Page 1

Babies make a big spiash Swimming lessons

Poker party

Spoke

a

for infants set

positive foundation

toward a lifetime of water enjoyment.

Monday, December

4,

2006

A

BRANDON WALKER

to

Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) bargained tcmis for the Student Life in "trust

and g(K)dwill," says

the president of CSI.

Matt Jackson said CSI hired a lawyer in late August because negotiations had bogged down and they were concerned about the partnership with the college. Since then, they have had difficulty getting the college to put anything in

writing.

“A

of negotiations have been

lot

which

verbal,

do

things.

We

be

done

in

isn't the best

for

way

to

wanteef everything to writing so there’s

meet with CSI. can’t even get

adding dialogue

a

going,” Tibbits said. Tibbits

keting

CSI assumes they

said

viable

busine.ss plans.

"We

also want

when

prepared

them

more

the decisions they made, such as not

getting a signed contract, and they

to be

take negotiations

should issue an apology to the stu-

very seriously.”

dent body. Even

CSI wants

change its relationship to that of simply a tenant. "We have to have something in place to monitor where stuTibbits said

same one

to

the board isn’t the

if

made

(that

decisions relat-

ed to the Student Life Centre), they ran with the same ideas.”

CSI also printed a pamphlet

dents’ fees go.”

that they cost

The

able to control us.”

CSI hasn’t been

able to get ironed out w'ith the college regard the retail store, the bar

and bistro and the liquor licence. "Currently, we’ve pre.sented the college

with an application for agreement over those issues. If the result is positive, we should have the Student Life Centre open sooner, if not, then it’ll be later,” Jackson said.

when

also said

CSI thought

partnership,

went

through

they’ve

was an equal

but after the

come

the

The

"They

(the

at

student

don’t feel

association.

the college should

CSI used

its

AGM

it

president of the college. John willing

“under $200”to

print.

The vice-president of student affairs, Mike Dinning, sent a memo to CSI saying the pamphlet is “fac-

as an opportu-

what Jackson

nity to lay out

I

be

tually incorrect

feels

and not an accurate

are important facts students should

portrayal of the issues.”

know

Student Life time to get students involved,” Jackson said. He asked students at the meeting to support CSI by writing letters and e-mails to Tibbits. "We’re asking for support so we

Jackson was asked about pamphlet being incorrect during the AGM, he said, “I won't comment on that until the student body reads about it in Spoke next week.” However, others had plenty to

CSI and the college are still trying to finalize key policies for the Student Life Centre. Agreements about the bar bistro, the alcohol policy and the convenience store have yet to be signed. ed,” said Lee Millman, the thirdRespect, radio show on a

say.

year student

we

Third-year broadcasting students

about

When

the

it

the

is

had a heated debate with CSI director Troy Brundle, who is also a thirdyear broadcasting student, Nov. 23. “We support CSI 100 per cent by

than 200 students attended

and most .seemed to support CSI. Free pizza and pop were handed out to students before the meeting began. “I feel like I got screwed because the school wants more profit by

agreement,

more than

differently.

the meeting

isn’t equal.

Tibbits, said he’s

it

.student a.ssociation,”

More

lawyer

to the conclusion

.sees

can move forward and get what deserve,” Jackson said.

the agreement

it

CSI

Centre. “I feel

Student Life Centre was

for the

signed,

going to events at the college, but I don’t support having words put in

my

mouth.

I

my

opin-

was

print-

wasn’t asked

ion before this pamphlet

(Photo by Ross Aldworth)

who

By BJ RICHMOND

could

Conestoga College student

and

tracks,

is

taking

main she witnessed what she

action against the Harvey’s in the

this

I

‘How

thought to my.self,

man

possibly be comfortable

me?” The two previous

Shane Watson, another third-year student said

who

witnessed the debate,

Brundle

properly.

were

infractions

cited within the last 14 months.

The

believed to be inappropriate food han-

was

on Sept.

dling.

2005, regarding a failure to maintain hazardous foods at 4 C or colder. The

cafeteria after

tions student,

went

into the Harvey’s in

the cafeteria to get fries. Seitz said she

employees making hamburgers without wearing gloves. She a^ed from getting the bun out of the bag ®kutting the meat on the grill, the erjployee never once put on a pair of

saw one of

the

second non-critical infraction was cited on May 8 of this year, and involved a failure to provide and maintain adequate mechanical ventilation where required. Seitz returned to the cafeteria on Nov. 21, and saw two different employees without gloves on. Seitz said she believes

Richards brushed her off because he obviously did not take the time to correct

After she noticed the unsanitary behavSeitz talked to Pemell

Chartwells’ assistant

Richards,

doing his job

isn’t

“He was

telling the class

what we need and want. He should be asking us what we need and want.”

Millman and Watson host

manager of food

college,

the

Andy

resolved immediately.

tions Richards

During the conversation, Richards told that

the

Chartwells-operated

Harvey’s has been cited and fined

in the

Seitz said Staveley told her he to take care of the

When

was going

food handling

had told her about, Seitz

“This

is

something

being addressed and

that’s

if

obviously not

he thinks

it’s

show him how much of a joke

is,”

she said.

At

this point, Seitz

a joke.

it

really

could

CSI

Joint

need to get their acts together.” said Watson. “Now (because of the pamphlet) it’s a petty warfare between the two. I don’t like coming to the school and hearing about this war.”

curbeid

make

to

...

for

now

By

BRANDON WALKER

it

Conestoga Students her complaint.

CSI

Inc.

(CSI) will not be adding a uni-

versal bus pass for students at the college, the president

of CSI said.

“asks that sanitary practices are put in place immediately and continue for the

Matt Jackson said results from an online survey didn’t at the college. “The board made a promise that unless it was 55 per cent in favour or stronger, we wouldn’t go forward.” He said only 44 per cent supported the universal pass, while 41 per cent strongly opposed the pass and 12 per cent were neutral. Jackson said students were concerned that they couldn’t opt out of the universal bus pass, which, if supported, would have cost approximately $80 per year, but would’ve meant all students at the college paid the additional fee, whether they used the bus or not. “A lot of people were deadly opposed to it. I’m guessing they were drivers,” Jackson said. He said out of the ,500 students who were asked via their college e-mail accounts, only 290 students respond-

duration of the contract with Conestoga

ed.

complaint by writing a letter to Staveley which addressed the incident, as well as previous com-

responded

plaints

to Seitz’s

made by

other students regarding

the unsanitary conditions of the cafeterias.

Dated Nov. 22, CSI’s letter to Staveley mentioned the Harvey’s employees were “not complying with basic sanitary expectations, and that the employ-

The

letter

went on

and

College,”

in

that

unsanitary practo state that

students

feel

CSI

the

actions of Chartwells “are a representa-

way Chartwells view

their

customers and that the belief is they do not deserve the quality food that patrons

at

other establishments are enti-

support adding the pass

1

Jackson said he didn’t think CSI would survey students again about the pass next year, but possibly

in the not-

too-distant future. “It won’t go through until Grand River Transit improves its services. They need to add more routes to

the college, with quicker service.”

He

also said the

GRT

needs to do a better job of promoting the benefits of pub-

tled to.”

threatened to go to

tell

home.”

tion of the

said Staveley denied them.

I’ll

my

issue.

she brought up the previous infrac-

by the Regional Municipality of

other infractions. “I stopped dead in

and

Staveley,

Waterloo’s food inspection department for

past

to

station.

Andy

After speaking to Staveley, Seitz went

tices.”

explained the situation.

Seitz

hit

1

radio

Universal bus pass

to report the inci-

dent to the health inspector,

ees are engaging

at

“After telling

was going

food service director for Chartwells

which operates the on-campus Harvey’s. Seitz said Richards responded positively to her complaint, thanked her and told her he was going to get the issue

services,

I

She added since she got nowhere with Richards, Seitz went to the the situation.

sanitary gloves.

iour,

a critical infraction cited

first

13,

The incident happened on Nov. 15», when Danielle Seitz, a first-year business administration - materials and opera-

inspector.

(Staveley)

FM

They said they’ve received numerous calls from frustrated students. “I think CSI and the college 88.3.

Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) and the Regional Municipality of Waterloo health

admitting this to

Conestoga’s

started the debate

with Brundle.

Harvey’s accused of food infraction A

— No. 25

the

they attend meet-

We

ings with us.

attended

ently-run

He

37th Year

Andrea Diaz, a second-year management student at the college, said she was frustrated by the meeting. "CSI should be held responsible for

that

is

who

student

CSI has had some major stumbling blocks regarding policy.

said.

said

three issues

governors calls CSI handout

said

printed at least 1.200 copies of the pamphlet, called CSI vs. Cone.stoga College - The Constant Battle, and

taken them longer to respond,”

He

of

meeting.

can’t trust the college.

"Where we have concerns CSI doesn’t .seem to present

new Timmy’s,”

a

JacLson said CSI’s annual general meeting (ACM). Nov. 28. "As an independ-

The college has

struggled with accepting that and

Jackson

Board

Ibrahim Fareh, a second-year mar-

coliege) want total control of the

it’s

Coiiege responds to CSi pamphiet

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

informing students about the meeting and some of the facts that were to be discussed. Jackson said CSI

accountability.

Casino

with $30,000.

journalism students

Conestoga College, Kitchener, Ont.

“We

Centre

newsroom

learning

into Fallsview

$200 and walks out

between CSI and college heats up

Battle By

Student walks with

Continued on Page 2

lic

transportation.


Page 2

— SPOKE, December

Now ..with Random

4,

News

2006

Accusations rileTibbits

deep thoughts

By STEPHANIE IRVINE

Conestoga College

questions answered by

random students

A

Conestoga Students

the weirdest or worst

Christmas present you've ever received?

(CSI)

Inc.

vs. CSI Conestoga College - The Constant

document

entitled

an

received

Battle,

What is

time of day and have no right to supervise,” said Tibbits. “Already

official

because

how

I

never knew

to play.”

Gustavo Flores-Gonzales, first-year computer

programming analyst

money with

with Tibbits.

half a million dollars

an operational matter,

it

dent has decided to send out a four-

page pamphlet declaring what rats and awful people we are,” said president of John Tibbits, Conestoga College. The CSI pamphlet was distributed throughout the Doon campus on Nov. 22 and has also been available for viewing on CSI’s website. In it is a listing of issues regarding the Student Life Centre they say haven’t been resolved between them and college administration.

was CSI board

college’s response letter

as well as their president.

goes

administration

the

it,

all

through CSI’s document item by

were eight and every one is

points

there are three outstanding issues: a final

agreement on an alcohol polibar/bistro operations and a operations agreement.

retail

“One of

the fundamental princi-

we cannot

ed bar access

agree to

unlimit-

is

noon

froiri

morning,”

“(CSI’s)

idea

two

to

said

in

Tibbits.

somehow

that

because the students paid $8 million they have the right to drink

from noon

Jason

until

two

in the

morning

just isn’t going to happen.”

He

would be the board of governors and the college who would be responsible. “Matt Jackson’s gone in May,” said Tibbits. “I’d like to think I’m

Bartlett,

second-year

said ultimately

it

going to be here for another five to

police foundations

10 years, and

I

certainly don’t

want

be picking up the pieces in the if .someone cuts themselves in half because

got

sticks to

man’s thong.”

second-year

of good

change

could live with that, but how do you throw the CSI out permanently?” Tibbits said. “That’s just not going to work - where are they going to go?”

some alcohol

He added

in the bar.”

the alcohol policy

is

a

and non-negotiable. are not having alcohol at any

legal matter

“We

but to student

the potential negatives

is

because of

this dispute,

and added he expected more from Jackson.

‘The CSI president is a full-time employee, and one would

and landlord.

“I

the

he said.

faith,”

to students to

all

Tibbits said the worst part of the situation

CSI wants

do now

scholarships and bursaries as an act

paid

expect a higher level of preparation

because, quite frankly, they were

from him, one would expect greater respect from him,” said Tibbits. He said he has no question CSI’s strategy is to embarrass the college into folding because they don’t want to deal with it. “So our strategy has to be we’ll take this pounding, we have to stay the course in this instance and hope that people come to their senses,”

embarrassed.”

said Tibbits.

Dinning said there’s an agreement that states there would be a retail

discussion about sending the col-

Another issue of contention

is

that of the retail space.

how

interesting

“It’s

this

came

“As soon as we

up,” said Tibbits.

started talking to (Spoke) about the

Tim

Hortons, then (CSI) got angry

Dinning said there was a

lot

of

space in the Student Life Centre

lege’s response to all students, not

and the terms under which it would be allowed to operate are to be

just the

negotiated.

He

said the principle

that the college has

place

always had

in

they would try to have a

is

CSI board.

“We do

obviously have the

ty to circulate

shop it was immediately approved and they now have a massage area over there that was the photo

it

“We

said.

that

e-mail,” he

consciously decided not

we

because

We

did not think

did not want to

We

inflame the situation. it

didn't

to the student population as

a whole because that

abili-

to every student on

campus through

this

send

was

solution

we

did not think

in the interest

down

of finding a

the road.”

StucJent voices concern about Harvey’s Continued from Page 1 message

Seitz said she feels the that

Chartwells

is

sending by not

proper

the

precautions

while dealing with people’s food that

lowly students de.serve a quality in the serv-

Nov. 22

was the first formal CSI this year. She CSl's job to speak on

letter

to

They (Chartwells)

are not going to

it

is

behalf of the students and they

approach the problem as a united front as opposed to an indi-

will

vidual student. “It

to

CSI, said students have

come

to

to vent their concerns about

Chartwells before; however, Seitz the

first

person to

make

a for-

mal complaint about the situation. Stanciu added CSI has previously spoken with Chartwells in meetings about complaints students have made, however, the

is

our duty to

Seitz said the day after she

CSI,

all

the Harvey’s

went employees

were wearing gloves, but she thinks it is

Stanciu, vice-president of

incident. “1 think they

said

wrong, and 1 will fight end even if 1 have to be the one that’s hung out to dry for

Roxy

this

owe an apology

take the next step.”

this to the

about

action taken by

ice of their food. “It’s not appro-

was

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!

age) not to CSI,

view on

Tibbits said

within

(from the college’s percent-

profits

“This presi-

it.”

to

the revenue and

all

have a redundancy Of services. “When they first brought forward

CSI broadcasting

give

do

this.”

Ryan Kovarik,

the

down

it

“What weTe prepared

dent (Jackson) has a very different

priate. It’s

wasn’t a

was

college admin-

Hortons CSI turned 24 hours. is

Falconer (the previous CSI president) really thought the

when

50 per cent of their from an expanded Tim

profits

the col-

“Justin

student success side of this

Tibbits said

istration offered

appropriate.

is

It

activity fees.”

it

compromised

Stag Shop.

made with

Tibbits agreed with him.

they’re an

...

independent corporation, guess what they’re going to do? They’re going to come to this board and ask for more money and raise student

to

taking

“A rose thong from the

mem-

CSI are not necessarily supportive of some of the agreements bers of

think they’re going to lose

limited space available, rather than

Brittany Streaker,

nursing

ficulties is that the current

lege.

“We

money, and that matters from our point of view” he said. “Five years from now when they’re in the hole

vice-president of

student affairs, said one of the dif-

the past board

they don’t have a business plan.

range of activities because of the

a window.”

second-year

Mike Dinning,

CSI would make

a retail store because

woodworking centre

me

something from the East. It was a wing or a fin or something that

reputation

because of drinking and unsupervised events after-hours,” he said.

Tibbits said college administration doesn’t think

to

they had

“Some guy

developing very

is

negative

a

to that of tenant

the

counts.”

and the college quickly

their relationship with the college

ples

the thought that

“I live very close to the college,

Kevin Mullan, secretary-treasurer of the board of governors, said

first-year

“It’s

in

Tibbits.

cy,

respiratory therapy

this.

underpinning of the agreement, not

embarrassingly erroneous,” said

Ashley Nant,

we gave

“If

view on

the bar,” said Tibbits.

“It’s interesting there

grandmother.”

Tibbits added college administra-

item and points out what they call

factual

my

et cetera.”

“substantial errors.”

police foundatio?is

“A sewing machine

be discussed before we could approve it.”

on this alcohol policy I can tell you right now thefaculty union would be over here like a shot, as would a lot of parents and other people,” he said. Board member Len Carter agreed

In

from

three issues of concern that needed to

“Normally we wouldn’t get into something like this because we

members

first-year

from the

tion is not alone in their

The

Mike Bisson,

the toga party, complaints

community about students being

ward the convenience store we went back and picked out two or

nors meeting.

sent on Nov. 27 to

‘Pink fuzzy handcuffs.”

signifi-

they brought for-

drunk

but unfortunately the student presi-

game

-

this fall

Wk

approved,”

“When

Dinning.

response from college administration at the Nov. 27 board of gover-

consider

“A Scrabble

we’ve had issues

cant issues around poor planning of

immediately

going to be short-lived.

“I think

the

students.

out of the line of fire l^je because they have done some^K wrong for a long time, and 1 amvery impressed no one has gotten sick or there has been no adverse get

reaction to this.”

As of Nov. 29, Seitz had not called the health inspector, however,

she said she

is

not going to for-

the fact that they’ve been fined or

get about the incident.

sited two times previously is enough evidence that they take this

“I’m here for at least three to four years, so they have a long,

very lightly, that they don’t care

journey ahead of them because I will fight this, and I don’t care if I have to fight it for

about the students, they don’t care about their jobs, they don’t care about the quality of the service, and it’s wrong.” Seitz added she believes the stu-

dents have the right to be upset

long

three years.”

Staveley refused to comment on behalf of Chartwells regarding the

food-handling incident.


News was

audience

in\'ol\ed."

saiti

Eagle.

A reccnl business etiquette night put on by tour second-year management studies stiklents raiseil more than $65 for the management studies graduation eeremony.

Murim agreeil. aiUling. “The only we were rlisappointetl in was

Allison Murfin. Charlanna Agar,

Leach and Laura Lagle eoin dinaterl the e\ ent as part of one trl

the effort to

who

come

dill

that

and

out. but the peo-

ei)me out

tioned that the\ thing

that

did they

all

learn

mensome-

students

the

was

ad\eriising

agreed

that

not the issue with

professionals from the KitchenerW’aterloo area who spt)ke oti a \ ari-

attendance, since they had repre-

ety of topics to prepare students for the workforce.

send mass e-mails to busitiess students and post flyers. They fell attendance was di)wn because of timing issues.

"There were no glitches in the night at all. E\erything went really well. H\eryone was on time, all the speakers were great and the

want

sentatives speak to

\

arious classes,

"I think because it was a Thursday night it was more diffi-

— Page 3

people to come out because people don't live near the

to

of people

lot

come back

tion'l

to the school at

night." saiti Murlln.

Agar added.

think

"I

luture w'c shoultl

tit)

the

for

ending

it

at

and starting at school so mt)re people are art)untl." li\'e.

enjoyed the

e\ening." All

leaturerl lixe business

were hoping

i)f

sehoirl. anti a

more students would ha\e matle

their classes.

The e\ent

We

the turnout.

ple

•laekie

eidl for

a lot

thing

2006

4,

make Miss Manners proud

Etiquette night would ^ THOMPSON By ANNELISE

SPOKE, December

Despite the lower-ihan-anlieipat-

ed attendanee. they all agreed that planning the event was a great learning e.xperienee.

was

"It

really benelieial

actually

to

plan

(or us

and execute

a

"We about how much

project like this." said Agar.

got

learn

to

goes

efiorl

figuring out

was

inlt)

all

everything, and

the minute details

a bigger prt)ces.s than

we

real-

ly realiz.cd."

(Photo by Anneh'se Thompson}

Allison Murfin

(left to right),

Dave

Berrett, Jackie

Leach, Matt Jackson, Doug Leach, Charlanna Agar, Kathy Thomson, Laura Eagle and Len Luksa are some of the people who helped make a business etiquette night on Nov. 23 a success.

Annual fund benefits college People who have an association

Conestoga are asked to make a donation

with

By VANESSA BUTLER Christmas

is

certainly a time

and a great place to make a donation is to Conestoga's annual fund. The money is used in many capacities. It benefits your program, your campus and the college as for giving,

(Photo by Leanne Mountford)

Sarah Martinek (left to right), Sarah Wallace, Jessie Beitz, Bev Stone, Greg White, Pam Bunker, Laura Potje and Farrah Rodgers are just a few of the students and faculty who took part in the Skills Work! for Women networking dinner on Nov. 21 at the Kitchener Holiday Inn.

Students help shed

on

MOUNTFORD

than 100 young

women

between nine and dinners held each year and take place as far away as Ottawa and Niagara. 1

lis-

Bev Stone,

tened with rapt attention as they

were ists,

machinand hair

told to pursue jobs as

engineers,

chefs

dressers.

On

Nov. 21, Conestoga students and faculty attended the Skills Work! For Women networking dinner to

show high school

The event took place

at

the

Holiday Inn on Fairway Road, Kitchener, where 2 students and mentors gathered. Amy Ross, alumni officer for Skills Canada, who has organized networking dinner for the last 1

Biee

years, said

1

it's

be able to watch

really nice to

someone being

inspired.

“You can look around the room at this event and you can see the light bulb go on for girls,” she said. There are

lots

and

lots

ent careers out there, and to really

know what

to

of differit’s

go

hard after,

said Ross.

a teacher in the elec-

apprenticeship program

trical

at

Conestoga College, said the networking dinner is a great opportunity to learn about skill trades. “It

takes the fear out of

it,”

she

said.

Megan

girls the

benefits of a career in the trades.

1

dent

at

Maceiras, a Grade 9 stu-

College Heights secondary

school, said she

came because

it

COM DEV Elliot

International Ltd.

competed

at Skills

Canada

twice in college, winning a silver

and bronze medal. “I was the only girl in my program to graduate,” she said. The second speaker was Farrah

you don’t have the opportunity to meet with people who really love their jobs, you don’t get exposed to those things,” she said. The networking dinners for

Rodgers, who is a third-year general machinist apprentice. She works

women

trades into consideration.

“If

started in the

seven years ago, and

community

now

there are

at

VMS

tooling.

Rodgers told the high school dents during her speech

Job security

is

to

stu-

take

a definite bonus.

have some association with

the

college,

including college

the

in

Dec. 31 will qualify the giver to a tax receipt for the 2006 tax year.

you wish

drop off your it by campus mail, the deadline is Dec. 22. If you have misplaced your 2006 pledge card or wish additional copies, or you’d like more information about the annual fund, If

to

donation or send

The alumni association has a

Any donation received by the annual fund and postmarked by

brochure

which they would

their donation used.

that

like to see

They

are

Monica Himmelman at 3459 or mhimmelman

also a.sked to indicate whether

contact

or not they were a graduate of

ext.

Architect.

the college and if so, their pro-

@conestogac.on.ca.

Bunker went to the nationals for the Skills Canada competitions for two years, winning a silver and a She was also on

the dean’s hon-

list.

The message Bunker

There were three spotlight speak-

was Linda Elliot who graduated from the computer engineering technology program at Conestoga College. Elliot now works for

who

program at Conestoga College. She now works at Andrew Bousfield

our speaker

volunteer with

allows donors to select an area

careers in trades.

first

a

The third spotlight speaker was Pam Bunker who was in the archi-

bronze medal.

The

service foundation stu-

is

produced

would show her what she could do and she wanted to know salaries for

ers at the event.

equipment,

learning resource materials and

school.

engineering

campaign

taking place once a year. Pledge cards are sent to various people

this year.

scholarships,

assistance,

to the college.

construction

an ongoing

human

student

as

She also said her goal is to become a shop teacher at a high

tectural

fall

enhancement of facilities. Dana Stumpf, a first-year

well

bursary

alumni association. She had the task of calling all the donors who have contributed to the 2006 annual fund thus far, and thank them for their contribution

she said.

is

fundraiser, with a

employees and members of the board of governors, alumni association members, program advisory committee members and this year, the ’80s graduates. As of Nov. 25 the annual fund had raised more than $13,000

dent,

women

different options for

By LEANNE More

light

gram of study. The annual lund

told

stu-

dents during her speech was. “If

you

really

achieve

want

Sarah Wallace, eral

to

do

it,

you can

it.”

who

is in

the gen-

machinist apprentice program

at

Conestoga College, attended the networking dinner in high school and it was a really good idea. She came this year to let girls know what her trade is all about. Upon completion of her program

thought

in

February, Wallace will return to

Engel Canada building moulding machines, where she worked during her co-op year. Wallace is the only female remaining in her class.

work

at

injection

“I far,”

can’t believe I’ve

she said.

come

this

(Photos by Vanessa Butter)

The alumni association presented Welcome Home awards to

Conestoga students who have parents who are alumni

of

the college.

Above

left:Tess

Charbonneau

student, poses with her

(right),

a

first-year

Welcome Home award

marketing

at a

ceremony Nov. 6. Above right: Justin Barrs, a first-year office administration student, poses with his Welcome Home award at the same ceremony.


Page 4

— SPOKE, December

Commentary

2006

4,

flags should

All

be lowered to half-mast There is an interesting debate going on between the college and some of the college's staff and faculty. It all started last year during the college strike when a faculty member at Conestoga unexpectedly died. Faculty picketing outside the

campus were surprised

the flags

weren't lowered to half-mast out of respect for Ardele Darling, the

member who had passed away. When Walter

faculty

OPSEU

Boettger. the president of

Local 237, which represents

college faculty, approached the college about lowering the flags

he was told the flag pole holding the college flag

to half-mast,

was broken. He

insisted that all flags should be

flown

at half-

mast, not just the college flag, out of respect for the faculty

member. The college then removed

the college flag from the broken pole, on one of the other flagpoles and lowered it. According to college policy, when a current faculty member, staff member or student passes away, the college flag is lowered to

put

it

half-mast.

Not the Canadian flag, not the Ontario flag, just the college flag. the issue was discussed during a college council meeting Nov. 13, Conestoga’s president John Tibbits said, “Ultimately, I’d be embarrassed to lower the Canadian flag after the death of a stu-

When

dent or employee.” Tibbits said he

other schools.

was worried

“My

is

when you

Canadian flag when anyone dies, people are you guys doing down there?” Tibbits should rest easy

would stand out from

that the college

concern

knowing

start

lowering the

will start asking,

“What

that the college all

won’t appear an when some-

flags

one from the college community dies. All flags are lowered to half-mast when someone from Wilfrid Laurier University or the University of Waterloo passes away. In fact, the same procedure is followed at the University of Guelph. The website for the University of Guelph describes the procedure of lowering all flags to half-mast “as a gesture of respect and condolence for the funeral day of a deceased employee, student or past

members of the Conestoga community be

treated with

same gesture of respect and condolence?

ting only the college flag at half-mast after the death of a

even Heritage Canada’s

although

college,

member website

(www.canadianheritage.gc.ca) contradicts college policy.

According

Canada website, “Flags are flown at a sign of mourning ... On occasions

to the Heritage

the half-mast position as

requiring that one flag be flown at half-mast,

all

flags

flown togeth-

er should also be flown at half-mast.”

Unless the college there’s simply

one

in

thing,

is

no reason not

to

pays

dividends

lower as

It

all

of the flags

when some-

strong, tough, powerful, physical,

testosterone-filled

Males who don’t measure up to this image are

next level. If things progress to the

ridiculed and labelled a loser and

intervenes,

an outcast.

flying.

The scary thing

is,

TV

the ’80s with

men

He-Man and

each synonymous with marketing violence to children.

much

that

the toys, and spent

don’t

take

lip

from anyone.

culinity then

you have no choice

posed

Action stars

my younger

Diesel and Sylvester

status.

from

son

anyone.

at

so

stupid,

bumping

like

into a per-

a bar, that they are quite

are

tough,

What

pro-

macho

When two men

get

almost

is

like

teaching violence

their

characters

men;” guys who

tary

faces

it’s

Hopefully

on the Discovery channel.

They

stare

each

other

the

solution

problem? Awareness

each

in

watching some wildlife documen-

"real

because you

Just

easy to walk away from, but many

other’s

thinking

the

people don’t.

be

to

Why?

accidentally lip

sup-

provoke you into

something

portray “real men;” guys don’t take

person's

walked away from a fight? Most male skirmishes are usually over

thinking their characters

who

to

a

either

altercation or to lower your social

Stallone program us into

down.

will be

our is

is

1

.

children

never

the

this

to

No.

next

more peace

And that

acceptable.

generation

loving.

Spoke is

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College Editor: Eric

letters to the

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

editor. Letters

Murphy

d

Advertising Manager: Jessica Blumenthal, Kristin Grifferty Spoke Online Editor: Meghan Krellel Production Managers: Tara Ricker, Brandon Walker Circulation Manager: Nick Casselli

Photo Editors: Adam

Black,

Adam Hannon,

Tiffany

McCormick, Jon Molson and BJ Richmond

for verification.

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

be published. Letters should be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter letters will

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca Website: www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke ,

for publication.

The

Vin

like

are

and Sylvester Stallone program us

welcome

No unsigned

these

guys. Action stars like Vin Diesel

of respect

into

contacted

labelled a chicken or wuss. All

many

day

to

you’re

fight

at

men

grown

grammed

today's

in

you decide

a

is

Think about it for a minute. There I was, age six, playing games where the good guy killed the bad guy. This is the mindset many boys grew up with, and it’s where the violent mindset begins

Even

tirne if

walk away from

but to teach them “who’s boss.”

brother.

portray

Spoke welcomes

Most of the

If

someone challenges your mas-

shots

a

one start

witness

masculinity and

loved those

no fists

one of the most prim-

had many of

I

I

and the

to the

society.

I

Transformers,

It is

then

to take the

match up

level,

itive things to

are

grew up in shows like G.I.

raised to be like this.

Joe,

next

and

“gesture

if

need be, they are ready

doesn’t cost the college any-

a

condolence.”

Letters are

trying to prove to the other that

but doesn’t end.

simply fighting for the sake of fighting,

our community passes away. yet

What does it mean to be mascuSome would say it’s to be

playing war with

Tibbits said the college follows Heritage Canada’s policy by put-

of the

to be violent

line?

shows so

president or chancellor.”

the

programmed

are

intimidating.

oddball by following the practice of lowering

Shouldn’t

Men

Address correspondence to: Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

Editor,

N2G 4M4

Dr.,

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.


Commentary

How

important

Christmas

SPOKE, December

more than presents

is

City sidewalks, busy sidewalks, in holiday style, in the air

Christmas? If say nothing I’ll be given something anyway. I’m thankful for what receive but it’s only recently that I’ve wanted nothI

dressed

are your parents

you?

to

there’s a feeling of Christmas. Children laughing, people passing, meeting smile after smile and on

every street corner, you’ll hear; ver bells, silver bells,

Christmastime Bing Crosby Bells in

By JORDEN FELICIANO

One

ot the reasons he

days a week

When go

I

woke up on Nov. 24

to class,

assumed

1

prepared

ting

was

I

9 a.m.

at

when

10 a.m. class, but

woke up

get-

begin another

to

routine Friday. I’d get up for a

to

1

had a weird vibe. My dad has been working in a factory .seven days a week for the past two years, and he works on at 9,

1

Honda he bought so get his old Toyota to

when

That’s

away

usually sleeps

he and

.so

spent a

1

1

tionate

toward each other, and

when

left

1

time

first

since

his

of

all

this,

incredible

bed

day

all

My

dad usually leaves for work around 5 a.m. and I woke up assuming he would be working. Well, they say never assume

make an

things or you’ll

of

me and

ass out

you. I’m sure you’ve

heard the saying before. over

make

I

sure

1

up

dad wasn’t

then called an ambulance.

was taken from Cambridge to Grand River Hospital father

Kitchener where he cuiTently

getting treatment for a “mystery

is

ill-

according to the doctor.

my

10 a.m. class after

the commotion, but couldn’t go to the hospital with my mom and grandma because I had a test all

my

in

1

p.m. class.

1

didn’t get to

the hospital until after that

done, which was around

was

3.

The chunk of time just gave me more time to think about what could be wrong with my dad instead of focasing on .studying, and doing my ^st. My dad’s father passed away four Hbars ago from lung cancer, caused by smoking, and my dad who is 46 now, has smoked since he was 2. The first thing that crossed my mind was cancer, and that wasn’t a good thought at all. (My dad went through tests at the ho.spital when he was admitted to 1

emeigency, and thankfully, they didn’t find I

any

cancer)'..

started getting flashbacks of

the things

my

dad’s done for

all

me

over the years; Waking up to

take

when

1

at 6 a.m. hockey practices was a kid and working

me

to

overtime hours during the week so I

could go to hockey and soccer

tournaments

family; takes

it

how

someyou to

in the

the conscious

be close with

your parents, they’ve sacrificetd

a

lot

United States.

Basically,

1

challenge and urge

anybody reading

whether you live with both parents, one parent, or you live on your own and only .see your parents once in a while, to hug them, kiss them and tell them you love them. You never know when the privilege of doing those things will be taken away, and you wouldn’t want them to leave this earth without you doing these things

first,

this,

see are stres.sed out thinking of the next gift to buy.

The only children town are

the toy

in

hear down-

I

telling their

mum

or dad

window

the

The problem today

is

to

is

a

parents

spend

quality time with their children.

They attempt ing

their

to

kids

make up by material

giv-

items

instead.

So, do this as often as you can, and make a conscious effort to be close to your parents; they’ve sacrificed a lot to give you breath and to help you survive in this crazy

world.

Lastly,

they’re

appreciated

let

them know more often.

Forget birthdays and Mother’s and Father’s Day,

it

in the

and

breaklast,

I’m guilty of walking through the mall and saying “Oh, I’d love to have that!’’ We’re all materialistic.

try our new items. There was always a time where we didn’t speak because we were busy with our trinkets. We wouldn’t .see each

The point I’m trying to make is we’re losing what Christmas really means. Christmas for some individuals about the birth of Christ. He was born Christmas Eve and was sent from God to save us all and is

give us eternal

Christmas has developed into a materialist

holiday.

Now, you’re

not true. I spend time with family on Christmas. However, you live in a society surrounded by

other until dinner.

There’s a famous saying, “Nothing lasts forever.” Nothing you receive will last. Granted, be thankful

for

don’t

it

let

But

get.

away from

friends or family.

life.

Life

For others it’s a chance to rest from school or work and get home. Or so it used to be. When I go home for Christmas I’m always asked the same question. What do you want for

what you take time

is

the longest thing

anyone

can have.

Use

most precious time of

this

year to

make memories with your

loved ones; don’t waste time dabbling with trinkets.

A memory

lasts a lifetime.

Minor changes could make major difference in road safety A

few minor changes

much

driving

Two

way make

in the

veering off into other lanes.

Another huge problem is that the and curbsides are all getting smaller, so v'here do we lanes, shoulders

safer.

of the biggest problems for

Jenn Sprach

drivers are night driving and driv-

ing in precipitation.

become brighter, causing drivers coming in the opposite direction to become momentarily blinded. It is especially bad where there are no street lights because it takes longer for your eyes to adjust to the sudden brightness. Good examples of roads that are difficult to drive on at night because of traffic travelling in the opposite direction are

Highway

8

near the bridge crossing the river

right?!

my fammorning, congregates

noticed

materialist holiday

I

Night driving has become a bigger issue over the years because

...

away

downstairs to hand out gifts. By a.m. we’re done and we rush off to

put the snow.

Hello people, this

Canada gets snow.

Opinion

headlights have

I called my mom, who had to come home from work, and she

missed

Make

effort to

for school

my

the stairs saying doing well.

1

that

I

comes together

eats

cfevelopetj into a

time

take

1

The people

roads are designed could

mornings

in the

get

came down

ness’’

at the

items

from family. ily

the

likely sitting there thinking, that’s

is

it

go downtown

I

Material

Last Christmas

Christmas has

don’t have the energy

was

the house, frantically

in

who

long.

thing tragic or difficult for

and clean random things around

My

in

was distraught during and it was the first time

The importance of

...

who comes to

loved him

weekend.

when my grandma,

getting ready

1

and it was time to fix it. I now hug and kiss my dad every time I leave the hospital and plan- on doing so when he gets home, whenever that is, and although I hug and kiss my mom on occasion. I’ve started doing that more often since that frightening morning.

up.

two

buyers who need the gizmos. You’re guilty of

being materialistic. The media pushes us to believe that we never have enough.

Christmas.

ing are a scarce sight.

must-have.

and

that’s

in a

impulse hottest

they can say “I

want anything.” At that point you realize how much is missed because you were too busy with your new gaming system or trying on new clothes.

downtown

love

I

at

But when

first

realize that things Just aren’t right,

thotigh,

but

also the

didn’t get out of

knew something was

I

years

that

hospital for long periods of time

my dad because he never misses a day of work, regardless of his physical

when

I’ve only lived in the city for

four

house while she stayed

the

that

well, but that’s not like

Christmas

rural setting.

funeral

in a long time 1 offered to relieve her stress by doing things around

Nov. 23 because he wasn’t feeling

He

him

told

I

was

It

My mom

where he was present at every game and practice. My dad didn’t go to work on

condition.

father’s

knows how

sports,

first

there, it marked the hugged and kis.sed him

I

the rest of the

of time together since I stopped playing organized youth

the ho.spital the

day he was

haven’t really

lot

to

the

in

people smiling and children laugh-

time

day,

me, as much

written for

ed over the last couple of years, 1 allowed that to happen. My dad and usually aren’t very affec-

around four

afternoon and

to .school.

opposed

city as

was

to reach a point in

when

life

don’t

Opinion

about Christmas

folk

People have their

recorded Silver

first It

ing.

it’s

Kitchener

years ago.

in the

could

1

city

sil-

as our relationship has deteriorat-

weekends simply because, he says, he was nothing ekse better to do Saturday and Sunday mornings. He comes home from work the

that

go

hit

it

.seven

pay off the new

to

is

works

I

Becky Sharpe

in the city.

1951.

— Page 5

2006

4,

and Highway 401 Both of the.se places have concrete barriers dividing traffic.

By

making these

bit

taller,

it

barriers a

little

would, allow less light to

pass to the opposite side of the

road which would create a safer driving environment.

Another thing people often complain about lines

This lines

the

is

not being able to see the

on the road due is

to rain or

snow.

a problem because

many

on the road are white and

snow covers them you

them

until the

When

driving

road in

is

almost

the

if

can't see

rain

clear.

is I

Canada, and

hate to be the

one to break it to you, but it’s not going anywhere, so when designing roads and buildings create a place to put the snow.

only a matter of time

If not, it’s

before Kitchener will have to adopt the expensive process of shipping

the

snow

out

Toronto has

By planning

your

of the

city

like

to do.

for places to put the

headlights reflect off the road and

white

they reflect white.

cleared faster and snowbanks will

White and dull yellow just are not good choices for lines on the road. It may .sound and look silly but if

be less likely to be

reflective paint or unusual colours

these areas can make excellent garden areas or extra parking spaces.

neon orange or neon pink were used there would be no mistaking where the lines are. This would ensure drivers are always aware of where their lane is and reduce the chance of people like

stuff,

roads will be able to be

all

over the

making everyone’s life safer and easier. Plus, in the summertime road,

It

helps

all

the

way

around.

These changes may cost money to implement but when compared to the cost of accidents,

it

is

cheap-

er in the end.

should be done

monthly. Don't you see the faction your parents get

satis-

on those

CLASSIFIED

special days throughout the year? if you did that regularly? Your parents are your parents whether you like them or not and whether or not you agree with all their rules and advice they give you. So please, for your sake, let them know everything they do for you is appreciated and that deep down inside, you love them. Don’t let something scare you

Imagine

into doing these things like it’s

trust

I

did,

not a very pleasant feeling,

me.

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Page 6

— SPOKE, December

Commentary

2006

4,

Both CSI and the college are to blame There's been a storm hrev\ing between the college and Conestoga

Students Inc. (CSI) since the

day

of

arri\ed

when

school

unfinished

an

find

to

first

students

Student Life Centre. The clouds

have only gotten darker since then and the winds are really starting to pick up.

Students at the college have been unknowingly stuck in a tug-of-war between the college and CSI, due to w hat appears to be a power struggle.

The

college

CSI

students

w'ants

to

being stubborn not wanting an e.xpanded Tim Hortons. They went believe

CSI hired a lawyer

August and agreements must now be in writing, something CSI should have insisted upon from the start. has told the college

in

(Photo

I

on getting those agreements

First-year business-accounting student, Abdullah Zamel, learns

final-

far

releasing

as

information

ized.

force

CSI

sign

to

There appears

confidential

Spoke, trying to

to

on

for

the

for not opting in.

enough incom-

plete entirely because of the col-

They printed around 1.300 colour pamphlets called, CSI vs. Conestoga - The Constant Battle, describing some of the difficulties CSI has had with the college. According to CSI president Matt lege.

Jackson, those around $200 and the students at

pamphlets cost it's safe to assume Conestoga paid for

them.

The pamphlet

two

show CSI

the

in

year that have really

last

opened the board's eyes as to how the college views us. I don't think the college has accepted

(student)

the

how

fast

association

has

grown.” Jackson said.

seems

CSI

can be excused for their ignorance by getting a lawyer after the fact, after the Student Life Centre was more than halfway completed, and then they asked for everything in writing. It

like

in

feels they

truth is, the blame game gone on doesn't really matCSI and the college entered a

a student with

money

little

express

the

on a regular

store

Get

in,

when

it

comes

my

weekly chore of

filling

Unfortunately,

my

deteriorates

the

at

“handy” lanes

my

often

of these rather, their mis-

or,

greedy customer avoids any eye contact with those behind him or

Opinion

her in

fault

tion

is

there; they are usually the

moving lines in the store; but what justifies breaking the rule fastest

The

sign that

above these

sits

above the cashier? What makes certain shoppers more special than others? Why should some wait in

The that's

rule, not a suggestion.

the

ter.

for the bar/bistro

partnership in order to bring the

be eight-, 10- or 2-itenis-or-less, that is the magical number those

easy

Student Life Centre to the college,

venturing into these lanes need to

Obviously shoppers can't be

so they equally share the blame.

There have been times I have found myself putting items back because, if I don't, I would be over my limit and would have to wait behind the full-fledged

that big of a rush if they

shoppers.

basket in hand, stuck behind a

is

agreement for the retail space, and for the alcohol policy. What the pamphlet fails to mention is the fact that the college and CSI did have a di.scussion over those agreements, but nothing was ever put in writing.

"We went

agreement (with the college) with trust and goodwill, but that's been tested. I don't think we'd go into another agreement on trust and goodwill again," Jackson said. Unfortunately, trust and goodwill don't hold up in court. into

Now they've

both got to stop acting

like children

and move on with the

original plan.

The only

this

is

thing that does matter

students are missing out on what

they were promised by that part-

couple of cash registers

first

I

guess for some, however, rules

made to be broken. It makes me crazy to see people manoeuvre their more-than-full

money

get

back.

a it

live by.

carts into the

a

is

Whether

1

Student Life Centre with a bar and bistro. Anything less than that before the year is up and students should be given their nership;

are

few express lanes and

away with

Let

it.

Sure, the tempta-

snow,

it

Christmas

is

quickly

ing, with less than a all

the

ing? sible

1

long lines while others take the way out via the express lanes?

to

fit

dise

in

managed

half of the store's merchantheir

into

wobbly-wheeled

So

there

am,

I

my

barely-filled

pushing a cart that could potentially feed a small

customer country.

As

I

look around

express line

is still

I

realize the

the shortest so

I

have no choice but to stand there.

let

it

to the lack

remember

(Photo by Peggy O'Neill)

of living

build-

a year in

my

where

can

I

Cara Lichty

Two-year-old Rachel Fountain and jolly old Saint Nick pose together in Fairview Mall. People can choose from a number of

one

they are; patchy grass doesn't do

The

first

them

heavy snowfall of the season is one of my most favourite feelings in the world. It brings out such a feeling of nostalgia and gets me more excited about Christmas than any shortbread cookie could. Now that Christmas is so close every anxious family has put up twinkle lights on their roofs and giant blow-up Santas on their

photo packages ranging from $24.99 a single of your photo with Santa.

different family value

$34.99 or

just

to

loveable decorations don't

same

effect

have

without a thick

layer of soft snow lying all around them. The reflection of the lights off the

that

gro-

snow makes them what

like

as a

one of these express lanes. I may not last the day but would make sure anyone breaking the number-of-items rule, even those only one item over their

cashier

in

I

got

limit,

deserve.

I

the

they

attention

would ask these greedy

behind them why they felt their time was more valuable than the others'. If

I

didn't like their answer,

and I doubt anyone would ever muster up my idea of an acceptable response, I would send them packing; right to the back of the longest line in the store.

let

snow

it

snowmen mak-

the

is

still

one holiday

not

be the same without snow.

tradition that will

Wateiloo Park's 10,000 lights display will be going up Dec. 2 this year and as a rule go eveiy year. love walking through at Jiighl with friends, or boy of ch(|<^ with giant travel mugs of I

least

the

these

instances

is

It

I

at

lawns. However, these gaudy but

Who’s been naughty and who’s been nice?

Opinion

decent snowfall by now.

not having

how-

the cashier,

usually tame, quiet and

Even putting

ground. years

is

ing and shopping aside, there

of snow on the

There has not been

made from it

you're there.

guess that's close to impos-

due

may

or

make me wish 1 worked in a cery store, more specifically,

to finish

snowmen

may

polite.

snow,

appi'oach-

month

or she

customers to explain to the people

cart.

shopping, the baking, the

decorating and the,

19

take” ever,

written in extra large letters just

use.

He

line.

not get a reminder of the “mis-

fridge.

strategy

the

is

Kreller strategy

dreaded

the

to

onto the conveyor belt. Wha't usually happens next

Meghan

basis.

get out; that's

as the cartful

of groceries begins to get unloaded

of the grocery

lane

from the cashier

tion

still

CSI

under the

blood boiling, waiting for a reac-

and only one stomach to feed, I have very few groceries to purchase. I, therefore, find myself in

waiting for three key agreements,

said

to drive

is like

it

the Matrix Impaired Driving Simulater as Constable Chris Larochelle watches.

Express lane congestion woes As

respect.

“There's been a series of events

to think the unfinis

doesn't

college

influence

be a power

groups. Jackson said he believes the

ished Student Life Centre

to

struggle going on between the

e.xpanded coffee shop or look bad

CSI wants you

what

j

i

as

by BJ Richmond)

Driving under the infiuence

Since then, the college has stalled

is

and/or greedy

in

all

justice.

Although

1

appreciate the great

decorations that go up, including the

ones

at

the

malls,

it

seems

strange to walk into this Christmas

extravaganza and not be bundled up in my winter coat and have my mittens on. Half the fun of

Christmas shopping is letting the mall be your safe haven from the

where you can buy hot chocolate and get free candy canes. Christmas shopping so far cold, a place

chocolate (Baileys optional), putting on 10 layers of everything

and being impressed by lights. I've been doing

get the ity.

my

It

same comforting familiarhuge damper on

will put a

Christmas.

So dear Santa,

if

you're reading

trip to the mall,

and

would also like on Boxing Day.

year feels like a very expensive

buying presents for people you only see once a year at

times even forgetting

why

the

every

year for as long as I can remember, and without snow I will not

been a really I this year and all Christmas is for it to sooner the better. But in

this

all it

this.

I've

it

to

good want

girl

for

snow, the addition,

1

melt for good


News

SPOKE, December

4,

2006

— Page 7

Fight illness * naturally By

ADAM HANNON

ments can be taken up to 10 times day without any side effects. She .said probiotic dietary supplements have also been developed to a

A

Conestoga College doctor said and naturopathic remedies are undervalued by much of the medical community. Dr. Anne Marie Mingiardi has vitamins

replenish

the healthy bacteria by antibiotics. “Supporting your immune sys-

killed

been a member of the Quantum Health Alliance for about six months.

tem

She used to study naturopathic medicine and herbal remedies in

always presented as acceptable,” she said, adding that this is bccau.se

her spare time, before choosing to traditional medicine at

many doctors don’t necessarily understand naturopathic medicine.

study

cines, if .she

tional medicine.

edy

of patients almost

lot

antibiotics,” said Mingiardi.

many

She added

that

the

antibiotics can

illne.sses

has

many

vaccines are not always thoroughly researched. She said an example of

medication.

vative.

instead of reaching for

Cold

some of

try

&

Sinus, they could

these (natural) reme-

dies,” she said.

She suggested zinc lozenges with C and echinacea to help treat cold symptoms. They can be found at naturopathic and health vitamin

food stores, as well as some Zehrs pharmacies. Mingiardi said it is important for

human body

the

to

have enough

would be the cunent tlu vacwhich contains mercury, which is a neurotoxin, as a pre.ser-

Eunice Egerhazi, an employee at Waterloo Health Foods Inc., said people come to the store to get remedies for everything from arthritis and prostate problems to cold and flu symptoms. store has a large selection of

supplements,

nutritional

homeo-

pathic remedies and teas.

Egerhazi said probiotics are also

becoming popular. She said they help to balance the bacteria in the

which helps the diges-

intestines,

it gets from sunShe said since many people aren’t out in the sun a lot, and

tive system.

light.

immune

because of the long winters, many Canadians may become vitamin D

cent of the

system

This

in turn helps the

system, since the digestive responsible for 70 per

is

immune

system.

deficient if they don’t take supple-

Egerhazi said none of her customers come with the recommen-

ments.

dation of their doctor. that people should

B6 immune

By HOLLY FEATHERSTONE

“People don’t

tell

Thousands of underprivileged children in the region will receive

new books under

year thanks to a locallyorganized holiday book drive. for Kids was established 2001 by The Guelph Mercury and The Record. Collaboratively organized and promoted by community partners including the Kitchener Public Library and the Salvation Army, new books are collected and donated throughout Waterloo and Wellington regions. “(The drive) as a group collects new books for underprivileged children,” said Jan Bockmaster, marketing and community relations manager at The Record.

community partners help promote the pro-

she said. “If they’re taking some-

gram.

and C, to supplement their systems, and help prevent illness. She said some of these supple-

thing, they’re probably not going to

“It’s

the doctor, because they’re already

drive)

solving their problem.”

community

Signs of Christmas shot are those, like Heather Berry

of Fergus,

Coloured lights are twinkling, malls are packed and red noses are aglow.

Yes,

it’s

that time of year

No, not Christmastime;

again.

it’s

flu season.

From October

March, the influenza virus is hard at work and that means flu shots. The provincial governments are responsible l^administering the shot and have ^Re it a priority. According to the CBC website (www.cbc.ca), Ontario

makes its

is

to

the only province that

the shot freely available to

entire population.

The Yukon

and Northwest Territories also follow the practice. The remaining provinces provide the shot to groups deemed to be “high-risk.” Such groups include those over the age of 65, those travelling to areas of the world where influenza

who

are allergic to eggs.

The influenza vaccine contains egg whites. Berry said there are special

- with

versions of the vaccine

the

egg whites removed - that can be taken, but it’s not worth it to her. “I’ve never had a flu shot,” she said. “But I’ve never had the flu, either.”

This brings up another question

commonly

that is

asked:

Is the flu

shot necessary? Lori Peterson, a registered nurse at

Grand River

way ing

Hospital, said the best

to prevent the flu

lifestyle,

but

life

circumstances do

not always allow for that. “I receive

protect said.

those

my

those

“My who

flu shot I

work

annually to with,”

personal opinion

she

is that

are at high risk for the

and anyone with exposure

others

to

such

people.

A

group that can’t receive the

make

(the

known, but we have (strong) partners,” she said.

means

flu

CBC

reported

The

70-90 per cent effective adults, but the

numbers

for

Christmas,

it

also

inspires parents to allocate

more

flu

who

are at risk.

The

flu

has

the potential to cause very serious

symptoms

in those

The Chapters Park

for Kids approximately three feet high, is already a third full of colourful children’s novels and picture books. All donated books must be new,

logo.

The

bin,

unwrapped and

learning

factor,

stuck to

it.”

To

donate books, visit www.therecord.com for a list of drop boxes in the region. “There are a ton of drop sites in the city,” said Bockmaster. The main Kitchener public

1

suitable for chil-

6 and under.

The drive operates from midNovember to Christmas each year and books are distributed in equitable amounts to Christmas Bureau families in time for the Dec. 25. Bockmaster said the drive should be successful again this year, boasting of

“We books

last year’s

collected last

donations.

around

7,000

year just locally,” she

said.

season has arrived seem.

flu shot is

The Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care confirms the

Canadian Coalition Immunization Awareness Promotion (CCIAP)

healthy

CBC report and says the vaccine has

http://www.immunize.cpha.ca/eng-

a 77-9

lish/influen.htm.

in

are lower

within each “high-risk” group.

in

Although the death total is only 0.004 per cent of the national population, those 1,500 lives might have been saved if those people had received their flu shot. The shot is free and takes several minutes, which is not a big sacrifice to

takes

per cent rate of effectiveness

1

healthy children.

its

two weeks

The vaccine

to fully develop into

protective state and can last for

to a year.

People

may

vaccine

still

who

up

receive the

contract an altered

strand of influenza, but the effects will

be

much

the virus, visit the website for the

In order to ensure a healthy

for

& at

and

enjoyable Christmas season with family and friends, be sure to take a few minutes to drop into a clinic and receive a flu shot. Local clinic

times

are

listed

For more information on influen-

eb/health.nsf

with compro-

2007 YOUR BEST SUMMER YET CAMP WAYNE, northeast Pennsylvania, USA. Counsellor-Specialists all Land/Water Sports inc. Tennis; Golf; Soccer; outdoor Adventure; Camping; Mountain Biking; Climbing/Ropes; Roller Hockey; Rocketry; Arts & Crafts; Water sports; Water-ski, Wakeboard; Sailing; Canoe/Kayaking; Theatre; Radio; Video; CDL drivers; Wait Staff and

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our Health Center. Let’s get the

www.campwayne.com Email :

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milder.

CLASSIFIED LET’S

a

which features the Books

dren ages the

Gateway

displays

donation bin alongside the cashiers by the main entrance,

time dedicated to reading with their

Besides

135

large

kids.

Bockmaster said kids enjoy receiving something new under the tree which they can “crack open (themselves) and it doesn’t have (food)

at

Kitchener,

Dr.,

za symptoms and various types of

1,500

that

Canadians die each year from the flu, and thousands more die ffom flu-related problems.

books

bins.

make to fight off death, no matter how low the odds of dying may

mised immune .systems.”

The

“That’s the nature of the beast.” When children receive new

home

care facilities and nursing homes,

prevalent, residents of long-term

taken a few years to

families don’t have a lot said Bockmaster.

books,”

they’re sick and lead a healthy

should receive the flu shot annually to protect themselves and

is

drive’s

“Many of

library and its branches, as well as Chapters stores, feature donation

from spread-

for people to stay at

is

when

Christmas Bureau program, with new books under the tree which are conducive to learning and will encourage reading.

Books

in

She said the

their doctors,”

Christmas

the

tree this

take vitamins, such as vitamins

By CHRISTOPHER MILLS

The aim of the program is to prowhose families are supported by the Salvation Army’s vide children,

vitamin D, which

She suggested

Annual book drive promotes reading

this

The

for

Kitchener.

prescription drugs.

important

"If students are affected by the

Dr.,

Mingiardi added that the effects of many traditional medicines and

use of too

kill

(Photo by Holly Featherstone) Kids annual book drive has already collected more than 25,000 books since its 2001 inception. There are many drop boxes located in the area, including Chapters, at 135 Gateway Park

The Books

She even uses them

they have fewer, side effects than

cine,

the Advil

familiar with the rem-

“We’re

in

tlu,

is

in question.

the body, and many such as laryngitis and bronchitis, don’t even require the

cold or

comfortable refer-

ring .students to naturopathic medi-

viruses,

bacteria

is

herself and for her children, becau.se

actually been detrimental.”

many

She said she

aren’t

demand

finding that our early development

of antibiotics for

stay

to

“The naturopathic options

McMaster University in Hamilton. Mingiardi .said some people have become too dependant on tradi“A

way

your best

is

healthy,” she said.

now! Online application 1-888-549-2963 (516-883-

ball rolling

@ campwavne.com

:


Page 8

— SPOKE, December

News

2006

4,

Award deadlines Students for

in financial

quickly approaching

Program aims to increase Kitchener’s downtown dwellings

need should consider applying

awards and bursaries

help lighten financial loads

to

By ROSS

ALDWORTH

rebates worth a total of almost

$4 ,000 have been provided. 1

downtown Kitchener

Applicants will be evaluated on a number of pre-set eriteria, such

building owners with renovatjons

as pre-existing condition of the

Applications for up to $100,000

By NATALIE

ANDERSON

This should be done through a

Deadlines December

is

awards.

Campus

Centres

Living

sponsors a residence gives

life

$250 every year

award

in the

The student must be defined by

OSAP

eligibility,

TD are also three There Waterhouse financial planning awards, $500 for a third-year student and two $1,000 awards for

program

study groups.

The Elizabeth B. Furey bursary $500 to a student in financial

Once

need

financial

selection

the

lished,

based on students

who

To be

in

this

downtown renewal.

dents.

Eligible

students

is

the

planning program, Conestoga College and the com-

grant funding, to a

ments. clubs and formalized resi-

College

dence groups. also

gram. Students must also be able to demonstrate the steps they have taken to improve the quality of

The deadline for all of these awards is Dec. 29. For more information check your student e-mail account or contact Vicki Russell in the student awards

such as intramurals or

their life.

office.

be demonstrated through involvement in sporting activities,

Focus for Change program and now be enrolled at Conestoga a post-secondary pro-

maximum

of

$100,000 per building owner, based on 50 per cent of renova-

core.

Downtown development manager Silvia Wright said the pro-

gram

is

one of many exciting down-

just

initiatives for reinventing

Kitchener. “This is an opportunity for downtown prop-

owners to be a part of that momentum,’’ she said. Applications for the program

erty

available

are

ment

in

2005 and

City

of

office, 6th floor. Kitchener

City Hall.

No

The program began

the

at

downtown develop-

Kitchener

tion costs.

activities.

downtown

the

positive

owners with renovaform of loan and

and

dents must have graduated from the

may

assists

It

tion costs in the

munity as well as participating in program, college and community

feature

year in Kitchener’s ongoing

also contribute to the success of financial

new

a

is

to

Contribution may be demonstrated through direct involvement in social activities such as govern-

It

The program

should

within

Property on King Street will be given special consideration.

town

space for residential use.

decided life

Upper

the

Program, which is designed to encourage downtown building owners to renovate underused upper storey

a willingness to help other stu-

eligible for this award, stu-

in

includes

Incentives

Renovation

Storey

is

process

taking steps to achieve that goal.

status

Financial

best repre-

estab-

his or her contribution to student

improve her

The City of Kitchener’s 2007

Students must demonstrate academic excellence, maintain a high academic standing and show

is

sent qualities similar to Elizabeth

woman who

second-year students.

area to be renovated and location

available at City Hall.

through academic activities, such as tutoring and organized or

Furey, a

or her residence.

now

Downtown

have a C-t- (65%) average or better, and must be able to demonstrate life at his

assist

to

involvement.

need.

must

including topics

those organized by the residence,

that

full-time as

summary

are

offers

to a student living in residence.

written

such as education, employment, personal growth and community

Inc.

winter

these

awards are Dec. 29.

tough on almost

everyone for funds. Budgeting Christmas gifts and new winter gear isn't always easy. However, you could get some of that money back if you apply for this month’s

for

have

applications

approved

this

at

been

time and the

has a total of $1 million available

closing date for applications

over five years. To date,

Feb. 28, 2007.

four

your food sanitary

Is

and safe enough By ANGELO MAZZIOTTI

to eat?

inspector

health

chicken on display

You

Conestoga College

leave

long night of homework.

after a

You’re about to turn left onto Homer Watson to get on Hwy. 401 when suddenly hunger attacks. Your stomach growls and your

mouth is drooling in anticipation. So what will it be? A burger? Chinese? Pizza? You decide to drive around until you find the permeal

is

your Condorhow do you

cooked

found at a

temperature

of about 30 C.

The chicken was discarded. The Red Papaya was $120 for a malfunctioning Also,

fined di.sh-

washer. the

In

Record,

26 issue of The was reported that since

Sept. it

June, the public health department

had

laid six

charges against four

restaurants in the area.

floor?

All of these were repeat offences and fines added up to $2,200. Included on the list was the Pioneer Bar-B-Q at 25 Sportsworld Dr. in Kitchener. They were fined for not keeping

All these„questions should enter your mind when making a deci-

cold enough and not keeping food

sion.

safe

fect

to satisfy

sized munchies. but

know

that

safe?

Who made

what you’re eating

hands clean? Did

Jessica Ruth, an

it? it

Were fall

is

their

on the

employee

at

a

local pizza establishment, said she

has seen

it

all.

have had other employees offer me drugs while working,’’ said Ruth. “These are the people who are making your “I

actually

from

rodents,

not

pests

insects,

having soap

didn’t .stop there.

sink and for inadequate hand washing by food handlers. The list just goes on and on. What about here at Conestoga? How do our cafeterias rate eom-

kitchen

pared to local restaurants?

Andy Staveley, was comment on the topic.

ices.

unwilling

“Dropped pizzas, expired toppings, you name it,’’ she said. “I would imagine it’s pretty much the same everywhere else,’’ said

and security administration dent, didn’t comment on food

Ruth

ty at the college, but did

We

have

all

heard the horror sto-

the

Record, local

Oct. it

17

issue

of The

was reported that two were fined for

restaurants

repeat offences.

E.

Jessica Wheeler, a first-year law

thinks

it

stu-

safe-

say she

tastes great.

was

fined

ever.

“The coffee here

at 10 King $460 when a

is

no good

though,’’ she joked. “That’s

brave

Bakery Mi Columbia St.

to

She did have one complaint how-

ries before.

In

or the

in

Chartwells’ director of food serv-

pizza’’ It

food

line

the

Tim

whj^^

Hortt^^

every morning; the coffee

Dooners

just won’t do.’’

at


News

How

^

By BJ RICHMOND the time of year

dreaming

begin

hibernate

when people

of

white

a

Christmas.

the

in

winter,”

said

For

their

green,

and gold. However, for some, Christmas may not be as joyful and silver

triumphant as people are led to believe, and to them only one colour comes to mind around the

who

tho.se

think

are

they can look

of

and

motivation,

changes

fatigue,

gen-

include a

energy,

interest,

in

Some common

symptoms of depression lack

suffer-

symptoms

several for.

or

they,

SAD or depression

there

eral,

pleasure

anxiety and self-evaluation.

attacks, obsessions

For these people, the holidays

blue.

According

to

wrongdiagnosis.com, one people experiences some

three

in

of and calls to helplines about depression and suicide rise by about 0 per cent durdepression in their

sort

depression

the

in

brain.

The.se

this

For single people, the holiday may be an isolated time and the loss of a loved one through sep-

can

be

However,

therapy,

if

the treatment

too early,

celebrating

holidays

the

alone.

Those who

lier in

the year are especially

someone

it

may

depression,

there

scheduling parties and social events

socializing, decorating, wrapping, entertaining and worrying, people can be left to deal with

eting,

both physical and emotional stress.

Shawna Bernard,

co-ordinator of

Student Services and a counsellor

at

one’s

People diagnosed with depression should also surround themselves with positive people who give them, encouragement, and, if they are alone, they should join a local volunteer group that brings holiday happiness to others. Bernard said if students are feel-

number of

in

November. She said she increase

this

exams and

the

holiday

season.

“There’s certainly the academic stress, but

another topic (that causes

Christmas holidays.” Bernard said although every indi-

stress) is the

vidual has his or her

own circum-

stances, she believes the expectations

people have of themselves

An

increase in physical activity

and more natural light can aid those who suffer from SAD. Typically the negative

SAD

moods

associated with

improve once the holidays

and winter are over. Sometimes dealing with a friend or family member who suffers from be as

depression can dealing with

the

difficult

disability

as

someone who has been diagnosed with depression is to make sure they

“They may

al

disorder (SAD).

affective

People diagnosed with

SAD

are

advice for people

seek treatment, offer emotional suppatience, affection and encourage-

ment, do not accuse them of faking or laziness, do not ignore remarks about suicide and encourage their participation in activities. The most important thing illness

remember when dealing with a

to

pointing out that their depression can

there

is

a shift in people’s circadian

rhythm, which act as “biological internal

clocks,” and triggers the

hormone melatonin, which induces sleep. Melatonin is produced more in the dark; therefore,

with shorter,

darker days and colder weather, the winter season

is

a

common

time

when this hormone may cause symptoms of depression. “With seasonal

affective

disorder,

the

symptoms would physiologically be related to

how animals may

(Photo by Christopher Mitts)

Going down under? Helen McCart, a representative from K.O.M. Consultants, speaks about possible study opportunities in Australia.

to students at

Conestoga

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: DEPRESSION in a bad mood or ‘leeling the blues”. These and have minimal impact on our lives. Some people experience sadness, loneliness, hopelessness, self-doubt, and guilt for weeks, months and even years. These experiences characterize depression, an illness believed to affect one in ten.

Most

of

us have experienced waking up

feelings are usually of short duration

Here are some signs which might indicate that you or experiencing depression:

someone you care about

is

FEELINGS - loss of joy in formerly pleasurable activities; crying a lot or feeling emotionally “empty”; hopelessness; worthlessness; loss of warmth towards key people in life; loss of sexual desire; deep sense of shame or self-doubt. PHYSICAL- overwhelming exhaustion and lack of energy; insomnia or sleeping too much; loss of appetite or over-eating; physical aches and pains; digestive problems; headaches.

individual

to

is

be treated and they will get

better.

Conestoga students seeking help SAD and overall depression can make an appointment with a with

counsellor at Student Services in

Room

1B21.

Bernard said

this

time of year the

counsellors at Student Services are

generally booked everyday, and that

it

may

take up to a

week

to get

an appointment. However, if a student immediately needs to see a counsellor. Student Services has designated times

at the

BEHAVIOUR-

irritability,

withdrawal; neglect of responsibilities or appearance;

reduced concentration, memory or

ability to

cope with

daily activities.

keep

depressed

sets in,

Mental

their

and shorter days that come with the

As winter

of

understanding,

through

port

influenced by the lack of sunlight

winter season.

Institute

Health).

itself.

who know

Bernard added the holiday season could be especially difficult for

Christmas or they may not have any family in this area, so Christmas could be a lonely time for them.” Another issue that adds to the ss of the winter season is sea-

in

to.

and strategize with the student about what support systems they do have.”

Some

not celebrate

Blues

try

during the holiday season are huge.

international students.

the

a support system with the signifi-

attributes

upcoming

the

to

stu-

seeking help in

planning for the

ing lonely they should try to create

“We would

in the

Beat

goals and being mindful of

selling office at the college notices

who come

al.so

diet.

cant people they feel closest

an increase

(National

is

of

wisely, setting reasonable time and

money

Conestoga College, said the coun-

dents

Services return

are

of that loss around the holidays. Other factors that contribute to holiday anxiety are financial

schedules and being away from friends and family. With the holidays being a frantic time for shopping, working, budg-

within a

Mental Health and nimh-nih.gov

several suggestions they can use to

keep the holidays an enjoyable

hectic

in

Association)

For people suffering from holiday-related

time. Three of the.se suggestions are

restraints,

should be able to get

few days.”

(Canadian

cause relapse, with-

ear-

ful

ments will start to taper off. “In the middle of December, students

depression can be found online at feelingblue.com, cmha-bc.org

stopped

mind-

lost

volume of appoint-

body into relaxation. One of the programs, Chillax, was held in October and there will be a Stress Free Zone on Dec. 7. Student

treated. is

out resolving any problems.

people

the

help ease Conestoga’s student

February, which is a specific winter event where they talk about SAD. Further information on SAD and

depression

successfully

season

and death can leave

exams

gets closer to

a

messengers for

year.

aration, divorce

final

it

offers

depression. With the proper combination of antidepressant drugs and

psychological

time of

to

Bernard added as

al.so

programs and workshops

two

people’s brains, and without enough of these chemicals, the brain does not respond properly, which causes

common

is

nephrine

1

why

sellor without an appointment.

Student Services

and phobias.

chemicals act as

and cau.se of death by 2020. There are many reasons

variety of

Chemically, depression is caused by a lack of serotonin and norepi-

life,

ing the holidays. The World Health Organization estimates depression will be the .second largest disability

— Page 9

and

tiredness

are a time ot depression, loneliness,

is

2006

in appetite, agita-

tion, constant physical problems and thoughts of suicide. Depression may be masked by other psychological problems such as anxiety, panic

holiday season, and that colour

and the end of the day when stucome in and .see a coun-

dents can

someone they know, may be ing from

They begin decorating homes with colours of red,

4,

to deal with holiday blues Bernard.

It is

SPOKE, December

beginning

these symptoms persist, or if their intensity is causing you to consider suicide as an it is important to seek assistance with a knowledgeable professional. On campus, counsellors are available in Student Services; a nurse and doctor are available In Health Services (Room 2B(^). If

option,

A Message Visit

from Student Services our website httD://www.conestoaac.on.ca/isD/stserv/index.i$D


â&#x20AC;&#x201D; SPOKE, December

Page 10

4,

2006

students, staff, friends and family welcome

/\\\

ZAtOFi C-vSI Incalth plan

Massage The CSI

P)enefit5

health plan covers Massage

Therapy when recommended by

S

300.00 per policy

to submit a doctor

your

80% up

You are covered

sician.

first

You

year.

phy-

a

will

to

need

ffer

referral note with

s

claim, and

it is

valid for

one

manute^T 60 45 and

50,

in I A,

minute increments

full year.

CSI

is

NOW

can

HOURS

very excited to announce that you

pay

the

just

deductible

fvdonday

amount of 20% +GST, when you get

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

your massage done here in the CSI Massage

Room

.students all

.

This service applies only to

under the CSI health Plan and

ay

other health plans must pay and

submit their claim. Paying

. . -

. ... .

f'^Ofdadd:.

:

I

5

o-4

:

5 O'

0;00-4:f

^

just the de-

ductible avoids having to pay the

amount and then submit your

^.venmuz appointments

full

avail

receipts,

and makes getting a massage here even

more convenient.

So book your ap-

pointment today with Jason or Josh.

The signup book CSI

office in

is

located inside the

room 2A106.

ealtli

flan

witli

doctor

Meet our Registcred Massage Jiierapists massage therapy program at Centennial College in .ScarborToronto for over three years working in two primary locations: a rehabilitation clinic and a high end fitness and social club. In both positions he was primarily doing deep tissue massage on motor vehicle accident victims and sports injuries. He also received a Rehabilitation Massage Therapy certificate from another 100 hour course taken at Centennial College to further his rehab skills. Jason worked in Muskoka for two summers doing relaxation massage, and wrap therapy in two different relaxed spa settings. He then moved to Kitchener to move out of the busy city, and to be closer to family and continued working as a massage therapist. In November of 200S he opened up his own business where he works along side a chiropractor on primary posture issues and pain associated with office work. Jason is available to give you a massages on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday from 8:30 am- 4:30 pm

Jason

ough

Jason Clowes

completed

in

2001.

his

three

He worked

year

in

Josh graduated from the Canadian College of Massage and Hydrotherapy North York campus in 2001 before starting his private practice on the Bruce Peninsula. He then spent three years working in a physiotherapy and massage rehabilitation clinic in Kitchener treating sports related and repetitive strain injuries through massage and exercise therapy. In 2004, he moved to Central America to work in hotels and resorts doing full body relaxation massage for spa goers and deep tissue treatment for tourists. Promoting a healthy lifestyle through massage, Josh is available to give you a massage on Wednesdays from 2:30- 6:30, and Friday from 10-4:30

Josh Holdtn

Hwnuiig

iipiHJiiiunKiiUs

avaiUhlo by rrtjucst fur both Therapists


SPOKE, December

Valid at Cineplex

Odeon,

Galaxy Cinemas and Famous Playe

fiompefition

Monday

Tuesday

Thmsday

Wednesday

I

students INCj

4,

2006

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 11


— SPOKE, December

Page 12

4,

News

2006

Christkindl Market going strong By JON

MOLSON

The concept of

the Christkindl

Market has been around for more than a few centuries, but in Kitchener

this

type of festival will

throughout Bavaria with Christkindl, which means Christ

200 King

W.,

St.

will feature both live entertain-

as well as items that can be

multicultural

Braun,

still,

Christkindl to

that

we

tunity

of

Market.

child.

Nuremberg was

to

call

the first city

different

the

Catholic

renamed

its

offers

of

city

modern

live

ages.

all

“You are never too old or too young to enjoy some entertainment, some good music,” she said. “There is just that festive feeling and I think that everybody likes to feel good.” She said there are benefits this type of festival brings to the

Munich

town

different

types of food and gift items, such

all,

"It

Some

our area.”

include a candlelight procession on

ture."

another

to attract that

many

president, Chistkind! Market,

don’t

merchants

advantage for the other

in the area,”

Braun

said.

brings out-of-town visitors to

Braun believes the market

is

have a system of

how many

peo-

because it is not like you are paying an entrance fee where it is regulated, so people come and go and people can come and go constantly,” she said. “But judging by the crowds, yes, it is very popu-

Jingle for

that the original

bringing in different entertainment,

some

different vendors with a dif-

ferent product.

The

idea of a tradi-

“1 know how many people keep attending something like

all

will this,

but of course, there are a lot of people in the area to entice to come,” she said. “Not just a core group but more people all the time.”

more

For

Kitchener’s

information

about

Market

Christkindl

www.chri.stkindlcanada.com.

visit

lar.”

student services presents the

know

ing the tradition in Kitchener.

Kitchener

“We

don’t

“I

concept has changed that much,” Braun said. “The changes occur in

tional

Astrid Braun,

down-

over the years.

market is that you wouldn’t see a lot of changes, you would have something familiar.” Braun is confident about continu-

culture.”

ple,

there will be a live gospel band.

of the festival’s highlights

something that is different from the way that we celebrate here is an opportunity to experience

counting exactly

an oppor-

experience another cul-

“To be able to experience

from across North America) to a downtown core of any city is certainly a big

is

that

people (more than 35,000 visitors

The market will open on Wednesday at 4 p.m. and at 7 p.m.

as crafts.

She said there hasn’t really been many changes to the market

becoming more popular.

area.

“First of

interpreta-

music,

ple of

in

market as well.

Kitchener’s tion

market 1805

its

at 6 p.m. and a performance by the Forget Me Nots, a German choir, on Dec. 9 at 4 p.m. Admission is free. Braun said the market is for peo-

Thursday, Dec. 7

from the way

experience .some-

celebrate here

to

said

president

Kitchener's

is

despite

aspect,”

the

"To be able thing that

German

a very strong

heritage in Kitchener

Astrid

tions

"Christkindlesmarkt” and

purchased.

the

century,

Kitchener City

Hall, located at

is

16th

the

in

goods.

replaced, in certain Protestant loca-

will

at

"There

However,

sell

run

annual event.

from Dec. 6-10

ment

opportunity to buy and

because of the church’s reformation, the name Nicolas was

The German market

and

Nikolausdult and gave farmers an

at

reach the one-decade milestone this year’s

The oldest Christmas market in Germany can be traced back to the 14th century. It was called

10th year

in

way

the

a good cause

By NATALIE ANDERSON

Rockwell

from

Automation

decided to take their costumes a

Th ursday, December / /

J

OtOOam

*

I

tOOp

Bells were jingling

Jingle Bell

NTO ROOM lAiti ICSI

massage

til

e ra

the

way

to

Run on Nov.

step further.

Three members dressed

wrapped cardboard boxes

26.

Close to 300 participants of

all

ages and their supporters crowded the parking lot of the Cambridge for the 2.5-kilometre and the 5-kilometre runs. All the money raised will be used to send

ents, while another three

wore Christmas

YMCA

tltlll

aromathera ?3

all

the finish line at the 16th annual

children in need to

P3

Conestoga

summer camp.

student,

“I

think we’ve

every year for It’s

for

Julian

Liverpool, took second place in the

it’s

fun.

Liverpool, a first-year mechani-

Mi

engineering student,

said

over o

high school,” he “I’m normally a sprinter so I

don’t usually do this distance but

Iff.

was

it

alright.”

Several participants

holiday

spirit

showed

their

by wearing Santa

hats or reindeer antlers.

Some members

S>

been here 1

years.

a good cause and

We

like to

support

Jingle Bell Run participant

competing.

“I did track in

said.

members

costumes.

Rob Page,

he

participated in the race because he likes

gift-

the community.”

2.5-kilometre run.

cal

tree

in

as pres-

of the

team

Rockwell Automation employee, Page, said he and his teammates dress up every year. Last year they wore snowman costumes. “1 think we’ve been here every

Rob

year for 16 years,” said Page. “It’s for a good cause and it’s fun. We like to

support the community.”

JO

c

D ec /th 3TKZ3S TREE 10 <

u rs day,

I

zA^oe

0

^ 0

V,\ A, >>

1. stres^

(Photo by Tiffany McConnnick)

On

Second-year paramedic students Dianne Vries, left, Laura Fulton and Becky Pagett, (playing the role of the nurse), perform CPR on patient, Gordon Ross, also a student, in a mock scenario on Nov. 21 Students participate in weekly scenarios which test their knowledge and skills. Vries and Fulton were called to a scene where an elderly gentleman at a nursing home with an obstructed airway needed help. The patient was a do not resuscitate (DNR) and considered dead when the paramedics got to him. .

health‘s knac l<|^s ,1

'

the scene


News

SPOKE, December

4,

2006

— Page 13

Park has •

festive spirit By

AMY MEADOWS

daughter

five-year-old

his

see

to

the lights being switched on.

The

bridges and buildings

trees,

"This

been

Park are now decorated with thousands of after the llth annual lights Christmas Fantasy, Nov. 26. at

Kitehener’s Victoria

wanted to come because was something my daughwould enjoy.”

said.

"I

knew ter

1

it

He

At 7 p.m crowds met at the clock tower to be dazzled by the displays in the unseasonably mild weather. This year's celebration included

first time we have park for the lights," he

the

is

to the

said these events are perfect

for families as they arc free

and

great for the season.

be able to do things as a

“I like to

and the chance to make your own Christmas tree decorations. Displays included an eight-foot angel which stood on the roof of The Boathouse, strings of coloured lights through the trees and trailers filled with Christmas scenes. Christmas .scents filled the air as apple cider was handed out and

family that don't cost and Just get the kids excited for Christmas,"

chestnuts roasted.

all

carols

said Foster.

Shannon, who wouldn't give her name, was at the park with her two sons and said they love being able to come and see the lights. "We have brought them here the last few years and they like seeing last

The event is sponsored by outcompanies each year. This

them

its

RE/MAX Mark

The

sponsors included and Weston Bakeries.

Foster

was

at the

all

excited

isn't too far

side

year

the displays,” she said.

Christmas

away."

on every night midnight until

lights will be

from dusk

park with

that

“It gets

until

Jan. 2.

(Photo by Samantha Saechao)

Kavita Sharma, 24,

left

to right,

Usha Sharma,

54,

and Sandra

Singh, 44, agree that regardless of your religion, Christmas at time to get

Christmas By

for all faiths

SAMANTHA SAECHAO

bothered celebrating the Christian holiday, but did it for her children

Christmas is a holiday celebrated by many people, even those from other faiths. "I don't

mind

that

Christmas

holiday,”

Christian

said

is

a

Sandra

still a fun holiday.” Singh moved from England with her husband and two daughters to Waterloo this summer. They settled in this area because Singh's older sister, Usha Sharma, 54, and her family moved here five years ago from Guyana, a small country located at the top of South

Singh, 44. "It's

America.

The two

Hindus, but Sandra or Usha

sisters are

that doesn’t stop

when

they were growing up in Guyana. "I personally celebrate because the children wanted to

have it.” Kavita said coming from Guyana and now celebrating Christmas in

Canada

is

climate making

to

said

ny.

Kavita Sharma, 24, daughter-inlaw of Usha, says their religion doesn’t stop

them from celebrating

a lot less

a holiday.

the religious part of

We're not into Christmas.”

They celebrate the holiday like everyone else would by decorating their homes, putting up a tree, exchanging gifts and having a big turkey dinner.

Usha said she wouldn't have

commer-

have fun and give

gifts to

Schools in Guyana celebrate Christmas differently as well with classroom parties. Gifts are supplied by parents, staff wraps them and Santa gives them out. “The elementary school (in Canada) where my grandchild attends does not do that.

Christmas. "It's just

it is

ci^ized and more family-oriented back home. “The whole population in Guyana celebrates Christmas children.”

or just to

much warmer

walk around,” said Sandra.

Usha

just to

a time for family to

a

easier for people to

and be closer, while giving and celebrating the holiday.” “The weather just makes it easier

the Christmas holiday.

whether it is at dinner be in each other's compa-

it

interact

raising their children to cele-

it is

different.

it’s

gifts

^urate

get together

much

"In Guyana,

^from

Both say

is still

together with family and have fun.

it’s

bad, but

it’s

Not

that

just different.”

in Christmas said Sandra England was wonderful, with no snow and the atmosphere was just awesome. "There were a lot of peo-

ple at dinners, interacting, having fun, playing gifts.”

games and exchanging

(Photo by Amy Meadows)

Christmas Fantasy opened Nov. 26. A crowd gathered around the clock tower in unseasonably mild temperatures, to see the Christmas lights turned on. The bridge at the park is just one of this year’s many displays, which will be on from dusk until midnight until Jan. 2. Victoria Park’s annual


— SPOKE, December

Page 14

4,

Feature

2006

Swimming By TARA RICKER

sons

is

a big splash with babiesi

is

when

they are six months

Babies experience an endless firsts, from their first

amount of

to their first step, but before

word,

all that, let’s

not forget about their

Infants

ence

developing

are

swimming

their

before they can

skills

the

said

effect,”

“Water's

Kennel.

like

is

an invisible help-

ing hand.”

Early

le.s.sons set

a positive

toward a lifetime of

potential

the

The

benefits of

are unique,

and

tion

whole

Right: Carter splashes

around

in

the water

during his lesson.

on them

said

Kennel.

lessons

Parents

provide

have to deal with the fear when he

I

have

gets older,” she said.

Babies less than one-year-old accept the water more readily than older children. Often, they willingly

go under water the first lesson. “Fear of water is acquired as

the

Facts about Infant Swtmming

only time they can spend 30 pleasura-

grow older,” she “The longer the baby is kept away from water, the more likely

children

uninterrupt-

ble,

child,

com-

to feel

fortable in the water so he will not

confess that the

often

want Carter

“I

swimming,

during

development of

the

in

par-

their lavish

con-

the water at

Kitchener.

focused attenents

in

Forest Heights Pool

Babies

tribute to the positive

be placed

flourish in the

friendly” infant/toddlei

uplifting

to

left

womb.”

"babv

swimming

Carter McMartn suits up

the

in

Five-month old

Left:

the

environ-

behind

Forest

at

(Photos by Tara Ricker)

to

rediscover

to

Kitchener.

in

“Infants

begin

can

alertness

instructor

Heights Pool

pool,

and confidence,” she

and perceptual abilities,” said Laura Kennel, a swim-

ming

the

water with ease

the

to

increase their intelligence,

concentration,

and Dad as

in

babies can learn to relate

ment they

an early age gives

at

them

Mom

'"With

liquid

"Introducing an infant to the

water

of water sports.

co-teachers

said,

swim

foundation

speak.

medium

soothing

caressing and stimulating

its

buoyancy

splash.

first

"Through

of water, infants are able to experi-

and enjoyment

participation in a variety

old.

said.

*Scientific studies, which have been carried out in many countries, show that babies. regular baby swim training reduces an the child will develV e F infant's sick rate 65-70 per cent as compared op aqua phobia.” month-old to babies who have not had swimming lessons. Human infants *Water helps improve co-ordination and balance are well adapted McMann has been by allowing the babies to move bilaterally to swimming. partaking in swimWhen to maintain their equilibrium. subming lessons for three merged, they *Warm water relaxes and stimulates babies' months. appetites. automatically “He loves being in *As babies learn how to manoeuver in the water on hold their breath the water,” said his their own, their independence and and make swimmother, Gabe McMann. self-confidence blossoms. This is evident by ming movements. “It’s a great feeling to the ear-to-ear grins stretching These reflex behavwitness your child experiacross their faces. iours begin to fade as encing something new for early as three months *Researchers believe that this of age and need to be the first time.” independence and self-confidence revived. McMann said she decided to increases an interest “Swimming builds selfsign her son up for swimming in learning. and confidence, integrity lessons because she herself never learnt how to swim. courage for life.”

said Kennel.

minutes

ed

.|

“The

.% with

their

i

Carter

an

infant

up

signs

swimming sons the

-

;

for les-

better.”

Kennel said recom-

the

mended age for an infant to

start swim-

ming -

e s

I

Students lose their shirts, and other clothing,

in

the Sanctuary

MOLSON

By JON

intense

pay to get in and students trying to sneak in and there, were even a few students scalping their tickets trying to make an extra buck or

ation as well as a heightened level

maybe

of suggestibility, usually character-

minute,” Silva said. “I

Three main aspects, including focus, tremendous relax-

ize

hypnosis.

But

in

ond semester because lot

comedy and non-stop

enter-

ets

his hypnotist act

of a sold-out crowd

in front

the

in the

sells out not

only

at

our college, but all collegesthroughout Canada and universities as well.”

I

have had a

made attempts to accommodate as many people as possible by bringing in around

70 extra

“It

(Photo submitted)

Conestoga students get down and the Sanctuary on Nov. 23. at one of his shows. They were those who cannot handle

were animals and had the hypnotized participants wrestle each other for an imaginary

treat.

The

•second suggested they had itchy feet

and the only way

was

to relieve

the third student,

After choosing the people to be hypnotized he allowed three students to come up on stage and make up their own commands.

side

event was open to students

were

years

Tony Lee’s

great time.

The

18

in

old.

standing.

least

tho.se

as they participate

who

students had to improvise or

be

content

who

have .severe psychological disorders and finally, those who are currently on drugs, alcohol,

dirty

Lee promi.sed everyone hypnotized would remember everything and have a

some just

Students also had the option of signing in three friends as long as they met the age requirement.

Lee said there were three types of people who should not be hypno-

lot

so

of stuis

it

a

she really enjoyed

the show.

shoes and rub their feet all .over each other. And what would an X-rated hypnotist show be without the illusion of being completely naked, which was demanded by

chairs, but

it,

Jessica Bailey, a third-year robot-

tized

With rows of chairs and couches set up facing a stage, the Sanctuary displayed a theatre-like atmosphere for the event. CSI

at

on time.

ics student, said

event programmer for

CSI. “Tony Lee

a

possibility.”

Sanctuary on Nov. 23. "This was expected and every year it’s the same,” said Lindsay Silva,

were

there

of students that were disap-

dents inquiring about

tainment.

Lee performed

last

consid-

pointed they didn’t get their tick-

be factored into this equa-

to

tion -

am

ering bringing him in again sec-

the case of

Tony Lee, a triple X hypnotist, there are two more elements that have

come

they couldn’t

with the exception of marijuana, he said jokingly, because

and

allows

for

it’s

calming

increased

sug-

gestibility.

who

The

was-

first

made them

think they

the itch

note

to take off their

that

who added on a the people who

commands

for the people who hypnotized, so that was interesting,” she said. “Students enjoy it more, they can relate to it

were

more

if

they are able to be part of

other

(in the" Sanctuary) hold 350 and that is

my

unfortunately ple in.

We

staff

we

and

security, so

couldn’t

let

peo-

had students willing

to

was was

and he kissed his butt,” Bailey said.

“That

remember

will

I

for

a

while.”

fun to watch

lets us

the

really

part

the door.

“Capacity

it

the audience.

was

funny and where one guy mooning and the other guy sitting in a chair beside him “It

hypnotized.

including year.

moon

She said the demand was so great that CSI had to turn people away at"

the stage.

little this

so

She said she didn’t want

it."

only

a

said. “1

was really good.” Her favourite part was when Lee got those who were hypnotized to

in

“He got the audience involved more and he had a few more people go up on stage and call out the

were hypnotized couldn’t run off Silva said Lee changed up his act

X Hypnosis show

Triple

was very funny,” she

wasn’t expecting anything,

“I just

wanted it

to watch.

and

less

It is

to

be

more

embarrass-

ing.”

Bailey hopes that she can attend

Tony Lee’s next show at the lege, which will be held in new Student Life Centre.

col-

the


News

Hartnett sings her By KRISTIN GRIFFERTY

song

final forcetl

A

while wait

to

the

few bad jokes and some techkeep Louise Hartnell from giving it her all at the

glitches to be solved.

on Nov. 27. Hartnett was crowned the winner of the singing competition that was

upbeat than her

nical difficullies didn't

CSI

Idol finale

Sider's

came

still

and Alone,

secontl

Ne\'er

titled

final

song,

was

more

off as safe and a

little

Once

technical

problems were

Hartnett

was given

ist

a

Nicole Snider.

chanee

Hartnett and Snider, both class-

mates

in the recreation

and leisure

program, went into the ftnals ;dter week's worth of auditions that

a

included

other

aspiring

student

singers at the college.

The

ftnale

was

uled for Nov.

but

was

post-

poned due to illness, according to Lindsay Silva from CSI. Students and faculty came out to cheer on their favourite finalist, and to .see who would win the contest. Sider kicked off the finale with her first of two songs, singing .lesus Take the Wheel, originally performed by fellow Idol, Carrie Underwood. Her performance was well received by Judges Bert Last, an audioA'isual tech. Shannon Court from the AV department at the LRC, and Pernell Richards, assistant food services manager at

Chartwells.

Hartnett took to the stage next,

was forced to improvise impromptu comedy as technical difficulties prevented her from but

performing.

As

crowd grew impatient, CSI event programmer Lindsay Silva announced that Sider would perform her second and the

host and

sing

to

her

first

the

of two

Red Neck Woman. While Hartnett's voice was slightly weaker than Sider, her songs.

dancing and upbeat performance had the crowd clapping and singing along.

originally sched-

24,

champ

boring.

soKetl.

of

frotit

Idol

— Page 15

selection, but

first

crowded

in

CSI

2006

technical

Sanctuary, beating out fellow llnal-

held

to

4,

was

Harnett

for

way

SPOKE, December

Barefoot and dressed girl,

cow-

like a

Hartnett two-sleitped her

way

into the judges' hearts, as she per-

formed her second and selection.

Dream

a Little

final

song

Dream of

Me.

Once both

had perjudges no time in crowning Hartnett as the official CSI Idol. Sider was a gracious loser as she

formed wasted

finalists

selections,

their

offered a tearful Hartnett a hug of congratulations.

She said she thought that the judges made the right decision.

am

“1

said

really excited for Louise,"

Sider.

"This

is

an amazing

opportunity for her." Sider also said while it would have been good to win, she is happy that Louise is getting the chance to compete further. "I am going to be in London rooting for her as she competes," said Sider.

Hartnett will go on to represent

Conestoga held in

in

London

the in

college

finals

March 2007.

(Photo by Kristin

Grifferty)

Second-year recreation and leisure student Louise Hartnett was awarded the title of CSI Idol. The finale was held in the Sanctuary on Nov. 27, where Hartnett, along with finalist Nicole Sider, were given the chance to perform two songs for judges, students and faculty.

(Photo

Nicole Sider

and Louise Hartnett both made

They are second-year students program and are also friends.

final.

in

by Kristin

Grifferty)

CSI Idol the recreation and leisure it

to the

(Photo

by Kristin

Grifferty)

Conestoga audio and visual technician Bert Last, (from left to right), LRC employee Shannon Court and Chartwells’ assistant food services manager Pernell Richards give thumbs up to the finalists at the CSI Idol finale.


Page 16

— SPOKE, December

4,

News

2006

Former homeless man By

SUMMER MCPHEE

died he was adopted out to another family

next to impossible to put

It’s

who

He

“When my adoptive family got was sent off to foster tired of me

can’t even see over the top any-

homes where

more, said Richard McLean, who was formerly homeless. “There was never a light at the end of the tunnel, nothing promising for me,” said McLean. members of the Two Community Education Project on Homelessness spoke about their experiences with homelessness at a political coffee house on Nov.

tinued.”

20

drawn

said

out

it

path

family and then

when

McLean.

things,” said

He added

struggle that my life had always been,” said McLean. He added he put himself through school, and graduated

shoulders.

with honours.

vive.”

own

didn’t

I

know how

to

sur-

said

it

were higher than

to

he was working labour jobs

the

at

minimum wage and was going

did a bit of couch surfing, staying

nowhere with

with friends.

in

mother

He

McLean

at

his life.

said the only constant

support he had throughout his

my

first

He

ing his

life

move on

He

said he spent three years liv-

ing on the street and in shelters.

knowing

is

it

for certain if

it

ever

happen again,” said McLean. “It’s complete uncer-

going

to

tainty.”

mine said we could get a plt« said Arenburg. “WiiT my credit I wouldn’t have been

together,”

able to get a place on

“When

ing together.

Arenburg said she got on the list for housing and wasn’t particularly choosy about where she wanted to live, so she got a urgent

March 2004.

been in the hospital year now,” said “My mental health issues seem to be under control.” She said being homeless on two

tells

garbage and you hear

over Arenburg.

for

it

repeatedly you start to believe

was

was hap-

it

still

“I haven’t

you you’re useless and society

my

own.” having mental health issues during that time and over a period of two years she tried to kill herself seven times. She added her roommate moved out on her after six months of liv-

She said she was

place in

would was overstay-

turned

never

say

really

way of

to another place. I

can’t

again because there’s no

said he

dark, nothing positive

major

thought 1 might actually a productive part of society rather than a burden, which is what 1 considered myself,” said “I

welcome and then he’d

“Everywhere

would

become

earning, so he

stay until he felt he

was from his sister Cindy, who was killed by a drunk driver when she was 23. “That triggered

got to a point

money he was

Toronto,

life

eventually turnaround.

“You

“Eventually you get crushed,” he said. “I had to face the reality that

to

McLean.

burden of everything on his

stant

He added he moved where he thought his

he tried to carry the

bills

birth

his his

was

kicked out of his last foster home. “It just continued being the con-

McLean

homeless.

everyway possible by

14 he

to

the

where the

was a long to becoming

He added he was abused

the abuse just con-

when he was

in

college and university education

Wilfrid Laurier University.

McLean

said

know how

community. “I was too ashamed to tell people that I was struggling with

1

He

said he didn’t

access the support available

said even though he had a

.

The education .session, open the community, was held

cidal thoughts.”

abuse.

words the way you feel when you’ve dug a hole so deep you into

episode with depression and sui-

just continued the

story

tells his

a

occasions was the scariest time of her life.

yourself.”

“Everything

Richard McLean,

pening.”

completely

is

uncertain,” said Arenburg.

a man who used to be

don’t

know when

“You

you’ll be getting

another place.”

homeless

She added living in a shelter you a roof over your head, food to eat and a bed to sleep in, gets

the learning Peer Services

Learning

commons

Skills

Service

Writing Services

He added you never know where your next meal is coming from, if some animal will be gnawing at your toes when you wake up under the bridge in the morning, or if the cops, are going to beat

wrong place

We’re Moving!

He

at the

wrong

really stressful.

staying in shelters are drug users

killed in the

to

me

again.”

time.”

you never know wake up, or

if

you’re going to freeze to death

in

said

it is

She said most of the people and have various problems. “I wouldn’t wish it on my worst enemy,” said Arenburg. “Hopefully it will never happen

you. “I had a friend who was by the cops because he was

but

you’re going to

if

the winter.

“The only thing you can be

cer-

Facts about

Homelessness

tain of is the majority of society is

our

new

location,

in the Student Life

Centre

at

Doon

Room 2A103. As of Monday, December 11, the Learning Commons will be in its new location at the Student Life Centre at

Doon

-

Room

2A103, featuring learning

skills,

peer

space and hours, laptop computers

services, writing services, student study tutorial will

also

rooms. During office

be on-site and available

for use.

move, services housed the Sanctuary will be closed

In order to prepare for the

the current site

December

in

in

7-8.

calling

you a worthless piece of

way they McLean. “When

trash because that’s the

Temporary Located

in

1B36

(In

Hours of Operation- 8:30 a

it

He

I

other

people,”

said

in

a

and ended

suicidal, depressed

anxious,” said Arcnburg.

up

psyche ward

“I at

Grand

River Hospital for a while.”

She said she found

Telephone: 519-748-5220 extension 2308 Website: http://www.conestogac.on.ca/jsp/stserv/leamingcommons/index.jsp

Many of these individuals belong to the working

-

and foremost, you can help somebody by actually respecting them as a person. He said eventually he started building self-esteem and got to a point where he was actually capable of getting off the streets and moving forward with his life. “Now I assist people who are going through the same issues have gone through.” He added he’s in a strange way grateful that he had spent that much time on the streets struggling to survive becau.se it gave him a completely different perspective on being homeless. “1 can use this horrendous experience to benefit myself and to said, first

was

to

it

yourself.”

“1

4-00 p.m.

are

individuals.

hear

health issues.

the Sanctuary)

m.—

K-W

and garbage and you

repeatedly you start to believe

Cheryl Arcnburg, who was also formerly homeless, said it all started around Christmas 2003 when she started having mental

Commons

streets of

society tells you you’re useless

see you,” said

McLean.

Learning

The

hundreds and hundreds of homeless

benefit

CONESTOGA

-

home

a place

tem-

porarily, but she couldn't afford

it

because she was paying her rent using a credit card. She added she ended up going to Mary’s Place, a shelter for women in Kitchener, and was there for three and a half months. “I was lucky because a friend of

class, struggling to pro-

vide for themseives on a

minimum wage

saiary.

As a direct resuit, these peopie are forced to reiy

-

on the services within the community. For the individuai iiving street, iife is a daiiy battie, one often piagued

-

on the

with fear, and complete isolation

-

A

rising

from society.

number

of youth

are finding themseives on the street.

These youth are often and negiectfui situations, in which

-

fleeing abusive

they are forced out of their homes or ieave out of fear.

-These individuais are often young and vulnerabie, ranging in age

from

1

2 to 24.


t::-

News

SPOKE, December

4,

— Page 17

2006

Celebrate the season with history STEPHANIE IRVINE The Christmas season

Christkindlsmarkt,

upon

is

us.

located

mu.seum's galleries. popular since it began

It

in

the

in

Joseph Schneider

the

at

Another popular attraction

1988.

"We always have

a

in,

we’ll be

much busier," who works at

Cooper,

on Queen Street

Cooper said take part

said

Hannah

the

mu.seum

in Kitchener.

offered on

many themed winter

weekends including a butchering bee, gingerbread house workshop, bake day, Pennsylvania-German breakfast basics, candle-making, cooking a goose and even making toys and games. According to museum employees one of the biggest attractions this will season be the

museum. “You can

the

at

almost forget Queen Street only happens once every three years so people really look forward it,”

one.

I

right it

it’s

...

in the cost

activities arc

of admi.ssion.

and seniors are $1.50, pay $2.25, and children are $1.25 but get free admi.ssion on Saturdays in celebration of the

The Joseph Schneider Flaus

museum’s 25th anniversary. For more information call 519742-7752 or visit

Christmas season with the start of their winter-themed weekends. Flannah Cooper, left, and Roberta Grosland pose in their period garb after a successful Bake Day with master baker Karen

www.region.waterloo.on.ca.

Waddsworth.

Students

adults

for sale.

unique

of really

is

snows,

the .sound

Grosland said most included

I

lot

it

beautiful.”

my

can’t w'ait."

has a

dampens

really

The market will open on Dec. and offer wooden toys, glass and tin ornaments, gingerbread houses, beeswax candles and angels along with an assortment of other trinkets “It

when

there. Especially

said Cooper. “I’ve only been

here for a year, so this will be first

said

Roberta Grosland, curatorial assistant

to

1856.

in

magical,"

really

“It's

“It

visitors are able to

activities

in

any of the

through a typical evening

Tale for a

Winter’s Eve.

but closer to Christmas

coming

A

called

is

is

Tale for a Winter's Eve.

where the historical house is lit by candles and guests follow actors

Another popular attraction

of schools

lot

A

called

Haus?

said

else,"

Cooper.

and what better way to celebrate than by experiencing some local history

anywhere

find

n’t

has been

handcrafted things that you would-

(Photo by Stephanie in/ine) in

Kitchener has kicked

off

the

College or university,

which

to

By ALLISON STEINMAN

choose? mind.

“1

think

it

was

just too

much

school.”

A

second-year firefighting stu-

dent

Conestoga

at

is

adamant

that

college was the right decision for

him.

Joe Weinstein said the main rea-

son he decided to go the college

Joe Weinstein chose college because university doesn’t offer his program, firefighting.

route instead of attending universi-

going out into the workforce was because university doesn't offer his program. “University focuses more toward business and engineering,” he said. “It’s not as hands-on as college is.” Weinstein also said he enjoys the fact that he can go to school part time and have flexible hours as well as tuition fees which he feels ty or

(Photo by Tiffany McCormick)

Awarding student incentive

Post’s Aboriginal Education Incentive

Award since

regions across the country grant three awards annually. Aboriginal students

education and

of

said winning this

who

began

Thomas

said.

As a mother

in

2004. Each of their eight

Canada Post sponsors

of three, Furlong,

So,

time

ANGELO MAZZIOTTI

it's

when

love and peace

fill

A

the

and Christmas cheer warms the

air

cockles of our hearts, or something like that.

As the big day quickly we ask ourselves what

approaches

get for the nearest and dearest r

Christmas

Why

on

re-gifted or are considering re-gifting.

surprised

brave the crowded shopping

if .the

little

big jolly guy has

the gift a lot more, but does that it

OK? One

dent doesn't think I

if

through your closet. That’s right

of a

re-gift.” said

as

ea.sy

answer is re-gifting. Even before Seinfeld coined the

I

stu-

feel

very

the victim

Lindsey Eaves, a

Re-gifting has

mon

re-gifted item

been the victims of a

Remember

Another student disagrees. Nicole Wolters, a first-year business student, said she would re-gift for everyone

re-gift.

that

stale

your family received Lucie last Christmas?

fruitcake

from Aunt

You can

bet

your sleigh and eight reindeer that

on her

list.

wish I had more stuff to give away,” joked Wolters. “No, but seriously, I think everyone does it. “I

I

gives

almost feel honoured that some-

its

in

is

li.st

of

tip-top shape,

the re-gifted item gets

be absolutely sure not to recipient the item

with a

not

really

at all,”

live

on

my own

and take

like

going

to

think

the

was

tell

the

a re-gift.

etiquette

list

is

absolutely hilarious,” said Wolters. fact that list

something in the first

we had

to

come up

from shouldn’t be doing

to save ourselves

we

place

is

UW

wanted to come to since I was eight years old for whatever reason,” said Lewis, who is in her second year of the com“I’ve

1.

she said, “allowing

me

of

Chain Hang

Low

(Kids)

Jibbs

Fergalicious

3.

Lips of an - Hinder

Angel

4.

Money

The Bank

-

Fergie

- Lil’

5.

My -

In

Scrappy

Love

Justin Timberiake

Shortie Like Mine 7.

-Bow Wow Smack That

8.

- Akon White and Nerdy

-

to get expe-

Sexy Back

10.

Money Maker

-

-

'

-y

Weird Al Yankovic

9.

rience prior to graduation.”

Lewis said the workload is heavy in university but she wouldn’t change her decision because she enjoys the social environment of a

November 27

2.

I

Justin Timberiake

(Pharrell

^rus)

Ludacris (feat Pharrell)

'

Text "PLAY" to 4800 on your Rogers wireless

phone to download your favourite ring tunes today.

university setting.

“I’m having a “I’m really

blast,” she

said.

fitting in here.”

Tyler Langfield, an employee of A-trax, a trucking said

company

out of

he chose the

workforce because post-secondary school ju.st wasn’t for him.

be some easier way, there is. Merry Christmas to all, and to

school,”

said

attended

college

semester

before

a re-gift!

Week

-

So just remember the next time you are in a long line in a crowded Wal-Mart store thinking there must all

RealTrax™ ring tunes

her decision to go to university.

Mississauga,

too funny.”

flop 10'#

he laughed.

had what wanted.” Lewis is glad she chose university, especially because of the preparation her program gives her. “The co-op is really spectacular,”

new, non re-gifted wrapping and to

“I

dream.

his

now

is

ways to make sure you don’t go overboard. The list includes making sure the

tesy in return.”

re-gifted or

is

puter engineering program. “It just

five

“The

Admit it! There is no need to be ashamed, most of you have either

re-

actually proper re-gifting etiquette.

phrase re-gifter, people

world had been re-gifting.

can

it

become so com-

society that there

in

would never do that to someone else, I would expect the same cour-

over the

me when

gifting.”

second-year business student.

“I

“I

care of myself.”

and

to his decision

because the classes he takes at Conestoga are mandatory in the industry, and becoming a firefight“It’s

to re-gift?

one would think of

friends, the

all

to tears,

downside

University of Waterloo student Rachel Lewis has no regrets about

making sure

.so.

would found out I was

“Personally hurt

as

is

Conestoga

at

independently.

admitted he has trouble find-

knows he wouldn’t ever change

er

who was moved

Learnalittle.com

re-gifting him.self

looking

it

be

Most people re-gift because they someone else would love

make

list.

stats like that don’t

feel that

malls searching for that perfect gift

when

With

done a

for

“a big supporter

He ing, a

school

was a re-gift. Regiftable.com says two out of three people have either

that time of year again.

award

and unbelievable.”

“feels very surreal

The Christmas season, a time By

this

because they are

return to school after a prolonged period

literature,”

award

it

more reasonable than those

enjoyed equally and make good money without going to college.” He added that he enjoys living

university.

Kimburiey Furlong, a second-year office administrative executive student, centre, stands with Carrie Thomas, a representative from Canada Post, left, and Kelly Nixon, an Aboriginal student counsellor at Conestoga, after receiving an award for $1,000. Furlong is the first Conestoga student to win

Canada

are

Langfield likes the fact that while out in the workforce he is able to support himself “I realized I could get a job I

“I

went

into

it

right after high

Langfield,

who

only

one

changing

his

for

PHONES

RMKINED


— SPOKE, December

Page 18

4,

News

2006

doesn’t hurt to get tested

It

By JENN SPRACH

It is

otics

Sex isn’t something that should happen, it is .something that should be planned, said Janet Warren, a family physician who

just

works at the college two days a week. "You should have a trusting rela-

near,

mouth

STD

attending

clients

suck every

out with

$30,000 of cold hard cash stuffed in his

second-year busihit the jackpot

Arif, a

after a typical

cheesy

slot

Instead, his

Vegas tug of luck on machine. nerves were tested on

Nov. 24, the night Arif became a poker God.

On

1

to his already

prosperous

pile.

After six gruelling hours of no-

ness .student, didn’t a

and stayed seated in his evening throne where he would add nearly $ 5,000 worth of chips

this night,

Arif

knew when

to

limit poker, Arif

decided $30,000 for one

was more than enough night’s work.

1

“Although I wanted thought to myself,

money

than

I

make

to play

more,

this is

more he

in a year,”

said. “I

was too mentally exhausted

to

hold’em and when to fold’em. "Well, what can I say, tossed away the garbage hands, and I cashed in on the monster hands,”

continue on, I knew this gutwrenching night had to come to an end sometime and I’m glad it did.” Although $30,000 is the largest

said Arif.

sum

I

"Once my chips had stacked

Arif has ever

winning big

knew it over $2,000 in profit, was time to switch tables, and play high stakes poker with the

tice.

big boys."

and the year

I

won

isn’t a

at a

casino,

foreign prac-

they

usually

Itching

if

rashes

symptoms

wrists,

in the pubic area and found on your fingers, abdomen, elbows, ankles

charge, redness or irritation of the

and genitals are signs of scabies. Pubic lice can be .seen, they are a

penis or pain while peeing.

tiny,

include

Women may

slight

dis-

experience odour,

itching or irritation of the genital

light-brown

Sei/.ing the opportunity to rake in

dough, Arif began winning hand after hand while unllinchingly

controlling the high-stakes table

behind the velvet ropes

in the

high

report also said 52 per cent

men

while 48 per

women. STDs,

tested for

Trich

Mary

Hall, a

treated with antibiotics.

comes from

Genital herpes

family

Therefore,

cold

as

cause

Herpes look the

as cold sores, they are just

located in the genital area.

Once you have herpes you have

available all

With ing

the average post size rang-

close

to

$900, Arif's chips

swiftly stacked into a healthy

sum

2006

to just over

total

“I

was

everything;

hitting

straights, flushes, full houses, then I

looked

at

my

watch, and

it

hit

me." “I

had

won

over $15,000

in Just

three hours," he said.

“My heart told me my mind told me

but

is still

50 grand,

young,” he said.

Arif attributes his poker success to three simple rules;

The mathe-

matics of the game, the stakes of

game and knowing

the

right

time to quit.

you

two weeks.

Anyone who you had

close conwith should also be treated

tact

if no symptoms are apparent. "Be wise, be responsible," said

even

Warren. The only way

I

should

to stay.”

quit,

help is

protect

by using

them

only treatments which can reduce breakouts or help heal current

cent, they can

breakouts.

fall off.”

The virus can be passed even when there are no sores but cannot

HIV

be transferred from things

pass through the condom, Warren

simple

a

swab

women

for

test

test that is usual-

performed during a pap

test.

usually just pee into a cup.

easier

“It’s

prevent

to

them

(STDs), then

it

everything

not always treatable,”

is

is to treat

Hall said, adding,

them, and

“Once you have

one it’s easier to get another one.” Chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, trichomonas (trich), genital herpes, human papillomavirus (HPV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), pubic lice and scabies are

diseases or infec-

all

you should be aware of. Chlamydia is a common STD that infected people in 841 Waterloo Region last year. Three hundred and sixty-six of those were ages 20-24, 209 were ages 15-19 and 136 were ages 25-29. “People are shocked when we tell thern they have chlamydia because often there are no signs or. symptoms,” said Hall.

Some women

experience symp-

There

for life.

no cure,

is

like toi-

let seats.

HPV

different fornis.

and others can lead to various types of cancer. genital warts

The good news

a vaccination

is

available for

HPV

but

is

is

not

covered by the government. Genital warts can grow in various areas such as the thighs, vagina, cervix, penis, scrotum and anus and are rarely found on or in the mouth. The warts can vary in size, they can be flat or look like small cauliflower and they can bleed or discharge.

There

aren’t always 100 per

sometimes break or

also

is

some suspicion

may be

virus

“You have

the power,” said Hall.

your partner sex with me and a condom or no sex at all.” A baseline STD test can be done “Tell

two weeks after unprotected sex and three months later another more in-depth test can be done.

Some STDs can be found

in the tests.

you are tested positive STD around the region offer free medication for chlamydia and gonIf

clinics

cause warts don’t cause cancer but you could have more than one type. that

The other type of

HPV

would be

found in your yearly sexual health checkup when they look for cancell

HPV

clinics

have doctors

that is not given

The next tell

step

away is

ing after

.sex

HIV/AIDS

is

a non-curable',

life-

threatening disease which attacks

or between periods.

Men may experience a watery or milky drip from the penis, pain or .swelling of the testicles, a burning feeling while peeing or itching

the

immune

It is

system. passed through the exchange

going to

individual can call past part-

ners or the clinic will call them and

said Hall.

lower abdomen and vaginal bleed-

is

the past three months.

the person can remain

it

can

free.

who

anus, penis or vulva.

the

the type of

who

the partners you've had in

all

The

changes.

Depending on

The

write prescriptions for medication

can lead to cancer of the cervix,

in

early

chlamydia and gonorrhea but HIV and HPV take time to show up like

peeing, pain during sex or

like

the

small enough to

orrhea, said Hall.

HPV

Types of

cerous

“Condoms

said.

many

has

Some cause

now

condoms.

changes in vaginal discharge, a burning feeling while

toms

Chlamydia

If

STD

anonymous,

you think you may have an you can call your family doc-

tor or consult a sexually transmit-

ted disease drop-in clinics.

curable with antibi-

is

otics, but if left untreated in

women

IRISH PUbI

can cause problems with the reproductive organs and difficulty it

getting pregnant.

Symptoms

in

women

include a

players.

during

out of

asked what he will do with

the winnings, Arif replied:

think

I

DAY!!

ages 15-29.

make something

might build a mini casino

“I at

pain

in

Men green

discharge

while

TO JUL X

XI*

'Y

TJttUXLSDAYSi Urink

(SpcH-ials

& Food

after sex, rectal

or

should watch

burning

lower bleeding

the

vaginal

or discharge

knows, maybe 1 will buy into the World Series of Poker and start a new profession, and if there is still time, I might build a bigger Tim Hortons at the college.”

than

or

between periods or chills.

College,

sex

abdomen,

who

Conestoga

AYY

Gonorrhea infected 83 people in the region last year, 64 who were

nothing,” Arif advises fellow poker

all

to

STDs

yourself from

Sexuality Resources.

burning sensation while peeing, changes in vaginal discharge, pain

will

When

of money.

fabrics

inside the penis.

"Just follow these guidelines and

rollers lounge.

the

at

must be frozen, steam cleaned, washed in for

the

sores.

cold sores can

herpes.

genital

same

said

is

are

registered nurse at Public Health

my

“Tonight’s win has brought

the

lays

that

Creams, lotions and shampoo

^

the

in.sect

white, oval-shaped eggs.

same

tions

to his brain,

pockets.

Kemal

my

penny out of

Fortunately, Arif decided to listen

I

in his wallet, then strutting

last

opponents’ pockets.”

they do experience any

close body contact.

13.5 per cent.

Men

Conestoga College student can now claim the title of No. hustler after walking into Fallsview Casino in Niagara Falls with $200

men and

often silent in

also bed sheets, towels, clothes and

hot water or sealed in air-tight bags

ly

A

is

Pubic lice and scabies can be passed not only through sex but

peeing.

involving a

could

Trich

someone.

drugstore. But

It’s

I

rashes on various parts of the body.

into contact with blood. cannot be caught by kissing

It

green vaginal discharge, pain during sex or pain or irritation while

of his $30,'000 payday.

stuck around,

also causes

come

Waterloo Region are in the age range of 21 -30. The second highest was the 1620 age group with 23 per cent, followed by the 31-40 age group at

clinics

Both partners should always be

1

vagina,

the It

and

may have

they

treatments

cent were

if

or on

or anus.

toothbrushes

as

because

area, frothy, off-white, yellowish-

The

knew

including

effects

damage.

in

such

razors

in

of clients were

“I

seri-

Signs of syphilis are painless sores

Waterloo Public Health AIDS/STD program states 50 per cent of

By NICK CASSELLI

long-term

heart or brain

penis,

They are very common among young people, said Warren. A report from the Region of

Student $30,000 richer

with antibiotics but can have

ous

a^

of body fluids such as semen blood. So don’t you use personal

items

infertility.

Syphilis infected 20 people in the region last year. It is also curable

People will lie and say they don't have a sexually transmitted disease

one.

By Nick CasseHi) Second-year business student, Kemal Arif, buys a round of drinks for the whole bar at the Stampede Ranch in Guelph in celebration

can cause

women

untreated in

if left

tionship with the person."

(STD). Then the individual will get tested and, sure enough, they have

(Photo

it

afso treatable through antibi-

and

fever

10pm,

and

J Terry

for yellow-

Top

from the penis, peeing,

pain

or

llanrr. flip

"

40’*

Hop. Clountrv and more....

swelling of the testicles or rectal pain and discharge.

10 Manitou Dr. Kitchener (Corner of Manitou

&

Fairway)

#


Sports

SPOKE, December

I'f'ce/t

oj

December

4.

2006

Aries March

Libra September 23 October 22

2

April 19 You're strong,

clearly an individual; impulsive and able to

make your own decisions. Others envy your ways and try to make you feel bad about yourself. Jealousy is their own enemy, don't believe what they say.

Bump, Conestoga’s intramural volleyball teams enjoyed playoffs begin this week.

set,

week

hockey game

is

not

is

uncommon

a

.something that

to

it’s been happening since began 87 years ago. Although fighting in hockey tends to be looked at as just part of the game, that’s not the case at all

many

other sports.

Opinion a contact sport, but there are

If

start a fight

penalized for

The penalty ing

is

in the

NHL

for fight-

only five minutes.

Sometimes if a player hits another player from behind with the intent to injure he will be removed from the game and be fined $200, but in doesn’t

my

opinion that really

discourage

the

argue that hockey

is

a

contact sport so getting into a few*

scraps

with

opposing team

the

should be expected.

However, football

is

100 per cent

players

fighting

deterred.

still

Our

so

national image

improved by

one does occur the player must

sportscasters

on the oppos-

is

but

ball,

beyond

more common

a bit

things

rarely

light

you care

for

^^

^i S

As

crossed.

is

who

short with those

be rational, after

son to be

offend you,

all, 'tis

the .sea-

jolly.

Sagittarius 2

November 22 December 2

'

because

would be showing

You tend

to hold

people

in

You

a

often get upset

certain position

and when they measure up you often cast

the

don't

wear yourself too

them

aside.

Watch

yourself, not

everyone will meet your requirements but you probably don't measure up all the time either.

if

you

aren't

Don't by trying

thin

to impress everyone.

You

aren't

the

main

attraction but that doesn't

mean

always going

you don't

be

to

exist.

fighting seem established than it

Capricorn

ij

December 22

Completely trying to remove from hockey, or any sport for that matter, would be next to fighting

self-

Fighting in hockey has become a Canadian tradition because it has been tolerated for .so long, but per-

A1.SO, if fighting in hockey was reduced the sport might be open to a wider span of fans. Fighting is just simply irrelevant to true fans who really want to see

What

to do, what to listen to. one can help you with the choices you'll have to make; even you'll find it hard as your head and heart don't agree. Trust your instincts and make a choice you know you can live with.

No

impossible.

that.

sonally, I’d rather see a hat trick

than a fight any day.

You tend

to be conservative in

your work methods but you do not veto other points of view, a

many

quality

you for. mind as they success when

respect

Keep other views

in

may be keys to your methods don't work.

Aquarius

'X<.

win over the Comers, who were pulling double duty that day.

dozed the Free Agents 15-5, and Corrupt earned their second

With the season winding down and the playoffs nearing, the teams in the intramural ball hockey league are preparing for the post-

straight

shutout,

with

a

The

1-0

playoffs start Oec. 7.

to

win

You tend

have an amazing and focus when you need to. You'll need to to

put those skills to use in the very

near fumre as situations begin to

it

all,

are the favourite

arise that will distract

work

with a spotless 7-0

and the league’s which has allowed a league-low 25 goals as of game day nine. One team that could give the record

that

you from

needs your focus and

attention.

-

February 18

'

ability to concentrate

.season.

The Architects

-

January 19

January 20

MCNANNEY

-

of attention.

centre

Intramural ball hockey playoffs nearing By ALEX

the

holidays approach try not to be

should be.

and sometimes hockey of

will but keep hidden unless you or someone

make

clips

much more

escalate

the objectives to a sport

little

You have a strong it

But, currently most of the high-

in foot-

should be to teach kids about control,

-

21

instead of fights.

that.

One of

would akso be

less fighting

more video of saves and goals

game. Pushing and shoving between

the

plays

October 23

20

Gemini

the league had harsher for

fights.

shows

behaviour.

Some may

if

their aggression out

automatically leave for the rest of

it?

shove?

ing team.

and bare-

be allowed to

in

quality of plays rather than taking

few

Scorpio

May

-Then players as well as fans could concentrate more on the

O’Neill

So why should a hockey player ly get

think

would be

In fact,

for

to

penalties

NHL

-

You wear the face of confidence and collectivism while behind your mask you may be scared and insecure. We can't always be sure of everything, we're human. Oon't be afraid to admit what you don't know.

good game. 1

hockey fans

everywhere. the

April 20

season play on Nov. 22 before

of

Seeing a few punches get thrown a

to build.

spike

their final

hockey when push comes in

work continues

November

there a double standard

Is

You too have an eye for detail and arc quite industrious when it comes to your work. Take one thing at a time, you often take on more than you can handle and that will only create problems as

Taurus

(Photo by Adam Black)

— Page 19

2006

4,

Your versatile nature allows you to work on many projects at once while keeping everything in working order. Don't be shy to ask for help when you need it. Even though you feel you can do need a little help it all, we all from time to time.

top defence,

Architects

fits

are the Leafs,

utilized their offensive

who

season to lead the league in

offence.

game day

(Photo by A tex McNanney)

The goaltender

for

Team

Corrupt makes the save as players from

the Individuals attack the net eight action, the

GI

ball

in

game day

11 action of intramural

hockey.

out the Moonshine Raiders in a 12-10 shootout, and

Joes edged

the Individuals

and Pylons played

to a 9-9 tie.

Corrupt shut out the Free Agents 1-0,

Pisces V'

February 19

-

March 20

prowess to

The squad has scored 74 times

In

Ao

August 23 September 22

Izet their 6-1 record.

this

,

Virgo

.

and the Architects beat the

l.ast vear. a

Wm^i

pacciTiaker implant saveci

Max’s

focus on.

i.iii

spend more time

Your likes

is

limited and

You have many

and dislikes and are always

considering

new

aspects of your area and go With

ideas in life. it;

many

Pick one

try to

be

isfied

with one thing and

where

it

McCormick

is

in the

defeated the Corners 10-7. to the Hears

.see

a third-year

journalism student holding fate

game day nine action, the Leafs hammered the Moonshine Raiders 13-5, and the GI Joes bull-

sat-

takes you.

wifti his yrivtdjiilhcr.

In

The Hasty Passion Flakies

satisfaction

often short-lived.

life.

Tiffany Skur he

Corners 7-6.

new

People will want your help last minute assignments as your eye for detail and quick thinking ensure a good job and a job done on time. Don't be taken advantage of or let your work suffer, you have other things to with

St-'okt* rourfCW’tOrt.

palm of her hand.

'Jim.


Page 20

— SPOKE, December

4,

Entertainment

2006

(Photo by Aaron Schwab)

Local punk band rocks Kitchener club Tyler

Coker and Rob Pugh

of the Kitchener

punk band, A

Bitter

End, rocked a packed house along with their bandmates at the Schwaben Club on Nov. 24.

RENT the learning Peer Services

%%

Learning

a musical masterpiece

commons Writing Services

Service

Skills

By ERIC MURPHY

Job and Volunteer Opportunities Winter 07

A

packed house was treated

Peer Tutors

is

now accepting

specific

(in

applications for:

program areas)

B.Sc.N Business Administration programs Civil

Architecture/Construction Engineering

Volunteer Peer Conversation Partners all

program areas are encouraged

to apply

For more information and to apply, visit the Learning Commons ~ temporarily located in 1 B36 (back of the Sanctuary) until December 6. Training for peer tutor and conversation partner positions will take place in early January at our new location in the Student Life Centre, Room 2A103. It

Works!

throughout the

on inner city survival and a young group of tenants’ battle against a

The

Temporary Located

in

tommons 1B36

(In

the Sanctuary)

Hours of Operation: 8:30 a.m.— 4:00 p.m.

519-748-5220 extension 2308 Website: http://www.conestogac.on.ca/jsp/stserv/learningcommons/index.jsp

perfonu-

Tom

Collins (Warren G. Nolan, and the supporting cast, and the strong finish by Roger and the cast

by

with Your Eyes. that

for a state-of-the-art

your run-

this isn’t just

good

Benny’s

her

new

protest

studio

words

to

the

against

plans.

In

crowd Love along

obvious

favourite Seasons of

vs. evil epic.

Benny (Michael Ifdl), a friend and former roommate of building tenants Mark (Harley Jay) and Roger (Declan Bennett), is now the landlord. Benny needs Mark to convince Maureen (Tracy McDowell), Mark’s former lover, cancel

The song-savvy audience proved they were no Broadway slouches and showed their own musical prowess, belting out the

cyber-arts studio.

of-the-mill

very strong

Jr.)

group of homeless people who occupy a lot beside the building to

with the perfomiers.

This performance of the Tony and musical

Award-winning

Pulitzer Prize winner

of

its

was worthy

reputation, once again taking

the audience for a ride on a beautiful,

thought-provoking, emotion-

stining musical roller coaster.

one night you get more than your month’s worth with RENT, you get a year’s worth of enjoyment. In

just

The story begins during the Christmas season but this is not your typical warm and fuzzy holiday season tale full of mistletoe kisses and jolly Christmas shoppers. The audience gets more than just a

month's worth out of

when

it

comes

to

its

RENT

subject matter,

striking the heart-strings with hardhitting topics

such as love, relation-

ships and renewed hopes and

Telephone:

acts, the

landlord also needs to remove a

rent-free.

Learning

their

Candle, the clev-

emotional delivery of I’ll Cover You

Centre

at

exchange, Mark and Roger can continue to live in the building

CONESTOGA

My

This musical masterpiece reflects

to

Students Helping Students -

Brown) and

ance of Light

erly placed voice mail interruptions

make room

& Diploma

(Krystal

first

Mimi

in

However,

Students from

RENT,

the Square in Kitchener Nov. 21.

landlord’s plan to evict them.

Engineering

Mechanical Engineering General Arts & Science - Health Option

to a

spectacular opening performance

of the musical,

The Learning Commons

These include the humorous encounter between Roger and

more

homelessness, drug ^iddiction, AIDS and death. From beginning to end, the audience is taken on a thought-wrenching journey with emotional highs and lows. gritty

topics

like

(Internet photo)

The musical RENT played the Centre

in

at

the Square on

Nov. 21 and 22.

Digital Edition - December 04, 2006  
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