Issuu on Google+

Halloween

No

superstitions

Where they came from, why some believe

services offered for Aboriginais

Lack

of support could prevent

some

students from attending Conestoga.

them and

in

some

Organic foods a healthier option

why

the reasons

don’t.

A

learning

newsroom

for

If you improve your food choices, you could feel a lot better.

journalism students

Maws 14 Monday. October 30, 2006

Conestoga College, Kitchener, Ont.

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

37th Year

— No. 20

Get answers at info desk MEGHAN KRELLER

By

Student.s with que.stions about the Student Life Centre and it.s .service.s

will get

answers thanks

to the

introduetion ol an information desk, said Carol Gregory, direetor ot student development.

Ink) desk stall will be trained about Conestoga .Students Inc., student life and Student Services, the

three areas of the college that developed the concept. However, it’s

isn’t

important people realize this a college information desk,

said Gregory.

“This

“The information will be focused on services and

programming available

for

initiative,”

she said.

Life

“The

information will be focused on services and programming available for the students through the centre.”

the students through the

Recruitment for student leaders desk has begun and

to staff the info

centre.”

Carol Gregon director

a Student

strictly

is

Centre

applications are available on the student life website and the career

'.

Ten to 20 positions depending on the desk’s hours of operation, which services

ofstudent

site.

are to be filled,

del ’elopnie/it

The Student

Life

Centre

info

desk, which will be located just inside Door 3, at the entrance of the centre, will be staffed by stuwho will provide direction to

dents

anyone who needs it. Gregory said this is one of many new initiatives focused on the concept of students

(Photo by Kristin

Grifferty)

serving students. “This will help us in creating a student-centred culture,” she said. also helpful that everything

“It’s

Living Pretty Polly

wows

on the edge

the crowd by lying on a bed of rusty machetes at the Freak

Show on

Oct. 18

in

the

will

be central.

that

one-stop-shopping model.”

It

really encourages

have not yet been decided. Staff work approximately 10 to 15 hours per week at $9. 29/hr. This new position will provide students with a great part-time job will

on campus where their focus is assisting other student.s in a friendly, positive and helpful manner, said

Leanne Holland Brown,

dent

life

“We

stu-

co-ordinator.

are excited about building

team of students who, through

this

their efforts, will help define a stu-

dent-friendly culture in the Student Life Centre,” she said.

Sanctuary. For story and more pictures see Page 15.

Student runs By ANNELISE THOMPSON ‘I

think

While Conestoga College stunervously await mid-term results, one second-year general dent.s

are going to occur

the results of Waterloo city coun-

of

on Nov.

13.

Andrew McCaughtrie,

20,

has

thrown his hat into the ring, and is running against three other candidates for the position of

Ward

5

to

"I

J

1

take Waterloo for-

want

to take

Waterloo

a direction that will be sustain-

have someone younger with new ideas on council’

and taking care

“I’m running on the (improvement) of the uptown core, provid-

more services

for the youth of

next he said, because he feels he would be able to balance his academics with councillor at

all,

cil.

“A

“1 think we need to have someone younger with new ideas on council,” she said. “Not just six guys sitting around all saying the same thing over and over.”

other part- or full-time jobs, and a

is

the protection of Waterloo’s

environment, including protection of the city’s drinking water and “If

I

get elected, the

first

thing

I’m going to do is make sure that stop any construction or build-

we

ing

in

large

Brent Rohrer, a third-year

the

risk

to

destroying

cal .science

major

University,

who

5,

politi-

Wilfrid Laurier

akso lives in

Ward

“It’s

encouraging to see a young

who

will

represent

the

needs and wants of students, run-

Waterloo councillors are typically at least 30 years old. but

ning,” said Rohrer. “It’s also

McCaughtrie doesn’t age

is

feel that his

a disadvantage to his candi-

think a lot of the voters are

ready for a change

in

Waterloo, and

ready to hear fresh young voices on

(Photo by Annetise Thompson)

Andrew McCaughtrie, a

stu-

dent at the college, is running for Waterloo city council’s Ward 5 position in the Nov. 13 election.

council.”

Suong Tran,

to see that

protection

major,

at

the

University

of

platform,

his

because that’s also important to me.” McCaughtrie said his plans after graduation are up in the air. “I’m looking at maybe going to university to further

a third-year history

good

he has environmental in

duties. «

don’t think being on council

“I

lot

lot

my

academics,” he said.

of people on council have

of students

at

school have part-

time jobs. Mine would just become

one on council.” McCaughtrie decided

Ward and

to run for

5 councillor in January 2006.

officially filled in all the paper-

work

September 2006. is headed into a very big time of change, and a very in

“Waterloo

agreed with Tran.

person,

those

at

two to see

aquifers.”

“I

oecur I want eouneil to be on top of them, by seeing where problems

5,

about

affect

will affect

proactive in traffic management,”

to

heard

up a

a fellow student running for coun-

dacy.

“Instead of waiting for problems

like to start

own.”

Being elected would not McCaughtrie’s plans for

Ward

in

my

term

Waterloo, and focusing on being

he said.

lives

would

I

McCaughtrie’s campaign weeks ago. and was excited

which includes some aquifers that we draw water from, and poses a

cepts;

university,

business of

Another important issue that McCaughtrie hopes to tackle in his

said.

The fresh, new eity outlook that McCaughtrie hopes to bring to council is based on four main con-

who

she

said

northwest corner of Waterloo.” he said. “This is an environmentally sensitive area,

ing

Waterloo,

beforehand.”

it

over the next four years, the next 10 years and the next 100 years,” the Waterloo resident le

city council

to

wetlands.

councillor.

want ward and

we need

Waterloo

year

business student will be awaiting cil’s election

for

studies,” he said. “If

my I

business

don’t go to

exciting time of change. We’ve, hit the borders of growth, so

grow any wider, and

it’s

we can’t now time

for new ideas on how Waterloo can grow to be brought to council

instead of the traditional ideas like

creating

more suburbs

that take

up

a lot of land, but don’t provide a lot

of housing.” he said.

For more information on McCaughtrie and his campaign visit

http://voteforandrew.ca.


Page 2

News

— SPOKE, October 30, 2006

Now

deep thoughts

Job By LEANNE

Conestoga College

...with

great for networking

fair MOUNTFORD

Close to 75 per cent of jobs are

Going around from business

Random

questions answered by

random

students

when

looking for a job, a job

fair

On

Oct.

more

18,

think the

Scream guy

mask would be

the

scariest for me. like

see

don’t

I

the fact that

I

can’t

his face.”

Ana Almeida, second-year broadcasting

network of industry con-

attending. Career services publishes an

employer guidebook a couple

of weeks before each of

who

fair.

pro-

It

vides a

you’re

job you really want, she gaid.

a background on the business and

can be

“The job fair is a great spot to meet with individuals who do the

positions they are seeking to

hiring for the business they repre-

dents can target

and work.”

speak to and ask relevant questions, she said.

than

60

employers gathered in the E-wing at Conestoga College’s Doon campus looking for employees. Tao Cruikshank, career services it’s

much

meet with several employers in one spot over a short period of time than making cold calls or hitting the pavement in search of your dream job. “The job fair is an excellent place to gather information on the businesses attending and to learn about the organization’s goals, structure and types of employment opportunities and thus determine if this is a place you would like to easier to

work,” said Cruikshank.

would say that crazy girl in the Grudge. Her

lishing a

estab-

tacts is essential for securing the

the perfect opportunity to find one.

officer at the college, said “I

to

business handing out resumes can be a daunting task, so

Which horror movie character would make the scariest Halloween costume?

means

not advertised which

sent,

building that

start

net-

Kyle Cole, a first-year biotechnology student, said the job fair was interesting and informative. “However, I found it was mostly based around the engineering students,” he said. Career services do their best to gear the fairs toward student needs, that’s

why

the fall fair

is

By

spring

employment

fair

for

is

and

the

full-time

and

employment,

graduate

said

Cruikshank. Before attending any job fair, students should review who will be

reviewing

is

attending and

fill.

this information, stu-

who

they would

like to

“Students

should

expect

to

receive a great deal of informa-

on the businesses attending.” They should come with questions

tion

resume to hand out and be prepared to answer questions. They to ask, a

should act and behave the

“I

at the fair

same way they would

interview.

primarily focused on part-time and

seasonal

list

at a

job

.

cannot stress enough the need

for students to bring a resume.

It

demonstrates to the employer that

you

really

must want

to

work

for

them,” she said. The next job fair will be held on March 21 and 22, 2007.

“I

weird twitches scare the hell out of me.” Russell Baker, third-year

business administration

“The Texas Chainsaw guy, n’t

because he does-

play around.” Justin Barhuto,

second-year police foundations

“Anything that looks like

the chainsaw guy,

he haunts

my

dreams.”

Nicole

De Vries, first-year

informatics

management

(Photo by Leanne Mountford)

Conestoga College on Oct. 18 was a good opportunity seasonal employment.

The or

job

fair at

Beetlejuice,

By JASON SHERRITT

Many Kelly Forsyth,

second-year broadcast-tele vision

colleges in Ontario have

services geared toward Aboriginal

students but Conestoga isn’t one of

them.

“There

are

7,000

people

Aboriginal

8,000

to

living

this

in

Kitchener-Waterloo area so there are a lot of students that

“Just for

come

in (to

Conestoga) for their education,” said Kelly Nixon, the Aboriginal

shock value,

counsellor in Student Services. “So

Freddy Krueger.”

you have native people who

are

staying for awhile.”

Shawn Ramnanan,

Native students are

physiotherapy

at

a higher

risk of not continuing their post-

first-year

M

Ik.

secondary education because of a lot of barriers such as lack of family support, college support and financial

support.

Aboriginal

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!

student

Conestoga’s population,

according to Nixon, is close to or under the percentage of

just

Aboriginals

in the

country’s popu-

in line

around 3 or 4 per cent. “Funding is late or it’s not coming. I’m often working with students to try and resolve some of those right in the beginning and sometimes, students have withdrawn before they’ve begun. “If we had a position that was

develop a sense of camaradei^ much like the place for internati^B

more designated

al

lation,

Beetlejuice.”

students to find part-time

second

First Nations,

“Beetlejuice,

for

to this,

more work

they are supported.

“For Conestoga, there's more

work we can be doing in that Nixon also said a visible,

maybe

to

make

services

more

visible.”

Nixon’s office

is

located in a part

of the A-wing that most students don’t travel down, and in a room that has

been renumbered.

sometimes communities which places have support, which don’t and which to stay away from. Conestoga is one of six colleges that does not have services geared Aboriginal

students

are told in their

specifically dents. al,

Nixon

for

Aboriginal

stu-

said people in gener-

native or not, will

go

to

where

sepa-

where Aboriginal students can meet and rate

and negotiations could be done; also,

area.”

location

is

needed,

students.

“(International

students)

can

form connections with other students. I’d like to have a place where the native students can connect with each other and provide that source of support, especially when they’re coming from farther away. “We do get students from the northern communities and sometimes it is a bit of a cultural shock or they

don’t have the supports

might have had at home, or they’re looking for conlocally

tact

they

with elders,” said Nixon. “I can all those bridging areas

provide if

they can find me.”

.

.


News

SPOKE, October

30,

2006

— Page 3

Award welcomes students home All recipients

must have a parent who By VANESSA BUTLER

award,

aiul

is

an alumnus

seems

to be gaining in

Past cheques have averaged around $200. Depending on how

member on the alumni board, who is a recipient of the welcome home award. “He applied to a number of

many

.schools,

it

popularity.

When

sludenls

narrowing

are

tlown their choices for post-secondary education, they take a few things into consideration. Location,

utive

has a son

students apply, the

sum goes

up or down.

and got accepted to all of them,” said Milton. "All had to do 1

program choices, the facility and entrance awards arc all factors that

the .school's website. Connections

ence

inllucnce

magazine and C.IIQ, the college’s

was

students’

decisions

on

where they go to school. At Conestoga College, there’s lots of obvious pros, but there’s one that isn't front and centre. The welcome home award is an annual award offered to students beginning their

gram

at the

first

year of a pro-

college.

really a feel good award,” Monica Himmelman, director

“It’s

said

of development and alumni

rela-

tions.

President of the alumni association, Glenn Campbell, (left to treasurer of the alumni association, Mike Shipley, and vicepresident of the alumni association, Susan Milton, took part in the

is

advertised through

radio station.

was

tell

at

him a hit about my experiConestoga and his decision

easy.”

Milton’s son was a recipient

There is no academic requirement in order to receive the award, and you don't have to show financial need.

A

recipient's parent must be able be found on the database in order for the student to receive the to

award.

“The award is a gift from the alumni as.sociation to the students because they had a parent attend

year.

She said she

last

proud to have her son receive the award because she enjoyed her experience at Conestoga and she is a proud alumis

nus.

Students need to send a letter or e-mail including their student numbers and programs ol' study for both the student and the alumnus, as well as current contact information.

order to be eligible for the award, you must be enrolled in a

the

“This gives parents a chance to

distributed

diploma or certificate program, and have at least one parent who is an alumnus of Conestoga. Students

come back

annual general meeting on Nov. 6. For more information, contact

may

Susan Milton, vice-president of the alumni association and an exec-

In

(Photo by Vanessa Butter)

The award

only receive the award once. This is the fourth year for the

college,”

said

Himmelman.

to the college.”

As of

Oct. 16, the award had 25 applicants, with a maximum of 30.

The welcome home award at

the

will be

association’s

Monica Himmelman at 519-7485220, ext 3459 or e-mail mhimmelman@conestogac.on.ca.

right)

materials and operations

management

reunion on Oct. 21

in

the

Girls night out for

good cause

blue room.

By

Student pleased with Canadian progress in Afghanistan .

By BECKY SHARPE

to enable

A

Conestoga

from

student

College

pleased

is

with

the

Canada and other countries have made while fighting the war in Afghanistan. progress

that

Jevon

The success

Regiment

in

1

1th Field

we can change one

makes me

hope

support bring

to

war,” he said.

to

in

it

Canadians are

somewhere “Any goals

in

this

that

we

can help people achieve are well worth it and makes anyone fighting

know

Afghanistan

in

that

they

military

is

work on

work

to

one

n

Jevon Rudder,

and science student The

Canadian

Afghanistan

is

military

in

currently working

with the Afghan police and Afghan military

to bring

communities

stability

in the

to the

war zone,

said

Rudder.

“We’re trying to rid the Taliban from community areas and try to stabilize the area one piece at a time.”

The Canadian

military

is

trying

and court support.

tion

They

also run a 24/7 crisis line staffed

is

by trained volun-

teers.

“We

rely

on events

like this to

maintain the level of service that

we

provide to Waterloo Region.”

commu-

said Sara Casselman, the

nity relations co-ordinator for the

centre. stations, a silent auc-

readings and health and

tion, tarot

precision during

wellness info were just a few of

to hurt

a child

so crucial for us

precision

during

Soldiers are being trained to away from that old school approach of war where there is mass destruction and mass amounts of casualties, he said. “We’ve been trained to have less kills and more success in our actions.”

Rudder hopes he good job if he

many

enjoyed

services

during

women

the

their

night

of

relaxation.

All of the

companies volunteered

to provide the services.

get

seeond-year general arts

the centre

at

include counselling, public educa-

also doing their

attacks,” said Rudder.

piece.”

provide sup-

approach.

the

on

who

from an empowerment-based

port

Pampering

haven’t wasted their time.”

“No one wants which is why it is

troops and

them back

life

missions.

be able

my

feel like

getting

really

best to “I

in

terms of raising money. The centre has a committee of six women who have completed an

that

The

Guelph.

has

military

the

is well worth the risks have been taken so far, he

that

“If

with the

a signature

support centre

Services provided

needs,” said Rudder.

2008.

artillery officer

become

ing program and

said.

Rudder has been with the Canadian army reserves for more than a year and a half and will be going through his last period of training next summer before he can go to Afghanistan. He is an

Kitchener, has event for the

intensive and comprehensive train-

war

country as early as

Kitchener-

the

“We’re currently working in areas where there’s a need for humanitarian aid and medical

achieved

that

The women of

Waterloo Sexual Assault Support Centre came together once again to organize the fourth annual FemFest. The fundraiser, held on Oct. 19 at the 'Walper Terrace Hotel in

out of residential areas, he said.

Rudder, a second-year general arts and science student, will likely be going to help with the in

Afghan military skills them to keep the Taliban

to teach the

SUMMER MCPHEE

Alana Frieburger, a volunteer with the agency for two years, said the support centre

is

needed agency community. perately

“Women come

a desin

this

out for this event

agency and to celebrate themselves as women,” she

to support our

do a goes to Afghanistan, keeping everyone under his control safe during missions and bringing them

said.

home

being a woman. “Therefore, any opportunity you

Mary Kay Cosmetics was

my

can use to celebrate your feminini-

in

ty is terrific.”

supported the Kitchener-Waterloo Sexual Assault Centre’s Femfest fundraiser.

“I

will

safely.

hope

to be able to support

troops and bring them back one piece,” he said.

“We want to create equality between the sexes.” She added as a feminist she recognizes that there are barriers to

(Photo by Summer MePhee) just

one

of the

many companies

that


Commentary

— SPOKE, October 30, 2006

Page 4

How

we

are

far

go

willing to

for the truth? There are very few people out there

on the

Of

who

are willing to put their life

line as part of their career.

course, there are the obvious ones, such as police officers and

But what about those professions

firefighters.

that are a little less obvi-

ous? For instance, being a journalist

considered one of the most dan-

is

gerous and stressful occupations one can have.

Canada,

In

this

we are students, we are reviews,

As we

so.

isn’t

in

write our columns, stories and

no immediate danger. But, the

in training to potentially

fact

remains that as

obtain a job that will require

us to put ourselves on the line.

Some

of us will do so willingly and bravely so that the rest of the

world stays informed and aware of

Anna

the justices and injustices that

all

around the globe.

are occurring daily

execution style,

killed,

Every day journalists put themselves

Politkovskaya, a renowned investigative reporter from Russia,

believed in a free press. She paid for that belief with her

her

in

Moscow

apartment on Oct.

life,

being

to light

7.

What

Politkovskaya was famous for her investigative pieces on abuses by military and security services, the

2004 Beslan school tragedy and

other sensitive topics occurring in Russia.There are no leads as to killed

and

her,

Politkovskaya

According ists

is

to

very

is

it

possible

an article

have died

in

at the

wrong

Some war

we

communism,

43 journal-

all in

suspicious

76 jour-

this year,

from the Dominican the World Association of Newspapers

correspondents are just in the wrong place

time, while other journalists are targeted to prevent

Most of us come because

of

12,

on a whim. Some of us come while others are curious and enjoy digging

into this profession

love to write,

many of us do

not aspire to be journalists

with a vision of running alongside a soldier in Iraq dodging bullets.

we do

Yes,

this for us.

There

is

comes with completing an away at a keyboard. that

an indescribable sense of satisfaction

article after

word

many long hours

clicking

make

to serve you.

We

are in these situa-

keep everyone informed and aware of the

atrocities

won’t give you the time of day?

that

us so happy that

Are you supposed

we

M

has no limits, no sense of timing and, in

some

it

fall in

the rain, missed appointments

become

blamed on our

phone

calls are all

love, giving

it

control of

do we do

this?

Why

do we

allow ourselves to be this vulnera-

been told

I’ve

Is

it

does

it

you cannot

The 76 journalists who died this year did not enter the field thinking was an occupational hazard. Anne Kothawala, president and CEO of the Canadian Newspaper As.sociation, said it best when she said that journalists “die for our

times in

that,

when you

are reading an article, watching a

cast or listening to a radio piece. safe,

even

if

it

means

that the

It

may have been

news-

written to keep

person reporting on that issue

is

you

not.

someone

is

The knowlwaiting for

end of the day, someone

you through the hard your life and who will

always be there for you uncondiis

something everyone is

love?

tion, a feeling, a sixth

Why

An emo-

sense?

it

if

is

it

so powerful and

hold so

\s

letters to the

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

editor. Letters

contacted for verification.

No unsigned

care about time, distance or even preference.

There are no rules when

no handbook

no instruction manual

it

comes

to follow

There is no way of predicting the outcome of love and no way of protecting yourself from it. and your heart don’t coincide and

What happens when know one thing but

sensibly you

able or just unlucky because you

emotionally you feel another?

until

What do you

never found that right person? if

the

person you

want

What happens

you’re unlucky enough to

with someone

interest in

and

to guide you.

you’re torn?

be alone

who

fall

has

if

in

no

you?

or your heart? in the Is

listen to,

your head

Which do you

trust

matters of love?

ever an easy

there

between the two or

choice

in the end, will

the heart ache or the brain hurt?

What happens when your mind, body and soul want someone who

When

it

comes

to life,

what

is it

about love?

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College Editor: Eric

Spoke welcomes

Love doesn’t care what you want, you don’t want. It doesn’t

you

What

isn’t

a person.

die? Are you romantically unlov-

to

all it

a feeling, an emotion. Love

So what happens when youi Tiead

you never find love? Are

you meant

love

why much meaning to people? Why is it .something we

does

put

afraid of being alone for the

doesn’t want you?

wants. exactly

Why do we

of our lives?

What

innate feeling because that’s

to love,

love?

love?

Spoke

welcome

Letters are

for.

will help

What

Remember

wear away or dissolve

sleep deprivation and humiliation?

that

sakes."

for-

ourselves through the anxiety, the

edge

tionally,

someone

some-

Are we

that death

fade,

name of

or what

on going?

live without, it’s a

that love is

rest

at the

love

in

completely.

point yearns

who

live

And how does

the loving?

possible to love

some you

does the falling

the loving keep

driving force that every person at

How

we can’t

is,

Why do we

thing

have

ever? Or, like any other emotion,

lives.

Why

we

Or do you

Sometimes it’s so silly how much emphasis and credit we give this

without?

When

late night

once

feel that

they wouldn’t normally do. Walks in

go against

the advance and risk looking

like a fool in the

Opinion

can make them do things

pointing you in?

is

make

tion for our circumstances.

occuning on a day-to-day basis. would you feel if you were not aware of the nuclear testing that is happening in North Korea? Or what if you didn't know about the outbreak of SARS? These issues are reported to you so that you know what is going on in your world.

that are

love

cases, no considera-

People say that when they

to

your instincts and the direction

an uncontrollable force that

It’s

about iove?

it

make

ble?

But mainly, journalists are there tions in order to

a four letter

is

can’t stop smiling.

and

for a

be,

us cry or

love

told.

good story. Whatever the case may

Love

has the power to frighten us,

countries, ranging

21

from being

their stories

fall

unpunished. So far

left

Republic to Iraq, according to in Paris.

never know.

will

Toronto Star on Oct.

in the

have been killed since the

based

we

who

not the only journalist to be murdered.

incidences that have been nalists

that

danger trying to bring the truth

in

Murphy

Advertising Manager: Jessica Blumenthal, Kristin Grifferty Spoke Online Editor: Meghan Krelle Production Managers: Tara Ricker, Brandon Walker Circulation Manager: Nick Casselii Photo Editors: Adam Black, Adam Hannon, Tiffany McCormick, Jon Molson and BJ Richmond Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

be published. Letters should be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter letters will

for publication.

Address correspondence to; The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

N2G 4M4

Dr.,

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca Website: www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters must not contain any libellous statements.


News

Texas schools 1

“it’s

on

my

face and sent a big

about time!” charging through

my mind. When comes to defence it

against

The suburban district

students to do anything but etly

some

Worth school began teaching sit

right,

RUSH)

get

But as has

not

Browne said. Browne is a major in the British army reserve and is an instructor for Response Option, the company

Robin

hired by Burleson schools to train

“Getting under desks and praying for rescue

Instead, students are instructed to (that’s

will

docs not save one from death.

intruder enters the classroom.

rush

children killed.

it

recent school shootings, passivity

qui-

the

a

on

bent

been witnessed from the many

and obey when an armed

shooter

the

if

recipe

from professionals success,”

for

is

back?

is

Now

loaded with ammunition and hell-

new

the district’s

plan, .saying they fear

Fort

recently

Obviously,

for

killing

the

killing, there is really not

Some oppose

has the right idea.

they had decided to stay and fight

iheir students.

injury.

school shootings. Burle.son, Texas

way saying

much

responsible.

to

Only

ations will likely breed the

-

It

North America

was

surpiTsed

the

it.

shooting

amateur gunman most school shooters

are not firearms experts) will rarely kill

his victims.

me to my next point. we are told to coanyone who has a

This brings

The

fact that

operate

with

gun, coupled with a lack of prepa(Photo by Tara Ricker)

Handling the pressure Matt Graves, a first-year practical nursing student, takes the blood pressure of fellow student Lindsay Perry as Susan Hilton, a practical nursing professor, watches, ensuring it is done correctly.

ration for such an event at

most

Learning

Peer Services

Skills

for

you

girls?

tried light-

ing back?

Would

have messed up the

that

attacker’s plan

become

and caused him

disoriented and abort

to

it?

These are questions we have no

way

of answering, but the simple

we have become

fact is this;

so con-

ditioned to the idea of "do whatevthe

gun

tells

you.

and you’ll be OK,”

guy with

that

we

don’t

er the

realize

how Hawed

that logic

is.

Being co-operative is no guarantee you won't be hurt; and certainly a gunman’s promise of “do what 1 say and you’ll be OK,” has no

senselessly already. The only to stop future events like these

Too many people have died way

create

uncontrollable

is

to

hostile

and

environment

for

potentially

a

possible assailants.

Schools

female students, and ordered

Burleson are prepar-

in

teachers and remaining students to

ing their students for these situa-

leave the classroom.

tions

Women

if

...

should

we

be doing the

same?

put marriage

on the back burner

Thinking About Getting a Tutor? Peer Tutoring provides the opportunity

little

can get close enough to shoot victims at point blank range. In recent shootings in Bailey, Colo., and Nickel Mines, Pa., the

What would have happened

Writing Services

Service

if

course of action?

merit.

respective assailants selected sev-

commons

carefully cho-

schools, allows the gunman to get into a position of control where he

eral

he

that

trying to atone for.

behind to protect those Or what if someone had

after the student

heart, an

face

he told his

someone changed What if one person had refused him and stayed

Bairing a point-blank shot to the

(let's

later revealed

But what

that

him three times. The principal was still able to tackle and subdue the student, and died later from his injuries. head or

was

course of action.

the

Cazenovia,

principal,

one-room Amish

sen his victims, the location and his

Wis. was recently killed by a student, but that

in a

had something from his past

was

likely freeze in fear,

.school principal in

incident,

wife the day of the shooting that he

or abort his plan and run away.

A

Mines

He had obviously

situations,

the vic-

school house.

students arc taught to assail the these

if

Charles Roberts IV killed five girls

specific student or teacher.

in

Nickel

the

In

same

and himself

gunman might

But what

more educated?

death.

assailant

no

in

tims had been better prepared or

arc the result of angry or humiliated students seeking revenge on a

If

am

I

people are

the.se

armed men who carried

the

their actions.

But what about situations where the gunman is on a mission? Most in

be clear;

that

out the attaeks are responsible for

fronting the assailant in the.se situ-

result

me

let

sake of

do but run. The Columbine rampage and the reeent Montreal shooting are good examples of this. Remaining passive or con-

school shootings

the learning

— Page 5

2006

30,

back against violence

right to fight

assailant, throwing everything they can - books, pens, calculators, even fists - to create as big a distraction as possible and cau.se

recently read an article that put

a smile

SPOKE, October

Always

to:

bridesmaid,

a

never a

bride? Not to worry bachelorettes, • • •

Improve your understanding of the key concepts in a course Review and practice challenging course material Improve your marks, performance and self confidence

To request a tutor visit the Learning Commons 1B36 (back of the Sanctuary) Students Helping Students -

It

located

Works!!!!

in

room

is the new 20. More women are waiting

30

independence of single

of myself.

Temporarily Located

young

girl

growing up

I

B36

(In

the Sanctuary)'

Hours of Operation: 8:30 a.m.-— 4:00 p.m,

Telephone;

the City,

now 24 marriage

my

came and went and

I

am

I’m not saying that all women should hold off from tying the

growing as a person, not

knot until they’re in their 30s, but that women now have the option of

is

I

one of the

have to say, last things

mind.

I’m mention, continually learning new things about myself and what I

want out of

life as far as

http://www.conestogac.on.ca/jsp/stserv/learningcommons/index.jsp

more

putting

down

stable in

my

waiting to get married

I’m a little older because I believe I won’t be so dependent on

walk on hold without what other people

that

the

worrying

life.

feel a little

until

which glamorizes being

single.

on

years old.

still

I

Website:

Who knows why so many women

oven.

to

519-748-5220 x2308

be able to take care

owning a dog and who knows, maybe even a bun in the Well, 23

Commons

in 1

a

will

have chosen to put marriage on the back-burner but it’s more than obvious that society has accepted this change, especially with the popularity of shows like Sex and

Ld-i .incf L-J^ur-mg

Learning

man and

a

Mr. Right.

urbs,

CONESTOGA

Opinion

late-

dling their thumbs waiting to meet

As

Canned

life;

Ricker

night outings, solo vacations, blossoming careers and aren’t twid-

always imagined myself happily married at 23 years old, living in a quiet neighbourhood in the sub-

c

Tara

later in

say “I do,” and they’re not living up to an “old maid” persona. Instead, many women celebrate the life to

monumental

aisle

think.

You can only follow your heart and see where it leads you. Time will take care of the rest.


Page 6

— SPOKE, October 30, 2006 Conestoga

Sign up at the CSi office,

Room 2A106

Room 2A108

;nts INC

^

students INC

I

We have seheduled yoiu* pro^am timeslot for graduatiou CSI office during the designated time for your program, we will waive the sitting photos. Ifyou sign up at the

fee charge.

MoiKloy,Odober30th'Friiloy,Noveitil)ettO

oacm ^ w NOON

12

rnmilWtiVimSt

MEDIA LIBERAL ilUDIEi

Monday, Nwomber BUi - Fridoy Decomber I

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

Monday, Doranbot 4Ui - Friday, Decomber IS

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Monday, lanuo^ 8 -Friday, February 2

siftn

iCHOOLOFBUIINEIi

up at the CiSl oflBce

Con estogA STUDENTS INC

18 +

$12 in advance $15 at the door

TANCTUARV 9 PM


SPOKE, October

30,

2006

— Page 7

work for the

DOING

Con ESTOC7A I

students INC

Submit your ^eSume to Lindsay fn

or email

at,

Councilors

iDforroatlOD

or

«

lsilva@conestogac.on,ca

parckse tickctS

Christinas

Wish Tree Lest we Forget

VOTE Municipal Election SANCTUARY 1 1:30

J^INAI; November

Christ*^®?* ;

Wish

Silva

Room 2AI06

Please visit rooro 2AI0G for more

Open Forum with Municipal

I


News

— SPOKE, October 30, 2006

Page 8

Cancer

a word not a sentence is

By STEPHANIE IRVINE

women

“That assures

that they’re

month and the Ontario Breast Screening Program (OBSP) is try-

where they’ve got the best equipment and that the mammogram is being done properly and it’s being used properly,”

ing to promote awareness for the

said Stacey.

participating in a site

October

breast cancer aware-

is

ness

As

early detection of breast cancer.

“Cancer

our region is very Stacey, said Jane

in

prevalent,”

co-ordinator

regional

OBSP

in

region.

“One

the

for

Waterloo- Wellington nine

in

be diagnosed with

it,

women

will

the OBSP had Dr. Robert Buckman, an oncologist from Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto, speak recently at

Kitchener’s city

and we know

that currently in our region only

women

part of their effort to raise

awareness,

Buckman

is

hall.

also a professor

are actually

University of Toronto, as well as a

participating in the breast screen-

broadcaster and author of several

25 per cent of

ing program, so

we

still

have a

lot

OBSP

The

currently

has

six

throughout the region that women can go to, all without a docscreening

books. His book Cancer

Not a Sentence, was the

of work to do.”

AIDS Walk,

for the 14th

(Photo by Natalie Anderson) annual Shed a Light on

Oct. 21.

“Nobody has cancer has

AIDS walk

“Cancer

like

have

tion,

but

be

by

ANDERSON

AIDS and What

better

way

is

know someone with come just to sup-

because they

there to spend

a Saturday evening than supporting

others

good cause,” said Cashubec, who began as a volunteer with the

port a

good cause? Eighty-three people did just that on Oct. 21, participating in the 14th annual Shed a Light on AIDS Walk held by the AIDS Committee of Cambridge, Kitchener, Waterloo and Area

organization.

(ACCKWA).

because they’re walked out.” That’s why ACCKWA decided to hold the walk at 6:30 in the evening,

a

Lynn Cashubec, co-ordinator of volunteer and administrative resources for turnout for

the

ACCKWA,

said the

was better than expected walk through downtown

“Some people come

out and walk

walk

ACCKWA,

said they also

awareness about the the community.

to raise

disease in

“The thing

is,

it’s

a completely

However, the number of walkers has decreased over the past few

preventable disease,” said Scofield,

years.

ing a friend to

“Less people have been coming out lately,” said Cashubec,

she said, to

make

it

last

“maybe

raised $8,000

year and so far this year $4,500 raised, but all the

money

who began

volunteering after los-

has

not yet been submitted.

AIDS.

The only 100 per cent

deterrent

choose

to

if

is

you do

have sex, always use a

condom. The second most

AIDS

is

through the

the

or

the

disease.

can

We

need

OBSP,”

word, and not

said

She added the

OBSP

is

a

(Photo

think that the

by Stephanie Irvine) is a key-

The thingamaboob

word confers some form of

chain and teaching tool from

sentence

the Canadian Cancer Society

us.”

follows

and the Ontario Breast Screening program. The

to

provincial

pro-

gram that is standardized

to

see past that

Stacey.

differ-

on

He went on say when

quality-

ent size beads represent the

people

assurance

average size lumps found by

told

measures.

All

self-examinations, health-care

condition has

are

also

woman’s first mammogram and by getting

cancer in the

strict

sites

common way

infec-

doctor,

they

and

abstinence, she said. But

of contracting

different.

The organization was

Kitchener.

Teena Scofield, executive director at

not,

is

it

diagnosis

a

self refer to the

By NATALIE

is lit-

erally a word,

and

family

awareness

raises

Buckman.

“Women to

nobody

like

said

infection,”

think that they

referred

a Word,

is

topic of his

discussion.

sites

tor’s referral.

Walkers prepare to head out on the downtown Kitchener route

in

the department of medicine at the

accredited through

professionals, a

the

regular

sharing of needles, said Scofield.

Canadian

“The more people know, the more they can protect themselves,”

Association of Radiologists and

she said.

Accreditation Program.

are their

diagnosis, they feel that

mammograms.

“this

cannot

be happening

Mammography

to

me”. “With most other diseases we

don’t feel that,” he said.

“It’s

very

rare.”

HEALTHY RELATIONSHIPS

Buckman

said the fear, dread and

with

associated

disbelief usually

word cancer make people

the

too

emotional to think logically about i!

is

and hebaviotTS bet'Mveen you arid' your partnsr wliich contribute to a happy, do not always come naturaiiy; lor yodf bond to coniiriuo to grow, you must ccrilinualiy

imfKJrtant io celebrats tno heaitliy attitudes

fuifiilipg reiationsfiip,

y<orh

HoGfitiy re-hationships

toward developing beallhy patterns

the medical facts of their diagnosis.

causes a mental paralysis,”

“It

Buckman, “And problem about the word said

Here are some characteristics

He went on

a healthy relationship:

of

that’s

to say that the cancers

200 completely different diseases that for the most part have no are

connection with each other apart c*

You are aole

Ic

from

For more information 1

pr

you can accept tne

ci

you continues

Each

of

you gels as much

V Tra •t’

fac. th.al oeittier

is [rKudect,

and novor

try to

change each

to

grow jc<y

in

other areas

or

is

honesb/,

t'usl.

of

your

life;

ard

family, school,

friends.

visit

amaboob.

m

painful dif-cuM

hmes as

in

happy

“The thing times.

and reeperd tietween you

tation

of

“That’s

why

II you have any more questions about relationsnips, counssllors m the Counselling Office would be happy Io taik with you. Drop in to make an arpoinTmsnl at Doon Campus, Room 1A103 iNow Student bfe Centrei 748-5220 ext 336C.

Guelph Campus. Admin.

Office.

824-9390 ext 148

Campus Room 1CQ4, B85 0300 on comiriuniiy support

is

or

224. available ihrough your Counselling Office. e:<l.

..

He

naming them you is the expec-

he said. so upsetting when

prognosis,” it’s

referred to simply as cancancer of the what?” ended the discussion by say-

hear

cer

it

.

ing attitudes need to change

used when someone recovers from them.

seem like no one Buckman. “I prefer to use a word like thriving, because that’s what people do.” “That makes

by the Wenien's

Rer<»urt(.-

Cruup

when

dealing with the cancers, and he wishes the word survivor wasn’t

it

else survived,” said

Si.vonsofCd

^

that

individually gives

I

InforiTiation

call

888 - 939-3333

other.

from gsving to the other as from receiving,

'Siaticnship remains as strong

Tr^ere

W.iterirxu

-

www.cancer.ca/Thing

V Each 4'

at all,

their process.

be an individual apart Irom Ihe other.

Neither depends on ihe Other to fssi irnpcrtant.

Both

the

cancer.”


News

Some

^

like

By PEGGY O’NEILL

at the

Waterloo and Guelph cam-

puses.

Whether this is your first, second or third year attending Conestoga College, you should

know

to dress in layers

while

the school.

One day your

room could

feel like a sauna,

vations,”

When,

and

as you change classes, it more like the Arctic. Although sometimes it may seem like the heating and the

said

is

all

Schill.

“I

spent

exactly,

the

at

the reno-

heat

turned on in the

depends on the outdoor tempera-

goes into

effort

resources staff

by the physical and manager, Tim

Schill looks after

all

construction,

washrooms and reno-

boiler rooms,

vations at not only Doon, but also

Code By

A month

of lockdowns

amid

schools arrests

area

armed two

of

fears

in

Collegiate, Oct. 18.

The

The

list,

article

in

issue

according to an Oct. 19 The Record, contained

names of 25 students

that

“should be killed.” Before the Forest Heights

inci-

the

Cambridge’s Southwood Secondary School was locked

down

for three hours

when

a stu-

dent

spotted

man

with

what

looked like a small handgun. Shortly before the

Southwood

lockdown. Forest Heights was victim

to

yet

upcoming

another traumatic

enter

when an at the

intruder stabbed a student

be done to prostudents? There’s already an

Cambridge were other schools

down when

a

man

to

in his

Schill,

“When

it

warm

gets really

September and October it is usually the computer labs that will suffer

lockdown? While I admit would be a huge expense to the suggested remedies and it would be a strong reaction to what I hope is a month out of the ordi-

there

thing couldn’t be serious, that

was more

also gas fired.

The construction engineering and technology students and the architectural applied degrees stu-

dents usually get a tour of the boiler rooms. “It’s quite amazing what’s behind the .scenes,” said Schill. Stephanie Stojanov, a .second-

year

absolutely everyone.”

sometimes her classrooms are a

The main building has heating which

hot water

gas fired, and

is

other, separate buildings like the

tle

OTA-PTA

student, feels that lit-

cool.

“Lately I’ve been noticing the temperatures are feeling cooler in

my classes. Having to carry around a coat, sweater and all my books can be inconvenient,” she said.

falling in

it

of teenagers and out of friendships

with their peers. I was of the opinion that those who would have a “hit list” in mind would not it,

but carry

I

it

out to the

know we

are

about a small minority here, but there was a time when I was of high school age that I went to school and felt safe. I went there, mostly to socialize I admit, but

knowing that I was in safe It seems these days (I’m

hands.

It

also of great concern

is

such hateful material can be

heard

early childhood education building have roof-top units which are

case

a

nario.

I

cold

it

anyone who published such a

that

prepared for the worst-case sce-

When

— Page 9

schools

I just made myself sound) there is the forming of groups that look to distance and alienate themselves from others.

something I feel should be looked into. Schools should be is

is

2006

talking

A healthy learning environment cannot exist with students fearing

What

30,

Some people are just naturally warm or cold most of the time,” he said. “We can’t please

in late

got so violent.

it

to

heat as well because of the old technology.

ate a healthy learning environment.

nary,

able

maintain a comforttemperature, but everyone try

of the older sections of the school are a little harder to

shock of everyone. I want to know when students

say otherwise.

does occasionally get complaints from students or the odd part-time teacher about the temperatures, but overall,

Some

physical resources manager

publish

published online.

in

Tim

armed presence. The more passive amongst us think this will not creI

resources

reacts differently.

outcry for metal detectors and an

school armed with steel pipes.

be locked

to

Physical

“We

or at

school.

So what needs

maintain a

differently.”

ahead

lockdown procedures

that

Benedict and Christ the King

try to

but everyone reacts

tri-city

day when students barged into the St.

forecasts,

the next

dent,

a

not

tect

ended when a “hit list” created by two 15-yearold students was discovered on the Internet site Myspace.com. latest

the

what the previous years have been like, but once the system has been changed over to heat, it doesn’t get changed back to air conditioning.

Heights

Forest

at

Schill usually tries to look

the most,” .said Schill.

year has been very good with few complaints Schill said.

comfortable temperature,

all

60s was stabbed nearby. Cameron Heights Collegiate, however, did

at

intruders has culminated

semester

said.

red for

AMY MEADOWS

“We

“We’ve changed over as late as October, but that’s pretty late,” he

at

and cool things down

try

like

this

tures.

it

Schill.

to

warm

outside

inside.

gets

feels

fall

air

in

at

then

cooling of the school isn’t very well planned out, a lot of time and

the weather does get

if

usually

only spend half a day per week Waterloo and Guelph.”

at

So,

again he can only bring

“Most of my time Doon, especially with

class-

some

hot,

it

SPOKE, October

not as old as

is

school

about

Forest

Heights my first reaction was that of dismissal. I wanted to believe

creating

huge divides

in

(Photo by Annelise Thompson)

schools and great animosity when the main reason to be at high is

to learn

and move on

the next stages of your

Here is less

is

to

hoping

that next

eventful than the

to

life.

month

last.

Graduate donates laptop Tim Kingsbury, a Conestoga College graduate of the materials and operations program, donated a laptop as a prize during the program’s orientation. Jane Lzu, a first-year student in the program, was the winner.

Canadian Veterans’ Memorial to be unveiled Nov. 5 By

SAMANTHA SAECHAO

The small area

is

metres from where the

On

Nov.

a

5,

new memorial

will

be unveiled in Veteran’s Green Park in Waterloo, in memory of all those who served in the Canadian

Armed

Forces

Second World

in the

Veteran’s Green Park

is

located

on the comer of University Avenue and Hazel Street, across from Wilfrid

1940s, because 50

were

built to

provide

dedication area last

was put

in the

year after the Government

of Canada declared 2005, the 60th

anniversary

of the

Second World War.

Check your pulse practical nursing student, Cheryl Wilts, takes the pulse of a practice

post-operative scenario.

dummy

during a

to those

who

live

significant in

it

the area

To continue with

the dedication

area put in place last year, a mittee

was created

to start

com-

phase

II

complete with the memorial that will pay tribute to the veterans. Last year the City of Waterloo approved a proposal to install the new memorial, which has now been in progress for the last few weeks. A base was put in and sidewalks were set in around it. The ceremony on Nov. 5 at p.m. will also feature a parade from

an area that

to after returning

housing for them.

Second-year

is

many

in

moved Canada in the

terrace units

(Photo by BJ Richmond)

tures about the history of Veteran’s

Green Park and how

of the park. Their work will be

veterans

A

There are three display

with information and pic-

Laurier University. The

park was built

park

posts

15

now.

War.

to

rial will be.

about

new memo-

end

of the

as Year of the

1

Veterans.

Central

The redeveloped dedication area commemorates and honours the

Avenue.

area’s first residents, the returning

Steinhoff, a

men and women and their families who have lived there throughout

eran,

the years.

Street

Special

MP

to

University

are Leighton Second World War vet-

guests

Andrew Telegdi, MPP Witmer and Mayor of Waterloo Herb Epp. Elizabeth


Page 10

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; SPOKE, October 30, 2006

AudiUciis Eeffln NCVCMI3CC ^tn - ictn vSigii

up

at

the CSI olTice

Room 2 A

1

06


SPOKE, October

2006

30,

— Page 11

^Qp e^F^b rT mjw L ilB jM^fmcTgallGcpji^ lojjs

*

A

omfs qmsiws

CcM

TRi/

I

i

^

VfiS\ Come visit the CSI Christmas tree to get a CHILDS

WISH CARD, on

you'll find their

Christmas

it

'HIS

gift

Is

your

opportunity to heor

wish that you can purchase

what your

and put back under the tree.

potential

oiunlclpol

councilors

hove

soy about things ^hat matter,

to

and

ask them what

they're going to

obout ft.

use you

do

TO ^ojl

OtClSloHS

Children 12 and tindllr For more information visit

in

the CSI office

Room 2A106

Making Photocopies?

COminQ

So

onestos^a .Students

jnc.

allot

6*'’ 13 *h

20 27 *h **’

.15‘f

a CO

STEP UP TALLADEGA NIGHTS

AM ii: 30 AM ll: 30 AM INVINCIBLE WORLD TRADE CENTER ii: 30 AM

MONDAYS @ THE SANCTUARY

Ct^N

11 : 30

l-STC)

GA

I


Page 12

News

— SPOKE, October 30, 2006

Organic: a healthier alternative^ By HOLLY FEATHERSTONE

properly nourish ourselves.

Grogan

obesity

said

are

equated to over-consumptive mal-

Analysis of the nutritional conand vegetables

which caloric value

tent in today’s fruits

nutrition,

has determined that most produce

supersedes nutritional value

lack the vitamins and minerals they

foods

had 50 years ago, according to an article in the October i.ssue of Alive

but we’re not getting nutrients.”

we

“We

in

focuses primarily on nutrition and environmental issues, also states in its article that the 2002 study found

and harvest of

rapid growth

the

produce.

By

farming

omitting corporate

technologies, organic growers fos-

gain weight (by) eating a said chronic

lot,

produce

ter nutritionally-abundant

while preserving

soil health.

said young people would by incorporating organic

Grogan

nutritional

can cause serious health problems for younger gener-

The Canadian magazine, which

engineering, which encompasses

ic

in the

eat.

Grogan

magazine.

and pesticides as well as genet-

ers

rates

depravation

benefit

ations.

foods into their diets. “Young people don’t even

know

how good

lost

improve our health, Grogan said consumers must be proactive by re-evaluating their eating habits and becoming familiar

in

with healthier options, particularly

they are healthy, Grogan said those

In order to

popular produce varieties, including potatoes and broccoli, to have

over half their nutritional value comparison with the same vari-

eties

they

if

were eating (healthy) food,” she said.

Although most students assume

who pay

organic.

50 years ago.

they could feel

and foods are often impressed with the alterations they’ve made. “Students who choose to clean up attention to their diets

organic

She said people of various ages are becoming increasingly aware of organic agriculture and food, an approach that executes joint concern for health and the environ-

eat

ment.

away by how much

better they feel;

how

their brains

function better,

their

depression

isn’t

“As cancer rates increase and warming becomes an issue, people become more aware of environmental and health issues,” she

it’s

said.

ly

Organic farming, which promotes ecological balance via alternative methods of weed and pest control, provides consumers with

alcohol, coffee, fast food and other

Waterloo.

the option of purchasing foods cul-

buy

The diet of the average North American is comprised of food that

tivated in a healthy, sustained envi-

et left over,”

ronment.

Although organic food is costly, Grogan said most consumers accept the prices because they are doing their health a favour. “People don’t complain about

Researchers attribute the depletion

of naturally-occurring

ents

to

entails rapid

of

nutri-

mass production, which

crops.

impedes the

growth and harvesting Such an approach of the plant to

ability

synthesize nutrients from the In

most

addition,

shipped before

it

soil.

produce

global

is

has fully ripened.

grown for taste grown for transportation,” said Eileen Grogan, and biochemist at nutritionist “(Produce)

or nutrients,

Eating Well Organically, an organic

grocer

at

1

04 King

St.

S.,

has travelled 2,000 kilometres or

organic

Certified

more. Such processing methods not only have detrimental effects on the environment but stifle our ability to

food and

its

production methods adhere to rigid national

regulations that prohibit

the application of synthetic fertiliz-

she says, “are blown

their diet,”

how much

lifts,

energy they have.”

She said eating healthily

commitment

a

is

mere-

eliminating

to

(Photo by Holly Featherstone) In

today’s market,

consumers can choose from a wide

only will consumers play an imper-

farmers by giving them price,” she said.

ers,

Grogan

a

fair

said students interested in

our budget.

tional benefits

you eliminate

all

learn to

first

and

accept naturally-occurring esthetic imperfections on produce. In addi-

she said.

should shop

fre-

quently to avoid nutritional

loss

students

tion,

Know how

STUDY IN AUSTRALIA!

must

of budg-

that stuff

to

By SAMANTHA SAECHAO

incurred by extended storage.

Students should also be wary of

how

far their food has travelled, encouraging students to purchase

ative role in supporting local

Diploma to Degree Conversion Griffith University

fastest

is

One* Year

strategically located

growing region - the

Gold Coast corridor. Australia's

in

Griffith

most innovative

in

Australia's

flourishing Brisbaneis

regarded as one of

tertiary institutions.

Masters Degrees range of one-year professional Masters programs. College students can potentially

Griffith offers a

gain a Masters with

two years

of

full

time studies.

For a

list

if

the oil

is

too thick

will restrict

it

your engine and make

Articulation Options of Conestoga College Diploma's that

will

lead into

one or more of over 500 undergraduate and postgraduate programs at Griffith www.griffith.edu.au/credit. Scholarships Scholarships are available each year for students of College articulation partner institutions.

Contact

KOM Consultants

move

it

harder to

the oil inside. If the oil

thin,

it

won’t create

amount of lubricant. Did you also know

is

the

too

right

improper car maintenance can cause your vehicle to fail your emission test, which can cost you from $ 00 to as that

1

for details.

much

$500? Murtagh says basic maintenance

Applications

Contact details

KOM

Consultants for further information,

and an application form.

as

can keep your car going for awhile, but it’s not always enough. Getting injector cleaners or engine Hushes or even oil treatments can be done simply once a year and can really help your car. fuel

KOM

Consultants

PO Box 60524 Mountain Plaza Postal Outlet Hamilton, Ontario

E: •

L9C 7N7

“I’ve

905 318 8200

T

install parts if

info@komconsultants.com

The length of the conversion program

learned

is

fixed,”

dependent on the diploma type and discipline

how

to

properly

they ever need to be

says Jake

year-old .student

Hishon,

at

the.

a

21-

University

of Waterloo.

Hishon says he very reasonable

www.griffith.edu.au/intemational CRICOS

t

Provider Nuntber

00233E

Queensland. Australia

at

feels prices are

auto body shops

and people must remember trade and the people working shops need to make a living.

When

it’s

a

at the

looking around for a good

grow-

but the fewer the kilometres

from the farm

your

to

plate, the

higher the nutritional value

in the

food.

“Go

for local as

much

as possi-

ble,” she said.

For further information regarding organic food and

its

regulations,

Canadian Health Food Association at www.chfa.ca and Canadian Organic Growers at www.cog.ca. visit

recommend a good repair shop. Once you’re satisfied with the quality of work and the you may want same shop.

to stay with

prices,

the

“I think that

much

as

Hishon.

“I

knock, run in the

new

is

people complain too

at

mean, it

auto shops,” says if there’s

for a

a noise or

few miles; break

parts before going into a

shop and complaining about it.” There are certain places to go for certain problems with your car. If it’s a fluid problem, it’s best to head to a fluid service shop where they are experts in that

field. If it’s

a mechanical problem, then go to a full service shop where they can check out what’s wrong. Before work begins, ask for a written estimate - this is your right. By law, you cannot be charged for an estimate unless you were told in advance how much it would cost

you.

If

they already started work-

Murtagh,

to

Remember

or family to

I

local producers.

keep your engine running place to bring your car, ask friends

There are many simple things you can do to keep your vehicle running properly. Remember to always recheck your owner’s manual if you are uncertain about something with your car. “As simple as that is said, not everyone does that and it does help,” says Kevin Murtagh, 20, an automotive technician at Oil Changers in Kitchener. “That’s what the manual is there for.” Did you know by using the wrong oil in your car, it can cost you more money in gas? Meaning,

Not

directly

organic products and their nutri-

real food, there’s a lot

from

prices because they appreciate the

quality and they’re supporting the

habitual expenditures that deplete

“If

variety of

healthy organic produce.

your

always use

to

waived.

Under Ontario’s Motor Vehicle Repair Act (MVRA), labour rates and how they are calculated (on a flat or hourly basis) must be posted in the shop and the sign must be large enough to be clearly seen.

Murtagh says not

to

compromise

when unsure about an estimate. Instead, leave and find out if the pricing is rea.sonable for

You can use it

differ-

as need-

Another piece of advice is, don’t the lights on your dashboard. It can mean there’s something wrong and in the long run it can make you fail your emissions test and your car will eventually break down. “Changing your oil will not turn off your engine light,” says Murtagh. “It means that there’s something wrong with your ignore

engine.”

Here are a few

little

known

facts

to consider: 1.

Always use

the

recommended

coolant for your car or else your vehicle

must be

can

it

ed.

Once

fee

it.

ent ones and go back to

ing on your car, within a reasonable

estimate

sure to get

or else

mess up your alignment and can cost you more gas. When you first start using synthetic oil, it doesn’t mean you have

time,

the

make

to

rotated

tires

can eventually overheat. is used up, sludge

the coolant

can build up in the coolant .systemp and it can blow a head gasket. 2. When buying a new or u,sed

^

most dealerships may tell you you don’t have to have an oil change until after 8,000 kilometres. car,

that

It is

actually after 5,000 kilometres

and

if it’s

not done then your war-

ranty can be voided.

about anything

3. if

Having an improper gas cap or

the gas cap seal

cost

you up

is

broken,

to a tank or

it

can

two of gas

what’s being fixed, then go back or ,someplace else.

every year.

you don't have the cash to get an oil change, you can go up to an

8 lbs. can cost four per cent extra

try

If

extra

1,000

maintenance

kilometres is

before needed, according

4. Tires that are

underinflated by

on gas mileage. Again, seem very little now, but adds up.

it

may

later

it


News

SPOKE, October

Change your ways before your ways

^

College office is By ERIC The

Desire, ignorance, pride, jealousy

and anger.

thus

According to the practice of tranBuddhist teachings these are the five poisons of life that can affect our mind, and anger is by far the most damaging. One of the reasons anger is considered the most damaging poi.son is because of the outwardly explosive acts which are associated with the emotion. These vicious acts of anger, which

On

quility in

include explosive outbursts, exag-

gerated hostility and authoritative

can be expressed both

defiance,

vocally and physically.

more obvious

the other hand,

to the public.

women

turn their anger inward,

damaging themselves

tend to

and end up

internally.

Finances, relationships and over-

main causes

stress are

all

ger people’s

anger.

that trig-

Collins

said

anger can also be instilled in children through life experiences and their families. “Some children have poor upbringings, which has a direct effect on how they deal with

They

situations.

how

learn

express their anger from their family since those are the most influential

mannerisms

as raising one's voice,

they know, have an anger control

swearing, threatening and argumentative and abusive language. as

problem, there are several signs they can look for. These signs include feelings of uneasiness and unhappiness, loss of appetite or

and

overeating, difficulty sleeping and

Physical

signs

of anger include

body language such

intimidating

muscles, clenched

ten.se

fists

glaring looks, as well as acts of

violence directed to oneself and others.

models

role

If

in their lives.”

people think they, or someone

of one’s

deterioration

physical energy. Continuous problems with anger control could lead to the loss of relationships, jobs, one’s well-

Another misconception about anger is that it is only a problem for men,

and not women.

anger

the misconceptions about

people are simply just

that

is

“angry” for no reason. However, anger

is

ment

that

complex temperastems from more in-depth

Shawna Bernard,

co-

ordinator of Student Services and a

is

behaviours are not

OK,

not

harassment

No

not

primary emotion that happens before the anger, whether it’s feelings of hurt, or betrayal,

loss

results in

ultimately

that

someone being

Some people mask

angry.”

their anger,

some explode with rage and others have a chronic condition of resentment, which surfaces over and over again. Nonetheless, anger ral part

of the

human

|ui accurate signal of

Problems in people’s ,

Another

anger

is

that

is

a natu-

condition and

more

serious

lives.

misconception about it is only a problem for

men, and not women. Joann Collins, a counsellor at Kitchener-Waterloo Counselling

(KWCS), said it’s not men who have trouble control-

is

thinks they

she urges anyone

may have

trouble

KWCS,

and

that

best

will

live

a healthier, happier

life

once you learn to control your anger. We all have some degree of dealing with anger and tend to act out on it. You can learn to be more assertive people once you know how to control your anger.” three

different

groups, anger management depending on the type of help people need. The first program is My Anger, My Answer, and it is an anger control program for adults. Controlling the Volcano Within is a

program family

in

life

association

with the

program, and gives par-

in them. Collins said this proto deal

Finally,

their

to

anger.

get

help controlling

“Anger

is

issue, not necessarily a

or a female issue.”

a

human

male issue

are not OK. Assault

is

not

OK, bullying is not OK, harassment is not OK.” Shawna Bernard, counsellor and

Physical exertion

another remedy people can use as an outlet for their anger. Jogging, swimming, lifting weights and even walking is

provide anger release, especially if feels they are about to erupt.

By

using physical energy and cool-

down, people are able

on a resume and it really prepares everyone for future jobs.”

i)fficc

Emotions Management

of reference,

it

looks great

dents of the office administration

Trish Morris, a first-year office

program with the opportunity to gain work experience before they

administration student, said the office administration skills lab

enter the workforce.

the

Holmes,

an

office

professor

in

up a similar lab in the Middle East and thought Conestoga students could benefit from such a concept. “The lab is like a professional office with all the equipment required to do a professional job,” said Holmes. “Students who participate in the model office will have two more years of work experience than most office administration grads from other colleges.” Second-year office administration students can opt to become office managers in the office to help and train first-year students in the course and monitor their work flow to make sure they meet

is

chose

she

Conestoga. “1

the

.school of business, first set

why

reason looked

at

three other colleges

that offered the

same course

but

Conestoga was the only one that offered the experience of the model office,” said Morris. “The hands-on work experience definitely gives Conestoga office admin, grads a step-up over other graduating students from similar programs.”

Morris said the atmosphere the skills lab

in

friendly and per-

is

sonable but also professional.

“The course

is

very good,” said

Morris. “Doing class thing and

some

we do

work

one

is

have to put

extra hours but the

.skills

in

lab

incorporates everything from our classes

in

a real office

more like the real world.” Even though working skills

lab

.setting,

in

the

challenging,

is

enter the

Courtney Brundula, also a firstyear office administration student, thinks it is fun and would

Self, a

recommend

work field, said Nicole second-year office admini.s-

aspects of your confidence.”

Second-year office administrastudent, Melanie Marriott, believes that students can only tion

from the model

benefit

office

it.

“The teachers and

tration student. “It really builds all

office

man-

agers are always available and very helpful but we also have to learn for ourselves which provides more of a goal than good marks,” said Brundula.

just “It’s

a great experience.”

experience.

negatively

makes

Conestoga

at

anger management.

Bernard

students

if

management group, we do have individual students, men and women, who come in and ask to work with a counsellor about anger managehistorically run an anger

ment.” If students

benefit

(Photo by Eric Murphy) First-

seem

would community

like they

more from

a

in

and second-year

office administration students

the office administration

skills lab,

the only

one

of

work hard its

kind

throughout Ontario’s colleges.

Student to an agency where they offer anger management groups. Bernard counsellors

service,

can

Services

added the to talk to

first

refer

at

them

step for students

someone so they can

is

wte cmdiaii^ imtiied ta tAe

learn

to understand their problem.

“Notice your what situations

triggers,

result

notice

with you

UttUed Way. 3m.

having an anger response, and talk

you

feel

fm $2 at 2:V€

3ue^day, OdaBj&t 31

open

to better under-

stand yourself.”

With help from anger management programs, people have the

is

opportunity to control their anger

an anger control program in association with local schools, which helps children deal with their tem-

it controls them. People seeking help with anger control can contact KitchenerWaterloo Counselling Services Inc.

per tantrums. All three programs run in eight-week intervals contin-

provides stu-

letters

Student Services offers

College,

said

pro-

it

to take

reacting to a situation which

them angry. For students

Marriott.

arc great,

Ontario’s college system.

“With this experience we learn what it’s like dealing with conflict, working with people and things like filing systems before we even

Services

an excel-

vides the opportunity for possible

deadlines.

co-ordinator ofStudent

to a professional if

with children in a calming manner.

Services

states certain behaviours

enough and ready

children provoke

women

Bernard said she’s seen both men and women come into Student

conduct

of

own anger when

ling their anger.

subtle before.”

“The code

ents a chance to recognize their

it

...

ways of coping.”

recognize they would benefit from help with anger management they could simply come in and request to meet with a counsellor. “Although we have not

gram shows parents how

sive

stand different

ing

Services Inc.

are

react to them, then they can under-

life situa-

management program suits their needs. “You

offers

they

support for personal issues, includ-

dealing with anger to call a coun-

KWCS

how

OK,

not

just

“More and more becoming more aggreswomen were much more

Assault

OK.”

matter one’s age or

tion, Collins said

who

states cer-

OK.

bullying is

selling service, such as

tions. “Generally, there is a

stand those situations, and

time to think before

join an anger

emo-

feel

lose their academic semester or even get kicked out of school as a result of acting out impulsively.

said anger is usually a secondary to conceal other

make one angry can help one recognize their triggers. .“If people can undera log of situations that

ing

counsellor at Conestoga College,

emotion used

yoga and keeping

painting, doing

with anger control problems could

tain

music,

to

an anger log. Bernard said keeping

one

quite a

emotions.

listening

being and even freedom. Bernard said Conestoga students

“The Code of Conduct

One of

as

to

behaviour can be examined vocally through such Intimidating

exercises

“The teachers

is

said

Conestoga College is the only one of its kind throughout

Sylvia

meditating through such

is

experience,”

lab at

administration relax

“The whole thing

office administration skills

The model

Students with anger control problems could lose their academic semester or face expulsion People tend to notice men’s anger more because their acts appear to be intimidating and threatening,

MURPHY

skills lab

a kind

of

lent

change you By BJ RICHMOND

one

— Page 13

2006

30,

before

uously from September to June. One of the strategies those with

519-884-0000. at phone by Conestoga students can seek help from Student Services in Room

anger control problems can use to

1B21.

and aamet> wiU Be »&wed puun 2:C0-3:VV in the SMue Staem and (Ac SCS^ iuncA Hearn

Jea, caAed

Came

tAe food, the

muaic and tAe wandexfui detcaice.

(Ul pHoeeecU getatAe ^United Way, Campaign


Feature

— SPOKE, October 30, 2006

Page 14

m

i

sBI

MCCORMICK

By TIFFANY

that

person would be considered

in

the league of the devil.

Don't step on a crack or you'll break your mother's back; throw the salt directly over your left shoulder; don't you dare break that mirror, seven years

is

a long time

bad luck.

for

We've

all

heard them, chuckled a

way, superstitions, good, bad, funny or scary, are part of society and are still leaving their mark. At least on a few people. A recent survey of 100 Conestoga students showed that 27 per cent believe in and follow superstitions,

while

73

per cent

superstition

defined as

is

a

be inOuenced

by supernatural forces, an idea or practice ba.sed on this. But where did these superstitions come from'? And why do people still believe in them?

The theory behind

spilling the salt,

a common occurrence

at

many

dinner

originated from the Middle Ages when salt was an expensive and precious commodity afso u.sed for medicinal purposes. It was believed if any was spilled it must be immediatetables,

thrown over the

ly

left

is used to keep the your body, at least today it older times the umbrella was

umbrella

shoulder to

general business student, said her

female black

superstitions have a lot to

wanted

cat. Christian priests

remove any

to

followers to destroy

claiming they were

insult to the sun.

women,

Horseshoes, not the

game

but the

objects, are considered to be an excep-

The

priests

lowers to

black cats,

demons. also convinced fol-

many

the owners,

kill

old

believing they were witch-

which

es,

all

evil

is

why

in

many

of witches a black cat

is

pictures

present.

never had a family

linked to her belief in

is

states

what

goes around comes around.

She said when people do certain things

it

could be

because they’re “skeptical

which was stronger than other metals and

it

could

and

come back around

bite

them

The

operations

spirits

in

which

the eye

would prevent sickness. Ever notice how an open ladder resembles a triangle? It was thought, in early Christian times,

leaning

a

that

formed a

triangle

^'sented

or open ladder which in turn rep-

Holy

the

Trinity.

one must never violate the Holy Trinity by walking through the triangle or else According

to Christians,

Kris

student,

Irick-oi-lrealing.

to

the bar or sitting at

going

to

home can now

blow some Halloween boredom

The St.

in

Paintball Arena, at

Kitchener,

Halloween

is

69 Agnes

having

its

paintball party in

first

hopes

of giving students something to do

tomorrow. The event will start at 4 p.m. Wearing a costume will get students free entry. However, ball and marker rental fee must be paid on entry. Balls are $7 and markers are around $5. Students are asked

to

ward

off

(Photo by Christopher Mitts)

.

“I feel that certain things

Many

i

party

sad

when you hear about

The Halloween will

them do and it’s give

worth $175 each. All players will be entered

something else to supervised so everyone

in a

draw.

probably end up doing this event again even if

"I’ll

can have fun.” he

it’s

said.

successful

not

said

year,”

this

cause trouble.”

Eoghan Green, the arena’s second manager, said this is sure to be a fun challenge for everyone who comes out to play.

Leggett. “Even

is

not being held

if

it

helps one

“As a word of advice anyone who. is com-

for

promo-

student from

ing

tional purpos-

being on the

don’t be afraid to get

es.

street

that

it’s

night

I’m

and with all the adrenaline going through you, you can’t feel it.” said Green.

for

want kids be safe while having “I

to

thrilled.”

fun.” he said. “Years ago we had Halloween

motto

having fun. so

and

as long as students

why a

and

I

paintball

following

are

party will

offer

them a place any day.

to play

youth on the

not only

consi.st

of costumes and paintball.

There

will

be apple bobbing and

which include unlimited free balls and six free one-year memberships to the arena. for players,

the

he’ll

“When

a blast.”

The

m

rules

students have

let

and

you

see

you makes

street or

hear about a shooting,

it

me

feel good knowing I can offer people a place to go,” said Leggett.

for

ly

the

really

He

safety,

is

service

party this Halloween

prizes

students resorting to alco-

Halloween

blast this drugs.

or

make

’"It’s

I

believe hanging A home on Dixon Street in Kitchener lets everyone have or do make me luckier.” horseshoe with the know that Halloween has arrived. Eden has a lucky pen that he uses and two lucky ends pointing up will January had one and so did poker chips he carries in his wallet. store good luck while hanging it October, a Friday the 13th that is. with the ends down lets the luck run Lindsay Ladzik said she believes out and allows bad luck to enter. Many perceive it as just another in superstitions as it helps explain Smash. We’ve all either .seen or why bad things happen. day but why don’t others? heard a mirror break at some point in The day itself, Friday, is thought “It gives a reason for everyour lives. When it does seven years to be in connection with the Bible. thing,” the first-year nursing bad luck comes to mind, why is that? Adam and Eve were expelled from student said. Broken mirrors, one of the most the Garden of Eden, Christ’s cruciVanessa Rodrigues, a common superstitions today, are fixion and the great flood all took first-year early childhood believed to have two supernatural place on a Friday. education (ECE) student, powers; they bring bad luck and The number 13, originates from said she’s always believed help tell the future. the recognition that 12 witches and in superstitions. It was thought in ancient times one devil are present at Satanic cer“I wonder what will happen that as a reflective surface, mirrors emonies. if I don’t do certain things.” held the key to the future and breakIt is believed that combining the She said a major thing for her is ing one meant shattering your own two together makes Friday the 13th avoiding cracks on sidewalks or future. Hence the years of bad luck. a scary, even deadly, day. floor tiles because if she falls into Beware the black cat. In ancient Christine Restoule, a second-year them she believes they could

thought

some

in

hats.

a

on the safety masks. Hal Leggett, arena owner since 1994, welcomes anyone above the

street.

why

superstitions are not a

to her.

“A black

cat has nothing to

how my day

do

Superstitions while they may be considered a passing phase to many, they are still important to some. What category do you fall

evil spirits.

purpo.ses, as the paint will rub off

^e

is

concern

she said.

to prehistoric times

was used

parties

1

first-year

pens or

it

not to paint their faces for sanitary

age of 0. Leggett said this is sure to be a fun night and only hopes that this will encourage students to get off

a

superstitions such as lucky

as

The event

with paintball.

Taunya Van Allen,

nursing .student, said her belief in

back

paintball

tive

a superstition,” she said.

Eden, said he believes

hol

Students looking for an alterna-

them out sooner or later.” Kyra Walter, a first-year nursing student, said life is the way you see it and how you make it. “You shouldn’t base your life on we’ll figure

superstitions of iron date

Have a By BECKY SHARPE

in supersti-

most occurrenees can be

explained reasonably.

God

in the ass.”

Second-year materials and

a

Doctor, said she

has no reason to believe

“Some things cannot,” she said, “but

pet.

Restoule also said her belief in superstitions

outcome.

she said.

Shawn

tions as

J

strike evil

life,”

life’s

affect different aspects of

First-year technology technician

known as pets, were considered bad omens so she tive animals, also

from

element.

may

student,

iron

magical

native, she said

karma, which

fire,

“It

one thing her family believed when she was growing up was that cap-

once considered a lucky trade, horseshoes were

made

change her

my

As an Ojibway

blacksmiths,

originally

do with

her culture.

chaim.

tionally lucky

Made by

of

traces

other religions and convinced their

used as a sunshade. In many societies the sun was revered as a high power so it was considered a direct

could withstand

don't give them the time of day. irelief that events can

In

is.

taken them seriously. Either

bit or

A

An

rain off

Egypt the Goddess Bast was a

first

time, hit,

not that bad

also said the

game

is

real

about conquering your

own

fear.

“What’s a better time to overcome your fear then on Halloween?” he said.

Green will be playing Halloween event. “I don’t want to miss out on the fun,” he said. in the

“Besides,

this

way

a

more experienced player be on the field to watch

“Paintball arenas try to give people

will

something better

out for inexperienced players.”

to

do

that

won’t

with

is

into?

going

to go,”


Feature

SPOKE, October

— Page 15

2006

30,

Blooda Orbax Grosses out students KJ KJ By KRISTIN GRIFFERTY It

was lough

to find a scat in the

Sanctuary on Oct.

Freak

Show was

in

1

8 because the

town.

unknowingly volunteered

lap.

assistants.

The factor,

stunts returned to the gross

when he was

slrailjaekct

Students crowded around to watch the Great Orbax perrorm his sideshow of stunts that ranged from

hammering

together by lying on each other's

nails into his nose, to

strapped into a

by third-year journal-

ism student Nick Casselli, so

Orbax

asketl the

face, breasts or rear end,

his words were much more

shoulder.

vulgar.

His

final

stunt

was by

far

the

each

know

they

Zoc Raaphorst, Jeaninc Beauehemin and Bailey Shields

would

be

using

an

upfront.

The students managed

down

their

ted

as

they

lunches,

said

Beauehemin.

“I regret

agreed,

"The college age group is one seems to be ready for a form of

entertainment

(who

would not give her real name) dazzled the crowd by walking barefoot over

machete

rusty

The

closed his eyes while per-

for

stunt.

a

is

bit

your face than

far,

and (they) arc

when

a point in their lives to appreciate

start

little

in

they

live cnlcr-

lainmcnl beyond just going

to sec a

band perform.” Orbax said his favourite slunl to perform is the human blockhead, in which he hammers the six-inch nail into his nose.

Oddly enough, Orbax

is

not as

freakish as he appears.

blades.

as he squirmed and

that

they've seen so

can

Polly

are

that

was super freaky. To end the show.

,Sikmn's facial expressions said

crowd because they

usually very receptive.

at

nail into his nose.

carney.”

is

said he enjoys performing for

the college

saying that the stunt

Pretty

and science student

that

more risque and

saying ass.”

c a

Raaphorst

forming the

and

"That was

flesh,”

real

to

he performs the

Orbax was quite

"Our acts keep alive North America's only indigenous arlform

He

regret-

decision

her

volunteer.

to his strange antics.

all,

keep

nipple and buttocks.

.

Vuk Sikmn was his first victim as Orbax brought him onto the stage to assist him in hammering a real

it

to

stapled cards to his face, '

However, as Orbax began his stunts, the crowd quickly warmed arts

why

asked

body.

hoped.

General

When

staple

to

Beauehemin

most astounding.

up

stapler

acts that he does,

Little did they

began his act with a few jokes that were not received as well as he had the Bizarre

to

industrial-sized

playing card to various parts of his

although

stapling a playing card to his lace.

The Doctor of

women

be his

pick a body part, and choose cither

he could escape by dislocating his

that

to

finale

both

the

He graduated from

the University

of Guelph with a master's degree

in

pe r fo rm c rs involved plac-

polymer physics, and has worked Discovery Canada.

Orbax successfully com-

cement on block

pleted his

Polly's

Squeals from squeamish females and cheering from the males

ing

egged him on, as first trick.

a

stom-

His second act of pullin his nose

ach while she

and mouth simultaneously had students in complete aw'c and hoiTor, especially after he tossed the condom into the crowd and into the

of machetes,

a

condom through

some grossed

laps of

laid

create

human

a

circle

^ I

of four

instructing

them

to

stunts

appeared to be of but

real

course the pern't

confirm

that.

link^ (Photo by Kristin

Zoe Raaphorst appears to enjoy stapling a playing card to the Great Orbax’s face during Freak Show, put on by Conestoga Students Inc. on Oct. 18.

in

which he has been

involved since

While

acts

professional

of

2()()().

his stunts arc quite danger-

ance. This incident, however, has not held him back.

formers would-

student volunteers, by

wrestling,

show

into freak

love

his

for

stomach All

Boating

Orbax got via

consultant

ous,

hammer.

Orbax then turned the stage over to some more students and proceeded

scientific

a

Orbax and the crushed block on her using a sledge

out

students.

to

on a bed

as

it

doesn't faze him.

2003, he suffered third-degree burns to his body during a performIn

Most people would dread being considered a Ircak, but not Orbax. He said it is better than being considered normal.

Orbax is currently travelling Canada with his show. He

across

can be seen in Toronto Club on Nov. 29.

at the

Mod

Grifferty)

the

flop 10 RealTrax^” ring tunes Week of October 23 1.

Chain Hang Low (Kids)

2

I

.

Jibbs

Know You See -

It

(A Cappella)

Yung Joe

3.

Lips of an - Hinder

Angel

4.

Money

The Bank

5.

Money Maker

-

-

In

Lir Scrappy

(Pharrell Chorus)

Ludacris (feat Pharrell)

6.

My Love

7.

Ring the Alarm

8.

Sexy Back

-

-

-

Justin Timberlake

Beyonce Justin Timberlake

9.

Shoulder Lean - Young Dro

10.

Smack That

(feat. T.l.)

-Akon Text 'PLAY" to

4800 on your Rogers wireless

phone to download your favourite

Enter to

ring tunes today.

WIN a trip to the 2006

Billboard* Music Awards in Las Vegas! •

Text

BILLBOARD to 555 on your

phone •

to get started!

Download any

Billboard ring tune or subsaibe to

Billboard Mobile 31,

2006

for

between

Septen^ 1 5

to October

your chance to vwn,*

Brought to you by Rogers Wireless.

(Photo by Kristin

Grifferty)

Jeanine Beauehemin flinches while stapling a playing card to the Great Orbax’s posterior. Orbax appeared to take great delight in shocking students at the college using crude jokes and gore.

(Photo by Kristin

Grifferty)

The Great Orbax dazzled and disgusted students in the Sanctuary by running a condom through his nostril and out his mouth. When he was done, he threw the rubber into the crowd.

’Billboard ring tunes start at S2.10 plus

50<

for die

download. The

is S5 (S3 content fee plus S2transpori fee). This subscription does not include the cost of ring hjnes. Bilitoaid IS registeteo trademark ofVNU Business Media. Inc.

Billboard* Mobile subscription


News

— SPOKE, October 30, 2006

Page 16

Mystery of Lovers’ Lane solved By JENN SPRACH

Then

The

true story of Lovers’

Lane

in

Ancaster has been altered over the years.

The

story

about a

trio

love at the

most people hear is of suicides due to a lost hermitage which now

truth

suicide,

is

and

it

there

isn’t

hermitage

was

the original

at

which was located on

private property about five minutes

away from

on

the hemtitage mins,

Sulphur Springs Road, said Jim Green, a local

Ancaster,

in

man who

has

Ancaster for 75 years. There were two hermitages which

lived in

many people don’t is .something know. The original hermitage was owned by the Ives family and it was this

at

who

Lane, said Green,

Ancaster.

in

man named

wealthy

came

hermitage that the suicide

a volunteer

Fieldcote Memorial Park and

at the

A

is

Mr. Ives

to Ancaster in the early

He

nal hermitage.

1

800s,

built the origi-

then brought his

wife and niece over from Greece.

Mr.

any English, so Mr. Black, the coachman, was asked to teach her Mr. Black

love with the

in

fell

niece, but kept this to himself for

when Mr. Black could

Finally, it

no more, he in

she was royalty and must be

woman

marry the

to

he loved.

The next morning Mr.

told Mr. Ives

love with his niece and

when

was

Ives

Mr. Black’s remains no longer at

he could go to work, but the carriage

six

never came.

he couldn’t be buried

in the

yard so he was buried crossroads and that’s

a sin

is

church-

down at the how Lovers’

lie

855 the Leith family bought the this is the one

1

now

that

known

he killed himself.

much.

neighbours built a

the

shack which she lived

second hermitage and

house door he found Mr. Black hanging from the rafters.

.so

So

little

her

in until

death in 1942.

“People keep making stories about

stands in ruins.

ily.

fam-

five children in the Leith

She cherished

the house

and was

for her unique parties.

and burned down, leaving the ruins that remain today. They did, fire

manage to save some of her included many edition books which can now be

however,

belongings which first

found

Fieldcote Memorial Park

in

second hermitage wasn’t even

built

People say they have seen ghosts and they even hold ghost walks there. “I’ve lived here for 75 years and I’ve never seen a ghost here,” he

During one of her parties the house caught

“The

Black’s ghost,” said Green.

yet.”

Alma Dick-Lauder was

Eleanor

the niece so

the land she loved so

the hermitage being haunted by Mr.

one of

couldn’t live without her,

in Ancaster.

Although the fire destroyed the house Dick-Lauder refused to leave

metres away from the crossroads.

opened the carriage

much he

Rd.

Lovers’ Lane but approximately

In

walked down to the carriage house to see what was taking so Finally, he

he

to the left but,

they buried Mr. Black, the road

ran straight along the stone fence.”

waiting for his carriage to arrive so

When

the cross-

is

said Green.

“The road now bears

Mr. Black just wasn’t good enough

Since committing suicide

quite awhile.

he was

that

now

thing

roads are no longer the crossroads,

treated as royalty.

They say he loved

the language.

stand

Mr. Ives responded no, and added

and Museum, 64 Sulphur Springs

name.

its

The only

long.

couldn’t speak

niece

Ives’

Lane got

her.

the real story of Lovers’

is

bought property and

a trace of the original

left,

This

was only one

hermitage property.

There

was the second hermitage which was built by the Leith family. It was the one that burned down, leaving it in ruins. there

Mu.seum

stands in ruins.

The

then asked for permission to marry

took place.

said.

A

was up

friend of Green’s

at

the hermitage and she swears she

saw

on a horse. of baloney,” giggled Green. “It’s weird what people will see.” a ghost of a girl

her she’s

“I tell

full

may

Getting lucky

be easier than you think By NICK CASSELLI

for your usual cleansing,

change it is your big night and don’t forget you are the man. You don’t just want to smell nice, you want to. smell like a million up a

For the average Joe, getting lucky bar is certainly not an easy task to accomplish. For most, it’s a long complicated process that requires countless hours watching Blind Date and many gruelling hours of pre-bar preparation. at the

Of course, not every young gentleman was blessed with the natural suave of Don Juan DeMarco or an accent like Antonio Banderas or the rugged

So, for

who

there

good looks of Brad Pitt. you average dudes out

all

are tired of watching the

late night bikini

attempt here

are

channel

mere few

at a

a

Having (Photo by Jon Motson)

Pool shark racks up at Conestoga shot,”

which

his skills in

this;

tonight,

I

am

Halloween

this

with your favourite horror

won’t

1

strike

.self

young diva

escort-

into

your

rent are the

to

Halloween is a scary time of year, and for some, downright terrifying.

The people who jump tle

.sound or

their

bed

at

at

who check

every

lit-

underneath

night aren’t scaredy-

cats, but arc usually the

ones

who

Halloween .series, the Nightmare

Saw movies and on Elm Street the

said

films,’’

Jablonski.

it

is

the time of year for

horror. It’s all about witches

and

are watching horror flicks.

ghosts.

Horror movie rentals skyrocket at Halloween, according to a Blockbu.ster employee in Guelph.

companies put new horror movies out near Halloween on purpose.’’ she said. “In theatres

“A lot more people rent scary movies near Halloween," said Ola

especially.

them,

mostly teenagers .she

Look

at

all

the

new

horror movies out right now.”

Jablonski said on a regular day,

Jablonski. It’s

“I think film

who

rent

added.

“The most popular scary movies

not near Halloween, about

40 per

cent of movies rented are horror films,

but

near

Halloween

it

about 75 per cent.

to

“I

character’s position.

I

same

time,

sitting in

I

feel safe becau.se

my

living

room.

I’m

It’s

a

safe fright."

Maybe

some design-

Rico time.

it’s

this night is all

should have mentioned

1

before,

you don’t haye

if

some

purchase

already,

about

it

fine-

smelling cologne.

The following brands

will

be

Gucci, Versace, Swiss Army, Polo,

out bachelor pad to call your own.

Tommy

me

into

my

next

tip.

I

home all

mean

NEVER

bring a

to

over

it,

so avoid

it

at all

Planning

is

everything.

a styling, profil-

limousine riding, jet flying,

wheeling

dealing,

kiss-stealing

^

son of a gun. You’re ready to paint the town red.

But,

leave

you don’t have a place, book

one for the night or talk and explain to him your He’ll understand,

it’s

to a friend

situation.

the

code of

in the

remember, before you

doesn’t work and

all

your

some candles and champagne room for afterwards, if you

know what

mean!

1

These are

just

some

helpful tips

before the evening begins.

The

the male. If this

men.

for

So now you’re

leave on your romantic expedition;

costs.

If

Locale Sport, Diesel, Armani and

ing,

your folks’ hou.se. This has combustible situation

date

written

because can feel like I’m being chased by the killer,’’ she said. “I can feel the pain of what’s happening to the character, but at the

start flashing

But wait, perhaps some of you might not have access to a pimped

Never,

personally love scary movies

time to

quite appropriate for your evening:

This leads

She thinks people like to watch horror movies and put them.selves in the

She thinks more people rent horror flicks near Halloween because

jumps

your skin should be

So now that you smell real good you feel even better, it’s time to make your burlap sac look like a cashmere sweater. Ah yes, the wardrobe is next. First, things first, you’re wearing silk undergarments tonight. Now instead of wearing your usual T-shirt and blue jeans, it’s

this

Get one.

By JENN CURTIS

this point

the ladies.

out

and

bachelor’s pad.

very

flick

own

At

“1

the man.”

in the tub

as soft as a baby’s bottom.

er clothes

Visualize yourself getting lucky;

ing a fine

Put those bubbles take a bubble bath.

the

following,

envision your confident

Scare yourself

is

bucks.

Remember

yourself the

can do

an attempt to sink all six the Sanctuary on Oct. 17. is

attitude

before

essential

evening begins. Tell

Gerry Watson, a pool expert, sets up for a “five bag trick balls in a single shot. CSI invited Watson to demonstrate

forever.

right

the

could

that

tips

change your fortune absolutely

in a feeble

night’s pleasure,

after all, tonight

little;

actual process of picking

a beautiful

young woman

is

up

anoth-

Lauren Ponting also loves scary movies and it doesn’t matter what

friends

rent a hotel for the night.

time to explain the mystical secret

time of year

OK, your confidence is up, the pad is there, now you are well on your way to a rocking affair.

behind

“It

it

is.

doesn’t really matter

Halloween is to me.’’ she rent them all year-round.’’

when

said. “1

are jerking

you around,

Instead of jumping in the shower

er story

and

I

don’t have enough

that.

you Promised Land.

But, hopefully these tips set

on the path

Good

to the

luck gentlemen.


News

Government hopes By CHRISTOPHER MILLS

^

looking

take

to

different

a

won

Moneymaker

Chris

in

the

2003 hav-

ing never played in a live tourna-

ment.

He won

his seat in

Las Vegas

by winning an online poker tournament, and his improbable win at the

world series netted him $2.5

million and sent poker’s popularity

membership

2003,

at

online gambling sites has skyrocketed (not to mention attendance at

World Series of Poker), and it is this new and uncontrollable fad the

Ontario politicians wonied

that has

John Milloy, a

of the governing Liberal

proposed legislation would restrict the promotion of illegal online gaming by print, pub-

1

52, the Ministry of

Services

Consumer

Government

Protection and

Consumer

existing

The Criminal Code of Canada states that Internet gaming is illegal unless it is conducted or managed by the province, but enforcing

leg-

islation regarding the Internet

is

a

government

is

difficult task, so the

AARON SCHWAB

porates

the

Member’s

of

intent

Private

Bill

to not include .search engines

such

as Google,” he said.

The

being referred to

bill

Liberal

is

that

MPP

for

Peterborough. Leal introduced Bill

60

was

earlier this year becau.se he

local lotteries

los.ses that

and racetracks were

Government Services

enduring.

Minister Gerry Phillips adopted the

and

looking to apply the leg-

is

islation

in

paramount

for

it

is

people to educate themselves about native

Canadian heritage

their

in

may better Aboriginal way of

area so that they

under-

stand the

life.

Jaime

Mishibinijima,

the

Aboriginal student adviser

at

the

it

taught and

is

is

that

we

see

not being taught to a lot of

the

complexity

native issues,” she said.

of

“Native

students often have a lot of differ-

around funding, around situating themselves within a mainstream campus, particularly students from First Nations communities rather than urban centres.” Alan Emarthle, manager of Six Nations tourism, said it was important for him to be a part of ent issues.

Aboriginal Awareness

Week when

way

to

bet

on

few sports

a

is difficult.

Milloy said the propo.sed amend-

MPP

Conservative

for Waterloo,

ments have nothing

do with

to

Elizabeth Witmer, said she person-

inhibiting anyone’s rights to gamble.

gambling and sees no difference between Internet and casino gambling when it comes to

ing

against

addiction.

online

ally

opposes

“While time,

is

Internet gambling, at this

as addictive as casino or race-

track gambling,” she said.

Members of the online gambling community, like Josh Kortleve of Cambridge, think the government has other motives.

“The

government wants to gaming to encour-

restrict private

responsible the

He

tak-

illegal

businesses

is

that the

based on the

in

is

protect casinos, but said

it

trying

to

has noth-

ing to do with benefiting the government itself. “Legitimate businesses such as

in

deal with increa.scd competition

update

is

spending $6 million

image and

its

new range of

ing a

cannot be governmentowned Ontario Lotteries and Gaming Corporation, which operFor either side,

ignored

it

the

that

expected to lose an additional $210

“The horseracing industry

employs

is

last

The

issue

debated

in

is

certain to be widely

the

coming weeks

continue

industry in the province and a very

how

important industry to Ontario.

tion, as well as a possible

approximately

It

40,000

full-time (people) and 25,000 part-

parties

to handle the

from

online

to

as

discuss

proposed legislabacklash

gamblers

in

the

province.

stand.

Those

are.”

Emarthle said he feels natives Canada are paddling upstream

in

in

their struggle to achieve an under-

with

standing

people outside of

make

their culture.

us,

media,” he said. “In the universi-

wards, three steps backwards, three

that .seems to

be fighting against (us)

machine

now, for

ple across the oceans (but) people

said.

“Some

who come

of the people

...

here and expect that they can

treat us that

way

the dances.

just to

is

make

a dollar.

isn’t

to

This

is

This is stuff that they do every day, singing these songs and dancing. “It’s a beautiful part of who we part of their

life.

things better.

it’s two steps forward and one step back, but can’t. It’s more like three steps back-

“(We’re) against a huge machine

a

immigrate to

and there are people working hard it’s good to see people coming together and I’m witness to that every day at Six Nations; seeing people working together to try and

-

that

and

fail to

right

in all the educational levels,

push

I

steps backwards.”

Emarthle said he has a lot of faith power of youth, who believe

to

recognize there’s a struggle

right here

“I’d like to say

underneath their noses.

“Everybody should be working hard (to promote understanding)

in the

in the natives’

“It’s the

cause.

young people who

send a powerful message,” he “In the late-’60s,

dents

who

it

were heard. Let’s do

also.”

Emarthle said there are a lot of Nations communities across North America that are like Third First

countries.

“Eighty-five per cent of our wells are infested with E. coli,” he said of

the Six Nations’ private water sup-

“We have huge economic problems, social problems and environmental issues.” ply.

to

come

to

things

like

Week),

Awareness

Emarthle said

it’s

we

also important

non-native citizens

about the native culture

to in

know

Ontario

and abroad because peace

come through

will

understanding.

“There’s going to be people in world who don’t want to

this

understand,” he said.

who

“There are

are going to be like that

and they’re just going

to close their

mind. “But there are more people, thank God, who are open-minded and they’re going to want to learn and

fmiltrT anil 10 Manitou Dr. tCitcbetier

was

can' said.

the stu-

got up and their voices

feel it’s that important.”

Oct. 16.

are

million this year.

both

largest

do

who

we’re just ready to go, because

of

They

few years.

agricultural

.second

the

educate people about the struggles. “We look at the struggles of peo-

(Aboriginal

promotes Aboriginal Awareness Week at the University of Guelph on

had

ates casinos in the province,

over the

do this as a hobby; this something that they decided

people

introduc-

law and they are losing business to those that are operating illegal Internet gaming businesses,” he

there’s not that strong of a

for

is

lottery tickets.”

industry are operating within the

that are here with us, they don’t

World

the

Gaming

and

Lottery

Corporation

and

region

Detroit

the

Ontario

revenue decline by $335 million

Canadian Aboriginals than people who have lived in Canada before,

invited

manager

gov-

those in the Ontario horse racing

ties

come

it

At the same time. Aboriginals

Six Nations tourism,

legis-

“The government is .spending $400 million on the Windsor Casino to help

have a strong and powerful culture they are very proud of, he said. “When we get venues and get

Alan Emarthle,

new

fact that

about $4 billion,” she said.

to

government

the

that

free market.”

not an addic-

is

protect

did not disagree with the fact

said.

is

to

promotion of

gaming

age public use of government-run gaming,” he said. “Blocking private gaming sites from being allowed to advertise goes against a

Online gambling

steps

Ontario,” he said.

not participated in by as

many Ontarians as other forms of gambling, there is no doubt that it is

“The Ontario government

all

“These (Six Nations) dancers

people

as third-class citizens and so they

understand

uses an online site as a conven-

a different view of

Some

their aboriginal people are treated

need

online

He

and

here from different countries

growing

some

in

for

a

but

even getting up and participating

it’s

critical

administrators, faculty and staff to

“There’s

addictive,

is

tries to live here.”

that

he

general public.

that Internet

people in schools anymore,” Emarthle said. “It’s not being taught to any of the people who come here from different coun-

education

event took place at the university

16-20 and was open to the

doubt

going to want to underare the people we’re hoping to reach, through our songs, through our dance.” Emarthle said it means a lot to him to see people taking an interest in native song and dance during Aboriginal Awareness Week and

Canada have

Oct.

little

they’re

how

see

of Guelph, said Aboriginal Awareness Week is one important way it is promoted. The University

Witmer agreed lation

Awareness Week promotes education

he was invited.

The Aboriginal community

There is gambling

legislation incor-

60 but most of the definitions have been narrowed so

“We Ontario thinks

rural

racetracks with annual revenue of

Aboriginal By

in

Ontario.”

to a casino

on a much larger scale. Phillips said Internet gambling is highly addictive and is overly accessible to young adults - and even minors - who can play anonymously for hours from the comfort of their homes. A study conducted Septerhber by the Ontario in Gambling Research Problem

Protection Act.

born with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and has been confined to a wheelchair for the past 13 years.

time (people) - mainly

lar casinos.

sites.

bill

already

was

nication, as well as the sponsorship

would be an amendment

the

and

Kortleve, 24,

of these

Service Modernization Act, 2006, to

2001

Kortleve, but a form of

for

games each week. For him, going

and telecommu-

worried about financial

Bill

between

2005.

tion

entertainment.

gambling downplay the addictiveness of gambling in regu-

lication, broadcast

provincewide ban on advertising sites.

quadrupled

8-24

1

ient

of Jeff Leal,

gambling

gaming

believe Phillips’ arguments against

and ready to take action. The Ontario government has introduced a bill proposing a for Internet

that Internet

ernment casinos are losing money to Internet gambling sites. “The Ontario government oversees casinos, slot machines and

party, said the

"The proposed

off the charts.

Since

MPP

Kitchener

member

Centre found

— Page 17

2006

30,

ban gambling ads

to

among young people aged

approach.

World Series of Poker

SPOKE, October

inort*’.*.*

(Cmmr of Maiiitow 4 Falrwail

it

again.”


Page 18

News

— SPOKE, October 30, 2006

Odoher

of

(Vee/c

2006

30.

2

1

to

Libra

Aries March

Maiden continues be a musical force

Iron

iCOPE

September 23 October 22

-

April 19

By

'

ADAM HANNON

1

Your impulsive

instincts

may

You cannot please everyone

will only

you'll regret.

fair to yourself.

the time so stop trying will begin to

"'C

May

-

work against you. Be

week

October 23

20

will be put to the

and out of school friends. family and with Remember to breath and keep your focus, don’t lo.se sight of in

what's important to you.

November

May

2

1

-

21

careful what you don't say week. Secrets tend to be your forte as people confide in you. Be aware of who the secrets are about, sometimes what people don't know can hurt them.

Sagittarius November 22 December 21

1

You usually think with your head Gemini and have gotten far because of it, but don't forget you are human too and your emotional needs cannot be ignored forev-

crowd

in

at the

Air Canada

Toronto on Oct.

16.

Maiden started off strong with up-tempo songs Different World and These Colours Don’t Run from their new album A

Be

June 2

-

sold out

the

this

Gemini

After more than 25 years as a band. Iron Maiden is still a force to be reckoned with. The British power metal sextet played to a

Centre

Scorpio

jUs>

Your patience test this

to.

need for constant approval

the

Taurus April 20

all

Work wear you down and

push you into something you aren’t ready to handle. Keep your head in control of your body and don't do anything you know

Matter of Life and Death. The whole band gave top-notch performances, but the precision of the guitar harmonies of Dave Murray, Adrian Smith and Janick Gers was especially impressive. These songs were already fan favourites, and much of the crowd

was singing along. The band played

the next three

songs off the album. Brighter a Thousand Suns, The

Than

Pilgrim and The Longest Day, stopping only long enough for drummer Nicko McBrain to count in the next song. After the fifth song of the set.

The song took everyone present on a musical journey from the soft

ones

to follow

it,

comes

and intense solo, and back again. the

band

finally

got a breather

while lead vocalist Bruce Dickinson greeted the audience and introduced their next number, Out of the Shadows. This was fol-

-

when

explorative

it

and seeking nature

often takes control. Life

is

short,

don't wait and live in regret.

Do

An

not be a scaredy-crab this

your shell when things get out of hand like you're used to doing. Be upfront and responsive. Be bold and brave. Don't

hide

inside

you

you

to

expect from Iron Maiden.

The next two songs. For the Greater Good of God, and Lord of Light, were entertaining and

com-

played,

although not truly memorable performances. The final song from A Matter of Life and Death, however, was somewhat of a disappointment. petently

The Legacy

started

off

well

done.

Once the band got to the bridge of the song, however, it became

how much

apparent

new

of a strain the

was

putting on Dickinson's voice. When he sang some of the higher notes, his voice cut out almost completely. In Dickinson’s defence. The Legacy is probably one of the most vocally difficult songs the band has written, ever.They probably should have performed it closer to the start of their set, when Bruce’s voice was still fresh, instead of an hour in. After Maiden finished performing A Matter of Life and Death,

material

the Dark.

title

The song took everyone

present on a musical journey from the soft first verse to the high-

energy ones which follow it, to the melodic guitar harmony and intense solo, and back again. Maiden ended their .set with the song everyone had been waiting

opportunity will arise that feel

come

precision their fans have

track of their 1992 album. Fear of

-

January 19

week.

Benjamin Breeg. The nine-minute epic was a hit with the crowd, and the band performed it with the album-quality

they treated the crowd to the

Capricorn December 22

new album’s first Reincarnation of

their

The

single.

enough, and the first five minutes or so of the song were very well

relationships as your

to

to the

melodic guitar harmony

Avoiding serious commitments has been your specialty

first

verse to the high-energy

lowed by

*

can't live without.

It's your nature to act quickly so do not slip or even your determination will not be enough to recover what is lost.

for,

the

title

track off their self-

album. The song sounded even more powerful and energetic than it did when Iron Maiden recorded it in

titled

Leo July 23

-

Aquarius January 20

August

1980.

-

After a five-minute break, and a

February 18

22

deal of screaming and cheering from the crowd, the band returned for an encore, performgreat

As

the ruler of the back, spine

and heart you are never anyone's doormat. Your friends may need your independence and assertiveness to rub off on them this week to help them face personal chal-

Your opinions will be challenged by someone who doesn't understand your innovative and eccentric ways. Hold true to your convictions and don't allow a narrow-minded person to get the

ing The Evil That Men Do and Hallowed Be Thy Name. During The Evil That Men Do. a giant tank replica rose up from behind the drum kit, and from it

best of you.

came

lenges.

a large, robotic version of

mascot Eddie. Although Eddie is a part of almost every Iron Maiden show, it the band's ghoulish

Virgo

Pisces

August 23 September 22

You

strive

for

perfection

February 19 March 20

You adapt well

in

every detail of your work. This

tions

week will test you immensely when constant sloppiness sur-

when way.

which

will

a surprise

Do

that he

to new situacome in handy is

ance,

thrown your

and imaginative

rounds you. Let it go, everything be perfect but the

tive

help you through this and your

work

response will inlluence others.

combined with

A

abilities will

the anti-'^.

many

of the songs from Matter of Life and Death, and

lyrics in

not panic, your recep-

can't alway.s

will turn out alright.

especially appropriate appeared from a tank during a song called. The Evil That Men Do. The combination of his app^^^

seemed

-

backdrop (which band’s showed newspaper pages from the second world war), made a strong the

statement about the band’s aversion to

Tiffany

McCormick

is

a third-year

journalism student holding fate in the

The tA/UflAf,

STA eSHOP. COM

palm of her hand.

Coming soon

to houseparties,

clubs and boudoirs near you.

armed most

conlJict.

important

part,

though, is that none of this stage show took away from the music being played. At the end of the night, it was obvious that Iron Maiden is still as much of a musical force to be reckoned with as they were 25 years ago.


Sports

Season over

SPOKE, October

tain

who

scored two

Condors played

The Conc.sloga Condors' men’s rugby learn won't be playing for a medal tor the first time in five years losing

alter

the

to

Seahawks on Oct.

IS

at

Seneca Rogers

Cambridge. The Condors played their best and most important game but came up short, ending their .season. Most of the issues causing the team problems were ironed out by the game. The^ Condors lost by 2 points and just didn’t have enough time to catch up after a mis.sed tackle and coming out flat in the second half For most of the first half the score was tied, 0-0, but both teams snuck Park

in

1

in a try in the last

lO minutes,

mak-

ing the score 5-5.

Seneca had a lot of penalties at the beginning of the game, however, Conestoga didn’t capitalize on the opportunities.

Nick Milbury, the Condors' cap-

15

in

favour of Seneca.

Right-winger, Matt D’Agostini, of the Hamilton Bulldogs, bar-

down the ice during the third period. The Bulldogs were defeated 4-2 by the Peoria Rivermen at Copps Colliseum in rels

Hamilton Oct. 21

in

the

AHL game.

the

said the

tries,

game

the

way

they should have been playing

all

place out of seven teams with two

wins and four

won

losses. Last year they

bronze.

Joel Hus.scy, the Condors’ assis-

year.

"We

stayed

in

a

trusted each other

straight

line,

more and were

playing as a team instead of individuals but Seneca just had said Milbury,

fire,”

on the team

who

more

has been

for five years.

tant

coach, said given the inexperi-

ence of the players the Condors improved a lot. “Inexperience was their vulnerability in the end,” said Hussey. However, it was interesting to note .

seasoned veterans, like Tim^ and Glenn Lull, didn’t play in the game. A lot of the rookies arc returning next season which looks promising

In the first few minutes of the second half Seneca was able to score on Conestoga. The Condors missed a tackle which caused the team to fall apart for 5 minutes which allowed Seneca to get up on them. Missed tackles have been a huge issue for the Condors all season

that

said Milbury.

helped them

1

In the last five minutes,

Andrew

Harris was able to score but the Condors were down by two tries with no time left. The final score was 27- 5 for the Seahawks. They ended thejr season in 5lh 1

Stefllcr

for next year.

Bob McArthur, Seneca’s head coach, said the Seahawks played

with their hearts and souls which

won

had never

end. Seneca has medal every year and

in the

the gold

lost

a

game

until

this

season. ”ll

was good

nation of field.

It

all

to see the determi-

the

players on

showed they

the

really love the

game,’’ said McArthur.

(Photo by Jessica Biumenthai)

(Photo by Jessica Blumenthal)

Larry Stuart, No.. 2, throws the rugby ball to Kyle Gallagher during a lineup in the second half. The final score of the game was 27-

— Page 19

Condors

for sullen By JESSICA BLUMENTHAL

2006

30,

During the second

Conestoga Condor rugby player, Shane Lloyd, No. 7, holds up a Seneca a maul. Assisting were Conestoga players from left to right, Nathan Lajeunesse

Seahawk player in and Andrew Harris.

half,


Page 20

Sports

— SPOKE, October 30, 2006

Rugby

action

Conestoga’s and Seneca’s men’s rugby teams battle for the ball in their game on Oct. 18, which ended in a 27-15 loss for the Condors. Left:

Right;

Team

tackles a

captain, Nick Milbury,

Seneca

prepares to

strip

player

the

and

'

ball.

Photos by Jessica Biumenthal

Condors’ COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

College Alcohol Inventory

The

was developed

future looks

%

Wisconsin-Eau Claire. It might be interesting for you to complete the inventory and then compare your score with the average scores that were recorded at the University of Wisconsin~Eau Clair. following College Alcohol Inventory

at the University of

bright Although the women’s

team fell short of making the fastball

True

False

1.

I

have drunk 5 or more drinks

in

a row at least once

in

the last

two weeks.

year

playoffs, the

was a success True

False

2.

f

have drunk

to intoxication at feast

once

in

the last two weeks. By

True

False

True

False

O

3.

I

4.

I

have drunk alone

have drunk alcohol

last

the last 3 months.

in

daily (at least

5 days

of

each week)

for the

month.

ADAM BLACK

After a hard-fought and muchimproved season, the women’s fastball team fell just short of making the playoffs.

After ending the season with a

Durham, and Seneca winning their' final game, the Condors dropped to fifth place and out of the playoffs. Durham went on to win the OCA A fastball championship, only losing one difficult 17-4 loss to

True

False

O

5.

I

have said or dona something under the influence 3 months.

of alcohol

I

regret during the last

True

O

False

have drunk during the last 3 months so that could do something that felt could not do as easily without alcohol talk, relax, be more outgoing).

6.

I

I

I

I

game (i.e.

Even though

False

I’ve

last

True

False

8.

I

experienced a blackout (memory toss) while drinking 3 months.

have driven under the influence

in

the

3 months.

of alcohol in the last

it

bright

for

team

core of the

9.

I

have missed school or work due to the effects once in the last 3 months.

of alcohol at

False

O

10.

will

OCAA

the

have experienced withdrawal (shakes, sweats, flushed faced) after stopping drinking in the fast 3 months. I

“The

remain

They hope

this

championships

girls

in

always play

with heart.”

Fawn Day,

True

False

11.

My drinking has harmed my persona!

relationships

In

the last 3

women ’s fastball coach

months.

True

12. During the last

False

3 months,

I

have often drunk

in

larger

amounts

or over a longer period of time than intended.

^core

Condors coach Fawn Day comall the hard work and determination the team has shown. “The girls always play with heart,” said Day. “They never quit plimented

it seems, and that's something our team has prominently done (all

.season).”

Add your scores on questions 1-12 (one point for each True answer). This is your severity score. The range is 0-12. 50% of UWEC students average score is 2.4. 84% of UW EC students score 5 or below. If an answer to any question or your counsellor at Student Services. “If Alcohol is

total

score concerns you, please consider talking to a

The team has improved aspects

of the game,

This

their offence. total

to 3

2005.

1

in

.sea.son

The team was

led in .scoring this

with 15

hits,

average

of

12 runs and a batting

.455,

followed

Milissa Voisin with 14

Visit

all

season by Brittany Swartzentruber

causing you problems you have a problem with alcohol/’

A Message

in

especy'^

of 58 runs, compared

scored a

from Student Services

our website http://www.conestoqac.on.ca/isp/stserv/index.isp r

hits, II

by runs

and an average of .368 and Laura Matheson with 14 hits, nine runs and an average of .333. For players interested in trying out next fall you can contact Day at fawner6(§>hotmail.com or check http://www.conestogac.on.ca/rec_ centre/html/wfastball.html for try-

out dates.

.

.

iij

at

fastball

2007.

feast

True

>

be enough to push them into

will

False

Conestoga. After a tough 2-10 season and finishing in last place last year, the Condors have improved to 57 this season, placing fifth. The intact next year.

True

was

heartbreak-

ing to miss the playoffs, the future

looks

True

-•

season.

all

j


Digital Edition - October 30, 2006