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is

preparing for

first

tournament. Sports 20

16:

2006

6|

Condors ready to hit the ice The extramural hockey team

every

gamer’s holiday

Monday, November

News

sure to be

at the top of

lists

new

release of the

PS3,

Catalogue by World Vision

ideas for Third World families.

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

Conestoga College, Kitchener, Ont.

37th Year

— No. 24

CSI and college lock horns Expanded Timmy’s By BJ RICHMOND Conestoga Students

(CSI) and

Inc.

management have different ideas when it comes to the retail area of the new Student Life Centre. Over the past few months. Spoke college

at centre of dispute “Our business model reflects that we would operate this store on a breakeven basis. Meaning any revenue happens

that

be generated will be

to

directly returned to the students.”

retail area.

However, the college sent the profor the store back to CSI, unapproved, with a few questions they needed some clarity on. CSI and college management have been

As previously reported, both the and CSI have submitted

regarding the approval of putting a

proposals to one another as to what

convenience store

has learned the college and student

government have been regarding the use of the

odds

at

college

to

do with the

new Student

retail

space

in the

Life Centre. In 2004,

CSI submitted

to the college a pro-

posal

in

negotiations

about a year

for

in the

new

centre.

This past summer, the college made a proposal to CSI regarding the expansion of

Tim Hortons The

in

posal for a convenience store in the

the Student Life Centre.

Student Life Centre, which would

lege discussed the potential offer

be operated by CSI and run by stu-

CSI become a partner in the college’s venture to expand Tim

dents from the school.

Matt Jackson, president of CSI, CSI would give back all the

said

profit

col-

Continued on Page 2

Proposed

finishes third overall A

team of Conestoga marketing

students finished third overall at the Ontario Colleges’

Marketing

Competition on Nov. 16 and 17. at held The competition, Algonquin College in Ottawa, involved teams of four from

advantage,” he

information

but

entrepreneurship and marketing research which tested

here

individual

and team marketing

Symons, co-ordinator of third-year marketing program

Lisa

make

compet-

said.

peting in various events such as

skills.

“Any

delivered

professors

the

the difference.” it was third-year

Even though

marketing student Matt Congi’s second time going to the competition, he still felt the pressure.

“We

A tariff proposed by Canada’s performing rights society threatens to shut down some radio stations’ online feeds and amounts to nothing more than nitpicking, according to the co-ordinator of

broadcasting

at

Conestoga

College. “I suppose it’s a smart business move, but I think it defeats the purpose of what the whole system was set up for, which is to give credit and some reimburse-

OCMC is

present to industry professionals so it is a little nerve-rack-

very intense but an excellent expe-

ing but our teachers have prepared

ment

us well,” he said.

Thurnell in a recent interview.

the

and a professor, said the rience.

“The competition is a fast-paced environment which requires participants to do a lot of problem solving off the top of their heads and Conestoga has finished at

“Our teachers deserve a 10 out of 10.”

Matthew Weiler, a second-year marketing student and teammate, said they

were pretty positive they

“Our team has received a lot of one-on-one coaching from professors here and has gone through one of the most intense learning experiences they will

pared.

keting student and one of the par^ ticipants for Conestoga, said just

being involved has added so

much

more to his experience in the program and the college. “The quality of education is much more than anyone can get from a textbook,” he said. “The professors

have been extremely

supportive and helpful.”

smaller artists in

my

opinion.”

radio stations to pay a total of 7.5 per cent of their gross annual rev-

because they were so well pre-

Quigley, a third-year mar-

“What’s happening is the rich guys, the Elton Johns of the world, are getting richer and it doesn’t do anything to help

marketing competition looks great on a resume but they have

nine years,” she said.

bring

Deanna Dobson, marketing

member,

also

built

student

a

a

a

third-year

and

team

great, relationship

Cdn

enue, or $200

for

whichever

fessors.

licence to broadcast online.

of real-life experience and broad exposure to make sure we lot

do succeed,” she said. “Conestoga has the reputation for being the No. 1 college for a reason.”

targets

“I

greater,

is

think

because what those people

tions.

tions for college radio.”

imagine you’re going to see a lot of stations stop streaming if (tariff 22 is approved),” said Thurnell. “They’ll pay their bill and say ‘We can’t afford to keep “I

doing this.’” CJIQ, said Thurnell Conestoga’s radio station, has decided not to stream for a couple of reasons, a major one being this proposed tariff.

is

trying to be fiscally

responsible by proposing this tariff.

“They’re saying they know they need to make more money, rather than increasing the rates to the stations or the traditional funding mechanisms which is concert halls, public address areas, radio

They’ve said where else get money from?” he

stations.

we

said.

He added “I

think

yes,

we

a win-win ... use the music to it’s

get listeners but at the

where would bands be these of any without radio? They don’t

same

all

time,

make

it

through

MuchMusic and MTV.” Mike

Thurnell,

SOCAN

artists

money

as

it

off of

it.’

ignoring

pletely

same

the

time, where

through

to

would

According to the SOCAN web22 is not meant to be a

site, tariff

“I think that

we could do

it,

and

for the non-profit

money-maker

sent.

He went on

that

They don’t all make it MuchMusic and MTV.”

we’re waiting because we obviously don’t want to get a retroactive bill and have to pay it,” he said. “I think we’re sort of wait-

power over

said Thurnell.

fact

any of these bands be without

say the great thing about the Internet is whether you like it or not, now

it

to

They’re comthe

we’re giving artists their first exposure to mass media,” he said. “I think it’s a win-win ... yes, we use the music to get listeners but

the Internet,”

afford

able

‘you’re using

and you’re making

organization and

are

evidence

doesn’t get what radio

“They see our

radio?

at Conestoga College

radio

hits is

does.

at

co-ordinator of broadcasting

really

it

hard, and once again

of people are saying we should be doing it, but I think

who

thinks

he

said

Thurnell

SOCAN

it

will be

whether there

can

it’s it

go, and any exemp-

will

ing to see

a

unfortunate does is it gives

how

the small stations are on an equal footing with the major radio sta-

per month,

with teammates and with the pro-

“The professors here want the students to succeed and invest a

tariff

Mike

said

said being part of the

trophy

would

Adam

artists,”

to

According to the Copyright Board of Canada, tariff 22, proof Society the by posed Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada (SOCAN), would require noncommercial

home

least in the top three for the last

ever have.”

,

itive

replicate

colleges

retailing,

,

tations our professors have in their

college can

15

Bv STEPHANIE IRVINE

the

“The experience and great repu-

com-

approximately

at

competition.

fields definitely give us a

coming to town

radio’s online feeds

Quigley said he wasn’t too nervous before the event, but there was a little bit of pressure because of Conestoga’s past success

is

Santa made an early appearance in Kitchener and Waterloo Nov. 18 at the annual KitchenerWaterloo Santa Claus Parade. He was in town checking to see who’s been naughty or nice. For more photos of the parade, see Page 1 4.

Internet access.

Marketing team MURPHY

Santa Claus

Hortons with seating and wireless

of the store to the students.

By ERIC

(Photo by Meghan Kretter)

that

a lot

is strictly

for the

benefit of the artists they repre-

“My said

who

question

Thurnell. off

now?”

is

which

artists?”

“Who’s nipping


Page 2

News

— SPOKE, November 27, 2006

Now ...with Random

want expanded Timmy’s

Conestoga College

questions answered by

random students

Continued from Page lege

of Christmas?

a Baby

I

1

In this business venture, the col-

What's your favourite part

“PRESENTS!

want

Alive.”

would be willing

assume

to

2,

preschooler at

ECE day care

love fat Santa.”

Connor Scott,

ECE day care

up the service and use its porof the profits to pay it off. Jackson said CSI declined the proposal given to them in August because the space and budget of the Student Life Centre are slated for a retail store. “We (CSI) do not want

said

an

to put

tion

would correct the congestion problem at the college. “The Timmy’s

break the commitment with the

as per the (November 2004) survey. Making changes this late in the ballgame would be too controversial,” Jackson said in a Nov. 20 article in Spoke. Both the college and the student government based their proposal on a November 2004 survey conducted by CSI. According to this survey, 77 per cent of Conestoga students considered a convenience store to be an important service to have at the college. However, this survey

store

and a cafe to be put into the

Liam McElrea,

ECE day care

Life Centre

either

Tim Hortons with

sell cigarettes

would

or lottery tickets.

Christina Flood,

lege) approached us, they asked us

and another Tim Hortons would be

to

variety to people at the college,

redundant.

“Many

items that I’ve

needed while stuck here (at the college) all day aren’t found in the current bookstore. There are already areas to

and the

sit

with a coffee

Internet.”

a

first-year

business administration

market-

-

ing student, said she agreed that a

convenience things

would make

store

Conestoga

easier for

dents, faculty and staff. “It

Laurier

last

is

stu-

a has-

went to year and they had one

go across

sle to

the street.

I

was really convenient on campus.”

It

it

Jackson said he

keep their proposal confidential, and I’m a little shocked that the college wouldn’t have had the respect to uphold their end of the deal.” Jackson added he believes the col-

lege is playing games with CSI by going public with the rejected pro-

posal after they got into a bit of a bat-

Helena Redshaw,

is

to

aware there are

would love

tle

with them over the

think

it’s

a

retail area. “I

of a political

bit

game

they’re playing, tiying to get us (CSI)

as the middle guy, the bad guy.”

JacLson said

want CSI

they

store,

the college didn’t

if

to put in a

convenienee should have made it

two years ago when they

clear

signed the agreements, which

stat-

ed CSI would have the right to run

students that

behalf of the students to

make

sure

meets their needs. “Students committed $10 million to this project to have what they voted on in place when it opens. For the college to come in at the last minute and change their plans is a bit of an centre

the

insult to the students.”

Jackson said there are alternative spaces in the college for an expand-

ence student, said he chose the Tim Hortons because the one currently

ed Tim Hortons. “If the college wants to go ahead with that, by all means go for it, but CSI does not need to be a part of that, and it’s not going to move into the retail space that we’ve promised our students.” As reported on Nov. 20 in Spoke, the college does not plan to move forward with plans to build an expanded Tim Hortons if it does not go in the Student Life Centre. Jackson said CSI has put hours and

and

not large enough.

“We

could have a ‘normal,’

sized

menu

full-

with a healthier seleclike a

Danielle Dyle, a first-year personal support worker student, said

she would have chosen the conven-

4,

to be kept

they (the col-

venience store would offer more

sci-

arts

food and seating, just normal Timmy’s.”

Christmas.”

was

“When

a retail operation. “It’s becoming

purchasing assets for the operation,

tion of

for

college’s proposal confidential.

week

the impression the

Jackson added students have funded the entire Student Life Centre, and CSI has put in a lot of work on

at the college

15,

at the college is

coming over

until this past

ducted another survey

Tim Hortons was

second-year general

family

Jackson said

research and began ordering and

at the col-

Seventy-two per cent of students chose the Tim Hortons over the convenience store. Chris Seary, a

“My

Mikayla Goving, a second-year

been

able to have our retail area open.”

CSI was under

social services student, said a con-

come

that

we would have

gic plan, business plan or budget.”

of an expanded

not

ECE day care

believe

to

September,

chose the convenience

left

not offered. Therefore, Spoke con-

was needed

lege in a Sept. 28 survey, the option

or a convenience store which

preschooler at

path

out of

had been led down the

tense between the college and the

seating and wireless Internet access

3,

We

fight. “It (the

came

student association because they’re putting up so many barriers this

an expanded

Quinn McElrea,

students

of a

bit

of

was going

expanded Tim Hortons on campus. “I just don’t believe it needs to be expanded in student space. It’s not what we’ve included in our strate-

believed a conven-

still

new Student

course!”

too long

up a

college’s proposal) field.

week

last

that the college

to see an

which asked 100 students to specifically choose which service they would like to see in the

of

way

store for Just reasons.

have

on Nov.

“The presents

is

late for class.”

the other hand, 28 per cent of

meet both these demands students have asked for.” Although 82 per cent of students ience store

preschooler at

On

there.

said they

2,

me

and makes

Student Life Centre. “We’ve started to

Santa, and Hot Wheels.”

lineup in the hall

second

the

until

ting

vey to plan for both a convenience

“Putting out cookies for

Amanda Lourenco, expanded Tim Hortons

August

showed 76 per cent of students identified that a cafe would be of interest to them. Jackson said CSI used the information from this sur-

preschooler at

First-year early childhood educa-

student,

also

3,

hours into the Student Life Centre plans, and they did not find out

tion

students

Aislinn GilIis,

without cigarettes and lottery tickets is pointless.”

financial liability as a result of set-

to

“I

72%

Survey finds

deep thoughts

had a wider variety

ience store

if

of items.

“A convenience

it

store

ballgame.”

late in the

He added CSI had done

a lot of

which have since been put on hold. Since these arrangements have been on hold for four months and the store said

CSI

not open, Jackson

is still is

starting to face

from the

financial losses

some

potential

revenue they could be earning. “We could be improving other services

from the profit generated by the store, and students are missing out on the service of the store as well as the profit it would generate.” Jackson said without CSI there would not be a student centre because CSI has gone out of their

way

to

be a leader in the project, with the college and

partnering

committing to build new space for college services. “We’ve committed a lot on behalf of our students, and we really hoped the college would be willing to work with us. It’s

just

playing a

frustrating

game

that

they’re

like this.”

preschooler at

ECE day care

Unite(j

Way

By VANESSA BUTLER

benefits from holi(day tive assistant

of student affairs

at

the college and also happens to be

The United Way

“When Santa comes down the chimney.” 4,

preschooler at

ECE day care

the

2004 and 2005 chair of the

Way

won

son, after the alumni as.sociation’s

the tickets to a

December game

Shipley, donated a

where the Leafs

will take

Maple Leaf

Thrashers.

Mike

pair of Toronto

tickets

Everyone who attended the United Way’s Tea for $2 fundraiser, which was sponsored by Chartwells, was entered in a draw. recipient

United

Way

of the

college’s

early bird prize

Darcelle Watts,

who

campaigns. Watts

“The alumni

to the organization.

The

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!

definitely

United

treasurer,

Amelia Reiner,

is

feeling the spirit of the holiday .sea-

is

was

the execu-

on the

spirit

Guelph campus. “Our alumni association was very generous to donate two prizes to the

United

Way campaign,” said who works in the

Shelia Hollidge,

co-operative education department at the college.

association

was

very generous to donate these tickets to the college’s

campaign,” said

Watts. “I’m the appreciative winner!”

Second prize was two ski passes to Chicopee and was won by Donald Davison, who works at the

Monica Himmelman was instruin making these two prizes happen and was also past chair of mental

many United Way campaigns. The United Way campaign

runs

annually. People are encouraged to

donate prizes as well as money the cause.

to


News

Clothing a By HOLLY FEATHERSTONE

attracted

The Doon campus bookstore's annual sidewalk sale, held Nov. 14 in the

CSI self-serve area, was and well-attended

successful

a

addition, the

in

“germ” toys and iiuotable magnets fa.scinated numerous stuplush

dents.

Both students and staff were

was unmistakably

ing

most

the

eager to purchase the price-reduced items as holiday gifts and presents

popular-selling item.

for themselves.

practical nursing student, said she

“The

went over very well,” said Mary Andraza. manager of retail

“We

sale

operations

bookstore.

at the

sold through on almost

clothing and

we

sold a

lot

all

the

of sup-

to

the sale specifically

I

new

herself, said she

“(The sale) helped us to clear out and free up some space and order

some new products,” she said. The sale offered a vast selection

in

of price-reduced supplies, including pens, journals and

mouse pads

as well as crested hoodies, sweaters

and toques.

A

rack of colourfully

resplendent T-shirts and sweaters

nursing

for the

sweaters and the Jogging pants that say nursing on the butt, but didn’t see

inventory.

elor

of science-nursing

look for a compass

said

the

assignment,

efficient.

came

any,

so

I’m

looking

Just

physics

a

bought

but

I

kinds of other stuff,” she

all

simultaneously

Schubert,

said the sale had a

shop-

good

surprised

office,

who ended up

purchas-

ing a couple of crested sweaters for

was

by the price reductions, which went from approximately $50 down to $15 on some selections. Though .some customers bought surpri.sed

was heading down

for themselves, Andraza said a lot of students and staff were stocking

up for Christmas as well. Claudia Schubert, a science professor in the general arts and sci-

was

(the sale)

to the old

here, so

1

know

Just hap-

pened to see it on my way by.” Andraza said the location was both attracting more stu-

central,

dents and providing ample

room

for .set-up. “It

was more

“It’s belter,”

she said.

“It’s not in

off and out of the way.”

It’s

Andraza

said,

“We were

really

thankful to the CSI that they pro-

The CSI

however, is not permanent location the sidewalk sale. Andraza said office,

necessarily

the sale

a

may

return to the hall adja-

cent to the bookstore in the

upcom-

ing years for ease of operations,

Schubert. “I

location

for

This year’s location, within the

CSI self-serve

student,

CSI

vided us with that location.”

turnout.

crowded,” she said. “I’m surprised at how many people very

“It’s

— Page 3

Trina Hynes, a second-year bach-

the hall.

said.

location,” she said. “1 didn’t

around,” she said.

Williams,

in to

arc here.”

was looking

and end-of-lines.” Andraza said the sidewalk sale will keep the bookstore’s selection fresh by allowing more space for plies

for

clothing. “1

planned.

ping for her kids for the holidays,

Natalie Williams, a second-year

came

to look at the tables,” she said.

for

With the majority of customers sporting armfuls of sweaters, cloth-

event.

ences program, said she spent more money than she had originally "1

2006

27,

at sidewalk sale

hit

batches of curious bar-

gain-hunters and,

SPOKE, November

was more conducive

to attract-

ing students as they walked by,”

she said.

including carting the merchandise.

This year, however, the remaining items were not too extensive.

“The main things

“(The CSI enough area

was

office)

a

large

everybody could (browse) around and have a chance that

Conestoga program

is

were

left

we

had large quantities of and some textbooks,” said Andraza. Some of the remaining books and pens were even left for students as

(Photo by Holly Featherstone)

Second-year by the

freebies.

quite a bit of stuff there

left

and put it on a free table,” said Andraza. Having an extra pen never hurts.

practical nursing

student Natalie Williams thrilled

“We

-

that

over were a few supplies that

thrifty

is

prices at

the bookstore’s annual side-

walk sale. The sale was held Nov. 14 in the CSI self-serve office.

a step above

Students return from seminars with knowledge and networking contacts By ANNELISE THOMPSON Three materials and operations

management

students travelled to

Orlando, Fla. recently as part of an APICS scholarship program.

Kerri-Lynn Kit and Jaime Nicol, students, and Brian

third-year

Ward, a second-year student, all agreed that the trip was amazing, as well as educational. APICS is the association

cess for everyone, but particularly Conestoga’s students. Kit’s team

end.”

came

The case

studies presented to the

groups were based on a that was having difficulties with their operations. It asked the students to try and find solutions to ing, within the three-day

time peri-

would be presented

od, and then

Kit said all the seminars were great but the best was the one with

the end of the conference.

"There was this one with the carfrom Dilbert, and it was about humour in the workplace, and it was light and funny and was a good balance to all the extremely

toonist

educational ones,” she said. that agreed also Everyone although the seminars were great, one of the best experiences came

from outside the lecture hall. “Meeting different scholars from different schools was pretty cool, as well as meeting different people from the same program at other schools,” said Ward. “It was also

ECE

all

problems the company was fac-

operations management.

a cartoonist.

The end

result

was a great suc-

and both Ward and

in first,

Nicol placed third.

company

the for

added, “I spoke to

find them.”

really exciting working on a case study with 13 other people who you’ve never met before, to present these eight-minute projects at the

“We

to with the ideas

need had and

Kerri-Lynn

“One

they would do in a situation like the 1

guess

is

Kit,

and

operations management

why

“I

me

izing point for

a real-

to see the calibre

of our program in comparison to what a lot of other programs are,” said Nicol. “The level of knowl-

we have

here

really a

people are there to solve the -case, you Just have to

much we knew.” Ward agreed with Nicol and

that

is

what most of the other schools are doing, and other schools were surprised with how step above

out the support of

some

special

people.

From candy paintings,

and spices

to toys

this

to

year’s early child-

hood education centre’s Christmas bazaar had something for the whole family. The bazaar, which ran from Nov. 10-17, was an opportunity for the

ECE (Photo by Amy Meadows)

Early Christmas shoppers browse items for sale at the

ECE

Christmas bazaar.

working,” said couldn’t believe

to raise funds for

new indoor

Deb Crawford, who at

Conestoga’s

“The parents, staff and faculty have been a great help and support,” said Crawford, a supervi.sor at the centre.

The bazaar

ECE

has worked

centre for

two

and a half years, said the event wouldn’t have been a success with-

this

year was the

biggest fundraising event they had organized. It normally Just features a Scholastic

Amy

apparatus.

but they probably

companies

do care

really

really are global

fair.

Powell, an early childhood

educator with

book

was pleased event went and said

at the centre,

how

the

the children

had been involved

the bake sale.

in

companies and the

networking was so valuable,” said

1

could have

which 1 would be the case when I went down. I thought it would be more like practising net-

what there’s was.” The trio also had doubts as to whether or not the companies sponsoring the event would be interested in making contact with students from Canada, because they were all American-based companies, but they soon found out they had nothing to worry about. “I went down there thinking, well, we’re from Canada so we’ll

Nicol. it

when

“I I

Just

walked

off the stage after the presentation

and someone walked up to me (to) shake my hand and said ‘here’s my card, nice presentation, and Just want to follow where your career is going.’ It Just blew me I

away.” In the eyes of the three students

was a huge sucand Ward even said he’s applying to attend next year and Kit and Nicol are both looking

the conference cess,

the

into Joining

APICS

administrative

team.

walked away from this thinkcould take on the world and

“1

Nicol.

ing

“It almost made us more interested because we weren’t the same as everyone,” said Ward. When asked if they thought the contacts they made through net-

I’m excited about going back, but on the organizing side,” said Nicol. “After going you really want to give back, becau.se you really do want to see it continue on,” agreed

working would be useful graduation,

after

would

all

to

them

agreed they

for

of the things for the bake sale were brought in by parents and staff, but a lot of it was made by the children,” said Powell, who has centre for three years. One of the biggest stands at the bazaar was Epicure Selections, run at the

by Jennifer Levitt, a graduate of Conestoga’s electronic engineering and technology program. Epicure Selections is a Canadian

company

British in based Columbia, which provides spices and seasoning blends from around the globe.

Kit.

to APICS and it gives you tenfold,” said Ward.

“You give to

everyone

“Some

been

1

back

be.

bazaar offered something AMY MEADOWS

think that

didn’t think

(about) what we’re doing, and they think the case study was

“1 really

fruitful contacts after this,

uating year, and I’m in here, and on some topics my knowledge was more in-depth than

these

edge

By

and gradmy second

won’t care so much, but so many of

student

you have the case for three days. It gives you time to find those people, and find out what you can.” Ward agreed with Kit and said, “all the right

some people

in their fourth

make an impact

ot

my teammates went out and actually found somebody from the aerospace industry who was attending the conference, to find out what case study; which

came

third-year materials

“We Just did what we needed to do with the ideas we had and it all together,” she said.

all

it

we

together.”

at

Kit said her group worked well together and collaborated ideas.

came

what we

just did

who were

Levitt has been working for Epicure Selections for three years and said she enjoys the two types

of work she does. “I work with men

all

day and

then get to be lively at night with the ladies doing epicure home parties,”

she said.

“1 also like

doing

fundraisers too.”

Crawford said they don’t set goals for the fundraisers and are Just happy to make as much as possible.

“We

haven’t tallied anything up

yet, but

it is

going extremely well.”


Page 4

Commentary

— SPOKE, November 27, 2006

Time

to

end

double standards

among ir

you can't lake

it,

cultures

don't dish

it

out. If you're

fun of a certain group of people for the don't gel offended

way

going

when it's done back to you. make fun of someone else,

alw ays easier to

It's

done back people get defensive: "That's

to

make

they live or act,

but

when

it's

racist, that’s disre-

spectful. that's insulting" they scream. It's time to end this double standard among cultures. Actor Sacha Cohen know's this all too well. He has been hit

w

numerous

ith

law'suits for his recent role in the film Borat:

America for Make Benefit Glorious Cohen portrays a journalist from sent out to research American culture. The indiinterviews believe it's a real documentary for and many get caught on camera saying offensive

Cultural Learning's of

Nation of Kazakhstan viduals he Kazakhstan remarks.

Kazakhstan.

The lawsuit was launched by two frat boys who apparently w here duped into making sexist and racist remarks in the film. They claim the production crew plied them with alcohol to "loosen them up," and then were put into an R'V where they were to be filmed picking up Borat hitchhiking. The boys were apparently told the documentary would not be aired in the U.S., and felt they engaged in behaviours they would not otherwise have engaged Firstly, for

those

in.

who have

seen the film, the

frat

Hockey night

and sometimes it finds a way to cut you

knife

Robin Williams in his 2002 DVD Live on Broadway, back. mocks Canadians, the French, Afghans and also Americans. In one quote from his stand-up comedy routine he states,“You can’t bomb the Afghans back to the Stone Age, because they’ll just say ‘upgrade.”’

As if Leaf ticket sales at the Air Canada Centre didn’t earn them enough revenue, the Toronto Maple games

now

As

a Leafs

enjoy a

trip

more than dent,

I

that,

Leafs

at

there.

Prices

experience

fan”

These extras the

$10

of tickets,

Hockey

that

perhaps

your

parties

own home.

abundance, and those diehard fans

few years.

their

The newest craze however, gives opportunity to see

the

a different venue, in a larg-

According

News

to

searching for trivia can

own game,

in

the last

few years.

make up

Personally,

I

enjoy a beer

However, for me, and 1 know I am not alone, I would much

would much

rather

a friend’s

living

that

game,

rather donate

my

the Captain’s

in

the

instead of paying $10.95

of

hard-earned dollars to crowd into a

beer

publication, fans in attendance at

dark theatre and quietly watch the

couch,

Cineplex theatres are treated to the

action.

home.

Blaze, an online

is

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

editor. Letters

with

my

my

in the

dollar directly to

Fund and

driiik

friends

privacy of

on

my the

my own

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College

Murphy

Advertising Manager: Jessica Blumenthal, Kristin Grifferty Spoke Online Editor: Meghan Kreller Production Managers: Tara Ricker, Brandon Walker Circulation Manager: Nick Casselli

Photo Editors: Adam

for verification.

Black,

Adam Hannon,

Tiffany

McCormick, Jon Molson and BJ Richmond

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

be published. Letters should be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter letters will

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca Website: www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke ,

for publication.

The

substantially

via the Internet.

Editor: Eric

No unsigned

event have risen

Spoke

letters to the

contacted

in

news

for

go

or find questions

room while watching

an article written

that

professional sporting

popular, especially with students.

along with attending a professional

tially in the last

and other costs

have always been

Beer and munchies are often

sporting event have risen substan-

Prices of tickets, parking

along with attending a

parking and other costs that go

welcome

Spoke welcomes

make

worthwhile are easy

ticket

to replicate in

the only

register-

with

ances, prizes, trivia and giveaways.

am

when

ing for minor hockey programs.

game

er-than-life format.

you make a joke at someone clse’s expense, don’t get offended when someone docs it to you. Life is a double-edged knife and sometimes it finds a way to cut you back. quite simple. If

financial assistance

The program provides youth with

“ultimate

it.

I

Opinion

Leafs alumni and mascot appear-

because as a stu-

cannot afford

Captain’s Fund.

thoroughly

to see a live

hardly think that

versa?

Letters are

1

once or twice a season, but never

the

is

fan,

out of

Grifferty

hometown

heroes in high definition.

fans

these double standards set in?

see their

to

Maple Leaf cinema is that $1 from every ticket sold is donated to a charity called The

Kristin

to the big screen at select

fans can

I

solution

Perhaps the only good thing

Cineplex Entertainment Theatres. At approximately $10.95 a ticket,

one out

When do

movies? come

Leafs have decided to take their

Other comedians, such as Dave Chappelle, have built careers on making racial jokes. Up until the end of his series, the Chappelle Show would base many of its sketches on racial profiling, yet the show is still extremely popular. There is a fine line between something that is funny and something that is offensive. Why is it OK for some cultures to mock others and not vice

The

at the

boys did not

seem too uncomfortable in making these racist and sexist comments. They also didn’t seem to be coerced into making them. Secondly, it’s hypocritical for Americans to get so angry over what occurred in the film when their comedians have a history of making jokes at Life is a double-edged others’ expense.

Stereotypes are inevitable, no matter what country you come from.

Address correspondence to; Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

Editor,

N2G 4M4

Dr.,

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.


Commentary

New book raises It"

Did

I

the

It is

title

OJ Simpson some questions

of the con-

of attention you receive. And what better way to bring that attention rushing back into your life than a healthy dose of con-

new book by OJ Simpson. The book - which was shelved by the publisher on Nov. lash

-

Aaron

enormous public back-

to

supposedly

a

is

fictitious

have gone about killing his e.\wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Cioldman

famous 1994

in the

And by “supposaccount," mean

the actual killer.

edly fictitious

I

Come

You

on, OJ.

hook

crime

got

for a

that

ever would have brought you, and, 2 years after the fact, what do 1

you do? You write a book about the brutal murder of the mother of two of your children, basically saying, "If was in that killer's shoes, this is how would’ve done 1

1

And

for one, see a

I,

number of things wrong with

this.

conjure up everyone’s

I'd’ like to

U.S. constitution, you cannot be an offence of which you

how

someone who shouldn’t have been killed in the first place should

strong anti-censorship advocate,

let ofi'

everyone still insists you committed, you gain more fame and notoriety from your "trial of the century" than your lucrative football career

things.”

tried for

have been killed? Now, I’m a

"blatant confession."

the

Opinion good conscience,

in

but did

not? Under

the double jeopardy clause of the

can you possibly write about

he were

killings, if

How,

ago.

And why

troversy?

Schwab

how Simpson would

account of

you not think of the

have been previously found innocent, and it is therefore highly improbable for you to be found guilty of the murders, so you might as well thumb your nose at the people who think you should be behind bars.

vic-

edly."

I’m sure they’re

mind would write a book how he would have carried out a murder if he was the perpetrator. However, you seem to fall short of the “right mind” descrip-

at

knowing how you killings should

peace now,

(Photo by Brandon Walker)

Money for a good cause CSI presents a cheque for $1,025 to Conestoga’s United Way committee representative Sheila Hollidge (third from right). CSI

No

innocent person

Chartwells prices and hours are reasons to complain

in his

right

think the

about

have been caiTied

out.

With this new faux-confession, you’ve proven beyond a shadow of a doubt that you have no conscience. This book serves no useful purpose other than to stir up controversy, which is exactly what you wanted. It’s been 12 long years since that trial, and you’re old news, OJ. But you crave the fame, the attention, the wealth; I’ve seen you on TV,

were accused of over a decade

sign autographs, loving every bit

stopping to pose for photos and

money by holding various events including a videochallenge, a dinner and a Halloween party.

raised the

game

Actually, scratch that “suppos-

tims’ families for one second?

suspension of disbelief, and assume for a second that you actually are innocent of the crime you

Everyone has played the board

game Monopoly. The object is purchase as much property in

to

and are henceforth excused from this logic. But OJ, your book is called If I Did It; the “If’ on the cover is white, and the “1 Did It” is bright red, as if screaming out a confession to the world - a confession for a crime you can’t legally be retried on, and recently decided

manipulation of prices.” Perhaps another way to describe the term monopoly would be to

healthy, you’re going to have to

to capitalize on.

present the most obvious example

nies like Harvey’s and Mr.

Do you think you’re fooling anyone?

to students at

tor,

order to bankrupt your opponents.

The term monopoly

keep

to

mind while dating

in

Dating these days can be com-

options open, never become unavailable. Should talking lead to

plicated. Don’t hate the player,

We

hate the game.

game

exists,

and

it’s

here’s a

keep

to

know

all

flirting,

Natalie

Anderson

list

of a few simple things

Opinion

mind when you meet

someone new. Never say what you really mean. Contrary to what you may believe, communication tant.

is

not that impor-

Sharing feelings just leads to

messy to

situations. It’s

much

better

avoid these situations by being

aloof and,

good can come of telling

the

is

a

is

good

a

many ways

to

thing.

There

approach the jeal-

useful tools in

all

be

Bringing jealousy

out in another person

because

it

is

ing of knowing

someone

warm

lie,

Why

said honesty

a

is

lie. It’s

twice.

cheat and steal

should relation-

Whoever If

never to

So while lying

feel-

likes you,

you the same

same

best scapegoat.

Who

responsible for their after that

much

can be held

own

actions

tequila mysteri-

service in a particular market, or a control that

makes possible

Conestoga College.

Chartwells, the

company

that pro-

standard. First and foremost,

everyone kisses on the first date. But ladies, it’s not until date No. 3 that you can “go all the way." Too soon and you’re a slut, too late and you’re a prude. Hence, date three

is

the standard.

men, we limits to

To

all

the

all know there are no how far you can go, as

long as you’re pushing for it. Be aggressive or sweet talk her, do whatever it takes. But if you don’t

the lines of dating are blurred.

have her by date No. 3, either give up or start lying to your buddies.

does everything become

official?

When do you become

exclusive? These are

all

Just

why

difficult questions. That’s

important to always keep your

these simple

dating rules and you will be on

very

own

remember

it’s

your way to having an

at the college, is a perfect

Chartwells is responsible for any food purchased on campus, whether it’s from Tim Hortons, Pizza Pizza, Mr. Sub, Harvey’s or

As

cafeterias.

a third-year student at the

one of my complaints is the price of food on campus. It seems unusually high. I decided to compare the price of food served at the restaurants on campus to those same restaurants off campus. All three locations went to were in Kitchener. stopped by the Mr. Sub on King college,

Street beside Theatre

Street

and to the Harvey’s at the comer of King and Cedar streets. The results were surprising. In

was cheaper, in other cases it was more expensive, and some of the time the price was the same. The biggest difference noticed was the price for a slice of pepperoni pizza, a pop and chips from

some

cases the college

Pizza Pizza. At Conestoga,

it

costs

$4-80 for that meal, but at the Pizza Pizza off campus it is only $3.99, 8

1

sleep-away camp, you love children and want a caring, fun environment

Directors

for:

Tennis;

Swimming

it.

safe to

assume

that

compaSub

may have

played a role in deciding the cost of food on campus,

but what about the food

Chartwells is actually providing? This year Chartwells decided to remove the salad bar due to health concerns. Instead, they’ve replaced it with small boxes of salad for more than twice as much as the salad bar used to cost.

Something

else that

unusually high

is

priced

the energy drink

is

Arush, marketed by SoBe. I’ve seen the beverage in the Price Chopper grocery store for $1 .80

and

at the

Petro-Canada gas staon campus the

tion for $2, but

same cans are listed at $2.50. Even with the higher than average prices, Chartwells

still

feels

(W.S.I. preferred), Golf;

Gymnastics, Cheerleading, Drama, High & Low Ropes, Camping/Nature, Team Sports, Waterskiing, Sailing, Painting/Drawing, Ceramics, Silkscreen, Printmaking, Batik, Jewelry, Calligraphy, Photography, Sculpture, Guitar, Aerobics, Self-Defense, Video, Piano. Other staff; Administrative, CDL Driver (21+), Nurses (RN’s and Nursing Students), Bookkeeper, Mothers’ Helper. On campus interviews February 7th. Select The Camp That Selects The Best Staff! Call 1-215-944-3069 or apply online at www.campwayneairls.com

the need to actually charge 20

cents to use the debit machine.

A

representative

from

Chartwells, Pemell Richards,

At Mr. Sub on campus, the subs are generally cheaper than off

it’s

$5.79.

was

asked by CSI about the high price of food during a board meeting on Sept. 19. Richards said the prices

on par with what students are at Humber and Seneca.

are

paying I

don’t see that as an excuse or

Two

as a reason.

don’t

make

(or

a right.

more) wrongs

My

guess

is

Chartwells has a monopoly in

Humber and Seneca It’s

as well.

unfortunate that until 2008,

the college has a contract with its food provider. Hopefully after that Conestoga will allow some healthy competi-

Chartwells as

cents cheaper.

campus

CAMP WAYNE FOR GIRLS — Children’s If

It’s

1

at

we need Counselors and Program

Company,

across from Kitchener City Hall

grilled chicken

LIFE!

&

King

the Pizza Pizza on

campus. The foot-long meatball

Northeast Pennsylvania, (6/16-8/12/07).

pay for

1

utterly

forgettable relationship.

CLASSIFIED SUMMER OF YOUR

example

of a monopoly.

any of the

Opinion

the

1

So why should he or she trust you? Never fully commit. Sometimes lies.

without ever having to confess your feelings. There’s nothing better

well,

Promiscuity and the double

permit-

is

flirting to kissing,

because they did it first. Now, should you get caught in a cheating situation, alcohol is always the

we

the

tell

...

ously entered the body?

the best policy,

be sure to delete all incriminating e-mails, text messages and voice mails because the only thing worse than lying, is getting caught. Afterall, your sweetheart

When

enjoyable

gives you that

people

is telling

making your new

interest jealous.

Let’s

ted,

ousy angle. Exes, friends of the opposite sex or even “randoms”

from the bar can

it,

ego.

truth at all costs.

ships be any different?

lie

major

dating faux pas.

Jealousy

face

everyday.

tell

actually like them. This leads to

which

Hide the

own

can learn anything from the boy who cried wolf, it isn’t never to

person you’re dating that you vulnerability,

than stroking your

probably ended up alone.

if necessary, lying to

hide your true feelings. Nothing

are

kissing to

played. Just to be sure,

in

and

and you see where this is going. These things are all OK. What goes around comes around, right? So if you’re cheating on someone, it’s probably

the

think most of

good idea about

us have a pretty

how

1

Brandon Walker

defined

is

by www.dictionary.com as “exclusive control of a commodity or

vides food to students and faculty

Things

— Page 5

2006

27,

by

troversial

20 due

SPOKE, November

on campus.

tion

The foot-long

sub

is

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

also cheaper

Conestoga, costing $6.59 com-

pared to $6.89 off campus.

At Harvey’s, most of the meals same on campus as they do off. The only exception is the grilled chicken burger meal with fries/rings/salad and pop. On campus it costs $6.99, compared to $6.39 off campus, a savings of 60 cost the

cents.

I

think the reason for the

1

the

want

to congratulate

layout

The

issue. article

and a

juxtaposition of an

on freedom of speech

letter to the editor

to deprive

me

masterstroke.

Geoff Johnstone,

higher price follows the trend of

many

Liberal Studies

fast-food places, the think-

you want

to eat

seeking

of that right was a

co-ordinator.

ing being if

you on 20

of your Nov.


Page 6

News

— SPOKE, November 27, 2006

Help those less fortunate By BECKY SHARPE

more than

in the family.

we

Items that Flave you ever been given a gift

to

request can add up

thousand dollars. The

several

Cossette added she would choose the gift of “hope for girls rescued

even receive the item you so badly wanted. Wanting is one thing, but needing items for Christmas is

few beds, a table and a wash facility. That amount of money here in Canada would buy a decent name brand laptop or a good secondhand vehicle.

another.

Members

World

of

Vision.

(www.worldvision.com) have

new

is

“A

lot

of

(don’t

how easy

realize

Third World countries this year. The Gift Catalogue by World Vision

people

way

it

is

and

for children

Not many

receive

aware

$14

as

want

“A

lot

student at

St.

Benedict

High School

that all the

More people donate food to the Guelph Food Bank during the coolmonths of the year, but only because the food bank runs more food drives then.

er

Most food banks do food drives Thanksgiving and in the spring, said Kim Campbell, who works at the Guelph Food Bank. The Thanksgiving and spring food drive each have a goal of 8().()()() pounds of food and the Christmas food drive has a goal of 60. ()()() pounds of food.

at

"In the winter, yes our skids look fuller."

she said. "But the quantity

of food going out to the people stays the

same

all

year-round."

The food bank makes families

who need

going without

Campbell

food

in the

us until the spring,”

not

tire

gram.

summertime.

community

Cossette asked for a video

This year for Christmas

camera but feels knowing the money

The food bank doesn't purchase

a

of the food, relying instead on

the donations that

come from

"We stockpile the food, so that ue can give out to the families

es and

when

families that day." she said.

it

they need

it."

she said.

During the summer months there

"We

the

a family with basic needs for a year. “I feel sad because 1 would really love to have

port

a

women

gifts for

is

cloth-

“So

it's

we

there are people in need.

com-

munity. Campbell said.

start to get

more donations."

Campbell said the food drives are held throughout the year so that there is

"The spring food drive and other donations carry

us

that until

we

receive

“We

will

Thanksgiving, the

it

are always encouraging peo-

ple to donate."

Campbell

said.

“We

and run rafnes, we run different programs, and some businesses run their own mini-food

go

.seldom a shortage of food.

By ROSS ALDWORTH

into the mall

drives.

Every

Shantel Cossette, a student at

St.

15-year-old

Benedict High School

in Cambridge, says she’s never World Vision heard of the Catalogue before but, even though she’s just a student, she can do a lot to help. “I think the

idea and

catalogue

is

a great

World Vision should have

little bit

helps."

urban design, and construction). A repKitchener resentative of the Downtown Business Association and appropriate City staff members will round out the remaining cominterest

(financial,

real estate

The City of Kitchener is looking some good ideas from citizens

for

on what

do with the Centre

to

Block.

Four citizen advisers

cho-

will be

-member Centre Block evaluation committee, which will shortlist and then recommend a

development

1

between

also

know

wants

and

This program is available to anyone who is interested in helping a family this Christmas.

can

logue

be

The

cata-

viewed

http;//donate. wvus.org.

at

items

All

purchased help improve the lives of Third World families and gifts will be given to families based on the level of need.

project

for

the

The

lour

citizen

createcd a strong vision for

located

on King Street beside city hall and consists of approximately 2.42 acres of open space. Its future development has been a topic of both

“Our community has the future of Centre

site is

in

and out of

Block.”

Hans Kitchener

’.r

director ofproject

adndnistration

and economic

expect-

two proposals. “Our community has created vision

for

the

future

a

of

Centre Block,” said Hans Gross, the Kitchener’s director of project economic administration and investment. Gross went on to say that

citizen

direct

would be up made.

Gross,

is

final

right

investment advisers

The committee process

ed to take one year and the general public will have the opportunity to provide input and comment on the

strong

mittee spots.

1

block.

City Council.

take that food right to the

"People are away on holidays, or doing things w'ith their families," she said. "Once school is back in

are not a lot of people in the

I

people need food this year,” she said. "It’s knowing the difference

Council seeks citizen input

we

as getting

camera but

that

to

which can range anywhere from $10 to more than $100. Donations for that amount of money will buy a family a goat, which will provide them with milk for a year and then meat for six weeks after, or three rabbits will provide meat, fur and companionship for young children

much debate

same

pay

needs.”

get day-olds from business-

from the grocery store and leaving it on your counter for a day or two." The food bank encourages people to donate to their I'ood drives and let the community know that the

badly to

for her gift could help sup-

with enough garden tools and training to feed them(Photo by Becky Sharpe) selves for the year or This bear is so simple and so affordable. It’s the health care for 10 chil- perfect gift for children who have nothing. Can dren who have lost their to help someone this year? father

and,

reintegra-

tion into a loving family.

seeds,

and

counselling

sionate

3.

The Centre Block

community.

said.

education,

PlayStation

sen to join the the

would sponsor a family." she said, "So we have more food going out, but also more food coming in. So it

lot

food,

vocational training, compas-

.she said.

balances."

sure that

girls

where possible,

through their adopt-a-family proin

the.se

and other electronic stores for approximately $250 for the Wii and $650 for

Popular

But the food bank knows what to do in case of a shortage. “If we run short, then we would contact the radio stations and let people know," she said. “But we would do that at anytime of the year, not just specifically summer." During the Christmas season the food bank hands out more food

"Individuals

to

provide medical care,

nutritious

ing

Thanksgiving drive will carry us until just after Christmas and the smaller Christmas drive will cany

must “serve”

are sold

Donations will

you afford

By JENN CURTIS

Third

in

systems such as Nintendo Wii and PlayStation 3 are being sold at Best Buy

mother AIDS.

throughout year

Christmas.”

eight to 12 clients a day.

vide them

Food drives held

own

each year

girls

who

The World Vision Gift Catalogue states donations between $250-$500 will buy a family a food crisis fund which will pro-

Third-year broadcasting student, Kait Taylor, has a merry time collecting cash donations for the Food Bank at the Kitchener Waterloo Santa Claus parade on Nov. 18.

how

to give but they’re too

children in the family. Girls

would provide for a family of six. The new gaming

(Photo by Meghan Kretter)

would-

1

World countries are sold off to owners of brothels, which are houses of prostitution. The girls are sold by their parents for $500 or less, which the parents use to buy food and give hope to younger

us

this

is

focused on their

could Christmas

of

disgusting,

it’s

to live that life,” she said.

of people don’t realize

it

gizmos

and

one

little

Shantel Cassette,

their families.

are

electronics just

to give

for us to share our fortune

with donations for as

think

“I

n’t

Many

in

a

from the sex trade." Financial support helps them improve their education and nutrition.

easy

creat-

ed a way for us to share our Christmas blessings with families'

is

ing the year,” she said.

$4,000. This buys a family home with a small kitchen, a

most expensive a

just a Christmas donaone for other holidays dur-

gift in the gift cata-

for Christmas and it's not quite the right colour or it's not the right name brand? Maybe you didn't

logue

tion but

a

involvement

part of the

process

until the final selection

is

Applications must be turned into Office of the City Clerk at Kitchener City Hall by Monday, Nov. 27 at 4 p.m. Kitchener resi-

the

dents or property owners will be

will

each represent a specific area of

given preference.

CLASSIFIED LET’S

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Pennsylvania, USA. Counsellor-Specialists all Lancl/Water Sports inc. Tennis; Golf; Soccer; outdoor Adventure; Camping, Mountain Biking, Climbing/Ropes; Roller

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SPOKE, November

27,

2006

— Page 7


News

— SPOKE, November 27, 2006

Page 8

Church has SUMMER MCPHEE

By

Historically

it’s

God

or not, or in

quite obvious to

see that spirituality has played a

or not,

struck a

it

chord leaving society wondering there is any place left that sacred,” said Wells,

who

if is

black.

is

significant role in black people’s lives, said Gillian

Wells, a second-

year social work student

at

Wilfrid

"As

1

see

look

at

have a new

to

fight," said Wells.

from an outward

“It’s a shift

an inward

to

black people today,

imperative for the church

it’s

young offenders and tighter gun control are just a few of the many

fight

solutions being offered.”

fight.’’

Toronto with a

in

small group of people

at

temic racism, poverty, lack of education, family breakdown, the

She said society often

and during the movements.

tion to slavery rights

She said

be positively associated.

“This reinforces the importance

shooting took place Wells attended

in their lives,

a wedding at the

that occurs in

was attending

months ago

the funeral of his 17-

year old friend Jamal Hemmings, a victim of a gunshot slaying a few

days

earlier.

"Whether you believe

in

church

summer

“I

after the

same church.

thinking just

there

sat

four

young man was actually shot not too far from where I was sitting.” She said while sitting there she this

and came

started thinking

to the

Osteopathy a By JESSICA BLUMENTHAL you saw someone who looked arms straight out holding a bowling ball, what would you do? The common response would be to tajce the bowling ball from that person. However, for some unknown reason interfering wouldIf

n’t

be the correct action, said a

qualified osteopath.

sure off of the dysfunctional

and would

let

anatomy

her hold that ball until

wanted to change. The former athletic therapist said osteopathy is the knowledge of the structure, relation and function of each part of the human body which is applied to correct whatever interferes with its harmonious operation. Osteopathic practice, which dates back to the late 180()s, is a precise yet gentle assessment and treatment of anatomical restrictions anywhere, from the head to the feet, in the body. Although a patient

such as the violence the community,” said

was

related to a perva-

sense of hopelessness and

sive

apist

workout.

He went

when he

tree planting

2003 for osteopathic physicians,

tree-planting friends from

medication and perform surgery, and manual

who do

practitioners, like Stark

not

medication or perform

prescribe

Wells.

“Mix

daily

these

The government set up a $ 15million challenge fund to provide young people with more ties to

opportuni-

succeed and give them an

alternative to guns.

“The

government

decided

to

youth with a limitless supply of guns and it becomes volatile.”

throw some money

She said when it comes to determining a solution it depends on where you think the problem lies. She added she feels that rapper 50 Cent is part of the problem, as he is a negative role model for

Wells added the church wants to be a part of the solution to end gang violence in Toronto.

at the problem,”

said Wells.

“The church leaders source of refuge for families, the church

are often a

many is

of these

often trusted

black community,” said Wells.

black youth.

in the

“His album Get Rich or Die Trying sends the message that you should either get rich or die trying,” said Wells. “You should go down

Maike Zinabou, a second-year social work student at Wilfrid

strong.”

funding church

She said as Toronto grapples with rising homicide rates, there are

number of

solutions

being offered.

Laurier, said she

is

uncomfortable

thinking that the government activities

purpose of helping black youth. support the idea of govern-

“I

ment-funded agencies, but I have had very different experiences with churches and I doubt that it is always the best way to approach a child,” said Zinabou.

was younger and hurt

told

body a

his

especially his back. Evans’s

him

miracle.

that osteopathy

So

he

did

Quebec was a

a

lot

of

research and read up on the practice

while his friend was

at

school

studying

The treatment was

it.

Evans had

to wait a while before

experiencing osteopathy because very few schools were teaching manual therapy because the general public thought it was quackery. When he finally went in for his

he sat down and the osteopath took palpitations of inbetween tissues. His lesions or fascia, which stores and carries electrical information, was read by the session,

really gentle,

he said.

The Guelph

resident said people

should be open-minded

if

they’re

interested in going for an osteopa-

thy treatment. “If you go in for a treatment and you’re closed off to the whole idea,

you may miss an experienee could

that

treat a serious injury.”

Fifteen years ago, massage thera-

py was thought

osteopath.

now

Evans let her work on his body and dig out the stored injuries.

Evans.

it is

to be quackery and extremely popular.

Osteopathy

is

worth a

try,

said

surgery.

the tissues

comes

you go

“If

in for

a

treatment and you’re

closed

off to

the whole

you may miss an

idea,

experience that could treat

a serious

injury.”

Dan Evans, Guelph resident

with symptoms, it’s the however remote, the

including asthma, delayed develop-

osteopath addresses. So. the practice of osteopathy normalizes

resulting from over-use and sports

autonomy

injuries, digestive disorders, circu-

in

cause,

to affect physiology.

Stark believes osteopathy interre-

anatomy, physiology, patholog> and biomechanics and there are four basic principles that connect it lates

all.

The

first

principle

each struc-

is

ture supports the body’s functions.

Next, the natural flow phatic.

ol'

the lym-

vascular and neurological

must be preserved and main-

lluids

tained.

physically, spiritually last

body works together

emotionally,

and

socially,

principle

is

and recurrent sore

The

issues,

throats.

of

palpation and knowledge of the interrelations of the human body arc critical to treatskills

ments. Palpation

is

a critical art and skill

an essential component of osteopathy - it’s a sensory skill that that

is

techniques:

rhythms of the body. The skill

identifies areas of

there

strangled or squeezed, in mu.sculoskeletal. respiratory, cardiovascu-

.soft-tissue

manipulation, which uses the func-

and counter technique and muscle energy

tional technique, strain

tissue or

palpatory

body can

when

the

Osteopaths use a gentle, handson approach incorporating four dif-

strain

pregnancy

frequent colds, sinusitis

the

it.self

ferent

latory problems, allergies,

body that are restricted, not moving normally, or constricted,

cogniti\'ely.

are no restrictions, heal

neck and back pain, pain

detects the subtleties of disturbed

Thirdly, the

The

Various restrictions can be treated

ment,

lar, digestive, reproductive and nervous systems. Dan Evans, a 32-year-old Guelph

discovered through a friend. resident,

Evans used

to

go

osteopathy

to a physiother-

is

with the

different kind of therapy

lot,

prescribe

employment on a

said

“Tougher judicial sentencing for young offenders and tighter gun control are just a few of the many

to violence

exposure

that

in place by the World Osteopathic Health Organization in

who

basis,”

development indicate

immediate refreshment, similar to those felt after yoga or a good

put

the lack of

and

also an equal

osteopathy different from other forms of manual therapy. The practice of osteopathy has

which were

internalization of oppression

Wells said a study done of youth in and around a Toronto housing

feelings of lightness, fluidity and

international standards

sys-

its

is

It

“They confront issues of

Wells.

makes

and visceral manipulation. osteopathic palpation which

those

Jane Stark said an osteopath would support the person’s arm to take pres-

of faith and spirituality to help black people cope with the stresses

and got a free osteopath treatment from a registered osteopath. After the treatment, Evans had

technique; the osteopathic articular technique; the cranial osteopathy;

fatigued, with their

civil

has been

spirituality

During a funeral service on Nov. 19, 2005 at the Toronto West Adventist Church, 18-year-old Amon Beckles was shot and killed on the steps of the church. Beckles

Ironically, the

relates

black people to the church in rela-

to

Laurier University

Laurier University on Nov. 13.

temporary issue. “The church was a place where black people could participate with dignity, pride and freedom.”

demic achievement and regular church attendance was also found

student at Wilfrid

Wilfrid

depression.

to be positively associated with pro-social behaviour in most black teenage youth, while aca-

second-year social work

solutions being offered.”

conclusion that the church should play a role in addressing this con-

shown

Gillian Wells,

Wells discussed the role of the black church in response to youth

gang violence

sentenc-

judicial

ing for

Laurier University.

I

“Tougher

ending gang violence

role in

(Photo by Amy Meadows)

Practising for the ice Capades! Skaters are getting into the holiday spirit at Kitchener’s downtown ice rink, located outside City Hall at 200 King St. W. Skating is free of charge, but you have to bring your own skates.


News

Put trash

occurs within

littering

five-metre

a

of a garbage

radius

comes

for mosquitoes. is not disposed of can linger for many years without removal or decom-

properly,

By ALLISON STEINMAN

it

450

there’s

position. Plastics require

Reduction

years to biodegrade, while glass

According to data -from the Canadian Community Health

open.

takes one million years.

Survey, an e.stimated three million

“In

website,

www.curelitter.ca.

The

which was commit-

taskforce,

formed

in

2003,

is

a joint

mem-

tee that includes municipal

Cambridge and Waterloo as well as ministry of transportation and board of edubers of Kitchener,

cation members.

The to

objective of the taskforce

promote

behaviour

anti-littering

by educating the public and, there-

community

encouraging

fore,

cleanup where required. Promotional signs boasting the slogan The Only Cure for Litter is

You, are visible within the college as well as the exterior of Grand River Transit buses and garbage

placed

receptacles

GRT

at

bus

stops.

Kathleen

Barsoum, Region of

Waterloo waste management coordinator, said the unique tagline provides a means of reaching out to the public via a strong, solid

Barsoum

mes-

up

to

however,

said,

the

aged

people

region seems to take heed of the

cannabis

environmental repercussions

five years.

litter

causes.

“The community

environmentally-sensitive and aware of the impact of litter,” she said.

Barsoum

is

said

is

discouraging

it’s

bad litter younger gener-

see people display

to

habits, particularly

or

15

least

at

used

older

once

the last

in

Marijuana smokers are family members, acquaintances, neighbours and friends, people no differ-

Gracias,

cleanup events not only

in the

“1

much

general

cleanup or spring cleanup,” he

smoking pot about

had an older friend she

who

friends got into

became

just

too,

it

this

it

“Around

said.

time a bunch of

that

did

just as

could eventually lead the

it

u.se

have a few drinks,” she said. There are several methods used

thinks

it

smoke the drug .such which are marijuana

to

my

other

and soon

social

thing

it

we

did.”

Now

Michelle

is

a regular

smok-

She smokes every day, buys up grams and spends about $100

to 14

a week.

an expensive habit,” she

gives

cigarettes,

A

bucket

a lot of

smoke

the

for a small

amount of marijuana.” She added that

on

it

helps because as time goes

her

tolerance

for

increases and a larger

the

drug

amount

harder drugs,

Michelle

depends mostly on the

person.

as “joints”

made with items around

me

con-

that

is

user to

can be

is

pot with friends

acceptable as getting together to

personally have experimented

“I

with cocaine and ecstasy,” she said.

first.

er.

“I don’t really see

for the fact marijuana

sidered a gateway drug, meaning

“1 tend to use the bucket method most often,” said Michelle. “It

community, but on school property-

smoke

aware of

is

opinion, getting together

sarily

occasionally,”

second-year

a

As

my

she

with any of them to date.

of water.

Michelle, a 19-year-old Waterloo

Consequently, student bodies are Osiris

just as

resident,

have been changed to

three years ago.

LASA/police foundations student, said he would like to see more lit-

becomes

.said

these facts, but hasn’t had to deal

house such as a 750 mL pop bottle with holes punched in the bottom, a .small metal piece and a large pail

in this article

resident, started

said.

the rest of society

to

Michelle

she hopes one day

use drugs or abstain. All the names

cially at lunchtime,” she said.

Barsoum

.said

“pipes,” and “buckets.”

“Teens are more likely to litter in a group than on their own, espe-

a target group,

no trouble.”

anyone else. Three people gave their rationale as to why they ent from

protect their identity.

ations.

ter

— Page 9

a price

at

Michelle

receptacle, according to the Litter

Taskforce’s

2006

garbage

If

Most

27,

Marijuana habit

in

garbage can By HOLLY FEATHERSTONE

SPOKE, November

“I think pot

me

less

Eric,

person

played a role

nervous about 19-year-old

a

said

in

making

it.”

Cambridge

he doesn’t think a

who does hard drugs necesneeds to smoke marijuana

“If you’re the kind of person that

shoot up some heroin for a good time,” he .said, “it doesn’t really matter whether you start with weed or not.” will

Eric doesn’t really see the point

is

needed to feel the effects. However, Michelle’s habit comes at a price. Regular marijuana use can cause serious physical health problems such as chronic cough or

in

recurring bronchitis as well as psy-

uate,

chological effects like short-term

drugs because he was brought up with strong morals and a sense of

doing drugs.

“You can have fun regardless,” he said. “Besides, some drugs can be excessively damaging.”

Grant, a Conestoga College gradsaid

he chooses not to do

sage.

said.

“(The taskforce) focuses on the tagline and getting that message to communicate,” she said. Bar.soum said thus far, promotional efforts have been effective in spurring positive involvement from educational institutions and com-

Gracias said litter is an ongoing problem and those who litter lack concern for their environment. “It shows great lack of respect not just for your immediate surroundings but where other people

location where Michelle chooses to do a lot of her smoking; her parents’ home. “My family is pretty open about

ing.

responsibility.

Also, according to the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, it is a

and animals may

iti”

done

or process the drug and could result

times,” he “But there wasn’t an addiction to deal with and I certainly had lots of homework to keep me

munity groups of varying ages. "There’s been a high recognition level,” she said. “It’s been sticking in people's brains, adults and kids

Gracias said although the region is fairly clean, litter is still apparent

“It’s

he said.

of

litter

habits.

said.

“It

takes 30 days to develop a bad

months said Barsoum.

it,”

By

to get out

of

litter to

the forefront, she said the taskforce

hopes to enable citizens

to think

twice before discarding their food

wrappers and beverage cups where they don’t belong. Litter

is

most

Although Gracias said he supports those

who

volunteer to pick

litter, he wouldn’t volunteer because he doesn’t think he should clean the messes left by others. “I make a conscious effort to not

up

ushering the issue of

common

along

persists,

as

most

litter

buried

is

including convenient stores and

ize

plazas.

Barsoum. Over the course of the winter, Barsoum said the taskforce, though

consists of food wrap-

pers and containers as well as cigarette

Such items

butts.

are

fre-

“When the snow melts, you how bad litter is,”

not directly responsible for

along Fairway Wilson Avenue in Kitchener, where an abundance of Wendy’s containers, Tim Hortons’ beverage cups, water bottles and

cleanup, will continue

large swathes of transparent plastic

is

quently

Road

spotted

and

punctuate the roadsides. Litter

is

not only

esthetically

repugnant, particularly and water systems, but

in

parks

it

poses

environmental threats to animals and water quality, both of which

comprise healthy ecosystems.

According

to

www.

wikipedia.org, small animals can become trapped in bottles and containers,

leading to suffocation or

strangulation. In addition, litter not

only pollutes the water supply, but containers capable of bearing rain-

water provide breeding locations

she said. “As long as

in the attic

it’s

where no one

else

is.

memory

loss

and impaired learn-

criminal offence to possess, traffic

in

“I

was asked many

said.

busy.”

criminal action.

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: DEPRESSION Thest us have experienced waking up in a bad mood or “feeling the blues”. Some lives. our on impact feelings are usually of short duration and have minimal weeks people experience sadness, loneliness, hopelessness, self-doubt, and guilt for illness an depression, months and even years. These experiences characterize

Most

of

believed to affect one

he said. As winter approaches, the concern for keeping the region clean

under the snow for many months.

litter

however,

in ten.

litter,”

roadways, ravines and places with a high concentration of people,

Most

all,

downtown

and sometimes near schools, particularly high schools because they have smoking sections,” he

habit and three

surprising of

the

lives.

expose children, in particular, to the dangers of littering before they develop negative vital to

is

It

Most is

downtown Cambridge, where he

in

“I notice a lot

alike.”

live,”

admitted.

its

real-

said

litter

promo-

community presentations and informing new citizens of the regional waste mantional efforts, including

agement bylaws

to ensure littering

inhibited.

“(The taskforce) tries to connect with people new to the region,” she said.

Barsoum said the region exudes a community feel for the task-

nice

force and therefore, most people have been both positive and

encouraging toward their

initia-

tives.

Barsoum gestions for

said

new

litter

cleanup are more

how

to

volunteer,

www.curelitter.ca.

visit

that

you or someone you care about

is

experiencing depression: loss of joy in formerly pleasurable activities; crying a lot or feeling key peopl emotionally “empty”; hopelessness; worthlessness: loss of warmth towards or self-doubt. in life: loss of sexual desire: deep sense of shame

FEELINGS-

exhaustion and lack of energy: insomnia or sleeping toe problems; much; loss of appetite or over-eating; physical aches and pains; digestive

PHYSICAL - overwhelming

headaches. withdrawal; neglect of responsibilities or appearance: reduced concentration, memory or ability to cope with daily activities.

BEHAVIOUR -

irritability,

consider suicide as ar these symptoms persist, or if their intensity is causing you to professional. On option, it is important to seek assistance with a knowledgeable and doctor are availat nurse a Services; Student in available are campus, counsellors in Health Services {Room 2B06). If

from Student Services our website httoV/www. conestoaac. on. ca/jsp/stserv/index. jsp

A Message Visit

ideas or sug-

than welcome. For more information about the taskforce and to find

out

3 re some signs which might indicate


Page 10

— SPOKE, November 27, 2006

Come visit the CS! Christmas tree to

10 for

get a CHiLDS WISH CARD, on it you'll find their Christmas gift

wish that you can purchase and put back under the tree.

Children

1

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For rnore infbmiation visit the C$1 office in

Monday

Tuesday

Room 2A106

Wednesday

Thursday wctvR»»

C I

nm: S

T

c

;

A

students INC


SPOKE, November

students, staff, friend

27,

2006

— Page 11

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Page 12

News

— SPOKE, November 27, 2006

Where our sweet Christmas By BECKY SHARPE

known

as the golden

was held Chri.stmas

is

approaching quickly

and everyone seems in a rush to hang up their stockings and pul up the tree. Sweet smells of Christmas cookies are baking in the oven and lights are

over the

beginning to shimmer all city. Mistletoe is being

in

bough and

high respect by the

Norseman. Not only did the Druids and Norseman use this plant but the North American Indians did akso.

Celtic Druids and the

They

used it for toothaches, measles and animals bites. Today, the plant is still used for medicinal

from that special someone, gingerbread is baking in the oven to make a dainty little house and candy canes are

purposes but not as often.

under the mistletoe

is

being added to the tree as a

an English tradition, but there

is

hung up

to catch a kiss

final

touch.

But wait, where did these traditions of mistletoe, gingerbread and candy canes come from? Although these traditions are an part of the .season, not

of their origins. tale

It’s

integrated

many know

time to

tell

of stories long forgotten.

do we

the

Why

under the mistletoe? Who started gingerbread men and houses? How did the cane start kiss

from a candy stick? Mistletoe, according www.candlegrove.com, used

to to

be

Now

where does the kissing

come from? Most people that kissing

more than Just one ly green plant. The

believe

made

who despised Balder and found a way around Frigga’s truce. By using mistletoe he made an arrow from its wooden stem and went off

to

make

Balder’s

Loki

kill

her favoured Balder.

Guiding Hoder’s hand, Loki aimed the arrow right for Balder’s heart and told Hoder to release the arrow. It instantly killed poor Balder. Frigga was devastated by know, you can’t

much

that

we

all

a god. Balder

was restored to life by the love had for him. Frigga reversed the reputation of the plant

which killed her son, making it a symbol of love and promised to bestow a kiss on whoever should pass under

it.

"Wayne McKay, 2 1, a chef at a home in Port Hope, says

retirement mistletoe

symbol of

Loki was a mischief-filled

kill

everyone

harm

to her son.

to

possible by using her blind .son to

the loss of her son. But, as

a truce with every living

blind

wanted

sure Frigga felt as horrible as

thing of every element to bring no

Now

find

brother Hoder.

original story of

Frigga loved her son so she

from

spirit

tale to this love-

kissing under the mistletoe comes from a Norse myth. In Norse beliefs there was a god named Balder who was loved and adored by almost every living thing. Balder’s mother, Frigga, was the goddess of love and beauty.

came

traditions

“When

is

I

more of a hassle than a

(Photo

A

gingerbread house

by Becky Sharpe)

an example of a well-known Christmas tradition. To think that something as simple, yet tasty and so full of holiday fun, came from a simple basket of spices that crusading Europeans brought back with them from the Middle East. is

love.

was younger the only

mistletoe

we had was

eaten by our

family cat,” he said.

more of an excuse

to just grab a

from someone.”

kiss

Jan Sluiman, 53, a Port Hope mother of two and a homemaker, says mistletoe

is

me

family Christmas

at

parties,” she said.

my

child,

“When

was a

I

uncle used to run after

,

everyone trying to fetch a kiss from anyone he could.” Gingerbread, the sweet and chewy treat that is loved by almost all children and adults, is another holiday tradition.

carecentre.com/history,

of gingerbread.

tale

when

It

tells all

the

started

crusaders from the Middle

East returned to Europe with spices that

Germany.

in

The

had never been seen before by

Confectioner’s

National

847 German immigrant August Imgard used the candy cane to decorate his tree in Association says

in

1

Wooster, Ohio.

Approximately 50 years

later.

Bob McCormack of Albany, Ga. was said to have made candy canes as treats for loved ones and shop-

keepers,

McCormack’s

Gregory

law,

The website, www.inglewood-

www.allth-

ingschristmas.com, states that candy canes came from Europe and were developed as tree ornaments

great for a party.

“Mistletoe was always a scary thing for

came from? The website,

they

really

“It’s

Keller,

brother-ina

Catholic

invented a machine in the

priest,

950s that produced candy canes by the dozen. The mass production of the treat grew and the popularity of the candy cane grew. 1

their people.

The most

characteristic of

Bakers

spice.

spice to their

all

the

was a ginger

spices brought back

was a hit. The name gingerbread came from the Latin word “zingebar.” The first gingerbread houses were made in Germany. The famous children’s storywriter. Brother Grimm, made gingerbread houses popular after the writing of Hansel and Gretel which featured

and

Gretel.

symbol of Christ’s the years people have

own

made

variations of gingerbread

added

own

their

candy

favourites to the cookie. Today’s

jcertificates

Hansel

after the writing of

house.

and

e ipod nano

storywriter, Brother

Grimm, made gingerbread houses popular

In society today Christians have recognized the candy cane as a

their

sp player

children’s

the witch’s life-sized gingerbread

Over

ional prizes include

The famous

adding this baked goods and it tried

The

red

purity.

represent

stripes

gingerbread hou.ses can be bought in kits of already-made cookie

washed

clean.

The

original

pieces and are a big

three red stripes on

hit

with chil-

dren.

“There’s

the

bloodshed and torment Christ was put through and the white represents the sin of the world being

candy cane had it, which to

Christians represents the holy trin-

absolutely

nothing gingerbread,” said

wrong with McKay. “The bigger

the ginger-

bread houses the better.”

Sluiman says she loves the smell and it's not Christmas for her until the sweet smell of gingerbread and cedar or pine trees floods the house.

ity. while the hook represents the shepherds who watched their flocks by night.

love

“I

the

Christian

candy canes,” Sluiman

makes me

feel great to

story said.

know

of “It

that

I'm eating something symbolic of

my

beliefs.”

not Christmas till you pul candy canes on the tree,” said

"It's

"Making

gingerbread at Christmas has always been a favourite activity for me." she said.

own hou.ses men makes

the

McKay. It’s

interesting

how

"Putting together your

traditions can

and gingerbread Christmas all that more special." Another sweet treat in December is the candy cane. Have you ever wondered who put the hook on the cane and where

any culture or belief he said.

work

three simple

for at

everyone of Christmas,

"Gingerbread, candy canes and neutral symbols of

mistletoe are

Christmas, making them religion friendly." said

McKay.


News Santa Claus has come to town

By

SAMANTHA SAECHAO

Hundreds of children lined up at Conestoga and Fairview Park malls recently to see none other

man

old

himself,

Santa Claus. Children between the ages of six months and 2 years waited for their chance to tell Santa exactly what they want to see under their 1

Christmas tree on Dec 25.

“The children love

to see Santa

Wendy

Enns, one of the elves helping out with the pho-

Claus,” said tography.

Since Santa Claus first arrived mall on Nov. 18, there have been around 50 children lined up at the

hour

each

photo

their

get

to

taken.

“The most popular item among PlayStation 3, which Just came out a few days ago,” said Enns. children

the

is

Although the elves get the kids up to see Santa fairly quickly, it is still

a

stressful for parents.

little bit

waited over an hour to see

“1

Santa

Claus

today,”

said

whose son Troy,

Freiburger,

7,

one of the kids who asked PlayStation

was

for a

3.

Freiburger said her son looks forward to being one of the first children to see Santa Claus every year. “I don’t

want Santa

of any of the toys Troy.

I

to run out

want,” said

Although the first few days are always the craziest, it won’t be slowing down any time between now and Christmas Eve. “We always have hundreds of kids each day until Christmas Eve, and Dec. 24 is one of our busiest days of the month,” said Enns. “It’s

when last

If

the kids

want

to get in their

one.

fondue

Killers,

pot.

The store also has prepackaged boxes of chocolates in different sizes or you can mix and match your own. They also sell pre-packaged bags of candy and chocolate and the ever-so-popular chocolate

yourself to celebrate the upcoming

best seller

holiday.

est

Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory This store is full of goodies of every sort and even has storemade, safe chocolate for your dog.

One of

best sellers

the

is

caramel candy apples. These are popular with all ages for they can be made into characters and can also be coated in different chocolate treats.

Some

favourite

candy apples are

with Smarties, monster NY chocolate cheesecake, chocolate-dipped caramel apple and just plain caramel apple. They range in price from $3.50 for the plain caramel apple to $8.50 for the different coated caramel apples and

caramel

$9.50 for the character apples. A different item which is popular for the holiday is a fondue set. It sells for $12.99 and comes with

The Black Parade, and The Sam’s Town. The store also carries T-shirts, hats and other items such as magnets, candies, plush toys and movie actor dolls. Or just go there to pick up a gift certificate. They start at

three chocolate bars and a small

There are many different things your loved ones may like or in most ca.ses, may love to have for Christmas. Whether it’s your sib1. lings, your parents, your grandparents or even your friends, going shopping can be quite easy when you know where to go. Here are some gift ideas for that special someone, whether it be for chocolate lovers, athletes, gamers, sexy ladies or even the music lovers in your life. You may even want to pick up something for that

the jolly

2006

27,

Great gift ideas for special people in your

By SARAH JAYNES

than

SPOKE, November

body

paint.

For the gamers in your life. Boutique Games (EB Games) is the place to go to find all the latest games and consoles. Each of the systems has its own biggest game sellers. For PlayStation 2, the Electronic

game

La Senza Express For the sexy lady in your life (best friend, sister or whoever). La Senza Express is the shop to go to find a Christmas gift. Most popular are the cozy tlannels being sold for $19.50 and other pajamas starting 4.

EB Games

2.

$5.

is

Final Fantasy the

lat-

at

You may

$29.50.

purchase

a

also

robe

soft

want

to

($39.50-

— Page 13

life

Nike and Adidas. For the athlete, check out Sportchek for equipment and gear. The 6. ever so popular Under Armor (performance apparel) for both males and females come in different styles and comfort. Hockey players may need a new stick which range anywhere from $100 $250 depending on the style. Sportchek has many other items such as shoes, water bottles, clothes and outerwear. Gift cards are also available.

LCBO Finally, local

you can check out your

LCBO

for .some celebration

$59.50) or slippers at two pairs for $28.50. If you dare, bras and

drink ideas. For the younger gener-

For the Xbox 360 gamers, the latest and best seller is Gears of War; it blends tactical action with survival horror and thrusts gamers into a deep and harrowing story of

panties

ular

humankind’s epic battle against a nightmarish race of creatures. This game goes for $60 and $70 for the collector’s edition. If you are unsure of what game to get, males do tend to go for either

It

in this

sells for

role-playing series.

$50.

more of an upbeat, action-packed kind of game, while females tend to like more sports

or

role-playing games. 3. Sunrise Sunrise is the place to go if you have a music lover in your life. They sell almost everything from

are

also great

gift

ideas

vodka

is

ages that are

readily

available.

also available.

Most contain a

bottle of

some

Foot Locker, Athlete’s World and Sportchek If there are a few athletes in your life, check out Foot Locker. Their most popular items for men are shirts and shoes with prices ranging from $10 - $175. Men’s Classic Adidas shoes are most popular and the Michael Jordan clothing line is a popular shirt brand. Over at Athlete’s World, you can purchase clothes for both males and females, with popular brands

of alcohol (rum, wine or vodka) packaged with a mixer or other

5.

DVDs

John for men. Other brands they carry are Vans,

and

is

fruity

flavoured.

you want

to

go and get your ho a few more days

ho hold up

for

until the little

ones

settle

down

a

bit.

The most popular at the LCBO rum which you can mix

with eggnog, just perfect for the holiday .season. Prices range from $10 to as much as $500. You can check out these stores at Conestoga Mall in Waterloo or Fairview Park Mail in Kitchener. A LCBO is located just a few blocks

from

both malls. Other gift ideas include certificates from day spas, hair salons or local theatres. Just look around and think outside of the box.

Emotional abuse seldom visible signs of the It is often difficult to recognize and identify emotional abuse because, unlike physical assault there are abuse. Nevertheless, emotional abuse may be the most painful and damaging aspect of an abusive relationship.

are you affected?

Do you

feel that

Do you

feel that your partner

Will

your partner controls your

life?

does not value your thoughts or feelings?

your partner do anything to win an argument, such a put you down,

threaten or intimidate you?

Do you Are you

feel that

told that

you cannot do anything

right in

your partner’s eyes?

no one else would want you, or

that

you are lucky your

partner takes care of you?

Do you have

When you

to account for every

try to talk to

moment

of your time?

your partner about problems, are you called

names such a

bitch or idiot?

relationship. If you recognize these behaviours in your partner, you may be in a dangerous Counsellors are avail^le in the Counselling Office, Doon Campus, Room 1A103, 748-5220 ext 3360, Guelph Campus, Admin. Office, 824-9390 ext. 1 48 or Waterloo Campus, Room 1C04, 885-0300 ext. 224. Information on community support is available through your Counselling Office.

Sponsored by the (Photo by Sarah Jaynes)

Santa Claus waits to see the next child

in line at

Mall in Waterloo.

Conestoga

Women’s Resource Group

.sort

are rye or

WHEN DATING TURNS DANGEROUS How

For the

samples.

wish.”

picture taken with Santa Claus,

most pop-

five per cent alcohol

older generations, try the gift pack-

and concert tickets. A popular CD is My Chemical Romance’s new

posters to

which has

with bras ranging from $30-$40 and panties three for $21, two for $24 and five for $25. Gift cards are

such as Baby Phat and Ecko for women and Phat Farm and Sean

CDs and movie

ation, flavoured


Page 14

Feature

— SPOKE, November 27, 2006

J-Cave

a

fwCCy, joCCy Cdristmas; Music was in the air on Nov. 1 8 as the Kitchener- Waterloo Santa Claus Parade

made

its

way down

King Street, from Erb Street in Waterloo to

Cedar Street

in

Kitchener.

Left:

The

Burlington

Teen Tour Band plays carols to get the crowd excited for Santa’s arrival.

Right:

A

two-month-old

future guide

dog gets

carried by a

member

of the Lions

Foundation of Canada Dog Guides.

Above: Members

of the

Bethany Evangelical Missionary Church

crowd’s attention as they guide a camel Left:

Members

of

down

of Kitchener get the

the street.

The Waterloo County Shrine Band never

fail

to dress

up

for the occa-

sion.

Right: Mr. Peanut parade sponsors.

struts his stuff

down

the street representing Planters, one of

Left:

Big Mike from 91

takes a ride

in

radio station’s

.5

many

The Beat

HummBEAT,

the

Hummer.

Photos by

Meghan Kreller

Right:

The Waterloo Regional Band marches

Police Service

between

their

musical

performances.

Ifs tHe Best time oftBe year!


Feature

SPOKE, November

27,

— Page 15

2006

^ hit By JORDEN FELICIANO

sion

St)

my

friends can sec mo,” said

Mike Leandres, Kevin’s Jolly old St. Nicholas received a

wanii welcome by

all

with candy canes and

(he children

Santa

letters to

hand at the Santa Claus parade in Cambridge, Nov. IS. The man in red, boats and marchClaus

in

bands paraded down Hespeler

ing

Road, one of the busiest roads

in

oldest son.

Other people enjoyed the fact that the Santa Claus parade is held at night, which makes the floats more interesting to look

at.

“Usually Santa Claus parades other cities arc earlier

noon,”

said

Shannon, 39. and daughter. “Ours this evening and by

Irric

father of a son

Cambridge, on a beautiful Saturday

started at six

afternoon.

that time

Rogers television was on hand to broadcast the parade live and made some of the people happy with their

lenges the boats to be creative.”

presence. "It

was awesome

television

to see

coverage,”

it

getting

said

Kevin

Leandres, 36, a father of two young

“Most people -think of Cambridge as a small city but we’re sons.

growing rapidly, so it’s cool Rogers here covering it.”

One of

to see

his sons especially loved

cameraman’s

attention

on sev-

eral occasions. “1

Shannon has been eoming

it

chal-

to the

Santa Claus parade with his family for five years in a row now, and said

he enjoys

it

every time.

good family time for sure,” Shannon. “Sometimes my par-

“It’s

said ents sit

come with us and it’s fun to just down with .some warm cider and

your whole family

to

enjoy a nice

evening.”

the coverage as he attempted to get the

already dark so

it’s

in

in the after-

want

to be

televi-

There trophies

boats

will

be eash rewards and

handed out

to

in several different

the

best

categories

such as best overall boat and best corporate boat, to be announced in the near future.


.

Entertainment

— SPOKE, November 27, 2006

Page 16

Electronic items top many Christmas wish lists By

ADAM HANNON

John Holden,

product specialdepartment of the Future Shop on 8 Pinebush Rd. in Cambridge, said MP3 players will probably be Future Shop's best-selling items for Christmas. He said the iPod is the most ist in

As

season

Christmas

the

approaches,

electronics

local

ready for the most hectic time of their business

stores

arc

getting

year.

a

the audio

1

popular

MP3

player, with close to

Holden

DVD

ing

80 per cent of the market share.

“This

the next generation of

40

sell

to

that

many

being on

sold

least

so $1,200, you’re into

Saturdays.

brand name that pushes

it,’’-

he

the

said.

He

said

when

it’s

closer

to'

Christmas they will sell out of iPods, although they get new shipments every few days. IPods range in price from $80 for a 512 megabyte iPod Shuffle, to $400 for an 80 gigabyte iPod

Movie

player.

Holden said iPods

are sold close

(Internet photo)

Blu-ray discs are a of replacing

DVD

new technology developed

with the intention

movies.

thing (that will be) close to as big

year.

ple think of shopping.”

Holden said peopL shop right up

“Boxing Day

because it is compatible with all Nintendo games, and can also be used as a DVD pilayer. He added

million

at

Day accounts

around four per cent of their

half

of the

the

price

new

PlayStation.

Shawn

new

for about $650.

Duncan, manager of The Source at 75 Pinebush Rd. in Cambridge, said MP'

It

most older PlayStation games, and also has a

plays

your needs. Let Express Personnel Services equip you for success by matching your skills with a job that elevates your work experience. fits

built-in

Blu-ray

player.

Blu-ray

discs

50

Full

a

new

technology developed with the

Need Christmas Cash?

are

players ;

for those,” he said.

He

:

LCD

added (liquid crystal

display) televisions are

of

replac-

5pm - 1am

€eck. It’s

Apply

Person: 50 Queen Street North (Queen & Weber), In

Downtown Kitchener 519-578-9030

www.expresspersonnel.com

-r--

7]

7" Floor

popular, e c a u s e

Starting Immediately

Xbox Users

some

ol

“Everyone’s going i

Time Positions

Providing Technical Support to

are

his best-selling items.

inten

tion

for

yearly sales.

PlayStation 3 gaming console sells

style that

dollars

without bre'^'^ing a sweat,” he id, noting that Boxing

around

Sony’s

work schedule and

will

our biggest. We’ll do well over a

the Wii

than

less

is

a

days of the

busiest

be

$280 each,

to the

minute, adding that Christmas Eve is usually one of the last

Holden said the new Nintendo Wii system will be a big seller,

that

Empower yourself with

“It’

kind That visual Christmas feeling makes peo-

as the iPod,’’ he said.

Equip for success.

snows,” he said.

.

beginning to look a like Christmas on

.

lot

Concession Street in Cambridge, as houses have been decorated for the holiday season.

(glob-

have also become popular. These systems come pre-programmed with maps and directions to thousands of destinations in North America and Europe, and voice prompting to communicate the direc-

Some GPS come as

expensive ones, can be attached to a laptop, and run off of software installed on the computer.

seems to affect when people start their Christmas shopping. “(They start shopping) it

GPS

separate units, while other, less

er

funny.

said in-car

positioning system) systems

systems

PlayStation game 3 consoles sold out the day they were released. Holden' said the weath-

when

al

tions.

and they make most of their money from the accessories. He noted that during the Christmas season, the two aisles of the store devoted to iPod mini systems and accessories will make about as much money as Future Shop’s entire TV section. _ “The new Nintendo is the only

to cost,

if

Blu-ray PS3 is the way to go. The Nintendo Wii and

that

“It’s

the

expensive player Blu-ray Future Shop sells goes for around

50

twice

TVs.

Duncan

Currently,

with

iPods,

said

Holden.

will

store

than traditional (cathode ray tube) '

movies,’’

said

on a slow day, his

they offer higher picture quality

movies.

is

ol


Entertainment

SPOKE, November

2006

27,

— Page 17

(Photo by Christopher Mitts)

Kitchener Future Shop employees (from left to right), Mynor Garcia, Richard Prasad and Keeghann Sinanan pose with the camped outside the store for several days in hopes of getting their hands on the new console.

new Sony

PlayStation 3 on Nov. 16. People

The next generation of video gaming By CHRISTOPHER MILLS Children from

all

over the city

and Vanleeuwen are

An

hardcore video gamers. They both

soles

Jans.sens

own

XBOX

the

360 as well, and

rush to the rooftops of their apart-

Jans.sens said he will “shortly” be

ment buildings and stare skyward, awestruck, as the shadow of a giant

getting

“3" hovers over them. Sony's commercial was a great metaphor for the release of its product a week and a half ago. The

Nintendo WII (pronounced “we”). The new Nintendo .system was released Nov. 19, two the

days after the PS3. Others were hoping to get their hands on the new console to turn a

new Sony PlayStation 3 (PS3) hovered over North America and

profit.

descended upon consumers with a

associate

fury.

Kitchener, said the

People of all ages - adults more so than children - were lined up

more than he expected.

outside

electronics

stores

across

North America, and Future Shop in Kitchener was no exception. Ten people sat bundled up outside the

on the evening of Nov. 16, 12 hours before the system was to be

store

released.

The two

at the front

of the line -

Janssens and Mike Vanleeuwen. both of Guelph - had already been there for 27 hours.

Jonathon

Mynor

Garcia, an entertainment at

Shop in hype was a little

Future

“People just want to get the system and resell it after a couple of days for some extra cash,” he said.

The day of PS3's

release,

Ebay

reported that the average system

was

$2,600 US. At a retail price of $659.99 for the 60GB. console, that’s a mark-up of selling for

400 per

were released across Canada, with an additional 200,000-250,000

density.

released in the United States.

mon DVD.

“We

Future Shop, along with stores across the country, opened

its

doors

The timing was planned by Sony

in

with

them.selves

find

leave dejected once they realize the

great too,” he said.

this

“The games coming out look

number of people in line already exceeds the stock on hand. Garcia said it was comparable to the release of the XBOX 360 earli-

easier,”

of the openings across Canada. A violent altercation at an Ottawa Future Shop was one of a few minor incidents, but nothing that compared to the United States. Several

he

incidents

man being

When

BB

had a more technical

port

Blu-

and the

many of

full

One

has to wonder

Come To Me

3.

Lips of an - Hinder

4.

Money

5.

Money Maker

their craft playing the very

-

»

be the most technologically advanced gaming system to hit the

In

Angel

The Bank

Scrappy (Pharrell Chorus)

Ludacris (feat Pharrell)

Love

Justin Timberlake

Pullin' -

(feat Nicole Sdierzinger)

Diddy

My ‘

(Kids)

Jibbs

- Lil' <.

Low

2.

-

to

used to read

is

Now

November 20

Chain Hang

these violent perpetrators

video games that sparked the hype. Sony, creator of what is considered

of

1.

-

how

honed

Your World Right

Week

gunpoint the night before

the release.

1080p,” he said.

laser that

girls

RealTrax^” ring tunes

shot; police declaring

gun; and the theft of some con-

.soles at

HDMl

were reported

patrons; a drive-by shooting with a

response. ray player,

generous.

year?

10.

one crowd a hostile gathering and using riot gear and batons on some

asked what features of the new system they were most looking forward to, avid gamers like

to the

extra

feeling

is

Me

Back (Radio Edit)

Chingy Featuring Tyrese

Sexy Back -

Justin Timberlake

Shortie Like

Mine

> Bow Wow Smack That -

.

.

.

wifft horn fts

I

of

One house on Wayne Kitchener

on Nov.

1 1

was .

fully

Street

in

(decorated

-

Akon

Text "PLAY*' to

4800 on your Rogers wireless

phone to download your favourite

Other homeowners

quickly followed suit.

(Photo by Christopher Mitts)

a if

I o ROGERS I flop 10

of the border, including a

.south

said.

Janssens

Santa

is

Security guards kept an eye on

“There were lineups, but we also took pre-orders (for the XBOX),

which makes things

PlayStation 3 this Christmas

most

er this year.

violet

wait,”

9.

will

Have you been good boys and

on some morning newscasts.

the

7 for the release.

Da.son

good, and the online play looks

lawn chair to fight the cold.

worth

1

Shawn

com-

of Guelph, gave a simpler answer.

order to have the product's release

totally

a.m. on Nov.

like

the

market, is expected to release up to 900,000 PS3 consoles in North 7. In other America by year’s end. 8. words, the only way most people

As he answers questions, hopefuls come up to ask him about the new system. They quickly

Janssens said, nestling deep in his

at 8

more data than

Other hopefuls,

said.

According to www.wikipedia.com, the Blu-ray Disc (BD) is named for the blue-

"It's

stantially

only have 10 units,” Garcia

"I'm looking forward

cent.

and write for high data storage The disc can store sub-

estimated 32,000-40,000 con-

here

is

ring tunes today.


Page 18

News

— SPOKE, November 27, 2006

Canadian board game

James Bond’s back By LEANNE

as

similar to Trivial Pursuit,

MOUNTFORD packed

were

Theatres

weekend

time

in

...

but

this

Bond came back

to

about

it’s all

women

the big screen.

Daniel Craig starred as the leg-

Bond

Bond’s first double 0 mission, he takes on Le Chiffre (Mads Mikkeksen), a terrorist banker in a high-stakes game of

On

Le

terrorists’ ket,

has to win

lost

it

who

Chiffre,

money

becau.se

in the

it

all

foiled

This

com-

beautiful

movie

The movie even has

a

comic relief as head of the

M

And, one of the biggest disappointments with Casino Royale is

Intelligence

Service,

little

the absence of Q’s character. In

(Judi Dench),

other

Secret

British

annoyed by Bond’s

Bond movies, Q’s

supplies

role has

Desmond

been played by Llewelyn and John who is head of the

gets

actions.

often

Clee.se.

Q

Bond

Q,

but not in inventing.”

Canadian market.

neat

exploding pens, rocket-launching cars and laser-shooting watches. Despite the lack of vicious bad guys and Q’s character, this Bond movie is filled with action, fighting, beautiful

women and

.sexy

cars.

This Bond movie follows the genre of its predecessors and it’s definitely a good watch for any

(/nternet Photo)

Daniel Craig stars as in

James

Casino Royale.

Board games come in all kinds of styles, shapes and sizes. A new and exciting Canadian game to hit shelves last Oetober is one that’s all about celebrating women’s achievements and experi-

action-lover.

The game, EVE’s Quest, packs

much

fun and learning into a cou-

of hours

ple

as

as

Pursuit,

Trivial

EVE’S Quest has something for everyone, including charades, singing,

The two women didn’t want their game to be just trivia, but to be

drawing and

intuition.

it’s all

had a great idea and put

into

it

they met in an international

developments operation. Broadhurst had the idea for almost years when she 10 approached McCarthy, who was ecstatic about it. After they looked into it to make

offers By JASON SHERRITT Rock

’n’ roll

bands are

like rela-

many

and very few may claim suc-

comes down

The

have fun and see or can learn, about women’s contributions from the past to the present.

Players must

WlHCbif

AXX

mer. Other

HOP.

10 Manitou Dr. Kitchener

:

^

BEFORE 11PM

(Comer of Manitou

Dan Snyder.

&

Fairway)

^

into

music

women

bring

There was so much wisdom, debate, comedy and spontaneous intimacy.” Marlene Daley,

EVEs Quest player

answering

their title

by using

McCarthy and Broadhurst

They

many other ideas versions of their

also have

different

for

game.

“We would make

eventually

girls,

Broadhurst said.

going to be buying the game, and were careful to ensure it didn’t bash men.

right

“The

inidie

a

we have on women, so

centred it

will

end up being a

One fan of EVE’s Quest from Montreal. Marlene Daley, said she “It

want the game

was

the best of

to end.

what can hap-

pen when you bring women together. There was so much wisdom, debate, comedy and spontaneous intimacy,” she said.

rock band

(different

“vue” some

are usually just one Hough. “I’ll ba.se the song around that and then rewrite it

get

25 times

distribution system,” he said.

said

until

think

1

the, lyrics

aren’t corny. if I’ll

Hough

they’re corny but

I

like

keep them.” is

dis-

women’s prod-

tributor for other

didn’t

market last October and Broadhurst and McCarthy became co-founders of Shaken the Tree Productions Inc. They distributed their game from

is

hopefully

petitive,” said Broadhurst.

to the

endless

are

possibilities

created

ucts.”

EVE’s Quest came

to

now. The company

The Montreal Gazette organall men. They were very into it and became comit.

ized a tournament of

like

a newer version for younger with less challenging trivia,”

McCarthy and Broadhurst were very conscious about who was

ing

feel

have reached their benchmark, and they are hoping to break even this Christmas. that they

of distribution for the

sort

band.

“(We) got denied by the iTunes “As for hard copy distribution (we)

tried

a big

independent distribu-

tor.”

the chief songwriter, as

The problem, he

said, is that

you

has the perfect band for a collective

have sales before you can get them to release your record. “It’s kind of like a catch-22, what

effort.

are

worked on songs

together yet, but he feels he

He

has been

now

Toronto for five years, looking for musicians for three and half of those years.

Hough he

in

were times when giving up but feels he’s

said there

felt like

in the best situation he’s in at this

ever been

point in time.

need

to

you know?”

supposed

to

do,

you

For the band’s future. Hough

would

like to .see

someone

releas-

ing their records as well as being

able to live a normal “I’d like to

own

life.

a house someday,

two

kids,” he said laughingly. “Hopefully both girls.” Kendall wants to be able to have the freedom to pursue her passion,

“Everyone’s sane,” he said. “At least, saner than I am. “Their addictions don’t control their lives and they’re all great

Pavement and Guided By

The band is releasing their first album themselves, titled Lo.^l In

said. “That’s

comes to writing songs Bellevue, Hough just picks up

Space. It’s not on a major or even smaller record label but a pseudo-

ing venture, adding, “As long. as

a

Voices.

When for

it

his guitar

and “fools around”

.something nice

“The

first

comes

words

that

until

out.

come

musicians.”

label of their truly

out of

a

together.

teenage metal-head, a little nugget of information not known even to the rest of the members of the band. Now he’s more into Frank Black, The Pixies,

I

since

include key-

The rea.son Hough got was because he was

iJ

liDfiES IN FREE

members

Kendall and bassist

r

I

been,

it

boardist and back-up singer Julie

DJ TERRY

'

started three years

Jordan joined the band.” Jordan Bruce is the band’s drum-

STARTING AT lOPM

3

it

it

the

was the best of what can happen when you

the intuition zone.

the band hasn’t

two months has

DAY!?

women by

or

sister

out worthy goddess, mother,

spell

diva,

like

titles

feels he has.

ago,” said Hough. “Only in the last

eXHX

to

“Or

“This band has not been solid

29

is

them.

since the day

IRISH PUB

object

how much you know,

and chemistry, which Brent Hough of Toronto rock band Bellevue

It

than

“It

14 and up can play the

to persistence

cess.

difficult

game.

line,”

tionships and restaurants; not

more

little

part,” said Broadhurst.

my mouth

(Photo by Aaron Schwab)

last

to enjoy the category for the most

intuition

Toronto

Rocking out

sixth .sense.

“Many people seem

.“Even the guys really enjoy play-

action.

Jordon Daniels, from the Montreal metal band The Gorgeous, gives an audience member a chance on the mic at Kitchener’s Victoria Park Pavillion on Nov. 17. The photo was taken with a one-second exposure and rear curtain flash.

women’s

lights

They then crown

about women. The creators, Johanna Broadhurst and Odette McCarthy of Montreal, were just two average moms who

except

when

EVE’s Quest has something for everyone, including charades, singing, drawing and intuition. Intuition is a category that high-

questions in each letter category.

Broadhurst and McCarthy have been friends since the early ’90s

XVESfDAY

noticed.

They’re hoping to break into the

Anyone

ences.

Branch,

with

gadgets on his mis.sions such as

Bond

U.S. market, but they’re finding

t

a

thrilling adventure.

as giving

“As a social worker I’ve always been involved in women’s causes,

By PEGGY O’NEILL

women and

company and did legwork such away free games to get it

this

exciting, fun and participatory.

is filled

sexy cars.

Gunfire, car cha.ses, explosions

it.

women’s

with action, fighting,

his

for

said.

achievements and experiences

Bond movies.

Bond movie

pany.

this

other

invested

stock mar-

plot to plunder an aerospace

and stunts make

in

went

thing like this before,” Broadhurst

Casino Royale aren’t

nearly as vicious or cruel as the

bad guys

back after he

Bond

in

original, they

celebrates the negative side, the bad

guys

was

it

“Neither of us had ever done any-

series.

In

poker.

sure

EVE’S Quest

endary James Bond, 007, in Casino Roy ale, a prequel to the

“1 just

own, making them a

independent

Hough

as well as

artist.

said he’s been trying to

own

want

a house. to

make music,” she

it.”

Bruce supported the house-ownI

can quit my job I’m happy.” Bellevue will be playing a Trepid Records: hou.se show Fri., Dec. 1, at 130 King St. N., Waterloo.


Entertainment

Horoscope Week of November

Aries March

21

Libra -

April 19

j

roundings.

You tend

not to look

where you are going, disabling you to see what you're getting into and what is coming at you.

BRANDON WALKER

projects

Your

calm

may

nature

and

often

lack the will to finish them. Challenge yourself and finish what you start, you may be surprised at what you can accom-

October 23

I Sjf

You

November

be

to

like

.scenes, yet

you love

the

The

week

as

kind you possess

build.

You need

you to keep control without notice. Take advantage, the work gets done and everyone feels equal.

assignments begin to to keep your head on your shoulders’ as others relying on your calmness will only irritate you as they panic.

lets

others think

ideas are theirs, enabling

May

21

-

Sagittarius November 22 December 21

June 21

Los

in

vice-president

CMH

of

turning

it

Cindy Gaal, who teaches

room

toddler

in the early

in the

childhood

said music and toddlers with social and emotional development. “Music also gives them a better

understanding.

cultural find

it

building,

infants

And

they

soothing,” she said.

We

.social

HMV

and

some Costco

at

whelmed by

“It’s the lyrics

also hear samples of the

that

Di.scs arc priced at

she said with a laugh.

releasing

the options out there.

irony,

I

little

a

little

as well as something they

could play to their baby.

up

a

brought

1

company meeting and

a

at

and (music) videos might affect kids. “My kids always liked AC/DC,” Gaal

said

building

infants

listen

to

in at

»

locations. Online, they can be pur-

to a lullaby version of Metallica or Tool and not have any opinion of it.

wanted something with edge, a little humour and

with

and gel them to sing along. Toddlers love music and they usually start dancing. Even babies want to bop along. Music is a part of being human. It takes us back to our tribal days.” Ross said Baby Rock Records discs arc available at WalMart, Sunrise,

Although Gaal hasn’t heard any of the Baby Rock Records CDs, she said a young child would listen

more

sing to them

Records, Lisa Ross, says it all started when she was shopping for a gift for a friend who was having a baby shower. “1 was under-

it

Gemini

them.

helps

The

behind

into a lullaby.”

education

21

control.

hours of music per day. “As they get older we’re

abies.

Angeles, also offers soothing versions of Pink Floyd, Radiohead and Nirvana.

-

there’s a certain juxtapo-

taking harder music and

is

in

Not sure what to get your kids for Christmas'? Try a CD with classic music from artists like Metallica and Tool redone in the form of lull-

Baby Rock Records, based

^

20

this

sition

plish.

easygoing

be disrupted

but

Scorpio

May

-

special

excitement of

the

Taurus April 20

— Page 19

|

By You enjoy starting new

2006

with Metallica

i

September 23 October 22

Your impulsive nature needs to be given the red light and you need to be aware of your sur-

27,

RpcKing babies to sleep

2006

27.

SPOKE, November

chased through Amazon, Barnes and Noble and through the Baby Rock Records website (www.babyrockrccords.com), where you can

Ross said the

label

the

ECE

Eminem, Kanyc

three

in the future.

on of

plans

versions

lullaby

least

music.

$16.98 US.

We.st and Outkast

Baby Rock Records was born.” The first three discs released were lullaby versions of Radiohead,

Coldplay

and

Metallica. “Metallica has been our bestseller,” said Ross.

You

like

move and

to

always on the go. You enjoy the newness of all aspects. While your pursuit of the new and exciting is a good change, don't forget the old and dull

you

they were with you

left

Your

are

behind;

first.

-

thinking

keeps you upbeat when others

down. You hate outdated

are

ideas and aren't fond of tho.se

stuck

in the past.

Instead of run-

ning. stick around and allow your thoughts to bring them into now.

Cancer June 22

progressive

pwra

July 22

Capricorn December 22

\

-

may

leave you hurt as words

Don't

them bother you,

let

fly.

they're

only words.

You're a goal setter and obtainer.

You

better

towards ideals to

strive

your

life.

mad

scientist.

One

of

my

co-

workers described the lullabies best when she said if there were

how

of instruments anyone could find a second-hand store.

Some

in

of the

instruments include the glocken-

even when you've reached your goal you feel it's not enough. Don't waste your life reaching.

and bells. “Each disc keeps the theme and sound of the bands,” Ross said. “The thing that makes these songs

vibraphone, melatrone

January 20 February 18

You

hate fighting, whether

personal

or

international.

prefer peace and

want lawn

to

know

will

‘Pal), Ijumbug’

harmony and

that

your future

not be a battlefield.

Work towards change, every great journey begins with a single step.

tests.

By TARA RICKER

it's

has anything to do with Christmas.

He

You It just isn’t Christmas without Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. This timeless tale, otherwise known as A Christmas Ghost Story, is so inspiring that you would have to put on an incredibly shoddy production to leave audience members

displeased.

Virgo

Pisces

August 23 September 22

February 19March 20

The K-W Musical Productions’ (KWMP) 2006 production of the popular Christmas

tale,

which was

held at the Centre in the Square You're

good

keeping secrets but lying is not a skill you've ever desired to possess. You enjoy knowing and giving the truth in any situation even if it hurts. Don't be quick to judge those

who do just

full

from Nov.

of disorganization and chaos,

innovative

while your social

ever seen.

Your private

at

sometimes the hurts too much. lie,

(Photo by Brandon Walker)

Two-year-old Olivia Latour rocks out during a music and movement activity in the early childhood education centre.

Aquarius

-

You have an air about you that no one can seem to explain, you can inspire even the most stubborn worker. That air you obtain will come in handy as others will need you to be the kick start they need to finish assignments and upcoming

like a

spiel, harp,

August 22

study for

careful

the

high you set the bar, sometimes

Leo July 23

Be

working in our office. He whole office environment, but he’s a phenomenal musician. He deconstructs every song and puts them back together. He’s ly started

hated

gnomes in a tree with a band, this is how it would sound.” Ross said the music is created using a mishmash

January 19

Wear an extra layer of skin this week, as tensions rise, tempers will snap. Work is beginning to build and your sensitive nature

Michael Armstrong has produced every album Baby Rock Records has released. “(Armstrong) actual-

truth

life

tends to be

life is

together

and straightforward. Don't let your personal habits affect your social mannerisms. When it comes to work and relationships, chaos is never a good option.

McCormick

is

a third-year

journalism student holding in the

palm of her hand.

fate

was

the

interpretation

1

mo.st

have

For those of you who have been under a rock your entire lives, here’s a quick synopsis of the living

story:

A

grumpy old man named

Ebenezer Scrooge resides in a generally upbeat town filled with people

Tiffany

16-19,

who

love the holiday season.

Despite their often simple and lower-class

lives,

they

find

the

celebrating in utmost joy Christmas with their family and friends.

Scrooge, a wealthy businessman, despises just about everything that

employees to work on Christmas Day and goes ballistic when cheerful people pa.ss by, hence the phrase “Bah, humbug!” Eventually, Scrooge is visited by forces

“spirits,” the ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Future. Their job is to convince Scrooge he’s far too mean and uncaring. They explain to him that if he doesn’t change in a hurry, he will be doomed to an eternity in purgatory, weighed down by chains and haunting others as a ghost himself. The play introduced the audience to the usual captivating cast of characters including favourites such as Bob Cratchit, Tiny Tim, Jacob Marley, Scrooge and the

three

three ghosts.

Where shines

is

a Christmas Carol truly in its

costumes, scenery

and, in this case,

KWMP

its

begone KWMP

made and newcomers to the performance a solid presentation.

David Atkins played Scrooge Watching his transformation through a wide range of

convincingly.

emotions - from being angry at the world to fear of the ghosts to his realization that he can make everyone else happy by simply being happy himself, keeps the story interesting.

The

region,

future

stage

was

also filled with high

from

all

over the

some of who looked stars. They brightened with

buoyant

their

spirits

like

the

light-hearted,

and kept the show

fresh.

For those who love the Christmas season and all its traditions, indulging in a holiday performance is

the perfect Christmas treat.

Friends of the

tap shoes.

introduced the art of dance to the timely classic through tap, ballet and jazz, which added an unexpected but effective twist. While no one actor stood out as being individually notable, the cast consisting of frequent returnees

cast

.school students

KWMP

and

"" St.

in Church Catholic John’s Kitchener are teaming together for an evening of Sounds to Celebrate

the Christmas Season on Dec.

1.

The performance

at

St.

at

is

being held

John’s Catholic Church, located

85 Strange

St., in

Kitchener.


.

Page 20

Sports

— SPOKE, November 27, 2006

Ready, set, skate By ALEX

MCNANNEY

“They’ll each get a ril

After a series of gruelling prac-

been

rolling three lines.

set.

13,

head coach Ben

made

his final roster cuts

Nov.

and now

prepar-

is

tourna-

first

ment.

we’re pretty strong defensively,” he said. “We got one guy that’s actually going off to “I

think

He

Buffalo State in the winter.”

said he thinks the team has a really

good top

ADAM BLACK into

looks

it

like

this it

is

going to be full of surprises. Some teams are going way beyond preseason predictions, while others are falling short.

Starting

off with

going

those

beyond expectations: the Toronto Maple Leafs are off to a great start. This was to be a rebuilding year for the Leafs, but they are showing heart and determination and it’s paying off in the win column. Newly hired coach Paul Maurice is showing great confidence in the youth of the team, something former coach Pat Quinn had issues with. This seems to be paying dividends as they’re currently sitting in Eastern Conference, four points behind the league-leading Buffalo Sabres. place

fourth

The Sabres

the

in

also have been turn-

ing heads, being in the spotlight for

month and a half of play. After making a run in the eastern finals they locked up two key players over the summer; goalie Ryan

the first

who had

Miller

a fantastic rookie

season, and sniper Daniel Briere.

They

also picked

Jaroslav Spacek,

ning

point

Edmonton Afmogenov

up defenceman

who

shot,

has a stun-

from

the

Maxim

Oilers.

was he injured), Chris Drury and Jason Pominville are all lighting up the league as well. Lindy Ruff might have the right chemistry in Buffalo to

13.

(before

produce a winner. Don’t be surthem at the end of the

prised to see

team’s

make any team

them work

up

in

first

two

she said.

Ford also said the OCAA might change the tournament for-

try to

mat a

eventually

She said

do

like to

have, like, an east and

west competition, do two or three

“That’s

said.

still

We’re looking the

women

at

tournament

They

in the works. doing that with

as well.”

The Condors

should be interesting

it

what they’d is

tournaments and then meet for a championship tournament,” she

the last couple of years,” she said.

contests.

bit in the future.

“I think

in

will play their first

Humber on Nov.

will then host their

at the rec centre

24.

second

on Dec.

tilt

1

For teams not meeting expecta-

Ottawa Senators are defione team to talk about. Goaltending woes continue to be a problem in the nation’s capital as newly acquired goalie Martin Gerber is having a horrible start. He has given up leads in five of the last six games he’s played, and seems to be having a serious confidence problem. I bet you general manager John Muckier is wishing he had kept goalie Dominik Hasek on the roster, who now plays for Detroit and is leading the NHL

Condor Pauline Kosza returns an opponent’s serve as her partner Stephanie Loree waits in antic ipation at the Festival Open badminton tournament held in Stratford on Nov. 1 8. Kosza and Loree

with the best goals against average.

lost

tions, the

nitely

Daniel Alfredsson

Captain

been

also

struggling.

Up

all

invisible

on the

point he

He

season.

gle goal

ice,

was demoted

at

superstars

line. This is shocking because he is one of the most talented players in the Ottawa lineup. He has been finding the back of the net more

like

Scott

commons

the learning Peer Services

j"'

Learning

Skills

Writing Services

Service

recently, but if he doesn’t find a

way

to lead his

team out of

don’t be surprised

funk,

if

this

he’s

shipped out of town. Ottawa’s woes are nothing com-

pared to what the basementdwelling Philadelphia Flyers are going through. They have been the epitome of surprise in this young

Lasf Call - For Tutoring! The deadline date

Today’s

and

NHL

is all

fmes.se,

skilled players like

are

really

Simon Gagne

struggling.

Tutors

will

a

tutor for Fail

December

1®*

is the deadline not be assigned after this date.

To request a peer tutor visit the Learning Commons - located in room 1 B36 (back of the Sanctuary)

Stirring

things up with the firing of coach

Ken Hitchcock and

for

the resignation

All

c

Bob

CONESTOGA

more shocking develop-

in Philly as

struggle in the

things

they continue to

Learning

months ahead.

said,

this

truly

has

been an exciting month and a half of hockey. With all the highs, lows,

and surprising twists, it’s almost like watching a mid-afternoon soap opera. Much like a soap opera you can bet fans are going to keep watching in anticipation of what will happen next.

semester

fast approaching;

is

Friday

about speed

something the Flyers are truly lacking. Their defence is as slow as molasses (Just look at

to request

courses

sea.son.

ments

Teemu Selanne and

out of three series.

one

Look

hockey world in an uproar was Anaheim’s acquisition of Chris Pronger after he requested a trade from the Oilers. Many questions were asked about why Pronger wanted out of Edmonton, but the Oilers’ loss was the Ducks’ gain. Lined up with

game

to the fourth

ting off the final ties with their for-

really got the

the best two

has been

and

of “mighty” from their name, cut-

mer Disney owners.

in

(Photo by Adam Black)

come up empty-handed

until

Clarke have done nothing to help this team with its on-ice woes.

with the dropping

2-0

high, but

recently he had only scored a sin-

of long-time general manager

summer

Condors reach

has

Ducks captured many headlines

Niedermayer,

is

two guys

“The top two lines are going to be guys with better hockey sense, the guys that can score; they’ll be set up with a playmaker,” he said, adding, ‘Then Fll have my third line, the guys who can grind it out and go toe-to-toe with their (opposing teams’) top line to shut them down.” Marlene Ford, the rec centre’s director of athletics and recreation who books the tournaments, echoed Gingerich’s sentiments. “We have at least half a dozen returning guys from the teams over

my

that plays

video footage of the playoff series

other

situation

“Seneca, Humber, Fleming, those were our old nemesises, so it’s nice to go up against those teams again,”

for the win.

against the Sabres last season), and

What

The goaltending

Gingerich said he plans on giving each guy a start in the

champagne out of

drinking

the

over the

be

tried out.

mighty Lord Stanley. The only team that .seems to be able to keep up to the Sabres’ statistics are the Anaheim Ducks, who only trail them by one point. The

.sea.son

will

Athleties

goaltender J.S. Guiguere, they’re sure to

Almost two months season,

and the team

College

rivals.

unpredictable

is

NHL

line,

pretty well rounded.

the air however, as only

NHL season

2006/07 By

on Nov.

tryouts

Ontario

Association

ing his team for their

final

hand,” he said. Gingerich said

the other colleges are

well as a few of the team’s

old

at the rec centre,

extramural ice hockey team’s

like, as

he wants to employ a well-balanced system,

On

hopeful wires a shot at another hopeful during the

what

to see

ter

Gingerich

A Condor

and then

Conestoga Condors’ extramural ice hockey team has the

tices,

(Photo by Alex McNanney)

start,

go with whoever’s had the hot-

Temporary Located

in

Commons 1B36

(In

Hours of Operation: 8:30 a

the Sanctuary)

m.— 4:00 p.m

Telephone: 51 9-748-5220 extension 2308

Website: http://www.conestogac.on.ca/jsp/stserv/leamingcommons/index.jsp


Digital Edition - November 27, 2006