent e-mails saying they'll be there

make

To

really

it

said although Charles

afraid, he’s pretty strong

visit

donation

a

www.canadahelps.org.

Couch potatoes? French not potatoes, ouch French fries, may be to

blame

catchy

(Photo by Adam Hannon)

Snow removal crews have been

hard at work at the college

this

semester.

many

the

of a recent

article

factors involved in effective

body weight, but

More

active living

The

and young adults

With an

your

of twenty questions to

is

the

rise

and

increased intake of "fast

lives as a result

of TV, computers and

video games, generation ”X”

is

quickly

book on

raising "weight-wise"

"Nothing we

notes,

gambling is no longer fun and you need help to stop, talk to a counsellor. Special community programs for people with gambling problems as well as self-help groups are available in our area. Like other addictions, problem gambling can destroy your life. Sadly, that’s one thing you can bet on. that your level of

Visit

Counselling Services our website http://www. conestoaac. on. ca/isp/stserv/index.isp

be challenging.

weight

day.

of following

low

To make

begin

by

to

ear

fat

diet

says,

reasonable

lifestyle

you

you

can make

it

in

educator

a

big difference loss

to help get

starred:

and dnnk

essential.

comes

habits at an

As the old adage to bodies, there's

Your family doctor, a registered

Here are some ideas

eat

set are

into a healthy diet,

must be eaten

helping you reach your weight

goals.

is

"When

specialist

in

and

Monitor your progress

only one per customer.”

moderation. Making small changes in

your

being

the necessary changes,

setting

measure that the goals you

early age

for us, while others are junk.’ fir

and

a

low

30-60 minutes per

Establishing healthy

claim

is

a

is

are

to

off can

reasonable, realistic and attainable.

some foods

simplistic

it

key ro successful

and maintenance

loss

combination calorie,

The

kids.

In a journal, record everything that

A Message from

losing weight and keeping

specific goals.

It's

All foods can

you are worried

hungry or did you

really

tat for other reasons (just because

a

absolutely perfect or entirely bad

but some foods If

a

and author of

dietitian

good

life.

suggests Judy Tocws,

registered

Tocws

frequently are you eating?

6 Were you

physically active for

becoming generation "XL*

need,"

or

fat

children,

on

junk foods" combined with sedentary

wc

sugar,

with your friends)’

m

of obesity

rate

in

the food was there, you were out

"Balance and moderation are wh.it

determine how gambling is affecting you. For example, how often do you go back to try to recuperate what you lost the day before? Have you claimed to win money that you really lost? Do you ever hide betting slips or lottery tickets from your family? After winning, do you have a strong urge to return and win more? These are just some indications that gambling is a problem in list

5 How

dynamic duo.

teems

"other" foods did you

high

(those

alcohol)?

improper

In fact, they are a

crucial, too.

is

Gamblers Anonymous has a

doing?

4 How many eat

have long blamed

a proper

Casinos, video lottery terminals, Proline, lottery tickets: the opportunities to gamble are everywhere. For many it feels like a harmless means of entertainment, but gambling becomes a problem when the behaviour begins to interfere with your family, personal or school life.

long did you do each activity? 3 Did you enjoy what you were

weight management.

We

How often were you active?

exploring

diets for creeping wciglu gain

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: Problem Gambling

1

2 How

for obesity. That was the

title

fries?

ALL ADDS UP!

IT

C

to

for the next 3 days.

how

Be sure to include what you

eat.

much and

After the

the time

you

eat.

3 days ask yourself the following

or

community

fitness

can provide more helpful

information.

the

Cancer Association,

Colorectal


News

SPOKE, March

5,

2007

— Page 15

Family takes a step for Alzheimer’s By JENN CURTIS

nine brothers and sisters lost their

mother, people become more for-

Some

That is a normal part of aging, Alzheimer’s

getful as they- get older.

disease

Canada Alzheimer's disease

In

peo-

affects about eight per cent of

ple over the age of 65.

Alzheimer’s gradually destroys a

memory and

person’s

their ability

such as and going to the washroom. Alzheimer’s can also change a person’s personality, behaviour and emotions. Unfortunately, there is no cure for Alzheimer’s and there is no way to carry out daily activities;

eating

talking,

how

to detect

quickly someone will

progress through the stages. But

if

detected early there are treat-

it's

ment options that can slow down the symptoms. disease causes Alzheimer's abnormal changes in the brain. It starts with the nerve cells, which control memory. The cells become damaged and eventually die.

who

Eventually, those

ed are unable aspects of daily

are affect-

care for them-

need

and

selves

to

with

help

all

disease

the

for

danced and read stories to us,” Richardson said. “Then one day she forgot how to cook, clean, nurse, entertain, laugh, cry, sing, dance and read to

lot

of time

own

better tomor-

-•

The walk

is

always the third

Saturday of January.

“Mom, you

are,”

unforgettable, that’s

what

Richardson said with a

smile.

Some

early signs of Alzheimer's

disease are

memory

going and changes

lose, difficulty

performing everyday tasks, language problems, poor judgment, misplacing things, changes in personality, putting things where they don't belong, forgetting your name or days of the week, leaving the house and forgetting where you are

in

mood

little

world,” she said.

information on For more Alzheimer’s disease, contact the Alzheimer’s Society of Canada at 1-800-616-8816.

Or

visit

their

website

afraid of us.”

We

tried to

hang on

to the

memo-

by asking her about the past, her parents, family and friends, ries

Richardson

said.

Having a mother

lose her

ry before losing her health

memois

hard

to deal with.

“Sometimes she would rememit would give us hope,” Richardson recalls. “We would think maybe she doesn’t ber our name, and

have

this terrible disease.

we would

And

then

reminded quickly

be

she does.”

far their

Buck Team and so team alone has raised more (Photo by Jenn Curtis)

than $10,000.

do

proud as a family to walk,” Richardson said.

are very

this

and her family pose wearing their Alzheimer’s Walk for They have raised more than $10,000 for Alzheimer’s over the past 1 1 years.

Christine Richardson (holding baby)

Memories

T-shirts.

Got a hot news tip?

out for the stolen vehicle during

Call

Spoke

their regular patrol.

Conestoga College, downtown

common

targets for car thefts in

region,

the

all

Waterloo

a

said'

Region police detective. “The slightly higher rates

makes

areas

specific

in

sense,

because of the larger concentrations of vehicles,” said Derek Doidge, of the auto theft branch.

Bait cars have also been used in the region in the past three years

and have proven

to

be an effective

tool.

These cars are set up in a locawhere car thefts often occur. Thieves who try to steal the car

tion

Auto cent

thefts

in

were down

However, this still means 1,700 vehicles were stolen in 2006 and 540 were never recovered.

more

GM

and Ford pickups, Dodge Neons and Shadows, vans and

Honda

ctuto theft

branch

rate.

Vehicles that are stolen are often

shipped out of the country, found at the bottom of a lake or burned so the car can’t be properly identified,

Doidge

the

If

money

thief

wants to make is broken down

the vehicle

to

unsuspecting victims. discovered the car the

rightful

best

ways

Offers

cvri

iictyx:

GROUP BUYING POWER to

is

returned

owner and

buyer ends up out of a money.

The

SK*SU3t

said.

and sold for parts or sold

to

Derek Doidge, of the

68.2 per cent recovery

If

products.”

SPOKE

and

wheel) and not leaving your car running in the driveway, you can help to prevent your car from being stolen.

“Vehicles stolen

3691

five per

2006 from 2005

Waterloo Regional Police have a

often than others include

at ext.

are then arrested.

By keeping your car in a garage, using The Club (a device to lock the steering

the

lot

of

Conestoga College

to protect your-

“Usually the ones (cars) that are looked after are not stolen,” he

from this is to do vehicle checks on the Internet, talk to the previous owner or buy from a

said.

dealership.

self

Con tact Judy

Ext.214-

no- obligation quote today! '

The

techniques police have been using are proving to be effective.

They are briefed

at the

“All

(makes and models of)

ups,

the

information is sent out to all squad cars and officers keep an eye

519 743-5221

21 iwestman@staebler.com

Vehicles stolen more often than

reported stolen.

reported stolen

net

the really crappy ones.”

others include

is

ai Local

vehicles are stolen but usually not

beginning of each shift about all the vehicles that have been After a vehicle

at

www.alzheimers.ca.

“Mom

Waterloo Region police cracking down on car thefts

areas and mall parking lots are

or

behaviour.

was scared, mad, nervous and

“We

By JENN SPRACH

for a

row.”

It was very hard to deal with sometimes, Richardson said. “Day by day she crept into her

and energy.

Richardson and her

“Hope today

us.”

called the Rita

is

with

person-

a

Alzheimer’s requires a Christine

laughed, cried, sang,

family.

it

of friends and

lives

cooked, cleaned, nursed,

affects

referred to as a “family disease’’

suffering from the disease

to

Richardson and her family have been doing the Alzheimer’s Walk for Memories every year since their mother passed away. Their team is

often

is

because even though one person

Caring

“Mom

that, yes,

life.

Alzheimer’s

Buck,

Alzheimer’s disease 12 years ago on Feb. 18, 1995. entertained,

not.

is

Evelyn

Rita

GM and Ford pick-

Dodge Neons and Shadows, vans and Honda products. “It literally takes

steal

some

30 seconds

to

vehicles,” said Doidge.

Waterloo Insurance


Page 16

— SPOKE, March

5,

News

2007

Week of March

5,

Roundabout mayhem

2007

I’ll

be the

first to

%

admit that

no return when through a yellow light, and the point of

Libra

Aries March

21

September 23 October 22

-

April 19

.

-

stops

down and Your strength and courage allow you to reach new heights in your personal and social life. Keep climbing that ladder of success as often as you You

detest being tied

word

can’t.

can, great rewards are waiting.

You are harmonious and easy going by nature. You often long for the life of luxury but don't wait for

it

to be

May

-

to you.

Keep working hard for the things you want and when you get them, you'll know you deserve them.

Taurus April 20

handed

20

y

i t At

abouts throughout Cambridge,

seem

didn’t

bad

like a

idea.

the concept of entering

and exiting a

What

is

it

Scorpio

yield

According

October 23

Official

-

sign.

it

provoked and gentle with those you care about; a regular three faces of Eve. Try to keep your emotions intact; don't let the undeserving know your wrath.

2

Self-expression

means you must

“it

,sg;

-

feel the

What

need

you

to hide

November 22 December 2

£

make you is made of a

up for

themselves; your assistance will

be appreciated.

took that yield sign for a red light. If there's

traffic

nothing to yield

to,

don’t yield. In

an

uncontrolled

intersection

really tricky. In a roundabout, traf-

me

fic is to

was

I

round-

in the

this

Now

where things get

the part

is

yield signs.

And

anything on

my

them.

If

yield to the car

on the

left.

I

don't

I

remember

driver's test about

the city

installing them,

should

roundabout, has the right of way. I guess the school bus driver who cut

is

going to keep

maybe

they

people on

how

then

start testing

through them. Or educate people through some sort of flyer

to drive

mass e-mail. Whatever it is, to be done about driver's education on roundabouts

or

something needs

should be taken out

or they

all

together.

(Photo by Jason

Rick Andrade, Steve Parkinson and Neil

Aquarius January 20

after rocking the Starlight

As you

a giving person

are never

or

stand

one for

to leave others

not

Virgo August 23 September 22

&

February 19

Two’s company, three’s ... The Machines, a local KitchenerWaterloo indie rock band. Playing

together

T he

as

Machines for only the past year and a half, their debut album. After My Misspent Youth, was released

November of

last year. is

the high ener-

gy, youthful-looking guitarist -

March 20

singer.

With freshly

able hair

it’s

cut,

almost as

if

and

fashionthe trim

takes the years as well as inches

Your

trait

you were born with. The cool kids have always been your friends and making new friends has always been an occurrence rather than a challenge. Spread the love and keep going in the direction you are headed.

feet are a valuable posses-

sion as they get you from place to

off.

“We’re a loud,

rock

band,” said Parkinson.

firmly planting yourself.

is

a third-year

journalism student holding in the

palm of her hand.

fate

’n’ roll

“A

three-

They were, and

still

ing to go that their

leave on

McDonald

“We had enough we couldn't possi-

said,

men.”

ning Andrade. "He's the

drumming

band. Rick Andrade.

“We'll only fondle you after the third date, that’s

The

our motto.”

jovial nature of the trio

"Plus Neil’s a real dick about that,"

declared a giggle-ready, grin-

Town

This

I

of

piece

mind. The Machines actually love this town. Andrade believes it’s a good time be in or from KitchenerWaterloo at the moment.

to

"With places

like the Starlight,

or smaller places

Room

or the Circus

like

Grad

the

Room,

I

dare

good,” he said, adding, “There seems to be a lot of really good bands in Kitchener right say,

it's

now.” Parkinson agreed that being in a is better than it has been.

"It's

nice you don't have to go

very far to put together a good

bill,

which hasn't been the case

in

a

long time.”

"We were

just talking about the

have these songs on there, f***

Andrade. “And it seems that there’s always at least two or three bands on Kitchener-Waterloo

I

you.”

To which McDonald

One of

succinctly

the

there.

many McDonald-

songs on After My Misspent Youth is a little ditty titled This Town in which the chorus

approved

They are also serious when it comes to what they do, the music

claims,

well.

thinking.

college charts the other day," said

effective

and evident in their performances of the musical nature as

I'm

know who am.” Well K-W, here's a

gotta

like,

replied, “It’s true.” is

what

band now

it.”

bly cut them.”

said

release of

any kind is an entire album. Parkinson said he didn’t see any reason to put anything else out, like an EP, of which he is not a big fan. “It costs the same and takes a little more work but if you got the catalogue, you might as well do it," he said. “We went into the studio with about 20 songs and an EP would have made it far more difficult to figure out what to cut and what to

McDonald, the smooth serving bassist and singer, added they’re also “handsome and gentleNeil

are, so gear-

first

excellent songs,

“Yes,”

McCormick

Sherritt)

The Machines power

don't

piece.”

dynamo of the Tiffany

fast

and have always helped keep you balanced. Be cautious not to misuse your feet; don't make them run away when the only way to solve a problem is

place

tight, together, real

tried-and-true.

Steve Parkinson

Pisces

of Kitchener-Waterloo’s

7.

sounding very

by nature,

enough. Don't let this attitude escape you as karma is looking your way. What goes around will come around to you; your kind and giving nature will be rewarded.

out

on Feb.

McDonald

K-W’s fine-tuned machines

-

in

Popularity appears to be a

empty

the car to the right-hand side.

February 18

can't stand

I

manoeuvres in that roundabout than anywhere else on the road. There is nothing in the driver's handbook about roundabouts, just

new

p!f|!Sl|1

designated peacemaker, stand up

who

have sat behind a car at an roundabout because the driver ahead of me apparently mistimes

the intersection, or in this case the

By JASON SHERRITT

for those

I

necessary."

-

to you and your well manner allows you to accept them calmly as they arise. While respecting the boundaries is credible, don't let them hold you back from what you want.

August

Even though you're not

that.

Only if neccan't count the number of

if

disciplined

You've never been one to cower

steel.

“Stop

I

idiotic

Sagittarius j

22

others

about wasn't aware of

you must yield to the right of way, which means literally yielding to

off while

at least twice.

have seen more reckless and

Obstacles and limitations are nothing

Leo

angry; your backbone

through a roundabout

only go when the way is clear.” Let’s break that down. Traffic in

down

away when

school,

Blair

-

you hiding from? Life is too short to always be afraid. Face the people or situations that make you uneasy, they don't deserve to rule your life.

-

necessary and

me to take

ypyj Capricorn ^ ecem ^ er 22

are

July 23

if

close to

makes the most sense Road to and from meaning everyday I drive it

go about getting it. Don’t lose your focus but don't let your focus cloud your mind from other areas of your life.

July 22

like shelled animals,

Stop

let

the west Galt area of

in

You aim high and rarely miss your mark. You know what you want out of life and know how to

Cancer June 22

},

didn't

own.

first.

The

to

off,

equally important.

fSJJggf

very impor-

is

when you were young; you get here on your

yourself.

is

&&&,

and you often focus on ways to bring it to the surface. Turn to your youth for inspiration and talk to those who were around

Much

and finish. Try to remain for the whole process; every part the start

"

tant

"the

things but are always present for

Gemini ^ ^ une

wiM

sometimes

"Once upon a time" and

go

just a

It’s

Handbook of

Driver’s

Ontario,

end" seem to relate well to you. You often miss the middle of

for

Opinion

essary.

circle.

about that red triangle

everyone?

21

Anderson

realize,

ble with

complex concept. Yield would hit you if you that’s how I remember. a

Cambridge,

it

however, that the general population would have such trou-

it

Living

Natalie

didn’t

I

traffic in the intersection or

You can be quite stubborn when you want to be, fierce when

cut

rolling

So when the city install numerous round-

to

it’s

to the. car that

second

are

that confuses

November

know

test

nature to me.

decided hate the

signs

stop

at

I

speed

1

“This

Town

don’t

know

"The community thing is starting up again around here.” The Machines will be playing at the Huether Hotel on March 10 as part of the Go! Music Festival.

to build


Sports

SPOKE, March

Women’s hockey team comes up By

ADAM BLACK

Conestoga board

The women's hockey team

fell

tournament Conestoga College

short of their second

would get on

early, with

off the

first

game

the

tie

scoring seconds

later.

tough semifinal loss to McMaster put their chances on ice.

McMaster got 40 seconds into

the second period,

"We tried really hard” said forward Michelle Mutszak. "But long

excellent stick handling,

our semifinal game just

The team

The Condors would answer

back, however, with Trish Beirns

with

go-ahead goat

forwards

their

much

too

the

displaying

which was

goalie

for

Liz

Batherstock.

killed us.”

ning their

started out strong, winfirst

game

against

St.

The Condors would come close to tying the

game

onds,

and Janette Hamel 1.

they were eliminated

The next game was against the tough Humber Hawks. Both teams

nals, the

had won one game each against each other previously. In the end, Conestoga's solid defence and excellent puck handling would lead them to a 4-1 victory. Hamell had

but just couldn't

McMaster

ment

dying sec-

in the

Lawrence College 3-1, with goals from forwards Amanda Parkins

women

beat

the

Even though

goaltender.

in

the semifi-

took the tourna-

as a learning experience.

“We

really

came

together as a

team,” said defenceman

Swartzentcuber. "Our

first

Brittany

tourna-

Condors would prove to be the most difficult against a tough

ment we didn't know each other, the second one we had played together a little more, this one we've grown accustomed to each other. The passing has been better and we've learned each other’s playing style so we know where to

McMaster team.

pass to.”

one goal and Parkins got a hat trick.

The

final

short

shot of the game.

after loads of defensive-zone pres-

in

— Page 17

the

win at the Women’s Hockey Extramural Tournament on Feb. 16. The team played hard, but a

shifts

2007

Parkins scoring

McMaster would sure.

5,

game of

the day for the

Condor goalie Kim Maxwell slides from goal post to goal post to make an amazing save against a St. Lawrence College forward. The Condors went on to win the game 3-1. The team's next tournament March 16 at Seneca College.

is

on

-per The Condor’s and Humber Hawk’s centres Condors won the match 4-1

fight for

a faceoff win

in

the Hawk’s defensive zone.

The Condors

The

cele-

brate their 4-1 victory

over the

Humber

Hawks. Conestoga would lose in the semifinals of the

Conestoga Women’s Extramural Hockey Tournament on Feb. 16.

Photos by

Adam

Black


Page 18

— SPOKE, March

5,

Sports

2007

(Photo by Annetise Thompson)

Lavliane

Rougeau attempts

Brampton Thunder,

to block

know about it, even though there are many teams in the area, includchampions,

national

Brampton Thunder. But on Feb. 17, Brampton’s Thunder was silenced when the Montreal Axion shut them out 1-0 during the series

final

of a three-game

between the

rivals.

The lone goal came

Kim

as Coley Dosser and Jayna Hefford cut toward the

St. Pierre

net.

The win was

Throughout the rest of the game both of the teams peppered the net, but the goalies held their ground and kept the goals to one. Yanick Evola, head coach of the Axion, was pleased with his team’s performance, and knew that the game would be close. “There’s a few really, really good players on the Thunder and it’s always tough for us to shut down Vicky Sunohara and Jayna Hefford,” he said. "They also have a solid and balanced team with good forwards, good defence and good goaltending so it's tough to

the Axion, as they were

during the match-ups.

injury.

their goalie.

beat them.”

biggest obstacle her team has faced

short-handed.

The National Women’s Hockey League offers up some of the best hockey around, but very few people

the

for

The Montreal Axion shut

out their

the

rivals,

the final of a three-game series.

in

By ANNELISE THOMPSON

ing

a shot

early in the

second period, when Montreal’s Annie Derossier managed to sneak one past Cindy Eadie’s glove while

especially sweet to

missing their captain Lisa Marie Breton to “Lisa Marie

is

a real sparkplug

She battles 100 per cent every game, so obviously it’s tough for us.

for us; but at the

same time

who much

are other players ten

play as

to

there

Montreal

three

last

1

we need

to get

other thing

is

gle player to elevate their

need 100 per cent of

so this

cent of the time. That’s

a

“The

that getting every sin-

haven’t gotis

on her

early in the game,” she said.

effort,

game.

I

100 per

what

1

don’t expect perfect plays

if

knows what

already

she

working on game. “1

think

to

for

me

effort.”

mates,” she said.

But Breton wasn’t the playerthat Brampton was worried about. Thunder head coach Donna-Lynn

She also said her team will need to get hungry by the time the play-

be

Rosa

said

Kim

St.

Pierre

was

the

the time, but

do expect

I

the

offs arrive.

“Hunger is what we’re working on for the playoffs. Tonight's loss

personally

it’s

important to win those battles and turn the puck over for my team-

want. all

she’s

improve her playoff

good chance and a big challenge for them to step up and help the team out,” said Evola.

I

hate

1

we’re going to lose Ed rather lose strategically because if this doesn’t make them hungry then nothing will,” said Rosa. Forward Kathy Devereaux says

losing, but

“Our number challenge was They have a stand-up

goalie and

was exactly what we needed.

The playoff schedule has

yet to

by the league, but people interested in catching a game can set

check www.bramptonthunder.com for updates.

Thunder veteran watches new prospects By ANNELISE THOMPSON Former

stalling goaltender for the

NWHL’s Brampton Thunder Moreland made Powerade Centre, 1

Brampton

the in

trip

to

Lisa the

Brampton, Feb.

7 to watch her former team face off

against the Montreal Axion.

Moreland, 30, left the team last season after becoming pregnant. “It’s different because when an NHL player has a baby they take a day or two off. For me it’s at least a season, and then trying to get back into it, if that’s -what I want afterwards." She says that although leaving

was hard

chapter

in

it

her

was time

for the next

“You can’t just sit there and focus on one part of your life. Life is a journey, and there are lots of steps along the way and this was just the next step,” said Moreland. As yet, Moreland is still toying with the idea of coming back to the league for a few reasons.

One

reason she

she has no real

may

ties to

not return

keep her

is

in the

I

Secondly, she also has to take into consideration the

new

amount of young,

talented players

who

are trying

to break into the league.'

“You have younger players that are coming up that are ready to play in the league, and while you’re gone you have other players establishing themselves, so you just have to try out and

life.

area.

“We’re not originally from here, so we don’t have any family around, and obviously with the first child you want to be able to see your family and stuff like that, “ she said, “so I’m just taking it day by day. I don’t want to make any plans as of yet.”

hope for the those

new young

anything to get to the puck. “I've actually accidentally back

flipped to get to the puck

when

to looking at universities in the

she said. “I realized that

go

I

don’t want

away, and Laurier has a really great reputation and hockey program so I decided I wanted to go to

that far

there for the next couple years.”

She also be

said that her

to play for

Olympics Championship some the

"I just

any

dream would

Team Canada

have so

woman who I

look up

to,”

World

day.

much respect made it to

has

National team that they’re

one

either at

or

all

for the

some-

she said.

I

was already down on my back,” she said. “It’s a very odd style to say the least.”

Her odd style is something that teammate and friend Vanessa Ley agrees on. Ley,

who

is

18 years old, has only

rience to skate with players at this level

of hockey,” she said.

Ley, however, will not try out for

me

to go to the which I'm very

excited for and I've already gotten to practise with them,” she said.

highest level

States and universities in Canada,"

17-

outs for next year’s season.

am

McNichol says her playing style is Hasek or similar to Dominik Roberto Luongo because she’ll do

who

has been invited to closed-door try-

I

hockey at the possible and it came

interested in playing

down

She was also able to skate with the Thunder at a recent practice. “It was an honour and great expe-

is

good hockey program, because

of them.”

goalies

year-old Cassandra McNichol,

“They’ve invited

any differently which I They treated me like I was one

played one season with McNichol.

trying to break into the league

invitational tryouts,

liked.

me

said

best,”

Moreland.

One of

got to practise with them they did-

n’t treat

“When

the

Thunder next season

as

(Photo by Annetise Thompson)

she

plans on attending Wilfrid Laurier

Former Thunder

in the fall.

old son, Ethan, to the

“I

wanted

to find a school with a

goalie, Lisa Moreland, brought her five-month

Powerade Centre

former team play on Feb. 17.

in

Brampton

to

watch her


SPOKE, March

'

National

Defense

Defence

nationale

A paid education

Une education

makes all the

payee fait toute

difference

la

simple:

we pay

for

your

tuition,

C’est simple: nous payons vos cours, vos livres et vos instruments, et vous obtenez de pointe que vous recherchez. Apres avoir regu votre diplome, vous entreprendrez une carriere remplie de defis et de perspectives, bien remuneree et beneficiant de la securite d’emploi.

tout •

contact us today.

en vous remunerant pendant vos etudes,

I’education

Pour obtenir de plus amples renseignements sur ces perspectives

Courses eligible for subsidized education program include: Computers and Information, Communications, or Control Systems Electronics, Telecommunications, or Electronic Information Systems Technician Computer, Computer Networks Engineering, or Telecommunications Technician Wireless Communications, or Wireless Communications Computer Networks Technician Communications, or Computer, Engineering Technology Automotive Service Technician Aircraft Avionics Maintenance, or Engineering Technology (Avionics) Program.

difference

carriere differente!

books and

To learn more about career opportunities and benefits,

— Page 19

Si

instruments, along with a salary while in school, and you get the high-tech training you’re after. And once you graduate, you’re guaranteed a career with great challenges, opportunities, compensation and security.

*

2007

vous suivez des cours collegiaux dans un domaine technique specifique*, nous pourrions payer vos etudes pour vous permettre d’entreprendre une

you’re in college studying a key technical field,* we could pay your way to a career with a difference! If

It’s

5,

de *

carriere, veuillez

communiquer avec nous des

aujourd’hui.

Les cours admissibles au programme d' etudes subventionnees comprennent ordinateurs et information, communications ou systemes de regulation electronique, telecommunications ou technicien en systemes d’ information electroniques ordinateurs, genie des reseaux informatiques ou technicien en telecommunications communications sans fit ou technicien de reseaux informatiques sans fit communications ou ordinateurs, technologie du genie technicien a Tentretien et a la reparation

d’automobiies

:

— entretien d’avionique

de bord ou programme de technique du genie (avionique).

Fight with Ihi Canadian Forets les Forces canaditnnts

Combatttz avec

Ijiilin

c

Mill'

www*farcfts«ca 1 ” 80 §"" 8§€«§488

Canada


Page 20

— SPOKE, March

5,

News

2007

Dangerous offender Jessica Kuepfer was a challenge for police to catch after she escaped from a cruiser via the driver-side door. Police had to arms and legs to stop her from struggling. This commotion occurred as part of a scenario held by LASA to give students hands-on field experience on Feb. 16.

carry Kuepfer by her

Dangerous offender escapes on campus By BECKY SHARPE

At the scene Kara Brake,

who

acted as a

was questioning witnessabout what they saw or heard after the

police investigator,

Four dangerous offenders being transported from a correctional facility to court ended up at Conestoga College Feb. 16, after an altercation

forced

correctional

officers

to

make a detour. The officers pulled

into parking lot 1, and went to the back of the van to see what was wrong. They found one dangerous offender lying on the floor with a huge gash in his

head.

Although the incident seemed real and it was actually a safe offender transportation scenario held by LASA to give students hands-on field experience.

dangerous,

es

incident.

LASA tional

students played the roles of correc-

officers,

security officers,

insurance

crime scene investigators (CSI) and dangerous offenders. Other students involved in the consolidainvestigators,

police

exercise

into an

'

“This

The

is

cruel detainment.”

secoftd female offender,

whose name

wasn’t available as of press time, was correctional

facility

Jessica Kuepfer,

who

police said

correctional facility awaiting a

charges.

was

trial

in the

date for

scene about 20 minutes after the incident and started inspecting the van.

By

then police had

murder, ran from the vehicle and back to the

the scene barricaded and guarded by a

and check on Pollard. Police gave chase and cornered her between two cars in the parking lot. Kuepfer struggled and put up

ber of officers.

van to

try

a fight but police picked her up by her feet and

arms and put her back in the police car, where her screams of frustration could be heard. *

“You

in the

on drug trafficking

Three CSI investigators arrived on the

escaped.

officers,

were from the paramedic, broadcasting and journalism programs. After discovering one of the offenders was injured, the correctional officers removed the other three offenders from the van while paramedics helped the injured man. Dan Pollard, 23, was in critical condition accordtion

who loaded ambulance. Police said later that they thought he had died. During the scenario, one of the offenders, who had been placed into a police car, ing to paramedics at the scene

him

can’t leave

me

in

here,” she said.

num-

James Phillips, co-ordinator of LASA, was happy with the students’ role-playing responsibilities. “I’m very happy with the outcome of this scenario," he said. “The students stuck with their roles and did an excellent job. It went off very well.”

Photos by Becky Sharpe

Police ensured bystanders and the media were kept well back from the scene.

Dan

Pollard, 23,

was rushed

to hospital after being struck in the

head while

in

the back of a police van.

Digital Edition - March 05, 2007  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you