Issuu on Google+

Varsity sports kicks into action Condors’ men’s and women’s soccer and men’s rugby all in

OCAA

Cambridge stabbing School safety called into question after man stabbed near St. Benedicts.

ews 7

league play this week.

Sports

Tuesday, October 10, 2006

18,

A

learning

newsroom

Roii out the barrei! K-W prepares for biggest Oktoberfest for

journalism students

celebration outside pf Germany.

19

News 15

Conestoga College, Kitchener, Ont.

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

37th Year

— No.

1

Contest winners move onto regionals By JENN

SPRACH

The three winners of a computer programming contest held on Sept. 30 at Conestoga College will be moving on to the regional contest Sheridan College in Oakville. Dalibor Dvorski, a second-year computer programmer/analyst student, took first place. at

Hongsun (Sunny) Jang,

(Photo

The top

a third-

computer programming contest

year computer programmer/analyst student, took second place and

Matt Skelton, a second-year

came in The three

dent,

were, from left, Omar Samad, Dalibor Dvorski, Hongsun Jang

stu-

and Matt Skelton.

third.

winners

received

Conestoga College mugs and T-

difficulty of the questions

shirts.

one and

Omar Samad, a third-year student in the program, came in fourth

Jang

Sheridan College on

are planning to wear their new T-shirts at the east central North America regional pro-

turnout this year. Last year the competition was cancelled because nobody signed up.

He

received

also is

a

T-shirt

the alternate for the

competition.

The

students will

now be work-

ing as a team at the regional petition

Nov.

at

com-

10.

They

ACM

will

is

regional

to sign

of three people need

up for the contest

to run, said Tanuan. This year five stu-

and universities in the area. Dvorski said the questions were very difficult and even though he won he hopes to do much better

It is open to any full-time Conestoga College student who

next year.

knows how

“I’ll

(Photo by Eric Murphy)

dents competed in the contest.

Anyone

have to work hard with the

to

use C,

C++

interested

or Java.

in

more

top three to prepare for the region-

information about computer pro-

“We

gramming activities can contact Tanuan at mtanuan@conesto-

al

The

compete against other colleges

the

A minimum

gramming competition where they

26.

between Jang responded “five,

actually, five plus plus.”

to

because he

Taking a kick out of the competition

five,

nervous about moving on competition but hopes he can contribute to his team. Meyer Tanuan, of the School of Engineering and Information Technology, who runs the competition, said he is happy with the

place.

Condor Rich Parsons defends his net in soccer action versus the Humber Hawks on Sept. Condors took a tough 1-0 loss. For more varsity action see Pages 18 and 19.

by Jenn Sprach)

four winners of the

competition,” said Dvorski.

work

as a team.”

When

asked to rate the level of

gac.on.ca.

Memorial donor clinic therapeutic for Walkers By JESSICA BLUMENTHAL

the

A

second blood donor clinic was

held at Conestoga Residence and

Conference Centre

in

memory

of a

woodworking student. William Walker was remembered

first-year

all who walked into the baseaPient of the residence Sept. 26. A smiling picture of Walker was propped on the registration desk. Walker died from an epileptic

Mj|y

amazed the way Conestoga community has

unteering and are

reached out for Will.” It’s

nice to talk to

when

William’s death and

them

2006.

negative situation.

"It was Will’s dream to donate if he ever overcame epilepsy,” said William’s parents, Anne and

drive and

made 1 1,000 donations combined. The Walkers were at the clinic so they could see

all

the people volun-

teering their time.

“We’re so proud of everyone vol-

to help, said

Anne. “The volunteers help to open a lot of doors towards empathic changes in the community,” she said. The Walkers found the clinic very

seizure while in his sleep January

Richard Walker. Both of his parents’ give platelet donations once a week. They have

Leu,

members of the

community who want

therapeutic

who finds out where clinics by checking www.bloodser-

vices.ca.

Rene Brousseau, who has taken welding and millwrighting courses at Conestoga, came to the clinic with Leu.

Brousseau, a first-time donor, said donating blood wasn’t as

it

as he thought.

with has allowed

to see a positive angle in a

ing. “It’s something everyone should be doing since you never know when you’re going to need it,” she

said.

donating blood in high school to get out of a math test started

and has given blood

are

dealing

Melissa Leu, who was at the is a donor for life, agrees donating is therapeutic and reward-

Leu

“There should be more memorial clinics, they’re a great idea,” said

1

6 more times.

“There

is

a lack

bad

of education

about blood clinics and donation,” he said. “The government should

make it mandatory that everyone who can donate, does. It would solve many problems.” This drive had more than 30 donors. The last clinic was held in April and had 24 donors.

The Walker family gave out two $100 gift certificates for a draw to students

who

donated.

(Photo

Melissa Leu donates blood at a blood donor

Conestoga residence William Walker.

in

memory

of

by Jessica Biumenthai)

clinic

held at the

woodworking student


— SPOKE, October

Page 2

10,

News

2006

Now deep thoughts ...with Random

Conestoga College

questions answered by

from

random students

What would you do with jelly

Alumni of Conestoga

beans?

“Drop them out of an

air-

Jeff Aellar, first-year electrical

engineering

sure

it

around campus have been sponsored by donors from the community. The ATS building was sponsored by a number of engineering firms. It is from this same buildings

are grateful

for their education, and like to give back in some way. “Conestoga College has been the No. 1 -rated college for eight years in a row now,” said Ingrid Town, executive director for development and alumni relations. “I want to

make

plane.”

stays that way.”

While you are taking a leisurely stroll through one of the congested halls of Conestoga, you may stumble upon a plaque or two hanging on a wall. Next time, read where it

ATS

building that those firms find

employees. Those employers know what skills and knowledge the students have acquired after completing their programs, whether they are an engineering expert, a skilled tradesperson or a machinist of

some

see need

first-hand the real for the

first-year early

alumni relations

whom

education

vital contributors.

she deals with today were

build

and

a

live in

Josh West, first-year

software

engineering

money

the

the time

all

need for around

Town. “The college is constantly in need of better facilities such as more up-to-date equipment in order to keep up with techhere,” said

Town

enough how

can’t stress

important donors are to the college. She said a number of significant

them out

Halloween.

I’d

for

building.

said another reason some-

one might want

to

make

a contri-

bution to the college is for a personal reason. “Someone might give money to the college to remember a loved one, someone who has passed away,” said Town. “The money they donate would go

attract those students, then every-

one wins.” She said a main objective for finding donors is to attract those people who want to give money, who want to make a difference and who want to contribute to the future.

The alumni of Conestoga

love to

alumnus in particular. Peter Benniger who runs Coldwell Banker Realty Limited, remembers his days at Conestoga. “Conestoga is

a real leader in the community,” it

as an eco-

who

Conestoga-trained students.

Sponsorship is something that Benniger is very passionate about. “Sponsorship is something thar is extremely vital to the college,” he said. ‘The college needs all the funding they can get in order to create a better college that serves the needs of the

community

He said the college needs the support of businesses and the communities, and that it is important for certain sectors to contribute.

“Therefore, the eollege and the

wise couldn’t afford to attend college.”

Benniger.

other-

said the college wants to

and the brightest students. “Just because they are gifted, doesn’t mean that they have attract the best

bet-

ter.”

community can see a direct those sponsors,” from

to helping a student

Town

nology.”

give

ATS

the car manufacturer.

“I see first-hand the real it.”

Toyota spon-

make a donation, some way.

institution like a university.

would

is

Toyota will then come back to the college and hire those students who have learned the skills necessary to be employed by

for another cause such as a larger “I

Another example

soring three classrooms in the

Town

we have scholarships to

and

of in our own industries.” Benniger said he has to thank Conestoga for its well-trained community, adding he has hired

once students of Conestoga, who want to give back to the college. Often she will have the alumni of Conestoga come back and want to to help out in

bursaries

results

Town

same donors

the

Town said fundraising for college is much different than fundraising

fortress

executive director

urgency for the continuing support

some of

attend post- secondary

nomic engine that fuels our everyday economy, which we see the

for development and

said

to

said Benniger. “I see

both donors and investors, said she sees first-hand the need and

from these

childhood

all

Ingrid Town,

Town, who works closely with

eat them ... not all at once though.” Courtney Schwering,

money

the time around here.”

school, financial or otherwise.

money

education,” said Town. “If

give back to the community, one

sort.

“I

came from. It usually features the name of someone or a company that has made a contribution to the

“I’d

and wide

far

By VANESSA BUTLER

pounds of

a thousand

“I’d

come,

Contributions

He

benefit

said

he

said

sees

Conestoga as being very forward thinking, a visionary that

very

is

proactive in ensuring the success of

tomorrow.

Students get on-the-job training

never eat

them.” By ANNELISE THOMPSON

Tracy Phan, first-year construction

dent to work Houston.

Students in Conestoga College’s

engineering/architecture

administration

office

“Put them

in

in

second-year computer engineering

office administration executive stu-

program makes

our college unique, because we are the only .school that offers a course like this;

now we

actually get

years of on-the-job

training

two and

is

a wonderful

for students to put on a resume because they actually have the work skills and are actually out doing things, where before they just had training and no real expe-

thing

rience other than the three-week

placement

at the

The way

the

end.”

program works

that

any professor

who

feels that they

student to their

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!

staff

and they

work

name

to

for

in

the

is

school

would like a them can give

one of the

office

administration executive professors

and they can possibly

set

up a

stu-

var-

are different professors in the

“One student chooses a professor work for, and that’s their boss,”

to

she said. “Anything the professor asks the student to do, be

it

photo-

copying, laminating or typing up a

document is

Admin

Sylvia Holmes, a professor in office administration execu-

program, said the biggest is finding enough professors so that each of the program’s 90 students has someone to work for during their two hours a week. challenge

school.

dent

this year’s win-

with professionals.

tive

Houston, a second-year

Read was

Lab; connecting students

Skills

who

dent, added, ‘This

Matt Skelton, second-year computer programmer/analyst

the

students

the

office administration executive stu-

them into goo and make them into wafers.”

first-year

ious projects for different clients,

knowledge.” Laura Wilson, also a second-year

“Melt

Jessica

ner with her slogan. Office

ence of being the only students in the province who, in addition to their diploma, also receive two full

dent, said. “This

Chris Bower,

basically

said

work two hours every week on

Jessie

them.”

are

them,

program have the unique experi-

years of on-the-job experience.

a swim-

ming pool and swim

executive

Wilson said

for

for their class, the stu-

required to do that.”

While

the first-year students are

busy working for the different professors around the college, it’s the responsibility of the second-year students to manage them and make sure they stay on task. “We work for one hour a week, as well as run the office, run the meetings that take place with staff each day, make sure the students are doing what they need to, work with some of the clients and make sure the student is meeting the needs of the client,” said Houston. Each second-year student is also required to make up a logo and slogan, and the winning one is used for the program each year.

“Last year

we

did not assign pro-

we made

fessors to students, first

the

years go out and find their

own, but they had trouble finding enough professors,” she said. “TJ|j« year

we adopted

called

new systH

a

‘adopt a prof’ to

try

and

eliminate that problem.”

The success of depends on the

this

initiative

program and dedi-

cation of the second-year students,

which Holmes says

is

why

it is

so

successful.

“The students work extremely hard in a variety of committees

ensure

that

the

program

to

runs

.smoothly and will be successful. This initiative and responsibility

they show will take them very far, not only in the classroom, but in the business world,” she said.

“They

really do,

do

it all.”


News

SPOKE, October

1

dropped

out,

it’s

wrong

the

pro-

gram,’ so our main goal with

it,

I

Huron Heights Secondary School could not have picked a more

believe,

appropriate time to introduce their

have a good idea of the options available to them. “There’s so much more than just

new

Health Program.

With

Pathways

Sector

growing

shortages

in

health-care workers throughout the

City of Kitchener and the province, the local high .school will look to

reverse the trend by offering

its

stu-

dents a scries of courses throughout

high school years to better prepare them for post-secondary their

institutions

and careers

the

in

health sector.

head of guidance at Huron Heights Secondary School, said the shortage was one of the primary motivations behind the new program. “It

came

cially in

out of the real need, espe-

our region; the shortage of

health-care workers in

all

areas.”

Kennedy, who worked as a guidance counsellor at Cameron Heights Collegiate Institute in Kitchener prior to working at

Huron Heights, said the school’s principal, Dave Carter, has a background

him fort

in

Kennedy

science that will allow

work from an area of comand use his knowledge to

to

awareness among students in the program. “The awareness is really what we’re looking at,” said Kennedy. “Some people get into it blindly and we hear that again and again, students coming back, saying ‘Oh, increa.se

also said

it

is

important

for students to

doctor, nurse, porter;

there arc a

different careers and we want them to be aware.” The health program is the first and only one of its kind in Waterloo (Region), so faculty from the .school

million

really

visited cities to

"We

schools

different

in

other

observe their programs.

visited different

different

Kim Kennedy,

the awareness piece.”

is

areas,

in

programs in Hamilton,

Brampton and Brantford, to take a look at what programs they offer,” said Cynthia Shepherd, a guidance

counsellor and the student success teacher

at

Huron Heights.

Shepherd said the school has also had meetings with different community partners who are excited about the program. “We had the WaterlooWellington Health Local Integration Network, that looks at the needs in the area, as well as determines the needs and the funds that should be distributed for health care.” she said. “They helped support us and co-hosted a meeting where we pulled together different partners to talk about the program and get input from them as to what they’d like to see in the program.”

The school has received interest from a number of community looking

organizations

to

get

involved with the program, including

St.

Mary’s

and

Hospital

Conestoga College. Paul Osborne, director of marketing at Conestoga College, attended one of the meetings and thinks the concept of a high school health

program is definitely interesting from a college perspective. “High school students can have a health major, and we obviously have a very large school of health sciences,” he said. “It would be great to have a major feeder school in our own backyard, and on our bus route, because that would better prepare students for what we have to offer. Everyone wins.” Shepherd said, “Conestoga was just really excited about us being able to say to them ‘what do you need in a high school grad?”’ The specialized courses that students will need to take as part of

program

will not be offered September, as the school goes through some test classes and

the

until next

scenarios to

make

runs smoothly.

sure the program The hope is for

those courses to be taught by professionals

from the

field.

“The person who would

actually

be teaching the health-care and medical technologies courses, we’re going to be hiring someone

who’s presently, hopefully, health-care profession ple, a registered

.

.

.

in

a

exam-

for

nurse with a teach-

intention

is

for students to

begin the program in Grade

.

9, as

.

.

health sciences

lab

was

that

dents can hear guest speakers and learn the theoretical aspects of the

program.

The

Learning

Peer Services

for

the

Service

-r

two years

next

school

is

grades from 9 to

1

lot

program

The

al.so

hope

in the

to outside students.

staff is excited about

to

to olfer

number of spaces

po.ssibility becau.se

them

said they

of interest from their

students and they a limited

the

with

2.

Kennedy and Shepherd expect a

until

capacity,

full

at

become

a

such a

would allow model for other it

schools that decide to develop sim-

programs in the future. “The groundwork would be done, and ba,sically they could adopt and change it to what they needed,” Kennedy said. Shepherd said the school is al.so getting input from the community the college and universities - as to what they would like to see offered and using that to develop their ilar

courses.

and figuratively. The lab features two hospital beds; a handicap accessible washroom, with all the necessary equipment to help patients shower and use the facilities; and a medical practice dummy that the staff have affectionately dubbed “Patient Kelly.”

Osborne thinks such discussions allow the college to set goals and

literally

The

school’s

health

sciences

also features laboratory and

medical equipment and a classroom and seminar room where stu-

help arrange the high school learning in accordance with what the

college

is

offering.

I can see the high school working closer with the college to allow students to focus on an area we’re active in. This will

“In the future,

allow them to really get a taste of the field in terms of the future and where they want to go,” he said.

gift

card

By BRANDON WALKER

commons

Skills

students, with a

new grade being added each year

Student wins the learning

500

has

currently

.school

Grade 9 and 10

built into the school’s plans, both

wing

ing certificate,” Shepherd said.

The

soon as they enter high school, but they would not be set back if they decided later that it was not a program they were interested in. Some of the courses the students will take are counted as electives, such as medical technologies courses and health-care courses. Others, like math and the sciences, arc core courses with some added focus on health-care applications. “The way we look at it is even if a student goes partway through the program and decides this isn’t exactly for them, it’s helped them in two ways,” Shepherd said. “One, it's (prevented) them from going into a career they wouldn’t enjoy, and secondly, as one of our goals for the school, one of our seven characteristics that we want our graduates to have is personWe feel that al health and fitness. at least by being exposed to this, they’ll see the importance and the value of being physically fit.” Students will also have access to the

— Page 3

2006

a win-win

jHigh school health program By CHRISTOPHER MILLS

10,

A

Writing Services

first-year broadcasting student

gift card bookstore on behalf of Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) and

was presented with a $250 for the

commuting,

The sources of stress for students are innumerable including family, income, it weakwork and school obligations. One of the reasons that stress debilitates is because infections and coids. While to vulnerable more leaving us system, immune body's ens the effect. cannot eliminate alt stress from our life, we can take steps to minimize its in your life. using the calming effects of music to relieve stress during busy periods

we

1.

2.

3.

4.

Try

deliberately composed Take a daily 10-15 minute "sound bath" by listening to music that has b^n and performed to be relaxing. listening to the music. Take yourself to a quiet place where you can relax and just concentrate on ease of gaining new information. Relaxation is vital to creating the ideal conditions of receptivity and learning because it removes stress and regulates the It is central to the process of rapid and effective lasting. So, close your office, breathing. This makes information assimilation easier and recall longer which to sit. bedroom or study place door, turn off the TV, and find a comfortable position in rising and falling of your abdomen with regular the of breathing, your of aware become listen, As you

each inhale and exhale. Follow this rhythm for a few minutes. Most New Age music Experiment with other widely available stress reduction or relaxaticn tapes. music that you like. cximbines music with natural sounds; such as waterfalls. Or, just find some

college

the

Scavenger

1.

2.

3.

4.

in

your

the

during

held

Alex Vieira said he’d probably spend the money on clothes. “I’ve already bought my books for first semester and I don’t need any for the rest of the year.”

Students had to go from booth to booth during the Scavenger Hunt, answering questions relat-

ed to being a college student. Vieira got all 16 of the questions

Attend an outdoor concert or music festival. Take along your favourite music and your headphones next time you jog or use public transit. Play soothing music in your car while commuting. Attend a noon-hour concert during your work week.

life.

CONESTOGA

(Photo by Brandon Walker)

Alex Vieira reacts

in 1B36 (In the Sanctuary) Hours of Operafcn: 8:30 a.m.— 4:00 p.m.

Telephone: 519-748-5220x2308 Website: http://wvw»,conestogac.on.caf]sp/slserv/leamingcotrenons/index.jsp

mock

sur-

card for the bookstore. Vieira won the scavenger hunt

“They weren’t hard questions,”

CSI

vice-president

Roxy

She said Vieira beat out about 50 students to win the gift card.

CSI and money. Stanciu said CSI donated $200 and the college donated $50. Vieira wanted to thank

the college for the

STUDENTS, are your closets cupboards bare?

Spoke Classifieds can help. Sell your unwanted items for just $5. Or, piace an ad for an item wanted.

Learning Ckimmons Temporarily Located

in

CSI VP Roxy Stanciu presents him with a $250 gift prise as

during Orientation.

correct.

Stanciu.

music and research has shown Researchers have long been studying the stimulating and sedative effects of and lowering heart r^es and pain relieving sleep, enhancing agitation, reducing in that music can play a role time to pursue the positive effects of blood pressure. Whether you need calming or excitement now is a good

music

winning

Orientation.

said Or, consider these ideas:

for

Hunt,

Contact the Spoke Advertising

Manager

519-748-5220, It’s

that easy!

ext.

at

3691.

full,

but kitchen


— SPOKE, October

Page 4

10,

Commentary

2006

Students responsible for their actions

CSI events

at

There aren’t too many restrictions when

it

comes

to attending events

organized by Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI), especially

be a student currently enrolled

to

if

you happen

at the college.

Students have the luxury of going to a variety of CSI events ranging

from the Toga Party

in diversity

to the Polar Plunge.

They can even

who

sign in up to a total of three friends, over the age of 16,

members of

aren’t

the college.

CSI has always accommodated students over the years and, provid-

ed there are no capacity or behavioural issues, then all students are

encouraged to participate. But, with this accommodation comes a on the

responsibility

make

dents to

Students can do their part by not signing in

whose attendance is more friends

likely to

part of the stu-

sure they conduct

cause a

With the genocide going on war

problem.

themselves properly.

And

while there

no denying the

is

who

majority of students

take part in on-campus activities and events

are there for the right reasons, the

it

at this year’s

on Sept. 21, when a paid-duty police

Party, held

Toga There are many things

officer broke his

can refer to as sexy.

reported in the local newspaper, publicity the college doesn’t need.

a form-fitting dress, a

many

like these are

impossible to prevent and occur frequently

bars and clubs, but what

CSI event

at

makes them so unacceptable when they

A

happen

at a

fight at

any social establishment won’t, under normal circumstances,

is

the potential ramifications that are created.

result in the closing of that place of business,

however, CSI

under no

is

The possible consequences

are also especially pertinent this year

because of the construction of the new Student Life Centre, which will offer a first-rate

unfortunate

if

venue for a

new

the

lai'ge

number of future

bar/bistro,

being built

events.

It

would be

in the student centre

couldn’t get a liquor licence. Since a percentage of every tuition pay-

ment

for this year goes toward the creation of the student centre,

imperative for students to enjoy and be able to take part in benefits

it

all

it is

of the

will offer.

is

more

likely to

could also hold students accountable for

who

may sound many

a

little

Grifferty

expert on military technique or

All of these are often considered

what

sexy by today’s society. But when

Opinion

conflict.

a

is

In Darfur, at least 400,000 peo-

not sending troops to

ple have been killed and

with black African peasants.

than two million citizens have

I

it’s sexy and they don’t want to go,” the term sexy is used in a whole new context. Is anyone else shocked at these words from someone from our own Canadian government?

don’t think

been forced

to flee

from

aid could be easily dispensed into

backed

wartom regions

This

militia groups. is

The Canadian government, the past, has

done

its

to help those

who

are in need.

a problem.

Perhaps you have never heard of

in

best to help

the crisis that

is

occurring in

minimum,

government can say

the

of the Toga

one out of 350.

government was unable

to help a country

by sending the aid

is

not enough. Often

really does

send troops to Africa.

way

it

is

right to the

is

sit

that

them

What

it

the

back on the

fence and observe what destruction is really going

some of us

on from a safe

it

has taken. But

have, including our

government.

Are these

that

its part.

gives

opportunity to

it is

enough so

just

Canada has done

to

facts

something

that

Stephen Harper and his Conservative team can ignore? I

can assure you that even

Harper has his own personal

what

is

and

isn’t sexy.

I

list

of

can only

hope, that as our Prime Minister,

distance.

According

.source.

to

an

article in the

war

is

not on that

list.

Spoke

welcome

/s

published and produced weekly by the journalism students of Conestoga College Editor: Eric

letters to the

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

editor. Letters

Murphy

Advertising Manager: Jessica Blumenthal, Kristin Grifferty Spoke Online Editor: Meghan Kreller Production Managers: Tara Ricker, Brandon Walker Circulation Manager: Nick Casselli |

Photo Editors: Adam

for verification.

Black,

Adam Hannon,

Tiffany

McCormick, Jon Molson and BJ Richmond

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

be published. Letters should be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter letters will

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca Website: wvm.conestogac.on.ca/spoke ,

for publication.

The

Money, food and other forms of

their

the

the only

contacted

to stop

there?

homes because of government-

But

actions committed

No unsigned

to start.

the

Stollery

and a compassionate human being,

Spoke welcomes

However, 62,000 military

troops were “tapped out,” and that

In his defence. Sen. Peter

events to risk losing them because of the stupid and irresponsible

Letters are

takes to deploy troops into

And why do we have

more

Africa because, “We’re dealing

Personally, as a Canadian citizen

Party,

by no means an

a stu-

if

drastic as well as difficult to uphold, but there

in the case

am

those stu-

benefits to be gained through participating in

by one student out of 100, or

it

I

personnel seems like a good place

Canadian Liberal senator says

CSI

are far too

Now,

sands of lives

dents should lose their right to take part in these events.

This

passionate scene from a movie.

assist in crises.

they sign in and

maybe

available.

Kristin

is referring to a comment made to the chief of the defence staff who claimed that Canadian

cause a problem. CSI

dent does something that merits being arrested, then

currently 62,000 Canadian troops

man work-

Darfur, or the hundreds of thou-

of fighting or underage drinking, students can do their part by not sign-

whose attendance

Toronto Star on Sept. 30, there are

reduce the world’s poverty and

Despite there being no foolproof solution for eliminating the chances

ing in friends

one

ing outside in the yard, or even a

Canada

obligation to continue the tradition of holding their activities.

definitely not sexy.

A woman in

knuckle during the arrest of a 20-year-old man. The incident was

Episodes

that

Darfur and millions around the world dying

is

war sexy?

Is

only takes one careless incident to ruin

whole event. The most recent example came

in

Address correspondence to: Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

Editor,

N2G 4M4

Dr.,

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.


Commentary »

only had

life

If

Blood,

an undo button The undo button

feature users to

is an amazing designed for computer take back the wrong move,

allows you to

make

as

McCormick

hides

the wrongs,

all

'W

Opinion

'

the slips and those wish-you-did-

our years’ of experience, doesn’t

n’ts.

What if life had an undo What if you could undo wrong

all

the

things you did in any area?

wish

I

button?

hadn’t dated him for two

I

years, hadn’t taken that job, cheat-

my

ed on

boyfriend, cheated on

gone

that test,

to that party or

drove

A simple undo button and it would all be gone. No evidence of any mistake, no regret and no

drunk.

Wouldn’t

make

it

world a

the

mean we

make

don’t

mistakes. In

adulthood seems to bring more avenues for mistakes to honesty,

all

we just can’t hide in when they arise. We have

the closet

to face them.

But what

we

if

don't want to?

What

if we want to run away and What if we want to take back what we said or did?

can’t

we have

an undo but-

we made could be

erased without ever coming back to

above also say that change our life’s

haunt us?

things differently then

Wouldn’t people sleep easier, knowing that no one would have to get hurt in a bad relationship if one partner hit undo and life went on as

bly wouldn’t be

nothing occurred? People always say that if we didn’t make mistakes we’d never

though? Would we be better or worse than we are now? Would the events we want to undo create a

sion or action

if

Unfortunately,

learn.

make

the mistake,

we have

to

sometimes one

that cau.ses heartache, regret or loss

to learn the lesson. Is

wrong

it

want

to

to

undo the

turns we've made? Is it to want to start over on a clean slate? Is it wrong to want to

wrong wrong

pretend nothing bad ever hap-

pened? we’re children we solve problems by hiding in the

When our

own

our eyes or run-

closet, covering

ning away.

We make

the

problem

go away.

Becoming an adult, even with

that

as the things

mentioned if we were to path and did as

we probawho we are today that made us who we

are wouldn’t have occurred.

How

different

would we

be

This killed some people, makin turn prompted Canadian Blood Services, which took over the management of the Canadian

quences?

Would you use life’s undo ton? Would you undo all

but-

the

wrongs, the mistakes and the wishyou-hadn’ts, yet be willing to give

up any good that came from those same mistakes or wrongs? Should we be allowed to undo what we choose? Or should we have to deal with our choices and the end result whether we want to or not?

work, relationships and life in general, do you ever wish there In

blood?

on

and I was informed blood could not be

questions on

of the

me

naire.

One of the questions on the paper was do you have AIDS. Just out of curiosity, shouldn’t they have asked me that before they pricked my finger and taken a

before they pricked

my

and taken a sample

finger

my

of

blood?

The way people

ual. I

perceive, and as

both blonds and whether serious or

it’s

Sumrrier

by telling that I naturally have red hair, but let’s keep that one a secret between me and you. After consistently highlighting my hair blond over the past eight

went from strawberry I lond to finally achieving the each blond colour that I always wanted. I figured the more blond I had in my hair the more fun I would have, isn’t that the saying?

years,

So we’ve

heariJ

jokes, but

all

these

when we

actually take a look at

some

very intelligent

women we some

of

them

Eventually the Marilyn

I

find,

Apparently,

am

I

not allowed to

wanted

to

obtain

Monroe bleach blond

24 news report said have been

their website there

five cases of,

mad cow

disease in

Canada discovered since 2006 and eight cases since 2003. so the posexists for Canadians to have eaten tainted beef. Another question you have to answer before you can give blood is: have you spent a total of three

Kingdom

United Northern

the

in

(England,

Man or the Channel Islands) from Jan. 1, 1980 through Dec. 3 1996? What if you lived in the UK for one or two months? It is possible that someone could have of

1 ,

period of time than three months and they are still able to give

donate blood in Canada because I lived in England between 1987 to

blood

1992 when Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), more

Canadians and other nationalities who are allowed to donate blood may have eaten tainted beef and could eventually become victims of mad cow disease. Yet, most Canadian will still be able to give blood in Canada, and I won’t. My blood will, of course, be accepted in Britain. It seems to me that if

commonly known as mad cow disease, made headline news around the world. According to Health Canada, mad cow disease is a degenerative disease of the central nervous system found in linked to a rare, fatal

cattle. It is

humans

disease in

called variant

Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The human form of the disease

in

The

Canada.

good enough

it’s

then

it

that

are

facts

many

for the British,

should be good enough for

Canadians.

lighter

the

if

blond” response after saying something embarrassingly Tm stupid, but unfortunately, unable to use that ridiculous excuse

anymore.

Run, she’s got a grenade

in

her

who

has a degree in biology from Vassar University, an extremely prestigious institution in States, United our very female prime minister.

Campbell

course,

myself as a

found that

Td

like

my

as

carry out

much

makeup on

consideration and

mom best

light

1.

Bossy

2.

Chain Hang

-

got the best

my mom

my

and

>

3.

I

me

let

have to use my intelligence and charm and there’s no harm in that. I’ve found that men naturally perceived me as being ditzy as a blond, but had no problem helping carry out

my

do find

I

get

more

6.

Money Maker

I

did

Now

Fergie

(Pharrell Chorus)

Ludacris (feat Pharrell)

7.

Ring the Alarm

8.

Say Goodbye

-

-

Beyonce Ashlee Simpson

Sexy Back

9.

-

Justin Ttmberlake

Shoulder Lean - Young Dro

10.

Text "PLAY" to

(feat. T.l.)

4800 on year Rogers wireless

phone to download your favourite

ring tunes today.

Enter to WIN a trip to the 2006 BillboartPMusic Awards in L<b Vegas! •

as a blond.

Text

BILLBOARD

phone to get «

Download any

eiiiboard ring tune Of subscribe to

Billboard Mobile 31.

2006

for

to 555 on your

started!

between September 1 S to October

your chance to win.*

Brought to you by Rogers Wireless.

answer to the question that’s been boggling minds for years, blonds don’t have more fun. All of my friends are the same and Tm still the same, so when we go out

-

are catty but

respect and less

(A Cappella)

London Bridge (Chorus)

groceries.

dirty looks as a brunette than

It

Yung Joe

5.

I

me

(Kids)

Jibbs

Lips of an Angel - Hinder

explain to you the

differences between being a blond and a brunette. Men’s heads did turn quicker

Too Short)

Low

4.

-

So now

Kefis (feat

Know You See -

some

things really started to

We all know women

I courageously went from blond to dark brown. I immediately got compliments on my dark blue eyes which apparently stood out once I dyed my

friend,

first

initially

brighten up.

me

groceries.

without the support of my and my super-cute blond

Kim

fairly intelligent individ-

me

from

reaction

I

After

to

think of

me

but had no problem

helping

I

was a blond. My boyfriend that is a good thing, so I believe him. It just means now 1

being ditzy as a blond,

own to

wouldn’t say

tells

men

naturally perceived

mouth So we’ve all heard these jokes, but when we actually take a look at some very intelligent women, we find some of them are blonds. They include Lisa Kudrow from

Of

I’ve

a blond throws

RealTrax"" ring tunes Week of October 2

That was a good thing, who can complain about compliments? I

when

dumber

a pin at you?

Friends,

Tm

flop 10

hair brown.

best friend but after putting

may have used the “what do you

right?

What do you do

almost forgot I am guess that’s not a

expect,

goddess look, but with too many blond jokes already coming my way I decided to not go so

The

1

I

Opinion sex

light.

been so long

very good argument.

the

are blonds.

do attend Conestoga

a redhead, so

I

you

start

I

MePhee

into this debate.

going to

mean

College which has been rated number 1, eight years in a row. Oh wait,

through jokes, is an ongoing issue. After having the privilege of being both, I believe I have more insight

Tm

I

was an undo button?

a result treat, brunettes,

a result,

eaten tainted beef within a shorter

have a unique perspective on being a blond, a brunette and a redhead

I

As

Ireland, Scotland, Wales, the Isle

that

accepted.

about the donation of blood that make sense to me. When I was old enough to become a donor, I went to a blood clinic. A nurse pricked my finger to test my iron levels which were fine. I then signed up to become a regular donor and I was given a question-

to give blood.

months or more

they

Red

don’t

lived

since

Opinion

have asked

However, there are some things

better life, or result in dire conse-

years

never be allowed to give blood in Canada.

curiosity, shouldn’t

This

Canadian

who have

five

1980

the paper was do you have AIDS. Just out of

ing a lot of Canadians nervous.

the

my

my

One

test for these diseases.

made by

show

sibility

adequately

Cross.

for

to

Mountford

into the

blood system in 1998, to become stricter with donors because they don’t want to repeat the mistakes

will

Britain

in

finished filling out the ques-

1

Canadian blood system in the early 1990s when the Canadian to

the

Canada

A CBC Aug.

during a blood transfusion.

failed

precaution,

a

will

tionnaire

C got

years

as

not allow people

Leanne

being transferred to a recipient Hepatitis

many

so

health authorities in

sample of

HIV and

take

itself,

need to be taken to prevent contaminated blood from a donor

Red Cross

ton?

The same people

if

can

understand that precautions

I

hide?

every wrong deci-

simpler place

“Every minute of every day, in Canada needs blood.” This is the message on the Canadian Blood Services website. Maybe if the organization wasn’t so strict with their donor policies, more people would be able to get the blood they need.

be made and

Why

skeleton to hide in the closet.

it

to give?

someone

process, but keeps the end result It

is

— Page 5

2006

10.

Tiffany

many

mistakes as you’d like during the •lawless.

you

in

delete or cut while working. It

SPOKE, October

the

it’s still

one crazy night of fun.

•Biiiboaid ring tunes start a; S2 10 plus 50C for the download. The Mobile subscriofion is S5 (53 content fee p[us SJtransport fee) Trus suosc'iption does not include the cost ot ring tunes, BiHboard is legtsierec tradernark of VNU Business Media, lr< Billboard'


Page 6

— SPOKE, October

10,

Commentary

2006

The debate I

was

surprised,

hear

to

my

responses from a few of

Sam's Club on of marijuana, and whether workers

it

the

charges for marijuana are tying up

they have yet to try cocaine, heroin,

the legal system.

crystal

My

should

Alex

be legalized.

They were of some in their late their early

McNanney

ages,

different

20s and some

in their

agreed that

should

all

be decriminalized in said

certain

it

it

some form.

should be allowed in

venues,

"like

it

in

is

Amsterdam." tion,

always been that it should be legalized. Like one of my co-workers

number of cases where

the

said,

Opinion

or two grams on them

is

All they end up getting

Some

In

opinion on the subject has

people get charged for having one

teens, others in

50s.

Almost

that

popular tourist destina-

people are allowed to smoke

marijuana

in

restaurants.

Another person said

certain

pubs

should be legalized for those

smoke.

in

co-

the issue

at

up

that’s

and it

who

ridiculous. is

a fine in

need it, such as for people who suffer from chronic diseases and use the drug to ease pain. One person though had the opposite opinion, saying it shouldn’t be

meanwhile more important charges like murder or armed robbery take years to process

legalized because

gateway drug

out of smoking

“it’ll

take the fun

it.”

There was also one response from a person who said it should be totally legal because all the minor

most

cases,

because of these

The drug

was

to other harder sub-

on the

it’s

always been dependent

People are using

user.

whatever

will take

them away from

the real world.

Most people are using joint or

I

know who

like alcohol.

it

two

use pot

They have a

a party, just like they

at

would have a beer or two. Another issue is the damage marthat

marijuana

kills

It

true

is

brain cells, but

alcohol does too, and yet that

is

a few people who’ve

do way more damage than marijuana, yet that is also sold by the gov-

ALDWORTH

By ROSS

help but wonder

a

is

slack of a battle which, in hind-

why

Canadian troops are still fighting and dying in Afghanistan. Yes, the oppressive Taliban regime was overthrown, it looked like we might catch Osama Bin Laden for a while, and in the days after 9/11 it

we

involved I

shouldn’t have gotten

because the best weed

help but feel

Canadian

soldiers

that

39

dead

are

because our leaders acted without due consideration and got caught up in the confusion following the attacks.

1 1

Now we

are left

was political suicide to not support America and strike back against

holding

the terrorists.

“transferred

But now, five years later, the Taliban is making a comeback. Bin Laden is still at large and the war in

Afghanistan to us in order focus on Iraq.

Afghanistan has been largely overshadowed by Iraq, leaving the Canadian military to pick up the

this

rope

the

American

our generously after

allies

responsibility”

The general

in to

public consensus in

country is against the war in Afghanistan, and many view it as a lost cause, yet there

seems

to

be no

made

i.sn’t

in

either country?

may sound

It

like a con.spiracy

you never know

in this

wacky world.

And ize

is illegal,

and

it

why

the real reason

if that is

marijuana

why

not legal-

with

trading

start

Mexico?

We

have a free trade agreement

we

with them, and I’m sure

send something

could

in return that the

Mexicans need. But then again, maybe being “world’s biggest drug dealer,”

end

in

the

isn’t

*

cause

lost

sight for

stationed in the

Canadian troops

wartom

Fifty-nine per cent of

in.

can't

Sept.

isn’t legal

an image Canada needs.

ernment.

sight,

weed

United States or Canada

the

in

theory, but

Afghanistan war can’t

just to

sold by the government. Cigarettes

used marijuana for many years and

I

it

escape their problems, they look to

always thought

false.

known

I’ve

think

I

Could Chris Rock’s theory be true? Is the reason

on.

ijuana does to the brain.

petty cases.

has been called a

but I’ve

stances, that

little

itself

meth and so

country.

more than

2,000 Canadians polled said that Canadian troops “are dying for a cause we cannot win” and an even

number stated that they would not serve in Afghanistan

greater

under any circumstances. Despite Chief of Defence Staff Gen. Rick Hillier’s claim that “Canadians believe in this mission as the rich, luxurious and caring nation

we

that

numbers speak

the

are,”

themselves. It’s about time we cut our loses, admit we acted rashly and bring our troops home. for

Crank up the tunes partner Think back, about Grade

the way back to Remember that kid

sound, which has kind of a pop feel to it, Bluegrass which is a fast

all

5.

who

sat at the front of the bus and back of the classroom, never played tag with the rest of your class at recess and knew more about books than the latest video

fiddle-based

the

swing, sophisticated dance music,

game

tars,

No

the kid unless

it

attention-getting

big

the outcast during the entire fifth

The

great thing about this

genre

versatile

is

that

letter

Y

is

the outcast of the

vowel family because it only gets used once in awhile. Tomatoes are outcasts in the world of vegetables because they’re really a fruit and country music is a mi.sunderslood outcast in the world of musical genres. However, I think it’s important to have an open mind about country music and take the time to learn a

more about you’d

it

rather

Eminem

little bit

before deciding

crank

up

your

or Britney Spears.

Country music, also known as country and western music, originated in the southern United States and has roots in the folk, blues, bluegrass res.

It

began

first

to

and gospel gen-

became popular and

rapidly

evolve in the

’20s. In

In

my

opinion, one would have a

difficult task finding

someone who

couldn’t relate to at least one coun-

fact,

singers say

got their inspiration from rock band Lynyrd 1970’s Skynyrd.

Country music

written for everyone.

of things have

lot

outcasts.

The

and country-rock.

artists are

known

for being very fan-focused.

noticed a

a

beat and Telecaster gui-

it’s

grade. I

an

they

necessary, because he just too different.

drum

is

sound using

many country music

to

was absolutely t)r she was The student was

western

Bakersfield sound, which

craze?

one really said anything

sound,

Whether you’re nine or 99, there is a song for

place in Nashville, Tenn. for more

than 35 years. The Festival is a charity event put on for country

The

great thing about this

versatile genre is that

for everyone.

it’s

written

Whether you’re nine

there is a song for you, whether it’s the Dixie Chicks’ hit If I Fall You’re Going Down With Me, Brad Paisley’s long-tenn relationship song She’s Everything, or the Wreckers heartbreak song. Leave the Pieces. There are songs about marriage,

or 99,

partying,

children

and growing

old.

Although

sounds slightly difcountry music is more similar to other musical genres than it seems. It’s actually known for embracing the styles and sounds of many other types of music. These include: Nashville ferent at

it

first,

per-

CMA

you.

try tune.

A

example of this is the Country Association Music Festival which has been taking fect

music

fans,

lasting for four

days.

The approximately 145,000

fans

who

participate every year

experience 30 hours of autograp^^ signing and 70 hours of live mus^^

by their favourite artists. I’m not here to change anyone’s mind, and I don’t expect anyone to read this article and run out tomorrow to get I Love Country

Music tattooed across his or her back. I just wanted to open the mind of at least one reader so that the next time the voice of Tim McGraw or Toby Keith comes across the air waves, one reader might listen to the song longer ,

than they would usually, and give the genre they thought they’d

never be able to relate to a chance. Crank

it

up

partner!

fair


News

SPOKE, October

\

HI

10,

Benedicts

at St.

concerned

own

for

safety after

stabbing By JORDEN FELICIANO

area

in

the doors locked until the end of

day which worried and .students.

the school

Canada

in

is

being

helped

arrives at

Grand River

Hospital’s

ER

(Photo by Amy Meadows) from the Ontario health minister

after a visit

ER

there thinking

we

could be stuck

schools to initiate lockdown proce-

at

man

23-year-old

stabbed twice

has

man

63-year-old

a

school,” said Lourenco.

was

cially

when

AMY MEADOWS

am

I

sure most of you will not be

shocked

The stay of execution granted to keep Grand River Hospital’s emergency room open, in my opinion, is

ever taken a

room,

you have emergency

to find out, if trip to the

behind the threatened closure was due to a a solution that will barely paper_^ lack of staff. over the cracks in what is a major The warnings from medical staff

According

The Record, Grand

to

from Ontario Health Minister George Smitherman. It was under his instructions that visit

Grand River did not lock

its

doors

for the time being, preferring the

idea of using outside resources.

term end a day after it was printed in The Record the doors would be locked at 7 a.m. Oct. 1 Imagine my

Staff

and ambulances coming of

apparently

the

in

moment

in time, but at

some

Cambridge will want their back. As for using agency this is a costly method in an

and out

shutdown

this profes-

and patients being in the

ER when

was so foreseeWhile I am

able from the outset.

quick to admit that every medical system is riddled with its own .

ailments, it hits you harder the closer to

somewhat

home

it

teachers had those

staffing crisis will only get larger

problems should have been fixed a

taken now.

long time ago.

improved changes in the cafeteria bring a variety of healthier choices for students CARA EIGHTY

to

the

cafeteria

Conestoga College. With everyone seeming

at

to be so

health conscious over the past few years, Chartwells has decided to

bring a new Balanced Choices program to the school. This program allows students to choose from healthier options, from full meals to grabbing a quick snack in-between class. Pemell Richards, assistant food service director, said the Balanced hoices On the Go program really

K

good way ance what they a

for students to baleat.

have a hard time choices when they’re in a hurry,” he said. “But with this program you can grab a tuna salad with some veggies and ”I think students

making

feel

really

healthy

getting you’re nutritious meal, it’s

like

a

so

easy.”

“CSI says the committee

fear that

is

change

is

the 25 cent charge for a

(Photo by Cara Lichty)

Pernell Richards, assistant

food service director, said he is working hard to keep students

cents a cup.

Conestoga’s cafeteria, said the stu-

“A

slight raise in prices is nor-

mal,” he said. “But I can safely say that the prices will stay where they are for the rest of the school year.

pops being sold and the most popular items being deli wraps and

And ing

as for the cups, we’re

money even

are

comes

to

are

day knowing I'm safe then

anything disastrous happening.”

selling

still

them

los-

for a

quarter; we’re just trying to help

buying very

cashier

good when

pretty

their

at

it

food and

few complaints

no negative vibes working

in the cafeteria, but

it

(the lineup to

pay) can get pretty slow because of students using debit,” she said. “Hopefully things will speed up

once

risk

Career Services

BOON ON CAMPUS JOB FAIR

Wednesday, October E-WING ~

18,

2006

10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. & Graduate Employment!

Part-Time, Seasonal, Co-op

we

get

our

new

debit

machines, but it would be nice students used cash more often.”

if

Aqua Terre

E*tend-A-Family Waterloo Region Fastenal Car\ada

AllSlaff Inc.

a

received. “I get

be expected.

stances.

Students and teachers were asked to stay in their classrooms with

AOESA Kitchener/AOESA Toronto

Muise,

Linda

there

this

Who will be there?

out the students.”

dents

committed

Benedict.

happy.

hot beverage cup, which students, faculty and staff use to get hot water. Last year the cost was 10

Richards said Chartwells has looked at other colleges to compare pricing and that usually, depending on the product, a price hike should

“Whoever

crime could have just as easily come into the school and done the same thing to the first person he sees,” said Jaeger. The precaution taken by the school satisfies Jaeger and all of the staff regardless of the circum-

“I’m a teacher and trust me,” said Jaeger, “I’d rather be stuck in a classroom with my students all

a def-

Aside from the change in food this year, the prices have also been altered on the products in the cafeteria. An example of this

al.

something like that could happen Justine said here,” around Lourenco, a Grade 12 student at St.

^

he said.

Richards said the choices the students are making are noticeably different this year, with more diet

stir-fries.

many

“After hearing about the shooting Montreal, you wouldn’t think

students.

inite possibility,”

of an angry criminal continuing an act of violence isn’t territori-

safe anywhere.

“I’ve

This year Chartwells has brought

new changes

Jaeger said regardless of where

CONESTOGA

been getting really good feedback from the students about “We've the program,” he said. actually been approached for the first time by the students about making a food committee.” Richards said the committee would bring comments and suggestions back to Chartwells from the

but

school.

Police instructed otherwise. With this latest act of violence

in

a

a law teacher at St. Benedict high

St. Benedict high school was one of the two schools alerted to lockdown and keep all students inside until Waterloo Regional

is

in

the stabbing occurred, the threat

Benedict 's law teacher

Kitchener- Waterloo is becoming a huge urban area (even since I moved here one year ago) and the

I

New and By

St.

nobody

is

I

get worse

left to

it

most

locked

you’re

in

espe-

same were also more worried because of not being updated on the situation. “I think I speak for most of the teachers working that day when I say I was very concerned for my safety, and the safety of everyone in the school,” said David Jaeger,

David Jaeger,

effecting students,

unless drastic action

department.

people wanting to enter

i

know we can continue to plug the holes in this dam but there will come a point when it will burst. Maybe then we will realize the

already cash-strapped institution.

ER

1 5 per cent 1 3 years ago, it case of not having enough

for

day when say was very concerned for my safety and the safety of everyone in the school.”

that

ment by isn’t a

speak

I

teachers working

of the

on medical school enrol-

cut back

think

gets.

staff,

waiting

patients

find

to

at the

me

point

.

turned up

I

“I

being enough positions available. I don’t want to pick up the paper in weeks to come to. read horror stories about ridiculous wait times

this

when

seems

from making a trip to the ER. If wait times were originally on average five hours, how could they possibly get worse? Bringing in extra staff from Cambridge Memorial Hospital and from a Mississauga-based staffing agency may well be sufficient at

The continuation of the will-they, won’t-they saga came to a short-

surprise

It

ever since provincial governments

sion, but instead a case of there not

deter

River was saved after an emer-

are so few people train-

would

that wait times will increase

local issue.

gency

that the reason

So why

ing for this profession?

to,

classroom.”

Many

in the ribs.

be stuck

to

school later than you have

concerns,

By

long

“Nobody wants

dures, Sept. 29.

after

support

life

sat

how

about

been charged with attempted murder

department on

“Most of us

stabbing in Cambridge caused two

A

to stay open.

it

all

faculty, staff

called into question again after a

An ambulance

— Page 7

and students

Staff

School safety

2006

Solutions Inc.

Arvato Services Canada, Bayshore Home Health

Inc.

Formet Industries George Guenzier & Sons Golder Associates Ltd

Inc.

Goodlife Frtness

Brucetea Haven

Cambndge Pro Fab

Great Northern Insulation

Inc.

Canadian Forces Recruibng Caressant Care Nursing and

Hatts Off Specialized Services

& Engineering Power Vac Services Rainmaker Sales Plarviing

RGIS Inventory Specialists Road to Learning Childcare Centre Sphehon Staffing Solutions Student Works Painting SunSource Red Cross Community Health

InStore Focus Inc.

Services

CISC

Intercon Security

TO Canada

City of Kitchener

Investors

Retirement

Homes

Ltd.

Clanca Financial Services

Inc.

Teutech IrvJustnes

IRMC tS2

Comcare Health Senrices Community Living Cambndge

Kelly Services

Stafftr^g

K-W Fiwndship Group

DAP lnc.MAPA Auto for

Seniors

KW YMCA

Costco Wholesale

Lanark Heights Long Term Care Nfthview Community Paragon Protection Ltd. Peekaboo Child Care

Debt Freedom Canada Elite Protection Specialists

Inc.

Transfreight integrated Logistics Inc

Services

Corporate Invesbgation Services Creative Memories

Trust

TOL Group Corp

Group

COM D6V

Initatives Ltd.

Virtual

Parts

Causeway

Waterloo Regional Police Wellington Early Years Centres Inc

Workside Day Care Centre

2TR

Control

Systems

•As ofOctober 1.2006

Sponsored by the Career SerMces Office - Student Client Services Building (519) 748*5220 ext. 3756 or 3340

Room 220


Page 8

— SPOKE, October

10,

News

2006

College positioned well for next year By STEPHANIE IRVINE

com-

existing programs, as well as

ing up with strategic plans for the

The

difficult task

of fundraising

was one of many

for the college

issues discussed at a recent meet-

ing of Conestoga's board of governors. “I think we’re going to have to buy John (Tibbits) a new pair of knee pads this year," said John

Keating,

who

chaired the meeting.

He told the 12-member board, who met in the Guild Room of the Student Client Services Building

on Sept. 28,

University of Toronto, we’re like the poor country cousins,” he said.

There are many fundraisers held throughout the course of the year,

such as the Conestoga Classic Golf Tournament, but the main focus right now is on the college’s alumni. John Tibbits, president of the college, told the board that a recent mail-out to Conestoga alumni received a very positive response.

“We

have to educate our grads

how much

owe

they really

goal by just one student,

He went on

to say that 15 years

ago the school didn't even have an alumni association. takes time to establish that

really

it

adds up.”

He

said the task force

strongly

is

focused on things like following up with wait lists for current pro-

grams, as well as developing new

programming

to

draw students

in.

“This really positions us well for next year," said Tibbits.

The board also discussed fees charged to students in addition to their tuition, which are being reviewed by the government. “We believe we must charge auxiliary fees to provide services for

(Photo

Jessica Herbert, a

same as a university would pay, but points out

are about the

By HOLLY FEATHERSTONE

col-

price.

shouldn’t be tuition at

feel there

all,

but our

very low compared to

Sweater sales have been phenomenal since the beginning of the semester, according to

relationship,” said Tibbits. “I think

tuition

we’re well on the way though.” Also discussed at the meeting was the growth of the college since

university,” he said.

pus

go toward things like expanding open labs and purchasing new software programs for

Herbert.

students to use.

the chill of

indicated in the recent

last year, as

enrolment count. “Full-time enrolment is up 12.5 per cent, and we’re looking at almost 20 per cent growth in apprenticeships,” said Tibbits.

He

credited the higher

numbers

an enrolment management task force that was put into place. Their job is micromanagement of the

is

Auxiliai'y fees

Tibbits

said

of the more than

1,800 PCs in the school none are more than four years old, and students currently have access to more than 400 software titles.

“We were

to

the first to charge a

tech fee,” he said.

“We

look

at

it

as

a value proposition to students.”

bookstore

Doon camJessica

clerk

Conestoga students are purchasing crested clothing with haste as

autumn ensues,

result-

ing in a significant increase of

sweater sales

fall

when compared

to

rolls

around, students are already in touch with what they need,” said Herbert, noting that most students

purchase

sweaters

the

in

first

She said more than half the

CORNER:

sweater inventory

Public Speaking Anxiety

is

“It’s

already sold as

work

a lot of

for a student

group to (have) that responsibility on their own,” she said, “so this year we decided to facilitate some of that work and offer some program-specific

clothing to

program

larger

The

ability

orders on

to place

specified apparel allows students to

promote program pride price,

at a suit-

particularly

those

enrolled in programs with a limited first-year student intake.

“(First

years) are excited

about being here at Conestoga, so they want to promote what program

first-year students continue to

Do you do any • •

be prime customers for Conestoga

of the following?

Feel extreme anxiety

when

thinking about doing a presentation.

merchandise.

Find your palms sweat, your legs shake or your heart beats wildly before, during or after a speech.

Find your thoughts race and your mind blanks before or during a Select your program/course/assignments to

be

“safe" from having to

want make a

speech. •

Risk low marks or failure

Develop creative excuses or illnesses

in

a course by not doing a speech. (that feel real at the time) to avoid

Fear ‘making a

Believe everyone

in

fool of

yourself

is fairly

in front of

teachers or peers.

calm but see yourself as a “wreck."

These are some signs you may be experiencing one of the most common anxieties; public speaking anxiety. It can be overcome using a planful approach involving; 1 recognizing and altering negative thoughts. 2) relaxation and positive mental rehearsal techniques: and 3) practicing in low-risk situations and )

then

If

in situations

with graduated levels of

risk.

yoOr course work, your well being, or your potential to perform as an employee it is lime to do something about H, Remember, avoidance actually

are affected,

increases anxiety! following resources are available to you at the college;

Inquire about

a Public Speaking Anxiety group in the Student Services Office. 2) Enroll in the Public Speaking option of the Anxiety and Personal Performance course (offered as an elective in the Winter semester). 3) Read the Anxiety and Phobia Workbook Bourne (available at the LRC on the shelf and on resenre). This approach must be supplemented with practice m 1 )

.

front of friends, family or classmates. 4)

Make an appointment with a

counsellor

in

Student Services,

A Message from Student Services Visit

our website httoi/Avww. conestoaac. on. ca/iso/stserv/mdex. iso

To place

a

group order, if ample been generated, one

rather apparent this year as well.

gram can arrange their order with Andraza at the bookstore. Student

childhood

education

one colour completely.” Herbert said the hooded and

in

full

zip-up sweaters are popular items

pink and black articles. White, however, is not as popular as it used to be. as

are

The colour

ranges from turquoise to gunmetal gray and students can enjoy a wider selection of program-specific items availability

they are in woodworking, busi-

ness, ing,

ECE, mechanical engineernursing

or

founda-

police

tions/LASA programs. Customized sweater prices, featuring both the program and Conestoga name, have come down from $55 last year to $35 this year. Mary Andraza, manager of retail operations at the bookstore, said there

is

requests

an for

increase

in

group

program-specific

renowned

for their tried-and-true

generic hooded sweaters in neutral tones.

“(Hotline Apparel) doesn’t tend move as quickly with the fashion

to

found

a

market

student representing his or her pro-

reps will be provided with sizing

samples as well as colour and brand options. Orders must consist of a minimum of 12 garments of the same colour and embroidery style. A class list of interested buyers must be submitted in addition to a $20 deposit per student. Orders take 2 1/2 weeks to com-

Andraza said the bookstore tries most reputable brands

to sell the

with regards to reasonable pricing,

Amid

the vast market of various

brands that offer custom clothing, students sometimes encounter

problems with large-scale orders. Stephani Rich, a second-year law and security administration student and chair of the college’s student faculty liaison committee, said her program tried to purchase custom clothing from an off-campus vendor last year. Although the clothing quality was good, students found “This year,

(ordering)

we

through

managing to lower our prices by 10 to 20 per cent and the students are very are

excited,” she said.

Rich said her program chose to conduct a mass order because students are proud of their commitment to the vigorous academic and fitness expectations required of their

program.

“Our program chose

to

do pro-

gram-specific clothing because are proud of

who we

we have done

to get

we

are and what

where we ar^ ”

today,” she said.

With regards

to

colours.

Rich

years: blue, grey

“(We)

feel that these colours rep-

resent the

“Student groups don’t always know who the best vendors are,

said,

from a pricing stand-

point,” she said.

program the besf” she “and they also look more pro-

fessional.”

Rich said her program anticipates their order, appreciating the servic-

Currently, the bookstore’s most

brands

used in previous and navy.

traditional colours

quality and reliability.

popular

(neutral

said students want to adhere to the

plete.

especially

“They have

with

tones).”

the bookstore,

promote what program

(ECE) sweatshirts have sold out

with trendy bright colours and Apparel is styles. Hotline

the pricing too steep.

clerk

interest has

if

The

Doon campus bookstore

Herbert said the prevailing interest in program-specific apparel is

“Early

your group “carry" the presentation.

Let others

Conestoga, so they

they’re in,” she said.

doing presentations. •

to

at

in.”

Jessica Herbert,

“(First years) are excited about

being here

presentation. •

they’re

ion-forward approach to clothing,

trends,” said Andraza.

areas as a service to students.”

able

with previous years. “By the time January

semester.

COl'NSKl.I.OR’S

thanks to the cheaper

clothing,

leges.

know some people

by Holly Featherstone)

over half of the product inventory has been

$4,000

more annually per student than “I

clerk, said

Students warm up to sweater prices

On average, Conestoga students pay $600 in fees on top of their tuition each year, which is roughly $1,800 annually for a diploma program. According to Tibbits. these fees student

Doon campus bookstore

sold.

students,” said Tibbits.

that universities get close to

us,” said Tibbits.

“It

"It’s a situation where we can get beaten to death with a wet Kleenex,” said Tibbits. "If every program misses their enrohnent

that getting sufficient

funds for the school is a tough job on a good day. “When you compare us to the

about

future.

of

collegiate-

licensed apparel include

Dubwear

and Hotline Apparel. While Dubwear has a more fash-

es the bookstore staff provided.

“We

are

very optimistic about

(ordering) through the bookstore

because of their organization and efficiency skills,” she said.


News

SPOKE. October

2006 ~ PaQ© 9

10.

Welding expo showcases trade

,

By SARAH JAYNES Officials of Canadian Manufacturing Week, Weld Expo Canada and Metal Finishing Expo Canada, held its bi-annual welding event on Sept. 26, 27 and 28. The expo showcased more than 400 exhibitors spread over 200.000

square Centre

feet in

at

the

International

Toronto.

were not only professionals but students from all over southwestern Ontario, including quite a few welding students from Conestoga’s Guelph campus. In attendance

The event

is

held for profession-

and students alike to gather and exchange ideas, learn about new welding products and to benefit from networking opportunities. als

Andrew

St.Cyr,

a

third-year

manufacturing engineering technology-welding and robotics student from the Guelph campus, said the event

meet people

“Coming really

is

a great

way

are ready and wanting a job,”

whelming

said

Doug

ing for a job.

fitter

Collison, the welder and

professor

at the

Guelph cam-

“He knows

that

we

place, and I suppo.se word got around because we have companies wanting our kids before they even graduate.” said Collison. The need for students may also

business.

Some must 1

in

some

welders

time, that’s

that there are a lot of

in the

process of weld-

Electric in Toronto.

eyewear and helmet should be worn at all times to protect your eyes from the arc.

why we

If

go out and find students, so they can be trained in a good company and work their way up.”

precaution

this

not

is

fol-

lowed you could potentially be 3.

A

leather jacket, leather gloves

should be worn because a welder cannot wear anything loose or flammable while

and

coveralls

welding.

sales rep at Lincoln Electric in

boots to avoid

being cut by any

stepping bits

on and

of shaip metal

or sparks.

be a sign that the demand for welders is really high right now.

“There

is

a lot of hard

a welder, the type of hard

then

they

can

that

6.

down

a welder

is

case of certain welding

could lead to you being elec-

Weld

in a

very well ventilated

otherwise the fumes can cause very serious diseases and illnesses over time. area,

sometimes

anticipate,” said Collison.

The dangers

sure you’re in a dry envi-

in

trocuted.

work and

labour that wears people

Make

ronment

work and

physical labour that goes into being

faster

5.

faced

7.

The hardest

welders

with can sometimes prove over-

intere.sted

in

lot

of people are

the sales portion of

is

thing

the heat.

It is

for

most

necessary

Piotrowski

met.

3M the

has recently

new

narrower,

find students, so

they can be trained in a

good com-

their

way

interesting

to

pany and work

up,” said

Defazio. is

changes

see

the

welding over time, the different people we meet and employ, the different equipment and the advances,” said Defazio. George Piotrowski of Empire Machinery and Tools in Manitoba said some recent changes have been the use of hydraulic machines. “The use of hydraulics makes all in

the difference,” said Piotrow.ski.

“When you machine

it

turn off a hydraulic

will stop immediately,

rather than the

come

has darker

lighter,

ability to operate

all

day, everyday in the scorch-

“Any welder can tell you that wearing a helmet is a pain, but it’s necessary, that’s why we’re always evolving and considering the health and safety of our welders,” said Reid Hefferman a representative for

3M.

Although being

advancements

made every year

ing indu.stry there

it

!

said.

made

a shortage

as their career

What could change their mind? Most welders make upward of $500 to over a $ 1 ,000 a day. “I was recently offered a job in Alberta, straight out of school making $600 a day to start, that’s not a bad chunk of change for a 2 1 -yearold,” said St.Cyr.

machines we use

Deposit: $25.00

idrew St.Cyr shows what he’s

are

weld-

path.

Foyer Inside Door #4

(Hhoto oy tiaran jaynesj

in the

is .still

of people choosing

10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

love seeing the finished product,”

tem-

The change of the welding helmet affects anyone involved in welding, especially if you’re work-

Tuesday & Wednesday, October 1 7’'^ & 18**’

“I

is

tint

perature to reduce the heat.

ON GRAD RING DAY

of at the 2006 Weld Expo.

out with

.Spcedglas helmet that

and has the

ing heat.

why we go out and

this is a huge machine safety and

Another area that the welding is always trying to improve upon is the welding hel-

ing

in

in

industry

tion.

“There has been a shortage

to cool

said

advancement

welding, rather than the fabrica-

“It

Always wear proper work

4.

Defazio said a

welders for quite some time, that’s

blinded.

Chris Defazio,

an advantage because of the repu-

of their program at Conestoga. “I have had many professionals approach me the past few days wondering whether I have kids

Be aware

ing.

for quite

the welding process

and severe conditions. “We like to train people on the process of welding, the equipment and what is involved,” said Chris Defazio, a sales rep at Lincoln

while

to

2. Protective

age

efficiency.

in

some time

that take

Although most welding does seem like your typical dirty job, there are other options if you are

welding

adhere

now

down.”

interested

when you’re

“There has been a short-

to stay

however, when in an enclosed area while using a torch, it can get a little .sweaty.

but aren’t interested in the labour

sparks and metal bits Hying around

graduate in April and already have tation

.

wear layers of clothing

basic precautions a welder

include:

a

St.Cyr and fellow students will

not only a stu-

is

dent but works for a local welding

opportunity to meet

for after graduation,” he said.

who

said St.Cyr,

Toronto

people and possibly get contacts

may be

faced with a few more obstacles,”

take pride in

our program and really train our students to be ready for the work-

to

protected;

with every job, but a welder

to

is

for the average Joe look-

"There are safety precautions

pus.

in the industry.

to an event like this

great

who


Page 10

— SPOKE, October

10,

2"^* 9**"

16*'’

2006

LITTLE

MAN

11:30

SUPERMAN RETURNS LADY IN THE WATER THE RING

MONDAYS @ THE SANCTUARY

STUPTlviTS iNC'

AM

ii:30AM ii:30AM 11:30AM

STUDSMTS INC

Sf5

Bring your

'4c

Available

own

till

skates.

lagBBlWI December stu" [


SPOKE,

/n

Tuesday, October 10, 2006

— Page 11

Advance

sign MR

[ih

^fun,

^orhnj

staff.

iwanitoheeomealiartof

«

estofStMtsOmieam

i-muii

vhff

onnnijot)

(tions TFor

lE^Retuofy^|

KLifo^l watson

www.conestogasturfents

Kcnwi

mo'"^

^VVW.

itudeots.com


— SPOKE, October

Page 12

News

2006

10,

LASA program New program

iliary for

co-ordinator has a in

of a smaller boat. He

also in the ski patrol for five

where he rose

years,

His experience fessor at Conestoga College,

James

Phillips not only teaches five class-

es but

is

also the program co-ordi-

is

close personal

their

He

“We all learn our trades, we all learn our subjects but we have to learn how

tration.

dent on

here about 0 to seven and about 10 to six,” said love it, that’s no Phillips. “But problem, it’s the first year, it’s going to be tough.” From high school he went right into the Canadian forces as a communications technician. He didn’t go back to school until later in life. Phillips was in the coast guard aux1

1

campus and having

dents respond to

it.

It

to

The

consolidation exercise..

exercise consists of staging an acci-

leave

fire,

be a part of something. We’re a part of a pro-

gram, we’re a part of a college.”

the stu-

also involves

James Phillips,

other Conestoga programs such as

pre-service

body protection,

fraud investigations and organized

a great asset

nator for law and security adminis‘i get

impressive and

crime investigations.

and resource for his students, as will be shown and perhaps put to the test when the students have

professor and co-ordinator,

paramedic, jour-

LASA

nalism and police foundations. By trade he’s a computer forensic and high-tech crime investigator

working for the provincial and federal governments as well as many fortune 1 00 companies. He’s worked in just about every

of things that are tell you about the background but tell you nothing about the person,” he said. “I’m loyal, dedicated, compassionate; that’s who I am.” the types

are

He’s been a security guard, private investigator, in canine security,

said Phillips.

year as a full-time pro-

leadership^

capacity in the security industry.

background, training is a big part of rescue and they go together,”

By JASON SHERRITT

new

my

“Training’s always been in

forensics

In his first

to co-ordina-

tor of on-hill training.

and

military

0 years, where he rose to - equivalent

to a captain

was

long history

1

the rank of coxswain

gets

He

is

also an expert in technical

countermeasures, which is the detection of electronic surveillance devices or “bugs.” “I

always

tell

my

students these

and

come first, he would rather be known

said his students

that

as a compassionate, great teacher

who cares for his students than known as someone who’s worked with celebrities and political fig-

something he did when he

ures,

worked

in close personal

body pro-

tection.

A

family man, Phillips and his

now

resides here.

Looking back Phillips

the

best

hopes to bring more community and humanity to the college experience.

“We

how

be a part of some“We’re a part of a program, we’re a part of a college. “You’ve always got to support that and support your fellow stulearn

to

thing,” he said.

dents

when you

Kitchener.

I

interact here,

town So

to

I

want

Phillips

the

have my family.” bought a house and

we all we have to

learn our trades,

all

learn our subjects but

community.”

is

Phillips

see

them

would consider

cess at the end of the year

the students

knew each

on into

life

side, all

how we

how we

By JENNIFER CURTIS Your parents always told you to wash your hands often. Well, they were right. Washing your hands regularly

the best

is

way

together.”

Joseph Mercola, author of Program says on his

Dr.

up

PERFORMANCE ANXIETY GROUP

getting sick.

Total Health

website,www.mercola.com, that washing your hand prevents the flu

Kitchener

30 King St.E

better than getting the annual flu shot. If

519.593.2303

done properly, it can sigyour chance of

nificantly reduce

Kitchener

getting other illnesses this winter.

10 Manitou

When

you take care

your body,

it

takes care of

Waterloo

you.

-

7 King St

Blank out or struggle on tests?

Washing your hands gets rid of bacteria and germs. You can easi-

Avoid/ fear presentations?

o

Panic while being supervised or evaluated?

.

Feel anxious

when performing

in

Cambridge

academic situations?

ly

mouth and

transfer that virus.

end

you’re

result:

in

The

bed with the

flu.

said avoiding sugar can also

reduce your risks of getting sick. Sugar lowers your immune sys-

making

something '

our..,.

it

that’s

easier

to

catch

going around.

Mercola says other ways of

avoiding an illness this

flu

561 HespelerRd.

519.624.9492

PERFORMANCE ANXIETY SROUPI Learn skids and engage

He

tem,

Join

N

519.886.4500

% •

touch something that has the virus and then touch your nose or

Dr.

519.895.1228

of

in

practical exercises that will help

you manage anxiety instead of letting anxiety manage you To register bring a copy of your timetable to STUDENT SERVICES by Mon., Oct 16 '

Location: 1B21, moving to 1A103

season

are eating garlic, keeping stressfree,

ting

exercising regularly and get-

enough

rest.

Following these few simple steps a surefire way to reduce your rfsk of getting sick this year. When you take care of your body, it takes care of you.

The group will begin the week of Oct 21^ <f will run for 4 weeks (time to be determined by student schedules)

is

Group Facilitators

-

Keith Martin

d Cmdy Robin

Coming soon

how we

interact later in life;

comes back

First-year pre-service firefighters Brock Gooyers, Tom Smith, Kevin Hoekstra and Chris Wise take a breather after strapping on their gear for the first time.

to avoid

all

interact out-

(Photo by Stephanie in/ine)

better health

of

other and

“It’s full circle, society,

cold season Suiting

a suc-

if all

his.

this

to

it

together; students in

programs, not just

system

Simple steps

in the

took their experiences and moved

Keep your immune

warm

and look-

hopes to prepare them to of his ability. He also

wife just had their first child, Nathan, five months ago. He said when he was just teaching part-time, he would commute between Kitchener and Ajax, driving nearly an hour and a half each way. “I started to spend more time in thought, this

in his life

ing forward in his students’ lives,

to houseparties,

clubs and boudoirs near you.

it


News

SPOKE, October

10,

2006

— Page 13

(Photos by Annelise Thompson)

Fire Bobby the pug

dog

ready to fight any fires that may break out at the Dumfries conservation area in Cambridge. Bobby was a participant in the Pugalug Club’s annual “pug-o-ween,” where pug enthusiasts dressed their pets in a variety of costumes.

Conestoga a soldier By BECKY SHARPE

Afghanistan

The London base will be creating a video to show Canadian

While our Canadian troops are at war in Afghanistan, par-

away

ents of soldiers are sending their

love and support overseas.

how much their country is supporting them and it will be sent overseas for Christmas. Parents and other members of

troops

Kerry Townson, an instructor Conestoga College and mother of a soldier, is a member of the support group. Families of Canadian Soldiers in

the support group also try to send

Afghanistan. The group was created by two

of the war.

at

women who approached CTV and

son

instructor’s in

care packages for their loved ones

on a monthly

basis.

Townson sent her son items to help him relax and get his mind off such as a Canadian Frisbee and a Canadian umbrella hat,” she said. “The sol“I got lightweight items

Introduction to Mindfniness Meditation

There have been some major sucin Afghanistan and when something devastating happens it makes the headlines and people forget about the good, said Townson. “They forget about the roads being built, the fact that girls can go to school now and small businesses can be run by women.” This is the one country where Canada and the other peacekeeping countries have to win, she cesses

said.

can play with even though they are

After a major tragedy there is usually a poll held to vote on whether or not it is time for

other couples, started the support

out in the desert.”

Canada

group in April 2006. The group now has a

These small items are a blessing to the soldiers and it gives them a

“Do I want all our troops home?” Townson said. “Of course I do, but

when they are bored with simple duties such as guarding the

not

believes it is important our troops know they have the love and support of their families and communities back home.

perimeters, said Townson.

over.”

The support group does not only support families with Canadian soldiers but families with any

cial to give love and support, because Canadian troops are fight-

“You can’t spend all of your time worrying about your son or daughter,” she said. “If your son or daughter knows you’re at home worrying, it affects their job so they need to know you’re supporting them.” The group started off informally, but as the group grew they contacted the London military base, which

loved ones in the war.

ing against extremist beliefs that

has a support group on site, and arranged for a guest speaker.

keeping mission, unfortunately, the Taliban has made that very difficult and the only way to win is to get

contact information.

left

Townson contacted

women and

families from the area once a month.

k

the

two

she, along with seven

total

of 30

who meet

Townson

%at

There is now usually a guest speaker at every meeting.

diers love novelty items

which they

diversion

There

are

many

countries

to bring their troops

at the cost

Taliban

and

them

to retreat,” she said.

Calm

the

Group

to:

Mind

• Increase Concentration

She said

this is

why

it

is

so cru-

• Increase •

Awareness

Decrease Stress

state death brings glory.

who a peace-

Join the Mindfulness Meditation

them take

Townson.

was

to

another?

of giving up to the letting

“It’s really hard to fight that type of belief, when someone doesn’t value life,” she said.

“Yes, this mission

Are you feeling stressed? Docs your mind race from one thought

home.

including Luxemburg, Slovenia, Slovakia, Romania, Spain, Finland, Estonia, Denmark and Switzerland. Most of these countries are said countries, peacekeeping involved,

is

“How

do you negotiate to

try

Wednesdays 4:00

-

5:00 tor 6 weeks

Oclll-NovlS

and

make peace?” Students,

professors and staff

have

loved ones in Afghanistan and want to join the group, have questions or would like more information, are wel-

come

to contact

Townson

townson@rogers.com

at

kerry-

Contact:

Lynn Woodford, Counsellor

Iwoodford @concstogac.on .ca to register


Page 14

— SPOKE, Tuesday, October

Walk

News

2006

10,

By NATALIE ANDERSON

She said there

community

Walk

for

Life, Sept. 30.

The walk is held annually to make the community aware that there are

people concerned

.still

that abortion

Canada,

legal in

is

Smith, president of 'Cambridge Right to Life. "Every year in Canada since the late '60s we've aborted about

100,000 babies a year, and those are only the ones we know about statistically,” said Smith. "It's a really full issue. It's full of emo-

and ramifications.” Cambridge Right to Life has been in existence since 1972 and members have been walking every tions

By TIFFANY MCCORMICK

A stereotype is defined as “a widely held but fixed and oversimplified image of a particular type of person or thing.” "^Stereotypes are formed on many aspects of today’s society, from to a

woman’s

role, the

of a superstar to substance and

alcohol abusers.

The Mind’s Eye 2006, a

In

proj-

committee of the Community Safety and Crime Prevention Council, hopes to dispel the stereotypes formed on substance and alcohol abusers with

ect of the substance abuse

this year’s

program.

The Mind’s Eye was created

In

“We

really feel that

injustice

and

actually a crime

it’s

our eyes to

in

human

a terrible

it’s

kill

by the council, which addresses

wearing 'Choose

the life’

T-shirts

sees us walking and they this issue is still

very

much

families, friends and neighbourhoods cannot be measured in dollars and the effects can be devastating, even deadly.” The program began last year with five films at the Waterloo Princess Cinema but has expanded to include 20 premiere films never seen in Ontario, 17 workshops and two speakers.

“The programming associated with In The Mind’s Eye 2006 is reflective of interests in our com-

man-

to a

which include gaps in treatment services, negative stereotyping and the stigma attributed to

tion

people under the addiction of drugs

and alcohol. Michael Parkinson, co-ordinator of community engagement for the Community Safety and Crime Prevention Council, said issues of drugs and alcohol have a very real

and

lasting

on Waterloo

effect

Region. "The costs to health-care systems, social service agencies, police services and workplace are significant, but the costs to persons.

offers a

new way

the last eight years,

on

to

BDO

keep

CSI has

BDO Dunwoody

relied

to provide a

yearly report regarding expenditbltes

and

profit.

Each

year,

CSI

has to decide whether to choose

Smith, who attended Conestoga College, said she got involved in the movement 30 years ago when a friend at school had an abortion

one of the

walk

is

ways

to get

first

and best

information out there

and to make people think. “People see the signs and you hear honks and you know that people are looking at you and it’s

the board.

around

chastity,

remember.

stepping up and carrying the move-

to

an educational organization that provides pamphlets and information not just on abortion and its effects, but on issues Life

you look

at

what

“My mom was in the right to life

always involved movement,” she

said. “As soon as I was old enough to realize and research, I have believed that abortion is

stirring conversation in the car,”

she said.

more

“The people on the board are getand I feel that it’s more

ting older

people

my

age that need to

ment,” she said. “I think

it’s

start

really

important for everyone to see that

young people are involved and not just older people

who

it’s

are past

childbearing.”

offers rare glimpse into Mind’s Eye 2006 will offer three drug and alcohol recovery programs and will present how they work with people who suffer from substance and alcohol abuse. “There are a lot of stereotypes and prejudices against people

she has started to this year and is on

Hiller said

volunteer

abuse the

workshops

ensure they don’t injure their lives

interested

more than they already have.” In The Mind’s Eye ,2006 started

Campbell, senator for the Liberal Party of Canada. All events are free with the exception of the movies at

Understanding Addictions on Oct. 19 and Understanding Crack Cocaine on Nov. 10, while nursing students may want to attend Young and Younger: Critical Issues of Substance Use During Pregnancy, the Early Years and in Youth on

Balmer said. “It’s important to breakdown those stereotypes.” Balmer said the community

the Princess (2inema.

Oct. 10.

needs to help these people “to

Social

service

CYP

recruits students

addicted to drugs and alcohol,”

on Sept. 19 and runs

when

A

it

variety

until

close

will

of

offered through In

Nov. 28 Larry

with

workshops are The Mind’s Eye.

students

may be

in

For more information, a calendar of events or to become a volunteer, visit

www.inthemindseye.ca.

an exceptional oppor-

“It truly is

tunity

for area residents,

service providers and students to gain a

and rare glimpse into issues of substance use and abuse,” Parkinson said.

real

Brice Balmer, chaplaincy director

House of Friendship in Kitchener, said his members from the organization who attend In The for

the

(Photo by BJ Hichmond)

Sole proprietor of Senior’s Move, Brynn Varey and local

Chamber

According

go over

to

to

CSI

their

president

long

Dunwoody

"We’ve got

record with and they’ve provided

track

outstanding service. The only reason we’d ever switch would be if

we found

a

more competitive

price.”

CSI’s next board meeting will take place Oct. 17.

realtor,

Young Professionals (CYP) at the college on Sept. contact Mark Womack at 519-749-6048. of

V

Benjamin Bach, promoted the more information on CYP

28. For

ON-CAMPUS CHIROPRACTOR

U

a

accountant. For

Hiller said she thinks that the

death.’”

abuse.

are very competitive.

its

up for"

In The Mind’s Eye has three components: increasing awareness and education, providing specific skills and training for service providers and promoting discussion in an effort to improve the way society works through issues of substance and alcohol

ing accountants. Since that meetas

to stand

to bring the best

sented with the option of chang-

CSI has decided

want

1

it.”

Parkinson said presenting the through different events

Matt Jackson, Dunwoody’s rates

ing,

and

killing

issues

ing,

Dunwoody

not

who

another firm books.

At the Sept. 19 CSI board meetthe student union was pre-

life,

including service face such issues in varying degrees each day,” Parkinson said. "It’s to bring awareness of the issues to the community at large, in an effort to facilitate community-ba.sed soluproviders

same accountant BRANDON WALKER

death. We’re just

something. And it was life. One human being matters.” Lisa Hiller, 28, said she has walked for as long as she can

Smith said Cambridge Right

CSI board approves By

it’s

munity,

of the world to Waterloo Region.

of the substance abuse committee to address issues of addic-

is,

saying to people 'choose

is

ing.”

said Smith. “If

of people’s minds.”

abortion

and was changed becau,se of it. “We had allowed ourselves to allow her to do that and 1 still to this day do this pro-life work,” said Smith. “I continue to do it because I feel like I owe that child

not anti-abortion. We’re pro-life,”

category.

The program began due

subdued

alive

say

tions.”

diite

it’s

know

that

so the community

risk factors associated with crime through social development in an effort to prevent crime. Substance abuse falls into that

the

support in the

contraception, fertility, euthanasia and any issues'* having to do with the beginning of life to the end of life. “We’re not the ‘meanies’. We’re

an innocent

being,” Smith said. “We’re

The Mind’s Eye

In

body image

More than 1 00 people took part in the Cambridge Walk for Life.

in a lot

year for nearly 20 years.

life

(Photo by Natalie Anderson)

Isabel

said

is

but

because it’s politically incorrect to talk about abortion. "In America 3,000 babies are killed (by abortion) every day,” said Smith. “That’s like the twin towers falling down every day and no one even peeps. Nobody is even aware that this is happen-

Despite the cold and wet weather, more than 100 supporters gathered for the Cambridge

awareness

for Life raises

i

Covered by CSI Health Plan

HEALTH SERVICES 748-5220

Ext.

3679


News

SPOKE, October

K-W

event

is

outside of By NICK CASSELLI Close your eyes, and senses kiss

llic

your

lei

aroma of suecu-

in sauerkraut lingers potently through the

nostrils

are

relentlessly

a lime.

a hot-pork injection.

is

booze

sausage like a ravenous dog when an overwhelming thirst suddenly consumes your body.

Oktobcrfeslers tend to get drunk

for

you.

you’re

at

open your eyes

as this

come

won-

to an end,

you

live

in

the

vicinity this

of

fanta.sy

Oct.

until

“Having an event

Kitchener-

14.

Waterloo Oktoberfest, otherwise known as “Canada’s Great Bavarian Festival,” is nine days of schnitzel, polka dancing and lots of beer. a

“It’s

community

Larry

said

celebration,”

like this is a great

our community.” The event was

Each year 135,000 people visit the numerous halls and a total of 700,000 individuals take part in one of the many

A

dog show, treasure

barrel race,

hunt and “Oktoberfest Idol” are

Blundell said

year’s

1969,

matured

estab-

K-W Oktoberfest

into

the

biggest

Oktoberfe,st

at the

it

is all

a matter of

demographics.

Oktoberfest commit-

is

always testing new

things and trying to keep things fresh, but at the

same

time

we

events.

larger sites are once-a-year

the Kitchener transformed for

as

into

the

don’t

“For the

first

Pridetoberfest,”

time this year the celebrated said

located in the heart

Kitchener, at 17 Benton

St.

Running from Oct. 6-14, better

Oktoberfest than

various

bigger and

ever,

featuring

including

17

locations

cultural

festivals

around

erected

Bavarian

at

For ticket and location informaHans Haus at 5 9-5701

4267

or visit the www.oktoberfest.ca.

website

Blundell.

at

throughout the region, buxom beer maidens will be seiwing precious brew by the litre to rowdy dancers as 30-piece Bavarian bands rock the thick air

It doesnY matter if you're German or not, Oktoberfest welcomes all who dare to release the

with those old-time drinking songs.

within.

unbridled enthusiasm suppressed

and Hans Haus.

K-W’s

is

Benton

17

at

official

St.,

downtown

Kitchener. to

wear a dirndl

or lederhosen but an Oktoberfest is

when

a necessity

The

first official

celebrat-

one

Oktoberfest sou-

venir and essential keepsake for

K-W

visitors to

Oktoberfest

is

all

the

(Photo by Nick CasseiH)

Conestoga graduate, Amanda Beckman, prepares with a

tall,

for

Oktoberfest

frosty glass of ale.

official blinkie button.

Oktoberfest has created an annual

button

Oktoberfest dancers, years, the

Larry Blundell, Oktoberfest executive director

scenes,

featuring

riQoL^yOLoorrj’s

musicians,

more recent lovable Onkel Hans charand

in

The souvenir buttons sell for $5 each with the proceeds assisting a variety of local charities.

“Over the

at

the

region.

tion call the

tents

this

is

more than 40 family and events

be

still

Hans Haus, of downtown

the

Since 1969, Kitchener-Waterloo

want

theme.’

last

few years

K-W

Oktoberfest has introduced hiphop, and country and rock music to the festival,” he said.

“We

try to

offer something for people of

all

ages to enjoy.”

A

Karlsberghaus.

Karlsberghaus

at

but not to

can

acter.

But the heart of the event is found in the 15 fest halls, sites throughout Kitchener and Waterloo that offer food and drink, music and cultural

such Auditorium, Oktoberfest

Hans Haus

souvenir

to lose the

parades, broadcast live to a

hotcakes,

tickets

Oktoberfest souvenir store located

hat

national T'V audience.

venues

Munich,

with a long bright feather.”

few of the events held during Oktoberfest, not to mention one of the country’s biggest Thanksgiving

Some

in

epic

retail

ing,” said Wilson. “Especially

tee

like

the world’s wildest shindigs.

humble drinking

the

Heidi

said

manager of

“You don’t have

the Bavarian theme.”

|pnly a

Day

occasion,”

the

wholesale operations

The

selling

purchased

in

into

spectacle, Oktoberfest tickets are

important to dress

Club of Kitchener. “The Oktoberfest committee is always testing new things and trying to keep things fresh, but at the same time we don’t want to lose the Kiwanis

director of Oktoberfest.

events the festival offers.

for

it is

Wilson,

looking

within reason,” he said.

experience

order to fully

“In

Oktoberfest

held on Oct. 7 and was hosted by

executive

Blundell,

is a time to celebrate and most people keep the behaviour

Attended by thousands of thirsty souls from all over the globe, this momentous occasion known as Oktoberfest promises to be one of a

Oktoberfest

that

oompahpah

time to

opportunity to celebrate diversity

runs

given

a

“It’s

worry,

Germany. With giant beer

the official

ly peacel'ul.

has only just begun.

original

began on Oct. 6 with tapping of the keg and

and rowdy, everyone is in a great mood and the atmosphere is entire-

Only two days

it?

Bavarian festival in North America, second in the world only to the

festival

although

said

but this

has

The

this year.”

also

the chicken dance.

From

in

Arif

brings out the wild side of people,

lishment

in full swing.

me

for

Oktoberfest, and accessing a cold refreshing beer is easier than doing

Kitchener-Waterloo,

is

hope they brought enough

"1 just

Having surrendered to temptation you begin gnawing away at your

If

Dust off your dirndls and leder-

one lime of year friends can loose and have one hell at the

it’s

when you and your

eraving

derful fantasy has

hosen, Oktoberfest

1

ing an eternity for Oktoberfest to

really let

uneonquerable

this

can’t wait

boozing and obnoxious behaviour to begin. "It seems as if have been wait-

for

or has

By TARA RICKER

Kemal Arif says he the

invaded to the point where the only

Now

It’s

dent

diagnosis

Lucky

by Tara Ricker) Penny Fulton, an employee at Hans Haus, said keeping the shelves stocked with Oktoberfest memorabilia is almost impossible during the Oktoberfest season. Hans Haus is K-W’s official Oktoberfest souvenir store located in downtown Kitchener.

Germany

come,

air.

(Photo

the largest

lor

sausage smothered

Your

— Page 15

Oktoberfest enthusiast and Conestoga College business stu-

sky.

Tlie cnchanling lenl

2006

10,

few of the performers sched-

“Oktoberfest generates $20 million for the

community each

year,”

said Blundell.

As

well,

each

Oktoberfest breaks

and

strives to

year

K-W

new boundaries

be bigger and better

than the year before, he said.

uled to hit the stage this year are Michelle Wright, Kim Mitchell,

“Hopefully this year will continue to meet the expectations of the

Sloan and K-OS.

community.”

OTIES IN FREE BEFORE 11PM 10 Manitou Dr. Kitchener (Comer of Manitou

& Fairway)


Page 16

— SPOKE, October

10,

Feature

2006

(Photo

The Maskerade Manor owner Tom

Hilborn battens

down

(Photo by Adam Hannon)

by Adam Hannon)

the hatches for the Halloween season with

The Spooky Room

at

The Maskerade Manor

features life-size

Halloween statues and electronic accessories.

Captain Flog ’Em.

Pirates could steal Halloween ADAM HANNON

By

With only a few weeks to All Hallow’s Eve, K-W area costume shops are battening down the

adults

N.

in

Waterloo.

know

all

Caribbean will be a blow out,” said Dunce. She noted that Harry Potter costumes are also popular.

Dunce said young children seem more traditional costumes,

to like

and skeletons. She said she likes to see people

like witches

put

some thought

into picking out

or designing their costume, adding

some people use create their

own

assorted pieces to

superheroes.

I’m

“I like to see imagination. really put off

when people

say,

‘tell

me what

for

parties.

more of an

adult thing now,”

Dunce. “People are really

enjoying

professional

makeup

to various

said.

“And

a

came

in,

she

wasn’t 90 pounds soaking wet. She went out as Homer Simpson.”

Seams Like Magic has about 850 rent, as well as acces-

makeup and wings. out,”

said

Dunce. She said sometimes it gets so busy in the last week of October that they have to turn off the ringer on their phone. gets bu.sy here

stuff.”

Tom Hilborn,

does custom outfits weeks notice, and

owner,

open year-round.

The Maskerade Manor

the rentals range

to $75, with a

Seams Like Magic

also has high-

end costumes, such as a deluxe

He

said he gets lots of people

looking for costumes minute. lot

He

of people higher

said this in the

is

at

the

last

because a

K-W area place

importance on Oktoberfest than Halloween. As a a

many

result,

clubs in the area don’t

tomers from other cities, such as Hamilton, Stratford and Guelph, where Oktoberfest is not as widely celebrated, often come much earli^

men

it

pretty intricate

worth about $1,900, so they rent it for around $250. Tom Hilborn has been the owner

weird when dress up as ballerinas,” she

“When

some

into

is

gets sur-

really

“Wc’vc never sold

growing Halloween decorating. We’re getting that’s

quite nicely

advertise

it’s

sories such as

“One area

TV

Wars Darth Vader costume. This costume is

think

costumes for

they are,” said Hilborn.

collector’s edition Star

the cos-

prises.

little girl

said his inventory has

at least six

Most of

$25

er

Even after 20 years in tume business. Dunce still “I

are

He

never been completely cleaned out. “It just depends on how picky

can still talk and eat properly while wearing it. In addition to rentals, Seems Like also

a

four

2,500 costumes for rent. Hilborn said even if someone walked into his store on Oct. 30 they could still find something to

Dunce said many people prefer makeup over masks, because they

with

including

inventory,

racks of costumes for sale, and

shows and movies.

from few exceptions. Dunce said the prices to have the same costumes made start at around $200. The prices to order cheaper costumes from an outside supplier start at around $30.

people have a good

The Maskerade Manor has large

wear.

it.”

Through their recent merger with Mavis Theatrical Supplies, Seams Like Magic has access to professional theatrical makeup and costume makeup. They also sell their

around a theme, such as Gilligan’s or the Wizard of Oz. Dunce added couples will often switch gender when dressing up for Halloween, such as the man dressing as a nun and the woman as a “I like to see

'decorations, such as this tombstone.

costumes

Magic

time,” .she said.

many Halloween

trick or treat-

to be,”’ said Dunce. She said sometimes groups of friends will pick their costumes

priest.

addition to costumes, the store also rents

said

go

her customers are

getting

Halloween “It’s

of the

Pirates

still

many of

ing,

“We

In

of children

lot

Bunce is the owner of Seams Like Magic on 321 Weber St.

and people dressing up as characfrom the Transformers cartoons and comics. ters

dress up for Halloween. Although a

hatches.

Shirley

(Photo by A dam Hannon)

zy in a piranha tank.” She said she has seen a demographic change in the people who

we

can't

even get to the phone. Halloween has turned out to be such a popular time of year, second only to Christmas. It’s like a feeding fren-

The Maskerade Manor on 18 Queen Street in Cambridge since it of

Halloween until after Oktoberfest. He added that cus-

er.

He added he starts taking Halloween costume reservations on

opened about 20 years ago. He said Pirates of the Caribbean costumes are going to be very popular this year, due to the two successful movies to date.

Sept.

Hilborn noted that superhero costumes, as well as celebrities such as

which is dedicated to electronic Halloween decorations and acces-

Marilyn Monroe and Elvis, are

.sories.

popular every year.

Wars

area

Maskerade Manor has an called

the

Spooky Room,

“One area

“I'm surprisingly getting a interest in Star

1

•The

lot

of

this year,”

he

added.

Hilborn said some of the more inventive costumes he’s seen were someone who dressed up as a tree.

that is growing quite Halloween decorating,” said Hilborn. “We’re getting into

nicely

is

some pretty intricate stuff.” They rent these decorations, such as a life-size Captain Flog ’Em, to people holding Halloween events.


News

SPOKE, October

Run

10,

2006

— Page 17

for

the Cure And

...

the air horn

sounded and the

participants

they’re off

CIBC Run for the Cure. The event was held at started the

Bingemans in Kitchener on 1 The 2,600 participants

Oct.

.

raised a total of $400,000.

The Waterloo Flames, U11B Rep soccer team took part in the five-kilometre run. This

was

second year participating in the event and they raised $2,500. Out of the 20 players on their team, 16 of them their

participated.

Photos by Leanne Mountford

Conestoga College graduate Christine Olah volunteered to help at the run. Her pink foam finger helped direct

participants

where

to go.

Condor Monthly: October 2006 Mon

Sun

Win $1600!

2

J

Thu

4

j

Conestooa Men's Free Skate for

7

6

J

Oktoberfest 2006 fc^'ns

2:3G-4pm free centre)

Informartion ""

pn

Sat

Fri

SLadent Shiny Hookey

ConestDoa Pride Students 12-2

Sor

Wed

Tue

Might

un Pprfnnr.ance

•Anxiety

Group

Student Shiny Hockey

iMMlint u

2;30-4pfn ^rec centre) 9

S

Happy Thanksgfving!

Oktnberfe^t "TianksaivirKi

n

n

10

Day

iiliiliiH

Ai

14

Stedent Shiny Hockey

fJational Ccif^iina

2:3&4prfi (RS)

Out Day' Booth

Parade

Eniov Mind^J

Ai

Meditation ls\an up

CSI Muchteberfest

this kveeki

ifiiiittiliin

iiitilimitfi iiliMliiiaifti Free Skate Deadline for

Performanre Anxietv

28 Rina Davs -

17

16

IS

PJna Da'fs

for

-

10%

home oane

Conestoga United

Way Campaign week...

c^tre)

On-camp»i5

Student Shsny Hcekey

Coeiestooa Men's

2:3D-4pm (rec oe^lre)

Rugby heme game

irtramural Baskefesa

(rec cemre]

4:30-6piT!

Shiny Hockey

StuderJl

Hockey 4:30-6

•ife'

pm pm

Floor

ticket to

pm

mtfamurai; Ftcor ;Hoc*ey

4:30-6 Intramural Vdleybaii

—10 pm

4.-'00-6:DO

CSI

CRC'|

pm

mtrarwura! Ice

7

^ Drop

4:3C-epm IrrtramR^: Ice Bockey 4:30-6:30

pm

Conestoga College and your

pm

Way 88Q

Intramural BaskefeaS

‘Ha!l-a(weeri

Chillax

wlh

us!

Gueteh Farmers' Market

Hockey

pm

^ ^

try

this

Sluderrt Life

month fora

Stuc

free cookie from the

SL cookie jar!

pm

jj^

Introducing the “Condor Monthly”

it’s

Hockey 2;3C^pm

Hookey

Hallowe’en

2:30-4f»fl (rec scentre)

Hockey 4:30-6

4::^l-6:30

{

Hockey

k>r

Shiny Hockey

Mramural

United

Irtkamural Ice

{Pc?id Area)

(rec omtrej Sttiderri

Intramyia; Ice

4:30-8:30

^

2:.3D-4p?n intramural Floor

Studerts 12-2

dentlife),

-

26 Sfeideft Shiny

2J

Students 12-2 pnt

30 Free Skaie

20

at

Si Jacobs M.a'ket

JOB FAIR

Conestoga Men s

ence

2i

19 2:3€‘-4pm (rec centre)

23 Free Skate far

starts

ofl

Shiny Hcckey

canajc 5ian

Ruat>v

10%

off

Students 12-2?xti (rec

Ai

iiiiiitlMlitliim

in

experimonthly calendar featuring activities, events and opportunities that maximize the student ca/stu(www.conestogac.on. the local community. Accessible from the Student Life homepage

a positive student experience!


Page 18

— SPOKE, October

Sports

2006

10,

(Photos by Eric Murphy)

Conestoga’s men’s soccer team suffered their first loss of the season tom picture) kept the score low with a showcase of saves.

game

in their

against

Humber on

Sept. 26. Rookie goaltender Aleks Bednarowski (top

left

and

bot-

Men’s soccer team comes close By ERIC

MURPHY

they weren’t going to lay

Conestoga men’s soccer team a

little

fell

short in a 1-0 loss versus

Humber College

in

league play on

down

anyone as they battled back,

for

testing the

Humber keeper

right

away.

The Condors continued

their

Sept. 26.

onslaught, only missing by inches

Although the Condors didn’t get win column, their hardworking tenacity and never-

as

give-up attitude showed Humber,

direction.

*^'iny points in the

one of the top teams for

the

Conestoga

last is

14

in the

league

years,

that

a team to watch out

Humber showed why the

they

top team

in

shots

As time ticked away and their came unanswered frustra-

attempts

started

tion

to

set

in

as

three

but just couldn’t capitalize.”

Barbuto has no worries about the of the season and feels that the

Condors received some question-

rest

are

able yellow cards for aggressive

the

play but

Condors will make the playoffs. “Our talent and speed are really

for.

perennially

were met with a and crossbars, sending the play back in the opposite their

series of posts

have to remember that Humber gets to choose their team from 22,000 students from the greater Toronto area.” Justin Barbuto, a second-year player, thought they played a great game even though they lost, “It was just one of those fluke games where you let one get away,” said the second-year police foundation student. “We had our chances

league as they immediately put pressure on Conestoga but the Condors didn't falter as they fought back with grit and determination.

Condor rookie goalkeeper, Aleks Bednarowski, turned the Hawks back with a handful of saves throughout the first half and came up big by saving a penalty shot to keep the score even. The Condors had few chances in the first half and paid for it as ^Humber went up by one goal after lobbing a shot over Bednarowski from way outside the 18-yard box.

However, in the second half, the Condors showed their fans that

still

were unraveled and

continued to fight back. Unfortunately, time ran out and

Conestoga fell to Humber, leaving the Condors with a record of two wins, ond tie and one loss. “They really showed a lot of heart and grit against one of the best teams,” said head coach Geoff Johnstone. “I definitely think the rest

of the league will be aware of

to

come

together,”

said

“Based on today, we shouldn’t have a problem making Barbuto.

the playoffs.”

Even the head coach from Humber, Germain Sanchez, was impressed with the Condors’ play. “They played very well with a lot of heart,” said Sanchez. “They are a very good team.”

The Condors

us after today.”

Even though

starting

also beat

Cambrian

Condors lost the close game Johnstone was proud and happy with his team’s perform-

College 4-0 on Sept. 30 in Sudbury and tied Mohawk College 3-3 on

ance.

their record to three wins,

“1

thought

we were

definitely the

team out there, e.specially in second half,” he said. “You

better

the

the

Oct.

3 in Hamilton. This brings

and one

loss.

two

ties


Sports

(Photos by Peggy O'Neill)

SPOKE, October

— Page 19

2006

10,

Women’s soccer team

Rugby time

in their

Cambridge.

1

Right:

in

By ADAM BLACK

game on

Fleming Oct.

4-0-0 record, while Conestoga .seventh with a 0-2-3 ranking.

women’s

Conestoga’s

Condor Evan

Bossuyt takes a hard

second loss

suffers

The Conestoga men’s rugby team lost 1 7-3 to

varsity

fall.

Below: Jake Vandyk to tackle

tries

a Fleming play-

er.

See Page 20

for the full

Despite playing a tough team, the

soccer team suffered their second

Condors

of the season against the Humber Hawks 2-0 on Sept. 27.

fight.

loss

Humber early

in

got on the score sheet the

first

half,

but

Condors’ defence worked hard keep them from scoring again.

A

story.

the to

“Humber to

division,”

Amanda

strong, but the lack of offensive

to

little

hope

for a

come-

Coach Aldo Krajcar thought

his

played really well defensively, but there are still kinks to be girls

worked out. “We had two small blunders due to lack of concentration which caused (Humber) to score on us,” said Krajcar. “We must work on our conditioning and work together as a team in both offensive and defensive units.”

Humber the

currently

sits

has always been

second in

OCAA western rankings with a

knowt

in our forward

veteran

said Britton.

“Unfortunately,

mistakes they capital-

ized on, but other than that

we

back.

put up a good

be one of the tougher teams

second half allowed Humber to go up 2-0. The Condor defence held attack gave

feel they

we made two

defensive error early in the

sits

I

think

played a very strong game.”

The

players do agree

improve on

still

a lot of

if

they want

their season, there is

work

to

be done,

especially if they hope to compete against teams like Humber. “I think we need to work on our

communication and moving up the field as a unit for our next game,” said rookie Holly Briston.

Despite having no wins so far season, the Condors have improved greatly from the previous season, which went 0-7-1. The Condors have no more home games, but will be on the road Cambrian, Mohawk, playing Redeemer and Fanshawe colleges. this

(Photos by Adam Black)

In a home game against Humber the Conestoga

women’s soccer team fought hard but,

in

the end,

suffered a 2-0 loss to the

Hawks. Top photo:

Kerri Lantz

throws the

ball

play as the

back into , Condor offence

prepares its attack. Above: Amanda Britton prepares to head the ball. Left: Goalkeeper Courtney Zettler makes a save.


Page 20

— SPOKE, October

10,

News

2006

Men s

rugby team suffers tough loss

I

By PEGGY O’NEILL

problems the team year

The Conestoga Condors men’s rugby team suffered another loss after an intense game against the Fleming Knights on Oct. 1 at Rogers Park in Cambridge. Sunday’s game leaves the team with one win and two losses.

The

final

Fleming,

score

which

was 17-3

for

located

in

is

Peterborough, but there weren’t any points scored until near the

end of

when Fleming

started

the first half, to get

ahead of Conestoga.

is

there

that haven’t

is

just too

is

having

<

this

many guys

played together.

“We need

to pick up some slack, once we get it, we will become awesome,” he said. “We’re like a puzzle right now.” Nick Milbury, one of the Condors’ hookers, said rugby isn’t an individual game. “If you don’t have support than you don’t have a lot. Rugby isn’t

but

like football,” said Milbury.

Head coach, feels

Jeff Desruisseau

he has a strong team,

it

just

showing in the last couple of games. “We have the most talent here by hasn’t been

“We have here by

the most talent far,

things just

aren’t carrying onto the

far,

things just aren’t carrying onto

the field,” he said.

Desruisseau

field.”

thinks

guys

the

haven’t been playing as a team and

-rt*.

JeffDesruisseau,' ’

Richard Watson, a firsf-y^^ rookie,

did get a penalty

kit^j^ch

draw on a few key guys. The team is still confident they can pull together and get the plays they’ve been doing in practice to he’s only been ablg to

Condors head c&^h

put

Conestoga on the rada^ ^|*c^y into the second half. of the Watson thinks that

translate onto the field.

(Photo

Conestoga’s next game is an away game on Oct. 14 against Fleming College in Lindsay.

the Conestoga Condors during a ended with a 1 7-3 victory for Fleming.

Richard Petan receives the Knights, Oct.

1

.

The game

ball for

game

by Peggy O'Neill)

against the Fleming

SAVE 10%* ON CAR INSURANCE AND SPEND IT HERE

i

I

At belairdirect you get: t

a

10%* savings

a

5%

discount

for full-time students

when you purchase your

policy

i

at belairdirect.com •

a

100% chance

Get a quote

to

reward yourself

at

beiairdirect.com/students

1888

280-9111

belairdirect. car insurance

I


Spoke20061010