Page 1

Haunting the Sanctuary

Flying high Conestoga aviation program now

More than 300

includes

people attended the last ever Halloween

Bash

A

learning

newsroom

for

Conestoga nursing students help the poor and homeless in Brazil, Rwanda.

journalism students

m Monday, November

6,

2006

hours.

Learning abroad

in

the Sanctuary.

flight

Conestoga College, Kitchener, Ont.

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

— No. 21

37th Year

Students take

due

hit

to

benefit delay BRANDON WALKER

By

Rcnwick says decided

this

year the college

hold the

to

list

of students

a claim

opting out of the health plan for

electronically through the school's

two weeks after the opt out deadline. "That way, if students dropped out early in the semester, the college would only have to send one list.”

Students trying to health plan

file

Oct.

bel'ore

19

were

forced to pay out of pocket.

A

representative I'rom the col-

health

lege's

provider said

the

problem resulted because personal information wasn't updated, resulting

ii>

The

claims being denied.

went

representative said the infor-

as

mation is updated automatically once the company receives it, and 19 the provider hadn't received this year's list of students who were opting in the health plan. until

Oct.

know

they (students) have a certain time period where they can back out of it (the health plan)” "I

Renwick

said Linda from ClaimSecure.

Although students had until Sept. 29 to opt out of the plan, students who needed the benefits couldn't a claim electronically until the middle of the semester. File

The Health Plan located

booklet,

Information at online

Conestoga

Students Inc.'s site (http://www.conestogastudents.co m/health_plan.html). says “at the

beginning of each semester, a listing of eligible and existing students

These records

to date is provided.

are used to put your personal information online so you can make a pay-xlirect claim at

your pharmacy

or dental office.”

The booklet also states that claims filed manually can take four to six weeks before students are reimbursed.

CSl

manager

office

Janie

Remember By ALEX

MCNANNEY

said

when

filled out the opt out

students

form online

to the school's insurer,

ACL. On

Oct. 13,

ACL

it

known

sent the

information to ClaimSecure.

She said another incident further delayed the information from being updated.

“When

insurance

the

company

ClaimSecure. they did it by e-mail and it went to the health provider's spam box. so although the information was sent Oct. 13, it wasn’t updated until Oct. 9, because someone from the

sent the

to

list

1

insurer

phoned ClaimSecure

to

double check.” Although CSI tells students in person that the benefits won't be online until mid-October, they plan on updating the brochure so it says that, instead of stating the beginning of the semester, Renwick said. She also said students should be receiving the

first

of two health-

care refunds very soon for students

who

opted out of the plan.

"The reason for the two refund cheques is because the Student Information System can only apply refunds per semester. CSI has asked the college to

try to rewrite

program so there is only one cheque, which should be starting the

next year.”

our heroes For more information, you can contact your local branch of the

With Remembrance Day quickly approaching, there will be numerous chances to pay your respects to

our fallen heroes, as well as our

liv-

ing ones.

The Preston branch of Canadian Legion at

will be

10:1.5 a.m. to the

Royal marching

the

Preston ceno-

taph on King Street on Nov. 11. which will be followed by a service. Afterwards, a banquet will be

Monkey business

in

other ways.

write a letter or

poem

You can your local

to

newspaper expressing your gratitude to these brave men and women. You can also wear a poppy to hon-

be

the time to shake his hand and gi\e

Kitchener cenotaph, located on Frederick Street. Afterwards, the

your thanks for his great bra\ery and sacrifice. These outstanding men and women deserve to be applauded for their bravery. Make a difference, and on No\'. 11. remember our courageous heroes.

at

the Preston Legion.

Kitchener, a parade in the city, as

will

at the

An orangutan mother shows off her baby boy at the Toronto Zoo on Oct. 28 during a Boo at the Zoo event, held to celebrate Halloween. For the story and additional photos, see Pages 14 and 15.

respects

well as a service

In

held

by Eric Murphy)

I

our our fallen veterans. Bur most importantly, if you meet a veteran in your path, take

held

(Photo

Royal Canadian Legion. Conestoga Students Inc. will not be holding a service this year because Nov. bis on a Saturday. However, you can pay your

veterans will march back to Branch

50 for a lunch serving of will be

stew.

That

followed with a bus tour of

the seven legions in the local area.

,


Page 2

— SPOKE, November

Now ...with

6,

News

2006

Keeping bums

deep thoughts

Conestoga College

By STEPHANIE IRVINE

and other influences have an impact on total enrol-

universities that

Random

questions answered by random students

Approximately 65 per cent of who start a program at Conestoga College will complete it students

If you the

had

do anything in world that you’ve never done before, what would it be? the guts to

according to an

to graduation,

offi-

from student affairs. “Right now from a college perspective, system wide, about 60 per cial

cent of students graduate the system,”

who

Mike Dinning

board of governors

at their

start

told the

Oct. 23

meeting. “I

would skydive;

it’s

as

close to flying as you’ll

there’s

a

lot

improvement

of room

for

can help us maintain and increase our enrol-

get.”

Brian WHde, first-year

general metal machinist

that

would streak

in

the

would go to New Zealand and go

bungee jumping.” second-year

said.

One

of the key ways to get stu-

dents to connect

through orienta-

according to Carol Gregory of

the student affairs office.

“For 2006 the goals of orientawere to provide first-year stu-

tion

in that students incr^^fe connection with the serviWf after these presentations,” said

Gregory.

According

a post-orientation

to

94 per cent of students rated the orientation good to excelsurvey,

lent.

“Engaging our students through

we

not only about also the tone

it’s

we do

while

set

is

it,”

she said.

“Bottom line, no matter what we do with retention the classroom is where it starts.” John Keating, who chaired the board’s meeting, agreed that stu-

“We want

make

sure (the stu-

get oriented

academically

deal of energy going into looking at

what best practices are, and having an approach that makes sure this college is doing it better than any

not as something that will be fin-

Gregory said the college’s residence, CSI and the rec centre identified right away that there was an increase in student engagement in

ished in September.

activities

he sees retention

that

something

you

where

have your hands on

to

dents)

to

following orientation.

“The residence said they’d never seen numbers come out to events

week

dent retention

other schools,” he said.

Keating added that after hearing Dinning and Gregory speak, he feels

to

some degree

the job of

the steering wheel,” he said.

like they did that first

Dinning said that in a system of 24 colleges, every one of them is talking about the issues around strategic enrolment management. “It is about, if I can be colloquial

said Gregory.

ly easy.

“Success workshops were so full new rooms had to be found. That really took us by surprise that students were signing up en masse for the study skills workshops.”

“These are people who have it bones to get better and better and better and better,” he

it,

the

number of bums

in the

seats relative to all of the colleges,”

he

said.

of the predictors indicate

all

She went on to say “orientation does not end on day one, and I think that’s really critical.” In phase

that the colleges are being chalin their

market share against

real rockclimb-

baek,”

that

ty

two of orientation

members ensure

Former grad runs go

is

buck

the

their

gram,” she said.

lenged

“I’d

he

both to the faculty and the pro-

said Tibbits.

“And practical nursing

are

is a key factor in Conestoga’s success. “It’s obvious that there is a great

about

Shawn Cooper,

who do connect who stay,”

high

think a high bang for

I

critical.

always have

“I

“Students

and they

in

“It's a face-to-face contact,

resource but

generally students

come

services.

all

tration.

“It’s

programniing/analyst

directly con-

is

nected to student engagement.

introduce

improving student retention is a key thrust for the school’s adminis-

He added computer

cate that retention

service providers

what we do, but

before.”

first-year

sta-

comprehensive academic, social and service orientation processes to maximize their success,” she said. Gregory said although orientation is supposed to be fun for students, the academic aspect of it is

ment during a time when we’re trying to grow the college.” According to John Tibbits, president of Conestoga College,

“We’re putting even more emphasis on this now than ever

Dave Agoteskii,

of the

that all

student affairs has indi-

their transition

ter,”

White House.”

Dinning added tistics that

program policy, practices and procedures are outlined to students. In phase three, orientation school

dents in full-time programs with

“You think you’re doing a good job but you could always do bet“I

ment.”

tion,

“So even though we’re near the top

the seats

in

that

facul-

college

increasing student retention

is

real-

built into their

said.

“I’m confident that’s likely to happen anyway without our intervention, but we might as well intervene and give a little push to

make

sure those things aren’t for-

gotten.”

government

for municipal

By LEANNE MOUNTFORD

mg.

Sam

Mike Harris likes to keep busy. While a student at Conestoga College he was vice-president of CSI, and also sat on the board of governors. Now, as a graduate,

Kobrynovich, first-year

integrated teleco}nmunication

and computer

he’s running for municipal govern-

technologies

ment. Harris,

business

gram

in

who

graduated from the

management 2001,

is

studies pro-

currently running

for councillor of South

“Wear white

after

Labour Day.”

Ward

4.

“I’m proud to have graduated from Conestoga College and I’m proud of my education I got

(Photo by Leanne Mountford) Mike Harris, a graduate from the business management studies program at Conestoga, is running for councillor of South Ward 4. Harris said he loves helping people make changes.

there.”

Bonnie Biermans, first-year

LASA/police foundations

“1 learned

so

much

being part of

CSI and being a student leader,” said Harris, who was vice-president of academics for two years. In addition to helping with initia-

such as making the policies and procedures fairer for students, he volunteered and participated twice in Conestoga’s annual Polar Plunge for the Heart and Stroke

tives

“I’d

go base-jumping

downtown

in

Kitchener.”

He

Matt MacA iday, third-year so/ht are engineering

also had a part in changing

name

the

Doon

Student

Association to Conestoga Students also

was elected and

sat

on

the college’s board of governors for

two

years,

one student per

which only

elects

year.

Harris said he sees the value of a college education and what

can do to the community as a whole.

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!

“1

10 core people

it

value what the college pro-

in

his

campaign

“I

change are

president, are both helping out.

out of the

Harris thinks part of the

He

it’s

important to be

community, and loves

make changes.

said he loves politics and

even student president

at his

was high

much

munity;

com-

massive,” said Harris.

it’s

The biggest students

impact

local

that

issues

concerning

Harris

traffic

wants

coming

city, the lack

in

to

and

of public

and problems for both longtime residents and students in student housing neightransportation

bourhoods.

He went

to

Conestoga, he

lives in

Kitchener, he works in Kitchenoj^

school.

remember

signs

how

know

Conestoga has on our

team are Conestoga graduates. Ellen Menage, who was a former president of CSI, and Justin Falconer, who was last year’s CSI

“1

Incorporated.

He

Harris said about eight out of the

helping people

Foundation.

get out and vote, he said.

vides to the city,” he said.

before

putting up election I

even

had

my

and he pays taxes “I

know

in Kitchener.

the issues and I’m pas-

licence,” he said.

sionate about the issues.”

The day Harris turned 18, there was an election and he was so excited that he was able to vote. He

and

said he’s voted in every election.

how much make if they

Students have no idea

of an impact they can

Harris said he wants to step up listen to people’s concerns.

“I think

we need

a young, vibrant

voice at the table, that’s going to speak up and ask questions,”

he

said.


.

News

SPOKE, November

6,

2006

— Page 3

Nursing students learn abroad By KRISTIN GRIFFERTY

because you are constantly being exposed to new situations and espe-

There aren't too many programs Conestoga where you can travel abroad to remote areas in order to

cially in

Third World countries, there

much

so

at

is

obtain a credit, or to gain experi-

was really liaixl to work at the orphanage with the children, it

ence

absolutely broke

'

your

in

area

study.

t)!'

'owever, lour Conestoga nursing

^.ic.lents ha\e been able to ilo just

help needed," she said.

"It

However,

my

When

for Russell.

she would partake

that.

On

Oct.

2.^.

Leah Russell and

Krista Martin.

Brenda

Schnurr.

Jessica Igo spoke to an auditorium

50 students

of approximately

to

describe their experiences vsorking

gram. and the other

twi)

went sim-

ply for the experience. First

Brazil.

areas

talk

to

Rus.sell.

haixlships

an experience

in

was

ciuiek

to

respond. "Absolutely." she said.

"I

am

so happy

have had the oppor-

I

tunity to trav el to different places at

young age." The next speaker was

a

Igo travelled to

Jessica Igo.

Rwanda and expe-

rienced the aftermath of the

genocide. For Igo,

the crowd was She tra\ellcd to Venezuela and to devastated of New Orleans alter to

Brenda

all

asked whether

that again, she

like

abroad. Tv\x) of the students earned a credit toward I'mishing their pix)-

heart."

wasn't

it

ence

it

FJW

was an experi-

that fell into her lap

by eoinei-

denee. After talking wdth classmate and fellow volunteer Krista Martin, she

Hurricane Katrina.

found a placement with the Nu-

Her purpose for traxelling was for volunteer experience w'ithout

el to

Ministry vocational school to trav-

obtaining a credit, but according to Russell, she learned

could ha\'e hoped In Brazil

more than she

and Venezuela. Russell and the homeless. she worked in the jun-

gle with Aboriginals and

became

accustomed

and

to their culture

ferent w'ays of In

New

plies.

was

visiting

in hospitals

Igo

locals.

home

said

maternity

her

experience

countries.

for her future nursing placements. “I I

became more aware and

how

nessed

the

wit-

determinants of

health influence health outcomes,”

survive the devastation and after-

about and I get emotional. I really miss the people there and the opportunities I had

math of Hurricane Katrina. For both placements, Russell simply applied and went through an interview to be placed on a travel team. New Orleans was even simpler as they were so desperate for workers she just applied and was instantly selected. Russell said her time working was often difficult. “It was sometimes exhaustive

because

of the

hard

labour and also emotionally draining

First first

said

Igo.

Rwanda

to help

often

“I

or look at

where

I

think

my pictures

could.”

Leah Schnurr, the

third student seminar, received a credit for her pediatric nursing

speaker

at the

placement in Uganda. She used her skills in the new cultural setting by assisting dying children and their families while learning the language and the culture.

alumni association of Conestoga and the alumni relations associa-

reunion for the cross

tion.

generational materials and opera-

Invited guests were the graduates

tions management program took place on Oct. 21 with great success.

from the past 3 1 years. Guests were treated to a reception, door prizes, a buffet dinner and an awards ceremony with invit-

The event was held

to celebrate

31 years of the materials and oper-

ations

Schnurr was given the opportuniexperience a less-developed health-care system while often working independently. Like the other students, she felt emotionally drained at times, but to her, it was all worth it. “I was very appreciative of the experience and what I’ve learned about life and nursing,” said Schnurr. “Since I left to return to Canada, I have felt that ty to

since

I

know

firsthand

how many

needs exist in Uganda, I need to continue to help them. I cannot just return to my daily life here and forget about everything 1 have experi-

enced

in

Uganda.”

management program

at

ed speakers.

program was called materials management, but in 2000 changed to materials and From operations management. Originally

Conestoga College.

The reunion was put on by Mike Shipley, treasurer for the alumni

association board, as well as the

after the presentation, she

ence, discussed her time in Zambia,

in Zambia differs from Canada’s, and how she learned a little of the language from both patients and

and what she had learned. While the other three students used Power Point and photos during their presentation, Martin had to wing it, due to technical difficulties. For her fourth year clinical placement, Martin travelled to Kilani, Zambia and worked in a 158-bed hospital.

She spent most of her time in the men’s ward working with TB patients and focusing on the HIV and AIDS epidemic. While Martin was unavailable for

the

operations

management diploma

graduates

are

pus.

ing

graduating class was in 1975 with Bob Salvisburg being the first co-ordinator, of the pro-

The

first

gram. Salvisburg was the force behind the program. The program only had about six seven graduates

to

in its first year,

which from a college point of view, made it a very expensive program

From 1975-2005

there have been

The materials and operations management program is designed

hospital staff.

All four nursing students spoke with passion about their trips, and had no problem encouraging others to take the same journey. When asked to describe their trip in one word, the adjectives ranged

from “amazing”

“phenomenal.” words normally used to describe class work, so it may be something worth checking

Now, those

to

are not

out.

reunion

in

can gain more experiCanada, and there are a lot

Michigan University Athabasca University in

ence

in

Tim Kingsbury,

a 1982 graduate

and alumni of distinction award nominee, was the master of ceremonies for the evening, and also donated a number of the door prizes. Kingsbury is also a member of the planning committee for the reunion.

reunion was meaning gradu-

the

cross-generational,

me

here,”

said Lirong. “I’ve learned

some

more opportunities methods

for

China, but there is a approach to teaching

in

different here.”

Greg Brown, a 1980 graduate, working in electronics, but is now working in logistics. “It’s a very good program,” said Brown. “It’s worth a lot, and is very started off by

flexible.”

Shipley said a reunion makes you to come back. “It’s about see-

want

ates of all ages attended.

like

1999 graduates replied, “It feels we’ve never left.” They noticed

seeing what people are doing, and keeping a good connection with the

associations;

Association of

the

Management Canada (PM AC),

for Society Educational Resource Management (APICS) and the International Materials Management Society (IMMS). After receiving the materials and

the

When

asked what

that the furniture

it

felt

was more com-

fortable in the Sanctuary

addition of the E-wing

Purchasing

management program

is

far. “I

Alberta.

first-year

acquire employment in the highly specialized fields of production

fessional

and operathe Sanctuary on Oct. 21

and

said she

thus

University,

a

from China, enjoying the program

ing old people, networking and get-

tionally recognized by three pro-

social time at the crossgenerational materials

follow-

Northwood

institutions;

Lirong,

international student

ting contacts,” he said. “It’s about

The materials and operations management diploma is interna-

right),

at the

Jane

evant.

like to

sis.

some

attain

return to the college, a group of

provide graduates with the and knowledge necessary to

and inventory control, purchasing, traffic, logistics and value analy-

(Photo by Vanessa Butler)

to

skills

to

Bertrand, past-president of the alumni association, (left to Julie Kingsbury and her husband Tim Kingsbury enjoy

able

advanced standing

The focus of

1,101 graduates.

tions

comment

stated earlier that the nursing style

1973 through 1995, the program was taught at the Guelph campus before moving to the Doon cam-

to run.

Norm

Krista Martin, the fourth and final

student to speak about her experi-

reunion for materials program a success

By VANESSA BUTLER The

Grifferty)

Carley, nursing faculty

helped her become more prepared

trying to

that

by Kristin

some of the

to help build

for

(Photo

Mary

member, (counterclockwise from top left), along with fourth-year nursing students, Krista Martin, Leah Schnurr, Jessica Igo and Brenda Russell, take part in a presentation on working abroad.The students used skills learned at Conestoga to help others in Third World

and bringing sup-

She was also able

a school and a

think

Orleans, she helped sup-

community

port a

dif-

life.

country

the

in

wards

for.

assisted the poor In addition,

Africa.

This past summer. Igo spent lime

and the

was new.

All of the graduates are currently

working in industries related to the program. Emely Tscholy, a 1994 graduate, said

she notices how the promale dominated. “The

gram is more women ter,”

in the field the bet-

said Tscholy. “It’s really a

women

friendly program,

women

breaking through.” Tscholy said that age and gender are irrel-

are

college.”

Shipley

Monica

said

Himmelman,

executive officer of

alumni affairs, and the scholarship department of Conestoga helped plan the event which took about six

months

Between

to organize.

get-

ting the proper contact information,

contacting

the

receiving

the

all

big job, but worth

At

the

graduates

RSVPs, it

it

and was a

in the end.

reunion,

a

lifelong

achievement award was given to Werner Funkenhauser, a graduate.


— SPOKE, November

Page 4

6,

Commentary

2006

Universal

bus pass a money grab The proposed would be

introduction of universal bus passes

the college

at

redundant service for most students.

a

Conestoga Students

(CSI) began .sending out surveys to 1,500

Inc.

students by e-mail on Oct. 25. Their goal

how

to ascertain

is

students

about the idea of uni\’ersal bus passes.

feel

CSI president. Matt Jackson,

said the implementation of the bus

pass would require each student to pay a mandatory $80 yearly fee.

For a bus-riding student,

would be a great

this

deal, since college bus

passes currently cost $185 per semester, which adds up to $370 for a regular school year.

The

would save these students about $290 a

universal bus pass

year,

or over 78 per cent.

Now

it

Come

.sounds like a sale.

get your bus pass! Seventy-eight per cent off!

Everyone loves satisfy their needs,

Everyone. Think about

sales.

wants and/or desires for

less

it,

consumers get

money

to

than normal,

and because of the lower prices, more consumers buy the product,

which

end makes the supplier happy.

in the

Realistically, the

chance of someone

suddenly becoming an avid bus user

mind

is

going

to

who

drives or walks to school

slim to

nil.

Nobody

pay hundreds of dollars a month for a

the bus to school. Additionally, to

is

it

will

car,

What

has to happen before the penalties for animal cruelty are more severe?

in their right

and then take

be a sad day when students

someone your own

Pick on

start

size

bus to school from residence.

bus passes are imple-

If universal

mented, however, these people will be paying for a service they will

chance

Go

a

slim to

is

have a party.

At

giant bonfire. It

least that

way

wouldn't matter to Grand River

fires are their

Let’s

transit,

bills into

a

though, because the bon-

assume these bus passes don’t change how many students use

means only about

6.269 students rely on buses. The cost for that

1

1

per cent of the college’s

many

lege bus passes for a two-semester school year

This essentially means

GRT

students buying col-

You grab

for these passes, that

come

with

oper-

by the

been convicted of abuse a six

SPCA

10 times and the couple has

at least

of Vaughan. For more than 40 years

owned and

The Meisners’ puppy oper-

it.

ation has been raided

Opinion

the Meisners have

is

it

times.

total

of

However, the harshest

two

ated unsanitary puppy mills, from

penalties were only

which about 600 malnourished dogs

of three and two months, which

necks and cram them into a com-

have been seized by the Ontario

were served by Ralph.

pact crate. Finally, you turn off

Society

the tenafied

by the scruffs of

all

the lights and leave the house with-

or even a drink of water.

thinking the preced-

ing scenario sounds unrealistic and

Unfortunately,

absurd.

there

is

for

of

Prevention

the

When

the

SPCA

anived

first

That

is

jail

terms

someone

the equivalent of

being found guilty of child or

Cruelty to Animals (SPCA).

out giving your children any food

You may be

would be $259,000.

However, if all 6,269 students paid $80 a year would amount to around $501,520.

Richmond

dolled up, you

to

simple;

is

because they keep getting away

their

downstairs. toddlers

a cold day.

pocketbooks.

public transit regularly. That

all

more than 40 years?

The answer

Benjamin

romantic dinner.

your children

at

helpless dogs for

treating

and your spouse get ready to head out the front door. Before you leave the house, you hastily yell and

nil.

$20

wann on

they could keep

to a

After getting

scream

college’s population, they'd be better to each throw four

you are

a convicted couple of

animal abusers continue to mistieat

on the cheek and whisper into

him or her

For the other 89 per cent of the

So how can

a long day

the office, give your spouse a

his or her ear that

suddenly becoming an avid bus user

use public transit to get to school.

for you.

someone

drives

or walks to school

So who wins here? Well, you could say the 700 or so students who

Good

at

kiss

rarely, if ever. use.

year.

of

who

They save a few hundred bucks

You come home from

Realistically, the

at

spousal abuse and only getting the

on

the Meisners’ farm, several breeds

proverbial

of dogs, both young and old, were

Currently,

found huddled together

filthy

Canada

states the

The

ties for

convicted offenders of ani-

in

pens, quivering from tenor.

slap the'

the

wrist.

Criminal Code of

maximum

penal-

truth to this horrible night-

dogs’ fur was filled with fleas and

approximately, off Conestoga College students each year.

mare. Although most people would

covered with disgusting feces to

mal abuse are a two-year ban on owning animals, a $2,000 fine and

If .some of the bus pass fees were kept by CSI, this entire situation would just become more absurd than it already is, if that’s even possible. If the fees were somehow split between CSI and GRT, it would just

never mistreat their children

the severity that their hind ends had

a six-month jail term.

be an underhanded

them

listing

Whether

way

to collect

more “administrative

fees,” without

as such.

GRT

cash-cow or joint business venture, the implementa-

tion of universal bus passes at

money

would be making an extra $243,000,

Conestoga would be nothing short of a

grab.

some

honific manner, the reality

dreds of people

in

in this is

hun-

Ontario abuse

The puppies, whose eyes

defecate.

encrusted

Animal abuse can range from neg-

were

terrified

lect to starvation to

physical hann.

human

order for them to

with of

contact,

the

and

slightest

the

adult

time the laws against animal

pass

Bill

increase

C-50,

the

for cruelty to a

MPs

which

maximum $10,000

must

would

penalties

fine, a five-

One extreme example of animal

females were confined to soiled

year jail term and a lifetime ban on

abuse

pens, where

owning animals. Animal abusers

in

Ontario

is

is

the bonifying

miserable

they

lived

out their

need to be taught a lesson.

lives.

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College Editor: Eric

letters to the

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be contacted

infection,

It is

abuse are toughened.

Spoke

editor. Letters

No unsigned

in

were

welcome

Spoke welcomes

be shaved

their family pets like this everyday.

legacy of Ralph and Rose Meisner

Letters are

to

Murphy

Advertising Manager: Jessica Blumenthal, Kristin Grifferty Spoke Online Editor: Meghan Production Managers: Tara Ricker, Brandon Walker Circulation Manager: Nick Casselli

Photo Editors: Adam

Black,

Adam Hannon,

Tiffany

Kreller

McCormick, Jon Molson and BJ Richmond

for verification.

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

be published. Letters should be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter letters will

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, exf 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax:748-3534 E-mail: spoke @conestogac.on.ca Website: www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

for publication.

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

N2G 4M4

Dr.,

(

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word tile would be helpful. Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.


News

SPOKE, November

6,

2006

— Page 5

Program soaring to new heights By ALEX The

MCNANNEY program

avialion

make

as

much money,” he

“Then

the

first

Conestoga College is taking off. The program has had 15 to 20 new students each year since it joined in September 2004. The program underwent an overhaul in

But the future

the

for

airline

industry as far as careers go

is

pilots with a post-secondary

which

educa-

comes into play. The aviation program runs Doon campus as well as the

get pro-

gram. Aviation just put through first graduating class since revamp.

the

'

Waterloo/Wellington Flight Centre,

Hying high. “Airlines are adding aiiplanes,

the aviation industry

airplanes arc

harder to succeed

The

tuition

the college

at

is

growth or non-growth. “If the economy goes soft, unemployment goes up, companies don’t

the program, because of the

fees at the flight centre.

An

early childhood educator at

the

said

centre

Christmas bazaar, being held from Nov. 10-16, is the perfect opportuearly holiday shop-

some

nity for

said

this

year’s

bazaar will be bigger than previous ones.

“This

gone

we have

the first year

is

out,” she said.

all

past three years the Scholastic

we have

book

“For the just had

year in

new equipment, this particular, for new climbing for

apparatus.

“The indoor climbing apparatus do a little is old, so we will fundraising for that as it can get very pricey,” Youden said. In addition to the Scholastic

book fair, the event will feature a week-long pizza event. Focus and Discovery toy stands. Creative (one of the originators

Memories

and

booking)

scrap

of

Shop

Candy

Reids

located

in

Cambridge.

“We

are

a

nut-free

centre,

so

everything from the candy store will

be individually wrapped,” said

Youden. Other items available for purchase will be something called

these booklets contain coupons various restaurants and golf courses around the community.

^

an invitation-only fundraising event will be held at Scholars Choice Store. The event

Nov.

will run

The

15,

10 p.m. centre will get 15 per

from 8 p.m.

ECE

until

and the

tre,

of the

cost

total

program can be

interested

but

pilots,

the

financial costs are too steep.

A

.student

the

could

maximum

from

a shock.

about $50,000,” Connors

“It’s

OSAP,

try

He

said family support

a big

is

factor in students being able to take

who cOme from

students

heavy

He

fees at the flight centre.

said

families

for

eligible

probably doesn’t have the rest, so it’s kind of a catch-22. It’s too bad, but there really isn’t any

you’re

competing

against

each

other.

Marshall agreed, saying her and

Berezuk’s class were close. “There were about 20 of us that

that.

The students who can

first

the program is a lot fun because you get to work with a lot of people, and also with your friends where in other programs

OSAP

way around

you’re (were) flying since the

said

ing the person $30,000 short. is

think.

day of the program,” she said. Mike Berezuk, also a graduate,

leav-

get the

first

in

the family.

day, and

Both agreed the program of work,

“We

requiring

a

in

an

invite

the learning

than

turnout

better

the

going

to

fall

Shoemaker said. Shoemaker also

strike

which put a damper on

they could get on

site,”

thinks

is

if

notieeable.

of the

equality

standards

bazaars

feature

craft vendors, but

Youden

said they

“It’s

sad to say, but

it’s

said.

there

“If

does

and wants

crafts

it

PN A&P

to

1

&

& Statics

Mondays @1-2

Jason

BScN A&P

Nabii,

Mary

GAS

great.”

Chemistry

& Biology

Elena

@ 1-2 @ 2-3

Thursdays @11-12

2D16 2D16 1D05

Wednesdays @10-11 Wednesdays @5-6 (new) Mondays @2-3

2A617 2A617 2A507

Mondays Mondays

Angus

take part that

would be

1023

Thursdays @11-12

Shanrron

Math

2A405 3A511 2A507

Thursdays @9-10 Mondays @4-5 (new)

Anthony

1

CIVIL Math 1

someone who

is

come and week,

MET Math

Room

Day/ time

Leader

Course

have been unable to book anyone to fill such a position.

CONSTRUCTION Youden,

Math

1

& Physics

Lindsay Tristan

Stabes

early childhood educator,

EETaCET

Physics

&

St^hen

Math

Doon campus child-care centre

“We would vendors

in,”

love to get some craft she said. “If there is

Learning Groups start the

someone who does crafts and wants to come and take part that it would be great.” Going by the money raised two events ago, at the Scholastic book fair in the centre, the upcoming

2D03

Tuesdays @2-3

Pamela

HO ADM. A&P

week

of October 2

week of unless otherwise indicatsl and meet each week until the (based upon attendance). Please note that this schedule is subject to change.

week,

Please note that this schedule aims to

accommodate as many students as meet all needs.

December 4

possible, but

c

bazaar should be a success. “We made around $ 1 ,500 at that event, which is very good,” she

CONESTOGA

said. this

one

will

be even

better.”

She added that college students are more than welcome to drop by and show their support on Nov. 13 from 8:30 a.m. until 5 p.m.

“We the

Learning

Temporary Located

will be set

centre,” will

up

at the front

said

of

Youden.

be around to help

you between those time.”

Hours

in

^ Oper^on;

Cwnmons 1B36

(!n the

8:30 a

in

all

workplaces in Canada, she gets a leg up on her peers.

offered in the following courses:

Traditionally,

more

“I’m the only female .student in our class,” she said, adding because

historically difficult PSLGs are FREE weekly study sessions that are designed to help students through classmates to compare notes, discuss courses. They offer a chance to meet with a tutor and other This semester, PSLGs are concepts, develop learning strategies, and prepare for exams!

she said.

behind,”

need to take the program, beeause the ratio between genders

Writing Services

Service

a lot

women

commons

Skills

is

commitment to the flight studying. “If you don’t keep up on it,

Peer Supported Learning Groups Fall 2006 Schedule

last

fundraising event they held. “It was during the (OPSEU)

Learning

Peer Services

1

dedicated

made easy

Youden and the other early childhood educators are hoping for a

the

Jantzi said.

lot.

Lindsay Marshall, a graduate of the program, said the students get to fly a lot sooner than one might

but

student can get

a

OSAP is about $20,000,

“A student who

said.

“Someone

cent of the profit that night.

Those

be

doesn’t have the funding, because

“Hopefully

treasure books.

On

many young people

that is usually a sign that the person

fair.”

The bazaar, held every year, is a chance for the centre to raise

money

to

other adminis-

things as people weren’t sure

ping.

Mary Youden

who want

program a

He

becau.se of a lack of funding. said there are

financial support are enjoying the

it

program,

in the

On

had no flying experience,”

flew the

absolutely

should go to the ECE centre and ask for an invitation.

Conestoga College’s Doon campus child-care

The $120

doesn’t have to run “1

it.

day, Jesse proved being a pilot

Christmas bazaar

AMY MEADOWS

By

Add on

is

Students from the aviation program at Conestoga apply their the Waterloo Regional Airport.

first

skills at

tration costs at the flight cen-

per hour.

Holiday shopping

ECE

is

$1,820 per year for the twoyear program, but the big catch cost of renting a plane

at

gram, are also enjoying (Internet photo)

with lower incomes often find

Connors said the indu.stry has been on an up.swing, with outlooks being brighter than they were for the past five years, which saw a downturn because of the terrorist attacks on Sept. 1, 2001. “9/1 was a big factor,” he said. Connors said the aviation industry is very .sensitive to economic 1

Jantzi, both first years in the pro-

flight

Waterloo

at

times are good,” he said.

1

the

at

sonal interest.

is

of passengers, so

full

is

Regional Airport. Students are mostly 18 to 22 years of age, with people from all walks of life. Some have pilots in the family and others have a per-

centre

its

According to Bob Connors, the liai.son between the college and the

going as far as Dayton, Ohio and Montreal, Quc. Marshall has flown to the Bahamas. Jaimee Shoemaker and Jesse area,

where Conestoga

the Waterloo Regional Airport.

their (light hours within the

very

good. Airlines are looking for niore tion,

means students now

Both now have their commercial and private licences and both have gone on some interesting travels. Berezuk has flown all around the

effect.”

2004, creating an afUliation with

This

just stuck together,” she said.

is

domino

they cut the travel. Ifs a

at

said.

thing that happens

Sanctuary)

m— 4 WJ p.m,

Tdephone: 519-748-5220 extension 2308 Webstte: http://www conestogac on ca^p/stsenrileamingcommons/indexjsp

is

unable to

tnae,” she


Page 6

I

I

— SPOKE, November

sTU D

E

NTS

I

N

c

6,

2006

li

Pl€ase visit

open Forum with

Municipal Councilors

ruo!!)

2 AI 06 for

more

Il')f0riBat!0D onto purchase tickets

Christi^ ;h

Tree

^

begins

i

SANCTUARY 1 1:30

ssBcmarv i!:30 am

(uiisttnas

wish

1

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a copy

Mm

VWWJLJLX

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To: C'anestc'ij (I ^ree-tin^

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to ci^r^^j^pr

STUDENTS INC

From: &6l 6kQQte-n fkvto 6tu^c


SPOKE, November

W e have seliediiled muh* prooraiii timeslot foe graduation photos. If von

siji’ii

np at

tlie

(\SI offlee during the

designated time for .voiir prop'anu

ne

nill

naive the sitting

fee eliarge. i

si^Ti

up at the CSl

offi ce

PHOTO STUDIO

Freinds, Family and Class Photos Includes; Professional friends, family

(jr

class

memories to

Photo shoot with your mates, last

1

5X7

print,

and

a lifetime.

November 29th- December

in

advance

at the door

1st

6,

2006

— Page 7


Page 8

— SPOKE, November

6,

News

2006

Relieving stress with meditation By TIFFANY MCCORMICK

is

Ohm, inhale, exhale, let your mind become blank and your body weightless. Meditation has been used for hundreds of years in many cultures for reasons such as peace of mind, greater control over the mind and to relieve stress and

automatic reactions to. things. “Anything we can do to help students manage stress will be helpful,” she said, adding that “sharing the wonderful skills and opportunities for students to develop strategies and become aware of themselves and deal with

manner”

stress in a positive

of'the reasons

why

is

one

she started the

program.

She said a currently

program

lot

of students are out

stressed

and

this

will be a valuable tool

enabling them to “develop awareness and focus without judgment.” Woodford, who has been a psychologist for 12 years, used meditation in other schools where she

worked and said in

it

is

a

good

tool

both her occupation and per-

sonal “It

life.

allows you to see, think and

was

lot

of stress she

facing.

away

“I’m always doing or thinking

with the understanding that they can use mediation in their every-

of .something,” she said, adding

day

.sessions she

dents

attend will walk

lives.

six

Mindfulness

and mindfully observing the body through silting, standing and walking meditation. Lynn Woodford, a new Student Services counsellor, creator and instructor of the program, said meditation is a powerful tool which allows people to be aware of their stress and decrease their

Second-year occupational therapy assistant/physiotherapy assistant students Kristi Scwab and Sabrina Poplawski relax at the Chillax Progressive Muscle Relaxation workshop in the E-wing on Oct. 27. The workshop was held by Student Services.

who

years ago to help with relaxation

and to deal with a

said she hopes stu-

in those aspects by building on focus and attention of breathing

ever medita-

first

program.

tion

Tiffany McCormick)

Woodford

Meditation, aims to help students

Conestoga’s

by

clearly to whatever life

bringing you,” she said.

“I hope they’re able to experience the positive aspect of meditation that allows them to take away concrete and useful skills they can use.” The first session on Oct. 25 consisted of a quick breakdown of

anxiety.

(Photo

more

react

what

by attending the meditation hopes to be abl^* “calm down and slow down.” IIF Abused as a child, Houston heard of the classes from a that

Student Services coun.sellor who suggested she attend. Houston said the abu.se she suffered

Of

will take place in the next

the

weeks, what the purpose behind mindful meditation is, its background and foundations and what the students hope to get out

said

of the sessions.

body.”

The

was

a

breathing

exercise for 20 minutes. During

were asked not

that time they

to

think of anything, but to focus on

it

“1 felt like

Houston

session,

first

was very

interesting.

was

I

floating,” she

said of the breathing exercise. “It

was

like

was moving out of my

I

She plans

form

six participants’ first

of meditation

to attend

each weekly

session and feels that meditation

good way

a

is

of a themselves.

control

their breathing.

“It’s

for people to take

situation

good way

very

a

internal healing,” she said.

on their breathing especially when they began to feel

office

distracted

thoughts

or

entered

their minds.

The exercise was a fundamental base which allows people to develop more focus enabling them to build up to full concentration.

No

student was able to

com-

focus for the entire 20 minutes but was assigned to meditate the same way for 15 minutes each day until the next class. pletely

Each week

will build

upon

previous session, introducing steps of meditation.

the

Susan

to

do

first-year

executive student, said she wants to learn how to meditate to help decrease the stress in her life and the physital pain she endures from carrying her books. “I need something to relax myself,” she said. Csisztu, who also plans on attending each session, said she’s

looking forward to learning the different types

and ways

medi-

to

tate.

you learn

it once you can anywhere,” she said. The meetings will be held every

“If

use

new

Second-year office administration executive student, Jessie Houston, said she began sporadic meditation approximately six

Csisztu, a administration

help

to

Woodford guided them through the exercise reminding them to concentrate

still

affects her daily life.

it

Wednesday

Room to

until

3-EOl. There

Nov. is no

29

in

limit as

how many people

are allowed and drop-ins are wel-

to attend

come.

Students have opportunity to jump-start their business plans By PEGGY O’NEILL For Conestoga College students

who have

a

business

plan

they

would like to jump-start, the LaunchPad 50K Venture Creation

Competition should be of interest. The competition is for students of Conestoga College and Wilfrid Laurier, Waterloo and Guelph universities. Community members and alumni associates can also join a

team, create a business plan and start

LaunchPad was

and every other

2004

cash prizes are given out to the top

by Wilfrid Laurier University and the University of Waterloo and in 2005 it expanded to Conestoga and

teams totalling $50,000, which goes toward launching each team’s business plan. Each team must consist of two students from two of the four institutions, and they must play a meaningful role.

started in

DOON CAMPUS BOOKSTORE 4tb ANNUAL SIDEWALK SALE TUESDAY,

Guelph.

At the end of the competition

successful businesses.

NOVU™

three

Conestoga’s spokesperson for the competition

ment

manageKeith McIntosh, and

is

student,

third-year

job is to make sure that all the students at Conestoga are well informed about this opportunity. McIntosh had info booths set up at the school on Oct. 20 and 23. He his

said there

ested

in

Rice talked about

Are^ (2A10B)

4

GREAT PRICES ON CLOTHING, TEXTBOOKS AND ASSORTED

ITE.MS

gave

IT....

COME CARLY DONT BE

DISAPPOINTED!

many

other pointers for indi-

viduals looking to join a team.

“LaunchPad the

is

the mentoring and

helping and the experience,”

she said.

“LaunchPad is the mentoring and the helping and the experience.”

were many people interhis booth, and not just

Barbara

“Any kind of student can join a “We can match up someone in engineering, account-

One of

the rules for the competi-

you can’t be a school organand enter the competition. McIntosh said he would like to join is

izer

“I’ve had a good time networking and meeting different people, and the $50,000 is pretty motivating,”

The four different schools are also number of free work-

putting on a

shops to coach teams and organizers about leadership, management

Rice,

workshop presenter Rice said Conestoga didn’t make it

i

to the finals last year, but they cer-

tainly had a presence. “We already have a better awareness, so we can

momentum,” she said. The next workshop is on Nov.

build on that

the actual competition next year.

he said.

DON'T MISS

the different

business students.

tion

Between Door 5

all

stages of team development and

ing or business to form a team.”

CSl Self Service

needed

the four institutions.

team,” he said.

10:00 Tm.

skill that is

LaunchPad 50K competition. Barbara Rice was the presenter at the workshop that was held on Oct. 24 at Conestoga College, one of the many free workshops being held at in the

at 5:30 p.m. at the Universityf|^’ Waterloo and the deadline to register is Dec. 8 at noon. For more information about

LaunchPad contact Keith McIntosh at

organizer-conestogac@launchvisit www.launch-

pad50k.ca or pad50k.ca.

i


Feature

These

SPOKE.

essential tips

for winter driving

keep you safe

will

By CHRISTOPHER MILLS

Dave Brown,

Kitchener

a

quickly on pavemenl.

resi-

Winter Christmas

Association of Canada, all-season

12 years.

power around zero Celsius, so

knocking and is just around the corner. Unfortunately, so are snowstorms and icy roads. It is no surprise that the number of automobile accidents rises in the winter. Poor driving conditions, reduced visibility and

was able

aggressive drivers can create

snow."

is

dangerous

-

and even deadly

some situ-

-

ations.

Ministry

of Transportation of Ontario have released nearly identical

with

lists

es.sential

winter driving.

lists

for

tips

The key

contained on both

points

are as fol-

lows:

Always keep your gas tank

I

least half-full,

and make sure

at

to top

up anti-freeze, as well as brake, transmission and windshield-washer fluids

Use a matching set of tires, ideally snow tires Dress warmly and keep extra I

blankets in your car

Keep

I

a winter

including;

emergency

kit,

for your

extra fluids

vehicle; a flashlight and extra bat-

candle and matches; extra hats and mittens; hazard markers or flares; and chocolate or granola bars I Check local weather and road blankets;

teries;

a

conditions before leaving I

"A

Carry a

map and

"When

they're not,” he said.

the traditional type of

By

according

to

snow

I

there

their

website

(http://www.safety-

used I

council.org/info/traffic/snowtires.

hack through foot-deep

Canadian Safety reminds drivers that attempting to use any tire all year

tire,

html),

Brown is refen'ing snow tires that were

long

a harder rubber and fea-

the

“Aggressive

son

tread

snow

last

ment,”

Brown

also use

all

for

“The new

said.

kinds of

in

bits

nologies

cashew

vehicle

will

are

no substitution for

ing in

reduced

visibility,

always

wear your seatbelt and beware of black ice and snow when driving at increased speeds and passing other vehicles.

being scientifically the

your

remember to always keep a safe distance from the car in front of you, use good judgment when driv-

of shells

The shells Brown speaks of are cashew shells, and are not themselves mixed in with the rubber, but rather what is known as cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL). Scientists have discovered that removed from

.sea-

important.

smart and attentive driving. As you go about your seasonal excursions,

tires

with the rubber.”

after

risks.

winter

increase your safety this winter, but all the new equipment and tech-

new technolo-

Some even have

is

safety

tires for the

Upgrading

tires,

8-10 years, but newer tires are rpade of a softer compound so they wear on pavethey'll

increases

Changing

tured large treads.

CNSL,

gripping

lose

a trade-off.

is

On

traditional.

mixed

and

Council

made of

gy.

Rubber

the

to

stiffen

tires

lot of tires these days, they themselves all-season, but

call

to older-style

Both Transport Canada and the

However,

and automobile aficionado, says he has been putting snow tires on his car each winter for the past dent

Following these tips for personal and vehicle safety will help ensure a safe and healthy holiday season for everyone and make, sure we all

shell

and applied to rubber products, can actually improve the resistance of such products to cracking and ozone degradation. This new technology improves

live to see the spring.

For

further

safety

tips,

visit

the quality of winter tires, but as

Transport Canada’s website at http://www.tc.gc.ca/road/WinterDr

Brown mentioned,

iving/menu.htm.

they wear

more

(Internet photo)

With winter just around the corner, Canadian drivers should remember to slow down when the snow starts to fly.

be prepared to

take alternate routes

Most importantly, carry -a

I

charged cellphone

A

cellphone

is

useful

if

a

motorist finds himself in trouble, but,

according to the government, way to avoid such trou-

the best

bles and prevent accidents

equip your vehicle

with

is

to

WHEN DATING TURNS DANGEROUS The

tires. it’s

Transport Canada adopted an industry standard in 1999 to assist

Canadian drivers

in identifying

purchasing snow increased

tires

traction

in

harsh winter conditions. that has

met snow

abuse

early signs of

snow

that

and

so easy to get carried away with the excitement of a

Often, this exhilaration prevents us from detecting

Here are some warning signals

to look for;

Your partner may be abusive

he or she:

some

new

relationship.

of the early

signs of abuse.

offer

Canada’s

Any

tire

if

traction perform-

ance requirements and has been designed specifically for use in severe snow conditions will bear

Wants

to

Becomes

know where you

are and

very angry about

trivial

who you

are with at

all

times

things, like not being ready

on time or wearing

the department’s seal of approval:

a pictograph of a mountain with a

on the side. The government also reminds people that all-season tires can still provide safe driving, but there is no

the “wrong" clothes

giant snowflake

Criticizes

Has

your friends and asks you to stop seeing them

traditional ideas

about hurting you, hurting your friends or commiting suicide

if

guarantee they will provide a necessary level of traction in severe

However, no matter a motorist decides to go

you don’t obey or decide

to leave.

snowstorms.

^hich

tire

^ith. Transport Canada stresses the importance of making sure all four tires are the same, and that drivers should keep a close eye on tread and air pressure. Air pressure in tires

drops

ing tread

in life

consumption.

cold weather, reduc-

and increasing

fuel

< Has ever hit you,

no matter how sorry afterwards

If you recognize these behaviours in your partner, you may be in a dangerous relationship. Counsellors are available in the Counselling Office, Doon Campus, Room 1A103, 748-5220 ext 3360, Guelph Campus, Admin. Office, 824-9390 ext. 148 or Waterloo Campus, Room 1C04, 885-0300 ext. 224. Information on community support is available through your Counselling Office.


.

,

Page 10

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; SPOKE, November

6,

2006

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Conestoga STUDENTS INC

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SPOKE, November

s

Come visit the CSI

Christmas tree to

get a CHILDS WISH CARD, on you'll find their

Christmas

gift

wish that you can purchase and put back under the tree.

Children 12 and t For more information visit

in

the CSI office

Room 2A106

it

^

6,

2006

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 11


Page 12

— SPOKE, November

News

2006

6,

Tainted veggies don’t deter sales Smart Foods, says people haven’t stopped buying produce

By JESSICA BLUMENTHAL There

the Ministry of Agriculture.

healthy or sale for

item that

isn’t

people to

eat, said a loeal

produee

vendor. First

it

ehieken.

was Most

then

beef,

it

was

spinaeh

recently,

of Kara’s

Food

and Rural Affairs, stating people were getting E. eoli from bagged spinach from California, he refunded people's money and threw out what he had left of the spinaeh. "Customers didn’t really reaet when they heard about the outbreak, people are not as shocked

always he some food

will

owner

coli scare, the

Despite the latest E.

and earrot Juice are the products being targeted said Gerald Kara. ov\ ner of Kara's Smart Foods. When Kara got an e-mail from

both spinach and organic carrot

in

in September and October which resulted in three deaths and more than 200 people falling ill,

Juice

ineluding Toronto-area residents. Fie said there are standards put in .

food for eight years, said she’s not going to stop eating vegetables because they contain essential nutrients and outbreaks don’t hap-

take,” said the

pen

She has her own vegetable garden and tries to eat her own produce as much as possible. “The chemicals and pesticides that are put on fruits and vegetables aren’t good for anyone. They’re bad for the environment, animals

the time.

all

“People are not as

shocked anymore when outbreaks occur.”

Vegetables aren’t the culprits of it

comes from

anymore when outbreaks occur,”

ticides

said Kara.

the vegetables, he said.

There were outbreaks of E.

and

ic

place but sometimes things happen.

the E. coli,

and materials used

farm

Kelly Sprague, who’s a vegetari-

coli

Gerald Kara,

the pesto

owner of Kara

Smart Foods

\s

"The benefits outweigh

the risks

that’s a

largest

farmed,” she said.

Memorial honours

LCBO

in

southwest-

downtown Waterloo on Oct. 24. ern Ontario

The new

opened

in

firefighters

location, located at

King and William streets, carries

By ROSS

many

available chilled.

place during the upcoming

The Kitchener Professional annual

their

held

Firefighters’

Memorial Day on Oct. 29

at

Civic Centre Park.

The

second

annual

event

included a parade of firefighters

holi-

(Photo submitted)

money

Students run to raise

Kretter)

Police foundations

and LASA students raised money

for the

Creek Conservation Authority in Aylmer, Ont. by doing a six-kilometre fun run on Oct. 25 at the Ontario Police College in Alymer. Overall, participants raised $12,000 for the cause. Catfish

STUDY IN AUSTRALIA!

Association

Firefighters

day season. by Meghan

ALDWORTH

almost 2,100 products,

Waterloo mayor Flerb Epp (left) said he is happy with the final product and he looks forward to the completion of the rest of the new town square. He said it should be a popular

(Photo

to

and people.” Sprague thinks a lot of problems could be solved if farmers stopped using chemicals and pesticides. “Everyone would profit from taking a closer look on how produce is

New LCBO wows The

gamble I’m willing Guelph resident.

an and has been eating only organ-

Halloween hot

and other emergency workers. Featured in the parade were the fire engines, antique Toronto Fire Service’s Pipes and Drums Band and the Waterloo Regional Police Service Colour Guard. Event co-ordinator Kevin Schmalz said the event honoured’ the memory and sacrifice made by fallen firefighters and their families while celebrating

the service

all

firefighters pro-

vide the community.

The award-winning Kitchener

at Revolution

Fallen

Firefighters

created by local

Memorial, Timothy

artist

Schmalz, is a focal point of park located on Queen Street, adjacent to the Centre in the Square and the Kitchener P.

Diploma to Degree Conversion Griffith University

is

in

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gain a Masters with

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Griffith www.griffith.edu.au/credit.

Friday night was their weekly 19 and over event and a large number of people wore all sorts of different costumes, from housemaids to doc-

2

and over event and had a costume which featured a human

1

contest

Scholarships are available each year for students of College

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battled

tors

much

floor,

out on the dance

it

to the pleasure of the

crowd.

College,

Shaw, Conestoga

the gladiators, Eric

22, a business student at felt

he

won

that battle.

took that,” said Shaw. “He had nothing on me.” When asked how he felt the night definitely

“I

Shaw said how much fun

went,

he was surprised

at

he had.

“1

knew

1

1

Professional

Firefighters

The large bronze memorial is almost four metres tall and depicts a group of firefighters framed by the wings of two

Interest in firefighter’s

21,

fun.”

a local memorial

it

was sparked by

1

was surprised didn’t see one said Lorenzo Casliglione, of Cambridge who attended 1

the

9-11 attacks.

also attributed

evening went

to the

how

music

well the that

was

playing.

break out involving a significant

number of people near closing

"1 always find there are more problems in the crowd when

time.

there’s

aggressive

rap

music

on.”

Shaw.

gets annoying because at the

end of the night you’re starting to wind down after having a good time, and then all these wild people start fighting, making it uncomfortable for everyone,” said

are grateful for the gen-

erous support of the communi-

which made this project posSchmalz. The thousands of dollars required to build the memorial 1^^ were gathered through fundrais- Wsing by the association. The memorial was then donated back to the community, along with a fire education-themed

ty,

sible.” said

said

or

rock

“On

more up tempo dance and hip hop Saturday they played a

lot

music, and. Judging by the crowd, that

weeping angels.

“We

Shaw

Friday night, one or two lights will

"It

Public Library.

Association.

fight,”

Castiglione said normally on a

info@komconsultants.com

Thi-

memorial was sparked by the 9attacks and immediately supported by the Kitchener

rival

1

both nights.

905 318 8200

E.

Interest in a local firefighter’s

throwing a couple of shots. On Saturday night, twp gladia-

in

would be a decent night becau.se was there with a lot of friends,” said Shaw. “But then more people knew were there, and most of them were dressed up which made the party even more

ends.

and an application form.

PO Box 60524

T

like.

People in attendance both nights .seemed to be having a lot of fun and there weren’t any crowd problems as there are on most week“1

KOM

from

didn’t stop

it

goers

One of

Saturday night was their weekly

sized toothbrush and naughty nurs-

KOM

party-

cessful.

es,

details

went

some

dents,

Scholarships

Contact

nights

costumes

theme parties Oct. 27 and 28 which were both very animated and suc-

lead into

one or more of over 500 undergraduate and postgraduate programs at

both

smoothly, without any major inci-

tors.

Articulation Options For a

Revolution held two Halloween

tertiary institutions.

Masters Degrees Griffith offers a

the

Castiglione.

made

it

a lot

for everyone.”

more enjoyable

playground.


News

Bas^

fiallcween

By JON Pop culture

came

to

liauntetl

MOLSON

file

Mario Brothers,

to the

year’s

this

at

annual

was very pleased with

the turnout."

said Lindsay .Silva, the events

programmer CSI. “The Halloween Bash is usually a

successful event and

anyone down overall

it

at

— Page 13

Pve

personality.

1

all

good time.”

(loudy made his costume

More than .'^00 people were in attendance lor the event, which was held by C.Sl in the Sanctuary on Oct. 26.

tor

2006

always been really into video games, so obviously will come as Mario," he said. “There really is no best part, it is an all-in-

Halloween Bash.

"1

own

6,

rreativtty

wi'rti

basically like their

icons, ranging in diversity

from Darth Vader

SPOKE, November

we

didn't have to turn

the doors this year, so

was very

himself. “First of all

I

bleached the

dyed them and then bought a red shirt and gloves,” he said. “There is pants, then

I

1

store

this

sorts

Preston

in

(C’ambridge)

that

sells

Halloween

ol'

all

cos-

tumes and there was. the

way

best

describe

to

it,

a

Skipper hat and 1 took a red shirt and wrapped it around

B o S

I

clcnls

n 0 n

- s

h

l

-

11

and t

u

-

dents alike got into the spirit of Halloween by showing off their cre-

ity

Schuett, a third-year architecture

project

management

strates the force at the

student,

demon-

Halloween Bash.

I

I

Ford, a first-year nursing student, said this

sion

time she has been to the Halloween Bash. "I'm two years younger,

for

dressing up.

of

all

shapes, sizes, colours

facil-

more

distinctive

costumes sported

at the

she

Toga Party

This year CSI .set up a beer bin which helped reduce lineups at the main bar.

here, but

hardest

thing

year and

were unbelievable.” She said there are a few reasons why the Halloween Bash is so popular. “Students enjoy dressing up and being different and finding their inner creativity,” Silva said. “No one goes to the Halloween party to judge others, it is their time to be themselves and be creative.” Andrew Goudy, a second-year police foundations student, dressed as Mario at the Halloween Bash and was the co-winner for third best costume. He came to the event with his girlfriend, Corissa Ford,

who dressed up as Princess Toadstool. He said this is the first time they have teamed up for a Halloween costume party. “We figured it would be fun to come as a couple,” Goudy said. “We’ve been dating for like five years, so we might as well

come as a couple.” Goudy thinks dressing up events “It’s

for

these

makes them more enjoyable. fun because everybody gets to dress

in the role

and a Halloween costume

is

was

it

Pm having more fun (at the

Fm

Andrew Goudy, second-year dations, and Corissa Ford, a

police founfirst-year

nursing student, co-ordinated their costumes for the first time by coming as Mario and Princess Toadstool.

go last year, as I had to was kind of out of luck, but this

“I didn’t get to

work, is

the

.so

I

first

Halloween

time I’ve been out to anything in

a long time and

it

enjoyable,” Cowling said. “It’s fun,

very

is

it’s

not

even Halloween and you get to dress up and just party for the night.” It took him more than an hour to get ready for the event and he spent upwards of $100 for the costume as well as accessories. Cowling, when putting the costume together, researched

some of

the

more

the character,

including Jack Nicholson in

Tim

Burton’s 1989 Batman movie. Cowling was so determined to achieve a realis-

we

“People just came out with so much creativity and put so much time and effort into their costumes, it was fantastic. The attitude, the creativity and the costumes

the last time

I came with more enjoying myself.” Mike Cowling, a second-year general arts and science student, also was awarded the third best costume for his Joker costume. This is the first time he has been to the Halloween Bash.

.so

really difficult to

this

impossible for us to decide,” she said.

Jigsaw killer from the popular movie series Saw.

far

“We

said.

Halloween Bash),

friends,

she had to go

choose the best just went by applause from the audience because it was

of the

.so

at the event.

was costume

costume

to the

famous depictions of

the

“It

off his

to a bar or

went

through

shows

go out

together,”

Silva said determining the best costumes

second-year law and

first

haven't been able to

I

officially

event.

was

Miro, a

the

anything like this where you can be together and dress up

so

apiece.

security administration student,

is

and types were exhibited. Partygoers, featuring homemade and store purchased attires, could be found mingling, dancing and expressing admiration for some of the

There were also prizes awarded for the three best costume.s, which consisted of a competition between 10 student finalists selected by CSI. The three winners were decided through the audience’s applause. First prize was a trip to Montreal given away by Breakaway Tours, second prize was a pair of Toronto Maple Leafs tickets donated by the college’s alumni association and the third prize were two movie passes donated by CSI. A student dressed as Jack Sparrow, from the popular Disney movie series Pirates of the Caribbean, won best costume, while the runner-up was a female Mountie and third place was shared between two students, one dressed as Mario and the other as Joker. Both received two movie passes

Joseph

For some reason,

hat.

ativity as well as pas-

- Costumes Dan

the

we've always had this wig at my house and put masciira in my eyebrows and glued the moustache on. It worked out well."

tic

portrayal

that

he dyed his hair green. Cowling said he has always loved the Joker. “He is one of my favourite fictitious characters and it must have been a month ago that I decided I’m going to be the Joker for Halloween,” he said. “He is yet he is funny, there is this great hypocrisy between him. He loves to laugh, but he loves to be psychotic. He is com-

evil,

pletely insane and it gives me a night to be completely insane and I love that.” Cowling thinks it is better to have a

homerriade costume. “It is kind of lame just going out and grabbing something off the shelf,” he said.

adds more of you into it, it is not just something you bought, it’s actually part of you. I spent all today walking around with purple hands because I dyed the suit pur“It

ple.”

He said it was worth all of the trouble and plans on dressing up as the Joker again for future Halloween events. “I want to use this costume next year because I love it,” Cowling said. “I spent a lot of money, so I still want to use it.” Next year the Halloween Bash will be held in the

new Student

Life Centre.

Mike Cowling, a second-year general arts and science student, displays his best Joker pose, while playing pool Sanctuary.

Photos by Jon Molson

in

the


Page 14

— SPOKE, November

6,

Feature

2006

to fte 200 Left:

The rufous-banded owl

reaches about 35

and lives America

in

cm

in

height

parts of South

like Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia. It feeds on small

mammals, small

birds, fish,

amphibians, moths, insects.

They

generally

in

worms and

lay their

eggs

tree hollows or

in

old nests of large hawks.

Right:

The

African lion primarily

preys on herded animals such

as zebras, antelope and wildebeests, although they

will

prey on smaller animals such

as snakes and insects if larger animals become scarce.

Below right: The slender-tailed meerkat can be found in parts of Botswana, South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, Namibia and Angola in dry, sandy plains, open grasslands and also

in

some

Meerkats

Above: The common marmoset lives in most Amazon regions of South America. It feeds on vegetation,

insects, spi-

fruit,

and

ders, small birds

bird’s

eggs. Marmosets organize

around

their lives

their families.

Neither the male nor the

female

of the pair will tolerate

rivals for

the attention of their

mate, and are very efficient in raising large

numbers

of offspring.

Bottom: The North American

amphibious and spend its life chiefly along rivers, larger creeks and lakes. They mostly eat fish but also feed on frogs, mud puppies, crayfish, clams and river otter is

prefers to

insects.

Far right: Renauld’s ground cuckoo grow no bigger than a chicken, but

its

colour blends

with the forest background, it from predators. It can be found in Cambodia, Laos, Thailand and Vietnam.

protecting

Photos by 'Bilboafd nng tunes start at $2 10 plus 50« for iKe download Billboard* Mail* subsa^jtion $5 (J3 content fee plus S2iransport fee) This rubscrptiori d:r: ':or iricludethe cost of nng tunes Billboard

rigisterecTtrademarkofVNU

Busir.*;:

inc

Adam

Black

in

rocky areas.

live in

large colonies.


Feature

SPOKE, November

6,

2006

— Page 15

Zoo

"fhs By ERIC

MURPHY

and winter and do events like this all year-round.”

The Metro Toronto Zoo devours all competition when compared to other fall

and winter

attractions.

Gray said off-season events also give people the opportunity

Animal fans of all ages arrived at the zoo decked out in their costumes for a Halloween event called Boo at the Zoo

to

on Oct 28 and 29.

the

The event, which was free of charge children under the age of 12 for in

all

costume,

more than

just a

zoo

summer

attrac-

tion said Kate Gray, public relations

warm

any competition

typical

fall

at

“Of course,

said.

we’re for the animals and besides edu-

we

also like to

entertain and give visitors and

bers something fresh

Zoo

visitor

come

all

mem-

of the time.”

Michael Miller said

it’s

out to events like this

at

the zoo.

“We

open during

she

cating and conserving

try to

still

visit.

“The zoo is a great venue and there’s always so much to do

animals,”

show

people that we’re

summer

besides just looking the

for attractions during the off-season,”

said Gray. “These sort of events

to

temperatures of a

it.”

great to isn’t

winter

compared

visitor

co-ordinator.

“There really

and

fall

weather

Michael Miller,

fea-

see

to

the animals react

“The kids love

games tured including ring toss and mini golf, a pumpkin-carving contest and actors in costumes doing card and magic tricks. The event was held to show that the zoo is

how

have a membership here so

come

Miller.

Top

“The kids love

left:

at the

as often as

Ella Miller

Zoo.

we

we

can,” said

it.”

pounces on her brother Devon while enjoying events

at

Boo

'


1

— SPOKE, November

Page 16

Entertainment

2006

6,

Do you have a By TARA RICKER

Who knew Local

firing cycle that requires the use

no colour,”

spontaneity and experimentation.

mixed?

Prevost-Mero’s studio

Elmira where the public

art

packs pottery with dung, preferable horse dung, during wood firing, an art

dictable with explosions, cracks and

Natalie Prevost-Mero

manure and

artist

form which she

ber

cow

playing in the

lo\'cd

I

and with

patties

said

Prevost-Mcro.

some of

in,”

Raku

the ethereal, cloud- ike pat-

clothes that

make them

1

Lake,

own under

Barefoot Potter

women

is

firing.

ceremonies

was introduced

way

in the 16th century.

is

smoke

piness through chance.”

uses in her workshops

words,

differ-

wood,” go from one extreme to

it

means leaving out

fectionist

she said. “1

firing in a

another; the rustic,

smoke

fired

way of doing

Counsellor's Corner Stalking is a population.

What

crime

that

over

the artists are

opened

"l^rk City

and Toronto,” said

who

other

organizers of the tour.

is

also 6ne of the

Prevost-Mero studio was one of

the per-

1

“The tour

offers

something

differ-

ent that Elmira and the surrounding is

Trail

not necessarily

known

for,”

eclectic collection of

1

50

in

seemed obsessive and caused

fear

participants.

munity,” said Dietrich. in

the

information on local

all

the

Kissing Bridge Tour

decided to take part

tour this

year because of

hype,” said Holton.

The

three

own

ter.ca

last

year was Centre in

the Square’s 25th anniversary, the

book commemorating its history was just released on Oct. 25 of this in the

Square: 25 Years of is

avail-

3.

into three categories:

Ex-partners: were in an intimate relationship with the victim Delusional stalkers: frequently have had little or no contact but are under the delusion that the victim is in love with them

Vengeful stalkers: are angry with the victim over some slight, whether or im.agined (could be argument, poor grade on a paper)

it

is

real

most stalkers are males who have been rejected by women but males can be victims too. College women are more likely to be stalked by someone they know; either .someone they had an intimate relationship with or with whom they had casual contact (i.e, a classmate). Male victims often feet more menaced than endangered Stalking is seen as a way to get power and control over a victim.

years

eral

manager of Centre

Grant said the book spective look on

Centre it

in the

came

you are being stalked. The most important

book

the

briefly but

at

the

was looking

Square’s board of directors, has

it’s

lot

how

in

the

is

a retro-

Kitchener’s

Square was built, how and the artists who

to be

have played there. “There are recollections from a bunch of people who have performed here and a lot of great pho-

The

if

mayor of Kitchener,

attended and spoke

very exciting

we’re finally ready

and a

been here

some suggestions

for granted.”

of fun,” Jaime Grant, gen-

now and

to launch today so

Celine Dion),” he said.

be aware and get support.

it

Carl Zehr,

forward to sitting down and reading through it. Zehr, who is on the Centre in the

tographs

to

took

launch, said he only looked over

What Can You Do?

is

do the book because she loved coming to the Centre in the Square when she was young. “It was always a real pleasure to come here, even when I was young I knew it was something special,” she said. “It was a gift and I never

proceeds go toward funding programs. “We’ve been working for two

Statistically

following are

or shnig@golden.net.

who

Square, said at the book’s launch.

thing

or the

www.kbt-

able at the theatre for $42.50 and all

2.

visit

the Square

in

ANDERSON

Memorable Experiences

are stalkers? fall

For more

artists

www.thebarefootpot-

studiotour.ca,

a co-operative stu-

Centre

Centre

.

put into

our pieces with the rest of the com-

year.

’.

1

we

the joy and excitement

Kerry Stumpf were first-time tour

the general

as; ‘'Repeatedly following, watching, phoning, writing, e-mailing or otherwise

Stalkers tend to

a great opportunity to share

“It’s

Lisa Dietrich, Shannon Holton and

Although

that

pot-

Book commemorates

of college students in the U.S., defined stalking

communicating with someone in a way or concern for personal safety

handmade

organic soap and

body care products.

area where the tour

artists in the

in

tery, stained glass,

takes place.

STALKING

happens more on college campuses than

a national survey

Elmira which features an

dio

By NATALIE

in

Studio Tour held on Oct. 28 and 29.

to offer then just agriculture.”

is It?

Researchers

Who

doors to the

she said. “The area does have more

“We

stops along the tour.

area

their

Kissing Bridge

Shannon Holton and Kerry Stumpf community during the fourth annual

Prevost-Mero said there are about

Prevost-Mero,

pottery and

-

So while

all

local, the spectators certainly

“hap-

direct handling of pots in a fast glaze

unpre-

a popular

“People have come from as far as

New

more primitive and direct The actual firing method is

way.

pots are

and

experimental

In

become

(Photo by Tara Ricker)

Local artists Lisa Dietrich,

aren’t.

different

Mero

ent poops, salts, oxides and

always

The

get the results she wanted in her firing.

and

in the area.

tour has

the region.

for tea

Prevost-

have experimented with

The

event drawing visitors from

meanings.

"I

covered bridges

to the dresses.”

Raku has many The one that

word

kinds of things to

all

Jacobs, West

The Kissing Bridge Trail Studio is named after one of the oldest

her

photo of these

an ancient Japanese It

St.

Conestogo

Wallenstein.

Rita

for

Elmira,

Montrose,

Tour

women

Raku of

taken Pre'vost-Mero a couple of

years of trying

pating in the tour, which included stops in

and

inspirations

some of the area’s artists in homes and studios bjj partici-

their

Veronica

like

Kissing Bridge

to visit

decided to

1

Harlow

Jean

nizable

“Pottery was the only thing 1 was good at,” she said. “I like learning by trial and error.” It’s

wanted so

I

also on display at

annual

fourth

Tour on Oct. 28 and 29. Art lovers were given the chance

phenomenal but sadly not so recog-

0 years ago.

1

current-

Trail Studio

couldn’t find the

“I like to attach a

name The

the

“I

Hayworth as Raku dresses.

of pottery and branched out on

her

the

my.self out of clay.”

She uses

more. She mostly taught henself the art

Her work was

pieces also

art

dresses,

she said.

which make them so unique. Prevost-Mero discovered pottery after working a string of unfultllling jobs and yearning for something terns,

is

The Canadian Clay

at

and Glass Gallery, the Hamilton Gallery and the Marten Arts Galleiy

call

I

Using poop infuses her pieces with

on display

of

in Bayfield.

include

mud and

lire,"

ly

which are inspired by the 1920s and 1960s. "fve always found other eras more grew up interesting than the one

can remem-

I

welcome

aminge an appoint-

to

Her one-of-a-kind

as far back as

is

ment.

perfecting.

"From

advance

in

Prevost-Mero’s artwork

located in

is

view her pieces but they must

to

continually

is

smell for art?

from people (like

who have

been associated with the centre for 19 of its 25 years and believes it’s a

commu-

very important part of the nity.

“Centre

in the

Square

is

an icon,”

symbol of what arts and culture are in this community. It’s a building but it’s more than he

said. “It’s a

that

obviously.

It’s

entertainment and the

on here that makes

it

the

kind of

life that

what

it

goes

is.”

Tony Bennett and

Grant said the stories and photocome from a wide variety of

graphs

people.

Do

1

not minimize or ignore

Respond

2 3

firmly that

Report threats

to

unwanted behaviour. you do not want furtnor contact.

Campus

Security and/or tno Police.

If

the stalker

is

a

4.

Conestoga College student, their behaviour is against the Student Code of Conduct and college sanctions may apply. Campus Security can also help you in dealing with a non-college stalker. Protect your private information (home/cell phone no., e-mail address,

5

address) Gather evidence

.

v/hat

6

.

you have

save e-mails, unwanted to do in the situation.

(e.g.

tried

You may need support appointment

to

in

gifts,

voice mail) and

dealing with the stress of being stalked.

see a counsellor

in

Student Services

for

document

Make an

support and advice.

"It’s amazing when you look back and you realize how many people have played here, and really famous people,” he said. “It’s really

cool.”

The author of

the book, Lynn Boland Richardson, said she is very pleased with its outcome. Richardson spent two years interviewing past performers such as Alice Cooper and Tom Jones, but she said the most fun she had was doing the research.

"There’s nothing more fun for

A Message from Student Sen/ices Visit

our website http://www. conest opac. on. ca/jsp/stserv/index jsp

me

(Photo by Natalie Anderson}' Author Lynn Boland Richardson was featured at a book signing at the Centre in the Square in Kitchener on

Her

than getting into archives and dig-

Oct. 25.

ging,” she said.

memorates the

Richardson said she was happy

to

history.

latest

book com-

theatre’s


,

Entertainment

Not quite ‘Man By

Robin Williams. When you licar name you aulomatieally think

lhat

who

lunny

roles,

make you

plays (mainly)

eraeking jokes

that

laugh.

his latest

movie

(Internet photo)

Man

world of politics

in

of the Year.

ymi

not going to I

will

between all of the confusion, the comcdic late-night host did his

say

in

'‘Politicians are a lot like diapers.

They should be changed frequently, and for the same reason,” Tom Dobbs (aka Robin Williams) says in the film.

parts in

thriller

with

to relieve the

it

of the Year

is

— Page 17

2006

about a

late-

where he is answer questions, but

presidential platform,

instead

The problem with the movie is most of the events could have been cut out, shortened or changed.

When saw the trailer, thought I'd be .seeing Williams and his usual antics, being the funny man he is I

I

and the movie being another spectacular hit. But no, it was boring. It .seems as if the producer couldn’t decide

if

he was making a

thriller

or a comedy.

would never fall asleep through Robin Williams film, but for this one, was templed to doze off halfway through it. Overall, some of the movie was very comedic, but most of the movie was loo serious for my liking. did enjoy watching it, but I

supposed

to

mocks

the other candidates

and makes fun of everything from hydrogen cars to same-sex mar-

a

1

I

I

wouldn't say

that

Man

of the Year

night political talk .show host (sim-

riage.

is

ilar to

Jon Stewart) who is urged by an audience member to run for

“You want an amendment against same-sex marriage! Anyone who’s

recommend watching

president in the next U.S election.

ever

been married knows it’s always the same sex!” he declares.

see something completely differ-

He

(Lic

am

.seemed more like a

Man

into the

I

give the plotline away, but

This movie was worth going to for the jokes and comments Williams says when he is at the

tension.

some humour

start to unravel.

dragged on a little too long at one hour and 55 minutes and it wasn't as comcdie as it appeared in the movie trailers. It just

eomedie

Robin Williams brings

up winning, much to his and everyone else's surprise. And then things

job of being funny.

movie, Man of the Year, the jokes were few and far between, and many missed the mark. Don't gel me wrong, Williams is amazing, but this In

6,

of the Year’

SAMANTHA SAECHAO

of a lop aelor

SPOKE, November

decides he will run and he ends

WLotching.

would only if you are a or just want to

a favourite of mine.

Robin Williams fan

I

it

ent.

S(KW III tpCkx-^

arvitSQiyve-

By ANNELISE THOMPSON

A

two

story of

tP

magicians,

rival

battling for prestige in turn-of-the-

may sound

century England,

new but

in the

assure

1

Prestige

is

a

Harry Potter

you

it's

By

The

shocking,

about love, hatred, jealou.sy. deception and yes, even a little magic. the story

their

own

In

(IntemeJ photo)

Christian Bale

and Hugh Jackman

story about two

end

rival

tricks

The story is based on a rivalry between once friends and col-

beautifully

leagues, Robert Angier, played by

that

Hugh Jackman, and

the information

The writing of

Alfred Borden,

magicians

and even murder attempts.

result is sheer brilliance.

the piece

layered

is

so

and precise,

even though you are given

needed

all

to predict

the ending, audiences will be kept

death of Angier’s

guessing what will happen next throughout the movie, as well as

the

tragic

wife.

wondering how the story

The two become so focused on their drive

and ambitions

to surpass

will play

out.

This film could have turned into a

the other as Britain’s top magician

no longer “afraid to hands a little dirty,” and

that they are

dark story of hatred and

get their

ences feeling disappointed, or even angry with the characters, but the

each begin their way down a dark, entwined path full of deception.

.

SIUDErnS

left

ability of this all-star cast

audi-

(which

WORKING FOR

star in

who

The

battle for

Prestige, a love supremacy.

Michael Caine, Scarlett Johansson and David Bowie) makes the story much more human and something that audiincludes

also

played by Christian Bale, following

mind

All

these

after seeing

film.

this

Dr.

Lynn Denlon

(Bahar Soomekh) awakens to find she is in a warehouse surrounded by weird and horrifying devices. She cannot move because she is

and Christopher) demonstrated in this film will go down in the books

Lynn then disderanged Amanda (Shawnee Smith) is watching over her. She warns Lynn at knifepoint to remain calm. Amanda leads her into another room, where she finds the villainous John “Jigsaw” Kramer (Tobin Bell) lying on his

as being able to delight both audi-

deathbed.

ences could relate

The superb of the Nolan

storytelling abilities

brothers

ences and-critics tiful

and

to.

alike.

(Jonathan

It is

a beau-

brilliant piece that is sure

you satisfied. would definitely give

I

this

movie

di.sturbing

of the

Lynn

Darren

Director

Jigsaw warns Lynn their lives are She has a device is

con-

nected to his heart-rate monitor.

Jigsaw’s

through his

held nothing back

in ter-

rifying his audience.

The

and .sound effects

all

amplify the

gruesome

these

pain

visuals

victims

endure.

The very graphic away from the

take

visuals almost plotline,

which

used to shock the audience. They cause many viewers to turn away and scream out in di.sgust,

If

victims,

own

Jeff

makes

it

test. Little do know. Jigsaw has a

more so than

the previous ones.

But don’t fear, the trademark twist ending is still intact, but is far less jaw dropping then the others. Tfie question remains, final

is

this the

chapter of Jigsaw’s twisted

games'? See the film and decide for

yourself

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is

intertwined.

of

student LEADERS TO STAFF THE Student hfe centre infoDesk!

most

Bousman

flatlines. Lynn dies as well. She must keep him alive until Jeff (Angus Macfayden), another one

SIUDENISi

tests in this latest epic are

gy.

the

he

4.5/5 stars.

The far the

tied to a wheelchair.

strapped to her neck that

to leave

higher purpose for them both.

covers

Lynn and

Now

to

III. For fans of the previous movies, nothing compares to the traps and tortures the victims in this latest gore fest have to endure.

may be

as the

disgusting.

Saw

such a way that the entire cast and crew seem to have developed mag-

powers of

ADAM BLACK

words come

broken, and the layering of subtle clues complex, but it is arranged in

ical

/ei/e/

Horrifying, grotesque, gruesome,

crafted

fully adult story

The timeline of

ne-W

series,

not.

beautifully

wfvole^

like a

pre-teen film, or even the next

chapter

/T

LADIES IN FREE BEFORE 11PM 10 Manifou Dr. Kitchener (Corner of Manitou

Fairwav)


— SPOKE, November

Page 18

6,

Entertainment

2006

CD

enraptures scallywags

By HOLLY FEATHERSTONE

Contrasts are abundant through-

Zimmer’s diverse

out

Enthusiasts

of Pirates of the Caribbean can extend their affinity

Listeners

infamous Captain Jack Sparrow and temporarily subdue

opus contains no

the

for

his

the motion picture

sonically-diverse

orchestral

BRANDON WALKER

By

Don’t be surprised

comes

Matt Dusk

crowd during

into the

Nov. 8 show

if

at

Centre

in

his

Square.

The 27-year-old jazz crooner

are about music.

“The music ence.

I

is

obviously the core

more the experijump into the crowd and I

it,

but

it’s

talk to people.

I

DVD can.

With

the

revolving around the entertainment

Dusk

factor,”

said.

'

He's had songs on the charts, Katie

the

Holmes

film

in

First

Daughter and on the television it isn’t because

show Casino, and of luck.

It only takes the listener a few seconds of hearing Dusk’s new CD

Back

In

Town,

to

realize

“entertainer” has talent.

Frank star

.Sinatra’s pipes

good

this

He’s got

with movie

looks. He’s also got the

couple of house

the coolest thing ever.”

Diana Krall

asked about the challenge of breaking into the American market, he .said, “I don’t think it’s necessarily harder (being from Canada). It’s difficult for anyone, period. Every week there’s 200 catalogue discs released. There’s only so much sell space available. Retail really determines what is successful or not. It’s an industry where it’s money and promotion versus talent and ability.” Although he performs primarily jazz. Dusk listens to all kinds of music. “It’s a plethora of mixes. Right now I’ve got five or six

albums in my iPod: Green Day’s American Idiot, the new Justin Timberlake CD Justified,

new

CDs and

one, a the

Music

disc.

is

new way

more accessible than

it used to be, with the Internet, television and

first

track,

appropriately

MC

Hammer

wanted to see if you’d type that,” he said. “That’s an interesting I would definitely say an influence, but only in some areas of what I do.”

is

The

Waterloo

(WEC)

Centre at

Centre

in the

is

Entertainment presenting

Dusk

time

signature

work

as

well.

and deterministic sketch for the listener, which revisits the inaugural violin theme in track one and

is intervened by solo viorecapturing a musical theme

The Curse of the Black Pearl. Zimmer, however, elaborates on this particular melody by lengthening the already colourful and disjunctive continualso present in

um

of notes with

full

orchestral

accompaniment. The second track. The Kraken, introduces Zimmer’s clever use of percussion:

a

muted bass drum

refreshingly

features yet another recognizable theme from The Curse of the Black Pearl, perhaps the only seemingly structural part of the composition.

Unfortunately, tracks 10 and are

11

drawn out, both distinct melody and stamina. The climactic

particularly

lacking orchestral

point

is difficult to

detect as well,

mundane

owing

to the

tion of

melancholic notes. Though

Zimmer’s notoriety

reverbera-

indicative of a beating heart, establishing an apprehensive ambience.

the listener proved to be effective,

The organ,

it is

“ah’s,”

jokingly listed

uses

to diversify his

nation of violin and brass, evoca-

Sinatra

He

as one of his influences. “I just

avidly

The ninth track. Wheel of Eortune, imparts an action-driven

question,

radio.”

for harmlessmisleading the listener further exemplifies his creative hallmark.

Jack Sparrow, launches with a playfully sauntering combi-

a compelling addition composition, gradually crescendos fo a rupturing variation equally fervent and captivating. Zimmer continues to demonknack for unusual strate his embellishments, including the strategic use of chimes, choir

When

whole jazz environment, the community is a big part of why the music is there, and the shows have started or a

Dusk took on a new role for his CD, that of producer. “It’s a lot of responsibility. The creativity becomes the business side of it. I absolutely love it. It’s cool when

It’s

believe a concert

should offer something more than a

CD

Christina Aguilera’s

you can create a baby from birth. I don’t just go in and sing.’’ He said every day he was the first person in the studio and the last to leave. “I’m mixing. I’m mastering. I’m on the photo shoot. It’s great.

from Toronto says his shows are as much about the audience as they

part of

ability to multi-task.

latest

the

K'W

is

entitled

lin,

up in

listener

Zimmer’s penchant

He

fication

it

the

ly

changes

of Sparrow’s half-wittedly drunken stride. Such vivid personi-

to jazz

l\_

comically resplendent Celtic variation in track seven’s Two Hornpipes.

nant chorale.

tive

Dusk

moment

repertoire, accentuated with reso-

The

the

as

distinct paradigm.

of despondent, unearthly chords, only to be blatantly tran.sfixed to a

in

the movie’s thematic, sequence in

in

to

rest,

Dead Man’s Chest by immersing

Contemporary composer Hans Zimmer (Gladiator. The Ring, The DaVinci Code) effectively traces

Matt Dusk, a jazz singer from Toronto, brings his good looks and incredible voice to Centre in Kitchener on Nov. 8.

to

engaged by an unrelenting cuiTent

themselves soundtrack.

Square

their expectations

One

tapestry.

forewarned

anticipation for the release of

theii'

(Internet photo)

are

to

the

for staggering

difficult to gratify an audience with an ill-defined finale. Despite a weak culmination,

Zimmer

effectively

intrigues

the

listener in the bulk of the score

with a vast multitude of alterations in tempo and style whilst keeping in

harmony

with

the

movie’s

tribal

chronology. Consequently, Dead

resounding vocal apparent among tracks five and six.

Man’s Chest is capable of enrapturing a wide variety of scallywags

heavily-articulated

rhythms

and

effects,

particularly

and swashbucklers, savvy!

Square. Genevieve

DeMerchant, the manager of marketing and development for said the

upcoming show

arrangements

ture

WEC,

will fea-

never

heard

before. “It’s a full big-band sound.

When

saw him at the WEC, the was the way he made me like he was singing directly to I

best part feel

me. He’s got an incredible sensual performance style that women love.”

Tickets are $25 to $55 and are available through the Centre in the

Square box office by calling 519-

578-1570 or

at

http://www.centre-

square.com/.

Eating out tonight? Make a smart choice. For healthy food choices, food safety and 100% smoke-free seating, choose an Eat Smart! restaurant. Contact the Waterloo Region Community Health Department at 883-2253 or visits WWW. eatsmarU web, neL

OHMioAiliMUif

«EHLRP0O3

(Photo by Holly Featherstone)

The soundtrack from Pirates of the Caribbean, the Dead Man’s Chest, shows off Hans Zimmer’s thematic sequences.


-

.

News

6,

2006

— Page 19

Guelph man’s dream comes true

»PE Week of November

SPOKE, November

-

2006

6.

Witnesses his beloved Cardinals win World Series Libra By

September 23 October 22

ANGELO MAZZIOTTI

"The win in 1982 was great too, this one was extra special because was actually here to be a but

Everyone who loves knows pasis one of the strongest emotions one can feel. It is that

1

sion. Passion

^You

were born a leader even

if

Pt)u tend to be shy, a leader lies within you. Stand up this week

and take of eharge of any situation you are faeed with. Hanging baek will only work against you.

Your charm and grace will be your best friends as situations may arise that need a smooth talker to resolve. Your poise and social-mindedness are great

you possess,

don't

let

them

skills

fade.

very

same passion

A

fans.

April 20

May

-

October 23

November You enjoy being peaceful

calm and

in

This week

situations.

when

comes

it

that

you through

just fine.

passion that makes a fan

to anything

all

his

You

are a busy

never able to

21

“We

body by

sit .still

As

you have the

a .sign of duality, ability to

nature,

for long.

be two things

once.

at

Don’t allow any negative feelings to

overcrowd your positive ones.

Be happy, you deserve

it.

Game

come

5

June 22

December 22

1

I

if

was

a

to

didn’t

I

I

had

to climb the

any way

I

game

said

Double.

“1

1

first

10th

again

in a heartbeat.”

Most North Americans, however, not

did

The

share

Series

set

Double’s passion. record lows for

think one of the reasons the

“I

Si.

Louis' Cardinals fan

lack of big

Double.

am

see

Double made

the

trip

with his

wife, Shirley, and got an early start

was the Cardinals

it

scries tanked in the ratings

live.”

Series victory and

1

Garry Double,

dream lifelong

felt,”

to that extreme, but they

viewership across the world.

could.”

don’t have words to describe 1

go

“Let’s just say it was the most have ever paid for a pair of nosebleeds,” joked Double. “But it was all worth it. would go back and do

was

I

going to see the

of the World it

game day

stadium walls,

Detroit

the

to

I

care

World

to the day.

“We

since 1982.

got into

St.

Louis the night

name

“1 think

someone

was

players,”

America wants to Barry Bonds do

like

something controversial every year. .series was just good clean baseball, the way it was meant to

This

be played.”

WIN:

-

January 19

your seemingly cuddly kitten. Your friends will need the kitten in you to come out this week as they'll need someone to talk to about problems they can't bring to anyone else.

Underneath

lion exterior lies a

You're like a iarized.

Shake the

-

You

are a person of nobility

matter the situation and always

Be

light.

aware, your kindness will be test-

ed as tensions are

rise

and childish

comes into too good for that.

pettiness

January 20

You

play.

life.

isn't

You

-

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-SONY PSP PLAYERS

-

-HMV

GIFT CERTIFICATES

the

I^ticTpateTnIi^

are

ONTARIO COLLEGE STUDENT

true to yourself.

ENGAGEMENT SURVEY

Pisces February 19 March 20

August 23 September 22 -

ers,

this

way you go open and honest about all you do. Pay attention to words around you, you may overhear information you don't want to be honest about. Whether it's right or wrong, stay Lying just

about

Virgo

great deal about oth-

Be

sometimes too much. Being who need you is

with

You care a

shell

February 18

holds your head high no

hold people in a good

$ 1 ,000

famil-

Aquarius

August

22

who

-

shy and

become

week, be outgoing and daring. Let loose from your cautious ways and experience an off-thecuff life. It'll do you some good.

Leo July 23

turtle,

reserved until you

there for those

one thing but being there for everybody is quite another. Do not allow yourself to be rundown by others’ problems, take time to care about you.

Tiffany

PART 2**

mix fantasy As a Pisces, you

careful not to reality.

yearn for things to be perfect, including life. You tend to see

PARTICIPATE AT:

only what you want and not what actually is. Don't fall for the fake. Real,

always

even

if

not

perfect,

http://www.wincolleaetuition.conn

is

better.

McCormick

is

BETWEEN NOVEMBER 1 - NOVEMBER

a third-year

journalism student holding fate in the palm of her hand.

a

.said

ONTARIO COLLEGE STUDENTS*

Capricorn

July 22

-

It

got to the ball park at

look for tickets.

true.

As a lover of freedom and independence you may begin to feel claustrophobic and tied down when problems arise with work, family and friends. Remember to breathe and take each problem as it comes.

Cancer

my

1

could.”

about 7 a.m.

Louis.

in St.

Double said

Series.

long as

November 22 December 21

June 21

-

with

1

did pay a hefty price.

going to remember Oct. 27 for as

May

it

didn't care if had to climb the stadium walls, was going to sec the game any way tickets.

Luckily for the couple they didn't

accom-

the passion that

Cardinals defeat

Tigers in

“I

Sagittarius

got to celebrate

I

this

have

Lifelong St. Louis Cardinals fan Garry Double of Guelph made the long drive to Missouri to witness

how

Gemini

said Double. "Last time

home on my couch,

at

team.”

that.

World Scries

you do. Don't panic as your workloads gain pounds, your willpower and determined spirit will get you through everything

your limits will be stretched as calm and peace are not on your agenda. Bear with it and remember your steadfastness will get it.

-

Half-ass has never been your style

time

that fuels sports

For one area man, that dream became reality, as he was in attendance as his team won the

21

was

Now, imagine finding your team in the World Series, and imagine panies

Scorpio 20

1

it,”

stand up, cheer and even shed tears.

feeling

Taurus

part of

and slept at a hotel,” saitl Double. “We got to the ball park at about 7 a.m. game day to look for bel'ore

* Full

**

and part-time day students

in

Sponsored by: Ontario Ministry

30,

2006

postsecondary programs

of Training ColIeges& Universities

^


Page 20

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; SPOKE, November

6,

2006

eakeporshuty

Digital Edition - November 06, 2006  
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