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A speedy soiution Some drivers slow down, but some buy a radar detector.

A young woman shares her experience of

News

14|

Emergency party with the Beat

teaching

overseas.

A

learning

Fundraiser to help buy ambulance

newsroom

for

journalism students

for college’s

paramedic program. Nevyr 8

Monday, February

1

2006

3,

Conestoga College, Kitchener, Ont.

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

38th Year

No. 6

Cop’s coat stolen By MELISSA

HANCOCK

by Conestoga security. Tribe because “you have to strike

ly

said,

One student Irom Conestoga College was not as smart as others at

the

first

held Jan. 26

Country Night event the Sanctuary.

in

A man, whose name, age and program of study would not be released by security representatives, stole the

regional

coat of a Waterloo

police

who was

officer

monitoring the event.

The rity

incident

cameras and the student has been and apprehended, said

identified

security representative John Tribe.

Code

of Conduct, but he also faces a possible court date, a fine and a criminal record under the Canadian

Criminal Code.

“Some people do stupid things,” Tribe said. Conestoga Students

(CSI)

Inc.

hosted the licensed event, but Tribe could not say if the student was intoxicated at the time of the incident.

He

manager, Rick Arnett,

Walter Fedy Partnership, looks over his work site at Conestoga’s Doon campus Feb. 1 The project is expected to be done by September 2006. See Page 1 0 for story and more photos. site

also couldn’t say

of the

improve the number of riders on Route 61.

A crucial bus route for Conestoga who

commute

from Cambridge was saved from the chopping block on Jan. 25. Route 61, that runs between Cambridge and the college, was scheduled to be terminated on June students

23. After hearing the concerns of bus riders, regional councillors voted against cutting Route 61, along with five other Grand River Transit (GRT) bus routes, when regional council approved its 2006

budget.

By

The

first

to

is

restructure

the

route to better serve the riders.

currently

students

takes

It

coming

lized doesn’t

it

would be incon-

region would have saved $440,000

college without the route. “If this

a year. However, council decided to

route

continue service for the six routes

wasn’t would have a

for at least another year.

put up with.”

Riders

of

in lot

place,

students

of back travel to

Route

which

61,

were concerned

that

the

elimination of the bus route would

mean

there

was cancelled

it

would be a very big inconvenience Jackson said he believed

and something

going to make

it

it

that

was was

very difficult for

students to attend Conestoga. “Just

because

it’s

not one that’s fully uti-

mean you can

forget

about those students.”

would no longer be from

made

the route.

Jackson.

city

the

their decision to save

“We

took a fairly strong

He added city council was

supportive.

During the next year, CSI will work with the council and GRT on improving the route and mak-

more

nursing student

the

didn’t

it

sunk

seem

in,”

real

does not believe that

taking care of them at

always makes the final decisions on which to cut. GRT is city council

currently researching

two options

route being cancelled.

They

started

an e-mail petition to save the bus

for riders.

also gather feedback

from the students who use the route, as well as students

who

will

be using it. Jackson said it concerns him that the city was going to cut the bus

in

“especially

to increase

enrofment

post-secondary schools.

way

at the

latch that allows the

door to shut was broken, but no glass was shMtered and the door has already been fixed. Tribe said it was an active night for security at the school.

always depends on rambunctious (students)

A

good

not to do that would be cut

bus routes to the institutions.”

In 1997,

Muharemofski could not

read or write a single English

Today she maintains an

word.

A

average, as she has throughout her

Muharemofski also

tutors students

The bursary was developed to recognize

who

“It

have a

and

support students

pursue

Muharemofski

full-

post-sec-

time,

ondary programs of study at

the

college

completion of a Conestoga preparatory program. after

successful

The bursary Mclver,

who

is

named

retired in

after

Robert

2004

after

Mclver spent most of his time working on preparatory programs. “Preparatory programs are a very

commitment

routes have

the poorest performance, however,

The

Many women from Muharemofski’s culture marry and start a family at a young age. Even though she has two children of her own, Muharemofski did not put her education on the back burner.

About 25 students went to Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) to express their concern about the bus

GRT identifies which

from

caused damage to Door 5

college.

35 years of working

after

it

be

Tribe said the .student intentionally

right to receive an education.”

when the Ontario government has made a

increased in order to save

to

another student, whose identity also wasn’t released, was dealt with under the student code for committing an act of vandalism.

had the

women

route,

needs

will

efficient

I

cheque in my hand.” Muharemofski came to Canada when she was 16 years old. She left behind her family, friends and home in Macedonia to pursue her education. “The culmre I was raised in

college.

route

stances of the offence,” he said. On the .same night at the college

college career.

$600 bur-

she said.

until

there’s not a lot of options.”

the

consequences.

ences programs.

budget cuts in the future. “If performance continues to be poor

on

ol both

depends on the circum-

A message was left on answering Muharemofski’s machine informing her of her win. “I couldn’t believe it, I had to listen to the message three times

They

ers

fine

in the health sci-

Cambridge. If the transit route were eliminated, the college would only be accessible from Cambridge by travelling up to Fairview Park Mall terminal, and then travelling back down to the

GRT. amount of rid-

Cicuttin added the

“A

sary last month.

ing

tion planning for

students can

ca,scs,

able to spend the majority of her

at the college.

direct access to the college

it

combination

to get.”

Conestoga College awarded its first R. Mclver Bridging Bursary to Servije Muharemofski. Muharemofski is a second-year

before

CSI made a presentation to council about a week before council

some

want

She was awarded

for those students to get here.”

unfair

even

face a fine, a term of probation or a

dealt with quick-

By TARA RICKER

to city

stance against city council,” said

includes about 70 Conestoga students,

on

it

time with them.

to use the route,” said Cicuttin.

Cicuttin said

it

Matt Jackson, president of CSI, said he was very concerned about the effect it would have on the students. “If the route

venient for students to get to the

Route 61 was one of the routes to be cut from the budget TOcause of low ridership. “It fell into the bottom of our performance routes list,” said John Cicuttin, manager of transporta-

and forwarded

but said, in

said, “It

council.

from Guelph and Cambridge two transfers to get on the route. GRT also plans to meet with college administration to come up with a way to encourage more frequent use of the route. “We are making a mutual partnership with the college to encourage students

cutting the routes, the

^osen

route,

one of

Student wins $600 bursary

Bus Route 61 saved to

in

which made

Tribe couldn’t say what repercussions the student has faced,

He how

a

at

event before.

The matter was

keys were

the code of conduct, a student can be discontinued from his or her pro-

college

had ever happened

.

By BENJAMIN RICHMOND

the stu-

if

dent’s actions were part of a practical joke, but said nothing lilce this

Project in motion student centre

ol fleer’s

more of an urgent matter, he said. “(The student) will now have to answer for his actions,” Tribe said. In the most serious cases, under

the student been

dealt with under the Student

(Photo by Jon Yaneff)

The

the coat pockets,

gram.

was recorded on secu-

Not only has

while the iron’s hot.”

“My

family thought

marbles when having

my

“They thought

her

first

though she

I

should be all

at

home

times.”

said her children

priority

is in

my

to .school

children,” she said.

Muharemofski are

lost

I

went back

I

and even

school, she

is still

at the college.

important part of the college and

how said.

it

serves the community,” he “The programs provide an

excellent environment for people

who

have been out of school for

awhile and are coming back to a learning environment.”

For more information on the R. Mclver Bridging Bursary, visit the financial aid and student awards office at the Doon campus.


Page 2

— SPOKE, February

13,

News

2006

PACs

Now deep thoughts ...with Random

Conestoga College

questions answered by

ADAM HANNON

By “I think

random students

benefit students

PACs

are

one of the best

kept secrets of the college,” said Leslie McConville, from the presi-

What

dent’s office at Conestoga College.

your biggest turn on?

is

“A

lot

know

of students don’t even

they exist.”

As

McConville

part of her job,

PAC

helps co-ordinate

activity at

the college.

A

PAC, or program advisory

committee,

is

who meet

“A

woman

that smiles.

Not enough attractive

women

smile.”

ways

discuss

to

improve education at the college. Every college in Ontario is mandated to have PACs. They meet at least three times a year to discuss cur-

Nathan Dempster, third-year civil

group of people

a

to

engineering

and issues in their field and to set reasonable goals for their program to accomrent trends

of work,

They

plish that year.

also review

and course outlines .to make sure they’re up to date, and report to the college’s board of courses

“When Heather and

go on a date and she has to pay for the bus.” I

Ken

also

with students, look

talk

.

hold mini job fairs, sponsor job shadow placements and even sponsor academic awards. Each program also has at least one

engineering

student

on

representative

their

appropriate PAC.

Academic

PACs

who

plays

in

are

advisers

authority like a board.”

Julia Robertson,

second-year practical nursing

woman

sexy

lips

with nice hair,

Kyle Dolson,

second-year business

“I’ve

been

so long remember.”

friend

my

with I

said

college,’!

McConyille, adding that each PAC member spends about 15 hours a year just at on-campus meetings.

This

include

doesn’t

any

extra

be involved with. ‘They need to have people with a

broad

there’s

of

area

said

sets,”

skill

someone out

who

there

helps the programs to stay current,”

she said.

She added

the college has around

women

LASA

Gracias,

LASA

“The students

coming out on

are

top.”

Leduc

said three-quarters of her

department are Conestoga graduates.

one of the most important do,” said Leduc. She added that she wants to stay on for another term after her first is “It’s

things

I

over.

00 years

1

directly connected

they do not usually set up display

to

that

issue,

would

including

formal dinner held Feb. 21 in the

in

most other places, day fell on March 8.

marks the deaths of 14 women

the historic

to

be part

some other Dec.

6,

the

events,

day

that

killed at the Ecole Polytechnique

“We’re women' and

want

for

in Montreal in 1989, by a man who claimed the women were femi-

we

nists.

of the

Magazine

said she

would

like to

see something around the college

larger celebration.”

commemorate International Women’s Day - even just some to

also

she

celebrate,”

Joan Magazine,

signs

world

educate students about

Quartette

The is

to

what the day means. At the dinner, Nancy Hamacheii^

chair

to be

Women’s Day the

Women ’s Resource Group

said.

women and we want

UN

“International

website

states

Women’s Day

is

a

time to reflect on progress made, to

provide

will

Hamacher member at

former

a

is

musit^^

Magazine

entertainment.

said

faculty

the college.

on March 8. According to the United Nations (UN) website, www.un.org, the first International Women’s Day was celebrated in the United States on Feb. 28, 909. Since 1917, the day was celebrated elsewhere and gained

call

women’s rights.” Magazine said the funds the Women’s Resource Group receives

(mhimmelman@conestogac.on.ca) their name and number of tickets

global force.

from the health and safety committee for events must be connected to anti-violence issues. Because

funded solely by which are $30 each. Proceeds go to Mary’s Place,

1

In' 1917 Russian

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!}

the industry reviewing the education

with the Georgian calendar in use

celebrated throughout

Os

She has been on the civil engiPAC at Conestoga for the past two years. “The biggest advantage is that you have different representatives from neering

tables around the colleges as they

International

first-year

student.

government. At that time the Julian

part of the larger celebration.”

cars.”

of

calendar was in use in Russia, but

“We’re

that drive fast

City

the

Kitchener, and a fomier Conestoga

The Women’s Resource Group commemorating be International Women’s Day with a will

just

“Women

an engineering

is

for

granted the right to vote by their

went from not just working totally on education and resources and anti-violence issues, but let’s

Myett,

technologist

said

right,”

is

peace.” Four days later they were

“It

Ryan

we’re doing McConville. Anita Leduc

for nearly

years.

second-year

600 PAC volunteers. Some are from the Kitchener area, while others come from as far away as London, Hamilton and Toronto. “They come from far ajid wide to help us because they believe what

students are getting,” said Leduc.

fairs.

and answer session with people from their chosen profession. “Students need to know that

Waterloo campus dining room. Joan Magazine, a counsellor in Student Services and chair of the Women’s group, said the Resource Group has been holding the dinner for about seven or eight

can’t

the

allow students to attend a question

a

By PAIGE HILTON

girl-

to

have practical knowledge and expe-

face.”

electrical engineering

give

ple

rience related to the programs they’ll

all

Celebrating first-year

amount of time peo-

must,

in

a nice

Evan Bossuyt,

have stayed as long as 20 years. McConville added that most people stay on a PAC for six to nine years. “In today’s busy world I’m very

McConville said open forums are becoming popular, because they

are chosen

people join PACs because they’ve been approached by col-

with

some people

events they do, such as job

Some

women

are appointed for

lead to similar jobs.

McConville.

“Thin

PAC members

three-year terms, but

grateful of the

number of ways, but they

and curves.”

who know them from working in the field, or through the co-op office. Others have been appointed to PACs after making their own inquiries about the com-

Conestoga cuirently has about 45 PACs, and the number is constantly growing as more programs are added. Some PACs may cover two or three different programs, which have a lot of things in common, or

PAC members “A

said

only,”

McConville. “They don’t have the

band.”

the liaison for PACs, faculty and administration.

mittees.

to decide if

“They

a

is

lege faculty

leaders consult with the

and when to make any changes to their programs.

“A guy

College,

at

portfolios,

Ferris,

second/third-year civil

Many PAC members

governors.

by Adam Hannon) Conestoga

(Photo

Leslie McConville, from the president’s office at

the

last

23rd,

to

Sunday strike

women

in

for

chose

February, the

“bread

and

acts

by

change and to celebrate of courage and determination ordinary women who have for

played an extraordinary role in the history of

International

Women’s Day

is

not

She said

tickets sold out shortly

went on sale Feb. 6. People wanting to get on a waiting list can e-mail Monica Himmelman

after

they

requested.

The dinner

is

the sale of tickets,

a local

women’s

shelter.


.

News

SPOKE, February

— Page 3

2006

13,

Faculty union says teachers’ work has changed BRANDON WALKER

By

help faeulty the

He The work professors do has ehanged

20 years, says

in the last

the president of the union loeal

tliat

response to a story

in the Jan.

30 edition of Spoke, where the president of the college, John Tibhits, asked

how

faculty could be

working harder if the workload formula hasn't ehanged in the last 20 years, Walter Boettgcr, president of

way

they used

larger class

to.

and

sizes

one-on-one time with students also equate to more time and less quali“it’s

a

when

struggle

real

you downsize a program, (when) maybe 800 hours over the course of three years (is removed), (programs go) down from maybe 24 or 2.5 hours a week to less than 20; something has to give,” Boettger said.

“Do you maintain

.same

the

two

rigour (in the program)? Increase

decades teachers do a lot of the work support staff used to do. "Support staff 20 years ago were supporting the faculty,” said

means more stuff has to be done outside of class, which means (faculty) have

237,

l.oeal

said

in

the

last

“They would do typing marks for us, they did of the clerical things we do

the rigour?

remember

He

said beeau.se of responding to

and modules, faculty are working

more than they did

in the past.

“Support staff pretty much did for us.” he .said. Technology has changed, Boettger said, but support for

teachers has diminished. “Support

doubt about

now

they do

that, is

no however, what

here,

there’s

not directly related

to day-to-day teaching.”

Boettger said present-day support staff assist administrators registrar's

but

office,

and the

they

don’t

part-time faculty,” said Boettger.

.saying the quality of education

something

decreases funding and,

in

“I

turn, the colleges feel

The

faculty, is

on the other

saying the quality

of education

is

of

paramount importance. And these changes are not necessarily

in

the

same one on one

or faculty.”

“You can’t pick things out. Students would be able to find a Job (when they finish college) but we want them to get the good jobs. We want them to be number “And we feel teachers are always struggling with time commitment,” 1

Students also struggle with time

commitment

for courses that have

as

it

it

it’s

comes with conditions

goes to the classroom.

and reducing class

sizes,

not the

number of teaching

hours.

has to be) directed to hiring

We’re not saying we want asked how long quality has been an issue Boettger said, “Quality is always an issue but it wasn’t until in the ’90s when we

had a 20 per cent reduction in funding, that it really started to (come to the) forefront.

ing and, in turn, the colleges feel

comply and they

One-Stop career shop

less

hours, we’re saying

want smaller class “(Tibbits story that)

to teach

we

just

sizes.

the previous 100 faculty have been said

in

the college

but

think

hired

at

that’s

a result of additional pro-

I

gramming, applied degrees. Yes, we do have more faculty, and our college

is

probably the best

in

regards to the ratio of full-time and

l^yj Griffi

in the

KFls, and with this

is

a correlation,” he said. “Colleges aren’t going against

Rac

the

Review,

surviving. There

funding.

going

is

don't

I

just

more

anyone’s

think

to dispute that,” he said.

how

Boettger said

colleges get

the big question.

is

Toronto

In a story in the I,

they’re

a need for

.Star

province will meet the needs of the

Rac Review by increasing

tuition.

The minister of colleges and universities, Chris Bentley, .said

a

how much tuition He also added

will

ri.se.

with the rise

schools

have

will

improve the quality of

is

to attend a

job

their class-

aid.

On

Feb.

7,

college

faculty

have

faculty,

the

lobbying for

that,”

Boettger said.

th UN VERSITY I

Employment job

fair at

RIM

2.

among aisles.

draw

m3\sa - Tie f!ixi4snr^

Con^toga Coie^. region

idlest

for

8 f?£fcaoe-Gott Ooast carHict. Gifinn is a lh*e-cam{^js nrere man 32£0 siaiT aro 34.030 £tuoer&

Park

nscKiiog 700G ififiefracmai stuoents,

AtUculaflon arrangemants let of Conestoga Coiege Dipscma’s that ?ead irio one or more of over 3>00 cfioesg^’aouate arvo unYersity. pease po&igi3<it 3!e prog'aTrs at

For a

blue and white curtain-lined tried to

rt

ifi/MJ5iratia's

A

Companies

wna!

2th

sea of students and alumni from Conestoga, Wilfrid Laurier University, University of Waterloo and University of Guelph mingled

Feb.

tSsccnii^

OK recertjy estaui&ned an artkxiiafison

^

the

visit

WWW grtnth.edu aa'credtt

attendees with free gadgets on the

The potential employees moved from booth to booth with

ScfioiafBhtpe Scho'arsnip^ are 3'/3i^te each yea^ for stuoems of Conestoga ani ctner Onlaho Coie^ aitsataBs^ painer

tables.

various companies to choose from. Companies at the event ranged

from TD Canada Trust and Centreville in Toronto to ATS and KEOI Canada Inc., who were recruiting for part-time and fulltime employment. With the diversity of employers in attendance there was bound to be at least one company of

interest.

Cameron, a second-year ^Gonestoga student, said curiosity brought him to the fair. “The material you can collect at the fair kills a lot of legwork on your part because there was a lot of information available (like booklets with the website for each St'efan

employer)” the information technology student said. Conestoga’s manager of co-op and career services, Mary Wright, said there was 20 more companies this year to make a total of 183 organizations. In

its

12th year, the job fair

drew

KCfd cy i fdioaTg year, or by sTJdiy ki Juh’. seecuai omef?a wii moude 1 March acacferrlc n-erH. oemor4r^3 Isatfersup ana peramai

imstLCiohs. /*pp(«35oos n-ust oe sert

(Photo by Jessica Btumenthat) Being prepared and dressing for success is key when attending a job fair. Bring your resume and smile to make a lasting impression on potential employers.

4,000 students said Wright. “It’s one-stop shopping for both parties,” she said.

Lou-Anne Gizzie^ from

HOCO

Resorts, said potential

the

recruiter

Entertainment and it’s

a

way

to screen

employees while they’re

before going to the

want “If

sure

you had done some research and had a resume

i/ourtan »az3 Posta Otcec

prior to the fair

“We’re looking for people who want to work and put some effort into their job. By meeting the students at the fair we can see who is enthusiastic and going to be a good match for our company,” said

to

Enthusiasm

may

help

when

employers, however, there is a lot of preparation that needs to be done to

potential

atuOy opp<»titoi6ee. Please corradKCMfdijrtner rforrratton. aetais ana an applicsikn torm

KCtA ConsuCarts PCBOX63S-24

prepared,

talking

on^ader

to apply to is also essential.

screening employers.

Gizzie.

*^e!0fU3ry the

A GrifRlh fspir«M5tal3*^ will D® awallade to discues

fair.

you have a recent hard copy of your resume, said Wright, and researching the companies you

Make

Ootocer flor stLOy in

it

offered an opportunity

present yourself and perhaps that an online

make an impression resume

could

submission

not

make,” said Cameron. Appearance is also key. By dressing for success you let the recruiters know you’re serious about the job, said Gizzie. The job fair is held February. Admission dents and alumni.

is

every

free for stu-

the

and the administration Park, together at Queen’s students

one of AjKtaia’s mcjst wno/aeve ara t^naintc wHYersaes. EsiaoisreO p&ire?^n^

1

in

Ontario voted 80.4 per cent in favour of a strike. “There has to be some lobbying of the government to come up with the funding to support the Bob Rae document. It would be nice to

GfSmtf? Urfversity fe

fair.

Conestoga participated in its year at the Partnerships

in

to

es and provide students financial

of^riun^s ana ^ti^xsXi’6 for you st GiKTltft iMivarsi^

1571. GnBiTi

it

month before schools will know

be about

will

Kteel a GitnSt

ging a great job. One way to network and get your name out there

Feb.

the premier of Ontario said the

By JESSICA BLUMENTHAL Finding a job in a student’s chosen field after post-secondary study is hard work. Networking is a way to increase your chances of snag-

be

ratio (of teachers to students), there

tuition

“(It

When

I

might

there

that

to be said about being

students .and

said funding will help and

faculty

they’re obliged to

number

funding

When asked what the colleges need to do to improve the quality of education Boettger said, “They should have more faculty. How we get there is a big question mark. Bob Rac, in his report, said the college system does have a quality He

think

“I

you would with

union president ofLocal 237

“The government decreases fund-

said Boettger.

stu-

Walter Boettger,

good

job.

66

to 66, the

(only) 12,” Boettger said.

important

Boettger said, so the student has the best chance of getting a

compared

dents are not going to receive the

deficit.”

best interest of students

students a quality educa-

has to be comprehensive,

a teacher has 12 students in

if

a class

change

the funding accordingly.

hand,

of

don’t think anyone would dis-

pute

they’re obliged to

is

paramount importance. And these changes are not necessarily in the best interest of students or faculty,”

so

To give it

change the funding accordingly. The faculty, on the other hand, is

he said.

he said. tion

(all of) that

work hard

I

“The government

1

I

e-mail and typing up exams, tests

staff

that

happen 20 years ago. can starting in 987 when our class sizes were 12 to 16 (students), believe now we’re up to 32. I’ve had classes as high as 66,” didn’t

for us, input

our.selves today."

And

to be assessing more. Tho.se things

Boettger.

a lot

had cuts, said Boettger. “Students have been saying this is overwhelming, we’re expected to do so much,” he said.

•y-

Plus

represents faeulty at the college. In

said

Helton. Oroato L5C 7H? T.51^318g2!00 E; mfc^omcohsutants.oOT-.


Page 4

— SPOKE, February

13,

Commentary

2006

ha^hV ha^ a C0i^S

.yg

Get your

priorities

the issue

Harper

straight, when we thought

^

vALEN-nMe s owf

tM gr.

Just

fitBi

was

a

done

deal,

it

seems

to be creep-

ing back up from the depths.

According

to

an

article in the Jan.

27 edition of The Record, Prime

Minister Stephen Harper intends to reopen the same-sex marriage can

of worms.

The prime minister

is

MPs

looking to pass a motion through the House of

Commons

to

revisit the

same-sex marriage

have

participate in a free vote, to see

if

they wish to

issue.

Funny, considering the same-sex marriage debate wasn’t even

in the

top five priorities for Harper’s Tory government.

Those top

five priorities

Act and giving tax

included passing a Federal Accountability

Canadians and Canadian businesses,

relief to

including a cut in the GST. Also, the Tories want to toughen up on crime, specifically those that are gun-related, providing $1,200 to parents for each child under the age of six for child-care opportuni-

and work on guaranteed wait times for crucial medical proce-

ties

dures.

Nowhere

in

those

priorities,

“Nowhere in those priorities do see anything

which were outlined during the

cam-

Conservative’s

election

paign,

anything about

I

there

is

about reopening the

reopening the same-sex marriage

same-sex marriage

debate.

Why

the issue In the

What's next?

debate.”

would Harper reopen the anyway? To most Canadians,

issue,

a done deal.

is

same Record

article,

it

said Harper

is

Get all you need on Valentine’s Day

passing the motion to sat-

isfy obligations to his right-wing supporters.

To

some of

satisfy

his party

members? What about those

affected by the same-sex marriage

The gay and

bill,

the ones

community of Canada,

lesbian

who want

like

it

directly

the

most?

every other citizen of

Canada, deserves the right to marry. After many long years, they

final-

got what they not only wanted, but deserved.

ly

Why

revisit

be a right for

No

something all

done deal? Marriage should

matter what their height, weight, colour or ethnic background

Everyone Harper

falls in love, is

wrong

including gays and lesbians.

for asking the

same-sex marriage

He

that’s already a

Canadians, no matter what.

House of Commons

to reconsider the

motion could be easily defeated.

Conservatives were smart, they would

If the

win over

election victory trying to

come from

the support of the

their recent

Canadian popu-

after

surprise

again divide the country.

gifts for

Same-sex marriage alone.

It’s

is

something the Tories should just leave

not fair to jerk people around, especially on an issue such

sell

So

have

much

Gays and

lesbians are

now allowed

to get married.

The Conservatives It was a

shouldn’t take their right, their happiness and freedom away.

long and hard battle to get the same-sex marriage

bill

passed

in the first

place. Just leave well

enough alone.

all,

a

product

of

it

much

of a

when you

see cards and

loved ones other than your

You can now

celebrate the sea-

and dog. aunt, step-father Whether it’s just a card or a heartshaped chew toy, there is something for everyone on Valentine’s

of

gift ideas for

lack their

So don’t

forget about

“All

you need

is love.”

The Beatles

Like Christmas,

for

it

can be the

some and

the

most exciting

For those of us lucky enough

for

So,

if

it’s still

many seem

to hate

it,

a sin to not believe in

why do we It’s

the day with,

yet

it

are, there is

doesn’t matter

no

we

mustn’t gripe over

the technicalities of this being a

it,

fabricated holiday, but rejoice over

celebrate it?

because

who

the fact that while every couple

doing the same thing on

better feeling in

who

the world than feeling loved.

the only people

Not having a Valentine can be hard. You develop feelings of lone-

two of you. As the Beatles you need is love.

welcome

Is published and produced weekly by the Journalism students

matter are the sing, all

of Conestoga College

letters to the Editor: Jon Yaneff

Writers

contacted

will

be

for verification.

letters will

Editor:

Circulation Manager:

Janet Morris Mike Bors

Photo Editors: Brent Gerhart, Melissa Hancock, Jason Sonser

be published. Facuity Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter

Letters should

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-maii: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

for publication.

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

N2G 4M4

Spoke Online

Advertising Manager: Steph Baulk Production Managers: Chantelle Timperley Paige Hilton Denise Muller

,

Website: www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

Dr., The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.

is

this day,

Spoke

should be signed and include the and telephone number of the writer.

to

have someone special to celebrate

others.

editor. Letters

No unsigned

own

members of

family.

you

Day.

cash for that special something or

name

loved.

your lonely cousin.

most depressing time of the year

sweetheart.

You hear people constantly com-

Spoke welcomes

to

this

still

those irritated with their

shouldn’t be too

plaining about having to fork out

Letters are

blow

why

Opinion

credibili-

son with your mother, brother,

as this.

is

from a best friend or a close family member to remind you that you’re

cards and flowers

Valentine’s.

They should stick to their priorities, which seem honourable, and win support that way, before trying to pull something that will lation.

certainly a

Mike Bors

The term “Hallmark Holiday”

is,

it’s

time of year, nothing could possi-

any holiday that exists

all,

really doesn’t ty.

and

the confidence. That

bly feel better than getting a gift

After

simply to

issue.

his

liness

day.

should remember that his Conservatives are leading a minority

government and

It has become more than a statement of fact to say Valentine’s Day is simply a commercial holi-


Commentary

Cancer You

think

you know what

news when someone close

for the to

you

My

is

diagnosed with cancer.

Dad’s,

shock of the news

hard to take; as

if

you

it’s

is

a surreal feeling,

some-

are hearing about

one else in some other family. These things don’t happen to you. Cancer brings a new perspective to your life. My daddy was no longer invincible. He never smoked a day in his life and he doesn’t drink life is

not

fair.

Since

the

diagnosis

have

1

complaining as much about little things and 1 have tuned

stopped

out people

who

are negative about

the

little

Janet

them and

Morris

what they have

for

now. guess you truly can’t understand

what

like to live

is

it

son’s

you have

until

life

lived

through similar pains time, and

we

same

at the

leaned on each other.

They were

who

the only people

could talk straight to and

awkward discussing

the

I

wasn’t

it

subject

comforting to know us,

.so

ready

help with anything no matter

to

how

small.

We

stayed in close contact with

of our relatives over the last few months, updating them equally on his progress and his setbacks. all

His surgery happened on Dec. 2

matter. I did feel supported by most everyone around me, but not everyone knows what to say about some-

thing

wa.s

It

many people were behind

had a couple of friends going

I

Opinion

another per-

through .similar experiences.

like

and they don’t

this

always know how

you

the world around them.

past

life that irritate

blessed

feel

1

initial

it

things in

since.

The

.so

compared to my made me wonder why

insignificant

people can’t sec

found out he had e.sophageal cancer on Nov. 2, and our family hasn’t been the same father

a hard road

is

Other people’s worries seemed

to

expect, but nothing prepares you

tell

to

respond when

them what’s going on.

SPOKE, February

and

it

was a success. He was

in the

1

visited

him

the hospital at

in

day and sometimes more on weekends. While it was difficult to .see him so fragile and helpless, there was just no other place I would have least twice a

the

in

He

came home and

we

positive;

experience some of the side effects

feel better.

from the surgery. He has lost 50 pounds in total and has been on a liquid diet for the last month. His esophagus has been stretched thin and was too narrow to have solid food pass through to his stomach so last week he had surgery to open up his esophagus. He seemed to improve a bit after that. still struggle sometimes when someone asks, “How’s your dad doing?” It’s hard to put on my brave face when I’m scared to death for him. I try to ju.st be honest and spare

For the most part 1 am looking forward to seeing him get better and better each day that’s how I

one wants to

toilet

to

know about how

to clean his face

of your dad retching or to

come

after

I

tell

me

to stay

makes them

think that

have survived through this so far. It will get worse before it gets

and

better

myself

is

being

honest

far better than

path of his life coloured glasses.

Dad begins

his

with

seeing the

through rose-

chemotherapy

in a

couple of weeks and the tough times will continue. I

try not to treat

different;

1

just

him

like

make

knows, now more than

much

1

he

any

is

he

sure ever,

how

love him.

highest hopes are set on his

recovery and happier days.

full

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Bryan and thank staff,

other

all

I

the

would faculty,

like

to

support

admin staff and our many co-workers and col-

leagues for their support and

donations to help during this difficult time.

We

him lying on the couch

depressed and upset. No one wants to know what it feels like when your dad turns to you and says “I’m dying.” I can’t describe how horrible it is to be

stopped walking

me

People around

bowl, to bring him a

and cold water to rin.se his mouth. People aren’t interested in knowing what it’s like to be woken up in the middle of the night to the sound to

Overall he has been strong but he

his

warm washcloth

home

faced with his mortality.

My

the details.

of the

for so long was the our household.

finally

his situation.

Things seemed to be back to normal for awhile until he began to

stomach at least twice a day, or what it’s like to rub his back when he’s kneeling in front

roles

about a week

er.

No

man who

rock

has every right to feel upset about

he’s sick

were reversed, he would do the same for me. challenging It was emotionally for him to be immobile for so long, he really loved when we were there to help pass the time and keep him connected to the outside world. This surgery marked a new era for our family; it was time for all of us to rally round and take care of the

If

on egg shells around him as the holidays were upon us and we stayed in just to be with one anoth-

them

rather been.

— Page 5

2006

3,

for all

1

intensive care unit for 10 days.

1

your

appreciate

really

generosity and want evei'yone to

know how

grateful

we

are.

Phyllis Caissie

and Bryan Sprague

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS for the

AUBREY HAGAR DISTINGUISHED TEACHER AWARD A CAREER 111 1AKE PRIDE Want

a career that’s

more

Une

carriere

dans

les

Forces

than just a job? The Canadian

canadiennes, e’est plus

Forces offer you:

qu’un simple emploi.

Nous vous •

offrons:

a wide range of careers in

un vaste choix de carrieres

professional fields

and technical trades

dans des domaines

specialized training

professionnels et

subsidized education

like to

teachers are those who demonstrate exceptional commitment to students and to their programs and whose teaching They also demonstrate leadership in their skills are above average. schools and/or the college and in related work with their professions or in the community. Distinguished

techniques •

une formation specialisee

une aide financiere

To find out more about our part- and

nominate a distinguished teacher?

Would you

IN

For more information following committee

or

nominations forms,

contact one

of

the

members:

full-time

pour VOS etudes career opportunities, visit

your local Canadian

Forces recruiting centre.

Pour en savoir plus sur les possibilites

a

temps

plein,

partiel

de carrieres ou a temps

rendez-vous dans un

centre de recrutement des

Forces canadiennes pres

de chez vous.

STRONG. PROUD. TDAY’S CANADIAN FORCES.

DECOUVREZ VOS FORCES DANS LES FORCES CANADIENNES.

CANADIAN FORCES

Canada

1

800 856-8488

www.forces.gc.ca

2004 Award Winner - Marlene Zister 2003 Award Winner - Titia Taylor School of Liberal & Media Studies - Paul Scott School of Business - Larry Drew

3926 ext. 3392 ext. 3496 ext. 3739 ext. 3253 School of Engineering & Information Tech. Liz Stacey School of Health & Community Services - Elizabeth McNair... ext. 39 13 ext. 3829 School of Trades & Apprenticeship - Jim Daniel ext. 3381 Chair: PD - Edith Torbay

Nominations open on January 9, 2006 Nominations close on February 24, 2006

ext.


— SPOKE, February

Page 6

News

2006

13,

Summer Job By TARA RICKER

The

summer job

that best suits

your

Summer “Any students who enrolled returning

profit organization

in

Summer Job

the

ment

fall

be

delivering

can access

a

opportunity hire

eligible for a

Services

$2 an

Summer Job

receive a training subsidy.

requirements.”

first is

developer.

Tryon. “There are no eligibility

“We have always provided the job development component but now we

to

resumes and cover

skills

and develop an action plan to

this April

deliver

and the

program,

achieve employment.

centres

continue to provide

will

still

the

services

currently

all

EPP components,

The

component

fourth

“I’m sure

this

is

Summer

component

will

be

program and

the

overall

it’s

very

favourable, said Tryon.

“We cent

maintain

least a

at

90 per

with our

rating

satisfaction

employers and participants.” All of the Job Connect services will be available at the Waterloo campus April 5 and the Kitchener

moving

new

of particular interest to the student

services will be

population, because ^students can

University Heights location next

any one of the Job Connect agencies and find summer job post-

For more information call Conestoga College Job Connect at

ings,” she said.

1-866-585-4088.

go

to

to the

fall.

IRS

“ she said.

a real Job Connect expansion.”

participant’s behalf.

of

oper’s

main goal

appropriate

available.

to

is

training

(Photo by Tara Ricker)

on the

The job

devel-

develop with

plans

Karen Shoemaker (left), a job developer, and Sherri Tryon, manager of Job Connect, are excited about an expansion and cannot wait until

is in full

it

force.

Conestoga aims

GETTING ASSISTANCE "It's

be brought up to the same level.”

sur-

veys to find out what employers and participants have to say about

up with a job

negotiating with employees

The youth employment

training could

(•

This service provides a participant with a job developer advocating and

of the

all

the

at

locations this April.

The third service that the program provides is Job Development.

is

we will be able the

set

are going to get to provide the

at

centre,

college’s campuses.”

let-

acquire successful interview

fully

all

competitive as another candi-

some

campus

approaching employers, he or she

“It’s

including this piece, at

ters,

focuses on develop-

of work or working part time,” said

gram

ate effective

is

would then be

beginning

perhaps doesn’t have

This service will be available all

Job Connect often conducts

and maybe wouldn’t appear

skills

a

you’re out of school, in school, out

exploration and access employers for on-the-job training. The proalso provides services to cre-

more assistance than what

is

we would meet with him or her in employment counselling.” If an individual was having difficulty finding employment or

part for us

that

Job Services (SJS).

who need

and resources. This open to the public. “Anyone can access this service at any one of the Job Connect agencies, regardless of age, whether

“The fascinating

career

on

in April

employment counsellor. To access this service through the college participants must be out of school, work and training. “There is some flexibility,” said Tryon. “If someone were only tak-

is

employment

be

Tryon, “to take someone

er,” said

Preparation (EPP). This service

ing a resume and meeting with an

com-

This component can be looked

willing

an incentive for the employ-

“It’s

as

It

is

eligible for a training subsidy.

date, but with

exploration.

tion, referrals

service

an employer

The second service delivered Connect is through Job Planning and Employment

ing one course through continuing

she said.

with

to,”

education or academic upgrading

requirements, receive one-on-one assist

go

about providing informa-

is

as a career and

to

be

This component provides career

Information Resource

help individuals identify training

coaching

the

Services (IRS). This part of the service

services to

at

provided through IRS.

ponents to Job Connect.

The

make

will

locations for people to

If

said Tryon.

little

.

four different service delivery

Connect program and is funded by the Ontario government. Job Connect eligible participants are unemployed, out-of-school youth, ages 16 to 24. These participants can receive assistance with finding and maintaining employment. For employers, Job Connect can be a source for recruiting prescreened applicants to meet employer requirements and some employers can be eligible to

The program provides

co-delivering

1

run by the college's Job

is

still

the

summer employment and the employers who

them are

are

employers.

to train the individual, they could

to

there

available to individuals

program but we now have staff on the Guelph campus to deliver the program first-hand.” Every organization that is currently delivering Job Connect will be able to provide the full Job Connect delivery April There are

Services," said Job

hour wage subsidy.

and coprogram,” said

co-located the

“We

Tryon.

Connect manager Sherri Tryon. Students can receive support finding

youth employ-

centres.

“We were

are currently

school and will

in

more

delivered through co-located non-

Job Services.

called

at creat-

implementing the services college campuses,

Huron Country. Job Connect services have been

qualifications and interests? It is

“The governrtient wants

Perth

provides a service to help you find

looking

sure everyone has a choice and by

Guelph, Fergus and Wellington County, Kitchener- Waterloo and

ing, as

is

ing additional access points.

including

nities

be looking for

a

Connect program

number of commuCambridge,

since 1997 in a

many employers will soon summer applicants. Did you know Conestoga College

The government

college has been delivering

parts of the Job

The dreaded hunt for summer employment is quickly approach-

Services ‘connect’

a funny thing about life; if you refuse to accept anything but the best, you very often get it", somerset Maugham

impress

to

GET HELP AS SOON AS YOU NEED IT Don't wait

until just

before a test to get help.

New

material builds

previous sections, so anything you don't understand material

more

now

will

By VANESSA PARKER

on

make

Conestoga

will

be hosting

its

largest student recruitment event of

from March 3 Explore Conestoga is open the

USE THE RESOURCES *

Ask questions

in class.

More

Check out Counselling in the Student Services Office, 2B04. * Pick up some learning strategy handouts in 2B07 or from the website. * Check with Peer Services, 2B07 for tutorials. Peer Supported Learning Group schedules, and individual tutoring. * Be sure to get help when you need it.

WORKING WITH A TUTOR Tutors are coaches, not crutches. They encourage you and give you hints as you need them. They do not do the work for you; however, they are there to

have a

specific

list

how

to learn for yourself.

tutor

When

working with your tutor,

Do not allow yourself to because they cannot take the exams for you.

of questions prepared

become dependent on your

to

in

advance.

than

5.

to all

who have applied programs for September 2006.

*

help you figure out

year

applicants

* Visit the instructor during office hours. * Ask friends, members of your study group, or classmates.

to

10,000 guests will

attend the three-day event held at

Conestoga’s three largest campus-

Doon, Guelph and Waterloo. Organizer of the event and Conestoga student recruiter, Jan es,

counselling or getting a tutor,

visit

the Student Services Office.

A Message from Learning Strategies our website http://WWW, conestoaac. on. ca/isD/stserv/leaminastrateaies/inclex. iso

about

it’s

the

In the last

to four years Stroh

new

trend develop-

ing.

“People are taking advantage to colleges and are applying to multiple colleges instead of the closest college geographically,” she said. “A few years ago students would rarely

use

all

of their choices for

Stroh

end of March. “I want to get them here (Conestoga) before they decide which school to choose,” she said. “This is Conestoga’s chance to do a song and dance and convince them that Conestoga is the school for

tain

added college applicants their mind set on a cerprogram instead of a certain

school.

���Students consider relocating

more now.” Stroh has also noticed parents are having a larger influence on suit a career

-i

their children’s decision of to attend

held over

differ-

ent schools.”

now have

is

two

has noticed a

ing out offers of admission at the

week

last

visit,”

said Stroh.

Stroh, said the college starts send-

Explore Conestoga for learning strategy assistance, or to inquire

so

when applying

them.”

To make an appointment

time

school the students usually

understand.

difficult to

application

future

where

post-secondary school-

ing.

ience to cuiTent students like the

“This year we have really pushed parents to come with their

last recruitment event Conestoga, CIP/VIR

said.

study

“This

Visit

way

to not be an inconven-

held

at

no cancrowded hallways or

there will be

celled classes,

lack of parking” said Stroh.

Stroh wants Explore Conestoga

be a lasting impression. “Explore is held at the end of

to

kids to the

weekend

event,” she

Explore Conestoga usually uses 100-120 volunteers from the college.

To

i

f

u

^

find out information on volun-

di

you can e-mail Jan Stroh

pi

teering

jstroh@conestogac.on.ca.

at


News

SPOKE, February

13,

2006

— Page 7

Graphic design students draw winners By BENJAMIN RICHMOND Conestoga College’s graphic design students displayed their impressive art skills in a recent

difficult

college were given awards of merit.

fish

place

the

in

illus-

Koi Fish.

Ever since wooden, tong-like tools with pieces of lead

them were

wedged

in

used as a type of instrument, people like first

Nguyen have been perfecting the art of drawing. Of course pencils have evolved a long way from wooden tongs and a hunk of lead. As a way to promote the new pencils, Staedtier Mars ran its firstever national watercolouring con-

More than a hundred people from across Canada submitted

test.

entries

the

in

competition.

Both

second and third place in the contest went to people in Alberta, one from Cold Lake and the other from

Edmonton. Staedtier

Mars

one of the lead-

is

ing suppliers in the global writing

instruments market.

The company has

representatives

on every continent and in more than 100 countries, including Canada. Staedtier its

new

Mars

recently released

karat aquarell watercolour

with enhanced lead. The high quality pencil has a wide

pencils

new

range of creative effects

New

when used

“The quality of work in this was so good that we awarded

shows you on HGTV and repainting every room in your house and moving around furniture

TLC

get

to create balance, there is a

The

interior decorating is

campus

The three awards of merit went to Robyn Dutton’s illustration Street

ing and advertising departments and management at Staedtier Mars. The judging was based on the utilization of the watercolour pencils to show shading, colour-toning and

Scene,

blending.

Manning, advertising manager of Staedtier Mars.

and

Rachel

Manning

Deline’s

by

Beetle

Goldfish

Ashley

evening, was offered

for the first time in September.

Originally,

program

the

Conestoga had the most impressive showing in the contest. Contestants were required to use the pencil crayons to create a

Nguyen’s composition. “Hands down, we knew instantly it was going to be the winner.’’

watercolour

have had a slight advantage over others because he has been work-

said

with

illustration.

As long as it was original, people could choose to draw whatever they wanted. Nguyen illustrated a picture of koi swimming to the surface of a pond. Nguyen said he was inspired draw this picture by a photo he had taken of a Japanese pond. Nguyen added he knew drawing the koi would be difficult. “Something 1 know from my past is that koi and water are some of the hardest things to paint in water

a

week

colour.’’

Despite the difficult task ahead, Nguyen said he wanted to put the pencil crayons to the test. “I wanted to use the pencil

“Some people

comfortable

in

a

ing.

If

the student

is

always doing post-modproject or presentation

be style

t'^ting

it.

"“^his has been said Guthro,

my

baby, actual-

who

taught ^the

course for six years. “There was such a strong interest from people who had taken

general

interest

the course.”

Guthro and Oldfield planned the program together. They made sure it was applicable for what employers are looking for and meets the needs of the community. credits and is The program has 330 hours in total. At the end, students will not only have a complete portfolio, but also an interior 1

1

is

his

not limited

Ashley Cress, Rachel Deline, Robyn Dutton and Trong Nguyen hold their watercolour illustrations on Feb. 2. Nguyen won first place in a national contest sponsored by Staedtier Mars, while the other three received awards of merit.

to his time at school. “It’s

a passion of mine.

down and do Nguyen said.

sit

I’ll

paintings at home,”

the presentation.

Nguyen

said

the contest

the graphic design industry.

He added

a totally different so they learn to do a

in

variety of things.”

it’s

the four wins for the

college also helps out the program.

Conestoga’s winners were presented their awards on Feb. 2 at the college. Manning was joined by Brian Henderson, regional sales manager, and Roy Flynn, local representative for Staedtier Mars, at it

feels great to

and get

his

name

win

out in

“If they hear

merits

we

got three other

coming out of

the class

it

program.” Nguyen said he decided to take graphic design because of his passion for drawing and he thinks it’s becoming an important industry in the world. “To be able to describe an image with something really steps

up

this

about communication.”

Nguyen tificate

received a $500 gift cer-

to

Curry’s Art Store, for

winning the first place award. Nguyen's award-winning artwork is being silk screened on 2,300 limited edition tote bags and all four of the students’ posters will be in art stores across

Canada.

Mars

be holding 2006, and will be accepting entries this month. Staedtier

will

two other contests

in

makes a splash

business (Aubergine Interiors, comer of University Avenue

at the

and Weber Street in Waterloo), graduated from the interior design program at Sheridan College. She said she has always loved teaching, although, she hadn’t really taught before.

have always given seminars business and I’m a paint expert as well and teach faux painting,” Guthro said. “I’m used “1

my

in

to talking in front of people.”

She has also done guest speechvarious businesses and at

es

organizations.

board they do needs to it

Teaching adults seems, though.

“They ask a industry,”

isn’t as

lot

questions and a the

lot

easy as

of challenging of them are in

Guthro

said.

“It’s

not like you’re talking to people who don’t know anything.”

Gillian Oldfield,

program administrator

She also said there are a

lot

of

students in the program who have never had any interior decorating

the interior decorating course

Linda Guthro, program co-ordinator, said it has been really exciting working on the program and

However, Nguyen’s work on watercolour paintings

ern designs, the next

for 10 weeks, said Gillian

a program.

ly,”

get

will

particular style of design-

Oldfield,

make

ing with watercolours since high school.

own

doing.

really

may

said he admits he

decorating program

key part to the program is for students to be able to learn by

was

program administrator. was non-credit and not “It marked,” said Oldfield. “So, you did it for your own fun and games.” Two sections of the course would run each semester, and both would always be packed. Because of that, Oldfield said, it was decided to

Nguyen

to

ran one night

It

immediately

she

said

noticed the colour and balance of

offered as a general interest course for about 10 years.

Manning

Cress.

four awards,

offered at the Waterloo

in the

breaking through the water.”

the contest along with the market-

new

program,

It’s

three

program at Conestoga College with your name on the registration form.

which

stunning.

to achieve the effect of the

surprise awards of merit,” said Gail

decorating certificate.

interior decorating

is

it

colours

Manning was one of the judges of

A

If the

the

class

interior

By DENISE MULLER

blend

absolutely

“It’s

graphic design student,

watercolouring contest for his

writing

place

first

amazing

first

said she agrees that

to

together to illustrate fish in water.

Aside from Nguyen’s

5,

was awarded tration

as a class project.

te.st

Manning

win, three other students from the

1

and do the hardest

try

The entire graphic design program at Conestoga entered the con-

Trong Nguyen, a

Dec.

first-year

crayons to

thing possible."

national contest.

On

drawing or water-

for colouring,

colouring.

“Some people will get really comfortable in a particular style of

experience.

always doing post-mod-

“You get the whole gamut.” She said the new program filled up in an hour and a half despite

ern designs, the next project or presentation board they do needs

having three sections (each allowing for 20 students) in both the

designing,” Oldfield said. “If the

student

to

be

they

is

in a totally different style so

learn

to

do a variety of

things.”

Oldfield said that’s something Guthro always stresses with her students because when they meet

with a client, that client

is

proba-

bly not going to want that student’s style or the one that they’re

most comfortable with. “You have to meet, as a decorator,

the needs of the client.”

Guthro, who has worked in the industry for 21 years and owns her

fall

and winter semesters.

“We had

not expected as

many

people to register,” she said. “We were hoping to have 40 people in the program. In our first semester

we had

60.”

Guthro said this kind of a turnout shows just how much of a need for this kind of a program there was.

(Photo by Denise Mutter)

decorating students (clockwise from left), Sukaina Thana, Danielle Oke and Colleen Hallink analyze a photo of a room after Interior

having a lesson on room layout and balance. pillows and doing draperies,” Oke said. as

London, Grimsby and Mount

Forest to attend the program. Guthro currently teaches both

long time there was a need for interior decora-

introductory classes, but plans to

tors.”

interior decorating) as well.

“I felt that for a

Students

come from

as far

away

teach

the

“That’s

final

class

where

I

(advanced

make

sure

they’re

OK

“It’s

not

before

all

I

fluffing

let

the

little

flock out,” she said.

To enter the program, you must be at least 19 and have completed high school or an equivalent. And be quick because the waiting list just

keep getting longer.


Page 8

— SPOKE, February

13,

News

2006

Get involved

volunteering

in

ADAM HANNON

By

“It's all

Grads

all

get jobs

about bridging that con-

nection,” said Jeffrey.

The

LASA/police

chair of the

foundations volunteer fundraising

group

at

Conestoga College said

volunteering

way

a great

is

involved in your community.

Jeremy Jeffrey police

a

is

first-year

who

foundations student

noticed there was a decline in volunteer

work

students

for

in

the

He helped

create

group in and and police

the

September, with other

LASA

second-year

3.

Salvation Army.

months of graduation. “I feel that the students that

by doing an iron

man

graduate from our program are

competition, but with a group.

The

so successful after graduation

said

the Volunteer Action Centre,

volunteering

which them

interviews students and helps

gives

make a community by

up volunteer placements.

set

The Volunteer Action Centre is a non-profit organization which

helping others.

He

said

people experience

it

also gives

in dealing

with

helps connect people with volun-

social problems.

(volunteering)

teer opportunities. Their goal is to

makes a

ence and businesses notice

differ-

it,”

fill

said

Jeffrey.

500 volunteer positions

at

more

work with community

(CSI) to expand the group to a col“It’s

been a learning curve,” said

Jeffrey.

He

said the group has been suc-

far. Students from other programs, such as nursing, have

cessful so

how

get involved in their community.

By

to

him

to find out

to

She

people at the Volunteer Action Centre are looking forward to working with students, and to help them, “discover the impact volunteering can have for themselves and the community.” Students can get in touch with the Volunteer Action Centre at www.volunteerkw.ca. said

the

BRANDON WALKER

urban scene.

Hip-hop for

winter weather that

snow

isn’t all

hammered K-W

that bad.

Some

with 15 to

20 cen-

Response

party.

held Feb.

23

YOUR i ST STEP TO

The event at

will be 9 p.m. in the

at the

door and can be purchased

through

student

from the

five

representatives

programs

that organ-

ized the event: nursing, paramedics, rescue, law

Sanctuary.

fire

Hosted by Fletch from 91.5 the Beat, proceeds go toward the purchase of an ambulance for students in the paramedic program and Raising the Roof, a program work-

istration

Any

and security admin-

and police foundations.

tickets left the

event will be sold

at

week of the the CSI self-

serve office and at the door.

Students attending the party can

ing to find solutions to homeless-

sign in one person from outside the

ness in the area.

college.

The

19 and over event will give

some of

-

Emergency

students a chance to shake

wintry scenes, like this

one, can be quite eye-catching.

CAREER SERVICES

prepare yourself

fans,

rip-roaring

a

it

to

dents

Alcoholic drinks, pop and pizza be sold at the party.

services.

who

hard-working

all

members of

everyone your looking for work and what pur looking for

Attend events to meet new people •Conduct Information Interviews •

With courses such as sociology and psychology, students develop competency in linking clients to community resource systems. first year and through until the final year of the program, students are sent into the work-

Starting in the

continuing

place to acquire skills that are not found in a school environ-

ment. This enables the students to create strong ties with possible

employers, commented It provides them with

Poynter.

workplace environments and teaches them great skills. “We’re grateful for the positive relations between our students and their workplaces,” said great

Poynter, “because

it

is

the work-

places that inform us of any

changes

in the

community such

as trends, technologies

and

college opened, Poynter said.

will

the hottest songs in the

EtAP LOYMEHT SaCCBS$\

Effective Job Search Tool! As the saynng goes,

•Join industry associations

netwaks •Adopt a role model/mentor •Ask, Listen and Share •Join online social

information with contacts

Icnovff

80%

'Its

not what you

but who you know Almost

of all jobs are not advertised. So

to secure the job of your dreams, start

TuesdayU& Wednesday

building your

February

network now! CareerServices is tocated in Student Client Services Building -Room 220

10% Off

differ-

ways of processing things.” The social services program has been at Conestoga since the ent

Networking -Your Most

•Volunteer

the

providers.

Where to start? Tell

is

as front-line service

How Do You Network?

»

stu-

get along very well

devoted to their work.” The two-year program

future

Tickets are $10 in advance or $12

timetres of

of

have

relations co-ordinator at the centre.

believes in a

Hip-Hop fundraiser for ambulance

The harsh

“We

ing with Conestoga Students Inc.

Kitchener- Waterloo area.

Tom Kalbfieisch)

co-ordinator

designed to teach students to

been

come up

(Photo by

the

Gwenanne Jorgenson, community

Jeffrey said they have

than 150 non-profit charities in the

Winter wonderland

Poynter,

talk-

in

lege-wide organization.

people the opportunity to difference in their

effort

with faculty and are completely

and Jeremy

about 15 members. very loyal,” he said.

much

community enhanced by volunteers who share their time, resources and talents,” said

Bartlett

a volunteer display. Jeffrey noticed a decline

The group has been working with

put so

extremely

Jason

volunteer work for students and helped create a volunteer group.

“The people getting involved are

we

and care into the planning of our program,” said Madeleine

Action Centre in Kitchener. “The Volunteer Action Centre

(Photo by Adam Hannon)

off

raise at events

because

social

First-year police foundations students,

show

2004 found employment within six

Jeffrey said they are thinking of

The money they

Jeffrey,

that 100 in

with be donated to the Volunteer

ings at the college, usually in the

morning. Jeffrey said they even met a few times over the Christmas break. He added the group is constantly growing and currently has

know

per cent of graduates

group competition would involve group problem solving, running and other activities.

The group holds weekly meet-

will be pleased to

food items were donated to the Food Bank of Waterloo Region and the clothing was donated to the

iron

first-

foundations students.

“It

services program at Conestoga

Door

raising funds

community.

Jeffrey

Students enrolled in the social

The non-perishable

play at

to get

By TOM KALBFLEISCH

The LASA/police foundations group recently co-ordinated a food and clothing drive and had a dis-

11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Foyer Inside Door #4 Deposit: $25.00


SPOKE, February

WANT TO START

13,

2006

— Page 9

Poker

ORJOIN ACLUB?

Night

CLUBS

hi

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21st GAME STARTS

DAY

AT 7PM Sign Up Starts 2hrs before -

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22

SANCTUARY

SANCTUARY

19+

11:30-1:30

ONLY

STUDENT CARD REQUIRED

CLUB REPRESENTATIVES PLEASE CONTACT THE CSI OFFICE FOR DETAILS

MOVIE MONDAY’S

EMPLOYMENT SOUND TECHNICIAN needed for CSI events & operation of DJ BOOTH Should have: -Extensive knowledge of audio/visual

equipment -Knowledge of sound boards DJ equipment

&

-Able to work variable hours and help at

CSI events

-Knowledge of venue lighting systems -Knowledge of DVP projectors

PLEASE DROP OFF YOUR RESUME AT THE CSI OFFICE ROOM 1B21

DOON CAMPUS

Conestoga I

STUDENTS INC


.

Page 10

— SPOKE, February

Feature

2006

13,

Students can tour student centre By JONYANEFF

too, so

I

like to see

what's happen-

A

can happen behind closed

lot

doors.

As

for the

why

morning

every second Tuesday

(the

tours of the

manager Rick Arnott construction is moving along

last

new

being Jan. 31)

student centre are

said

well right now.

“We're starting with foundations some footings are in and

conducted for students who are curious about what's going on

excavating

inside the student centre.

point where

know

problem has been students knocking on my door and asking if they can take a look," said Judy Dusick, general manager of Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI). "Tours can happen at the site of the "I

the

student centre as long as

it's

rea-

sonably safe to do so. At this point in time we're confining the tours to past tours construction

man-

agement students have seen the student centre. Boots and a hard hat are needed in order to take the tour. Dusick said she doesn't go on every tour. "1

1

)

to

bit

more

is

down

done,

we have

make

sure the construc-

were happening, to know how well students were asking tion tours

questions, to

know how

well the

to

the

to dig a little

for the rest of our foot-

he said. Arnott has been working for the Walter Fedy ings,"

Partnership construction for

company

two years and has been

in

con-

struction for 37 years.

site .services started

the workers

"We

what

we’re shooting "There are certain areas we are going to have to push a little harder to get done, so some parts of the student centre finished

to get start-

of them having high ceilings and

demolished and made into a couple

up in the new addition. "One of them is going to be closer towards the Tim Hortons. There’s going to be an open area with bleachers, where the students can come in and relax. There’s a lot of different aspects of the design

of office spaces, while overhead

glass vaulted

that are architecturally pleasing to

the eye."

have to have the walls up,

Certain areas that have been laid

show

the steel structure up, the concrete

out in the design,

board and then we can work on the details of the student centre,” he said. “We are working near the main cafeteria and during the week

going to be a cafeteria in one area, stores in another, but Arnott said[ he’s not sure what they might be.

down

for,” said Arnott.

were hoping

student centre.

deadline.

get

1,

can marry (connect) the new addition to the existing building of the

of Feb. 6

might

Dec.

ed in October. Some of the permits, such as grades, were issued Dec. 7. Arnott said they’re working to finish the demolition part, so they

The construction workers are trying to meet a September 2006

September, but everything

go on some of them (including

Jan. 3

outside,

"That’s

the inside portion."

On

student centre con-

struction, site

That's

The

demolition started in November, but

ing out there," she said.

stands,

we

will

be putting steel

electrical

and plumbing

He

said

that there’s

where the current cafete-

ria is they are taking out a

so they can build a

window

common

hall-

way, which will connect to the stu-

there.”

Arnott said the student centre

is

kind of spread out and each end

is

where student areas

are,

with both

dent centre.

Arnott said the existing men’s

washroom near Door

3

will

be

plumbing on the new men’s wash-

room

(located near Door 3 as well) being done and block layers are being put in so the walls can be put is

up for that area. Dusick said the student centre project is fabulous and she has enjoyed seeing it evolve. “The work is on time and we’re having a lovely winter for the workers to complete the work that needs to happen out there,” she said. “It’s going very smoothly, but there’s a lot of things that could

happen

We

in the construction phase.

could suffer some

strikes,

bad

weather and permit delays, but right now everything is working out well and we have a top-notch company working on the job.”

after is

going

as scheduled.

“We were a little late getting started budget wise because it was a little over budget. It takes some time to get all of

our pemiits through and

construction workers were answer-

obviously you can’t

ing the questions and I'm curious

permits have been issued.”

start until the

Left:

Roberts Group mechanical plumber Chris Palubeski works on the pipes

washroom Above:

in

XDG

the student centre Feb.

for the

new men’s

1

concrete former Jesse Dietrich carries a board after hammering

it

(bottom

left)

for the

student centre.

Below: XDG concrete jr. foreman Branden McDonald manoeuvres his up the forks in preparation to work on the centre.

,

Boom

as he attempts

to

hook

.


Feature

SPOKE, February

13,

2006

— Page 11

Teaching overseas

dream come By VANESSA PARKER The thought of signing

try

live in a

may

some

work

southeast Asian coun-

not be for everyone, but for a

is

it

36,092 persons per square kilometre, there is never a

a onc-ycar

contract obligating yourself to

and

tion density of

dream come

true.

Janna Ceechin, a former resident of Guelph and alien of

now

a legal resident

Taiwan, signed up to teach

English in a culture nothing like her own.

"Friends of mine were already teaching in Taiwan

when

I

decided

Ceechin. "One of my friends set up an English .school for children five years and younger." to go," said

Even though Ceechin had and connections

in

friends

Taiwan, she

said the transition wasn’t without

problems.

"Taiwan

is

a very different world

than that of North America," she

"Taiwanese people idealize

said.

North American culture but they celebrate such an array of festivals

and unique traditions." Even with all the cultural differences Ceechin said some North American pastimes still exist. "Taiwanese food is a lot different than ours but you can still get McDonalds, KFC and Subway." One of Cecehin's first stumbles with Taiwanese culture happened shortly after arrival. She and her friends were touring the capital, Taipai, shopping at night markets. "I

saw

a street lined with bright

colours and lights and thought this

market will have some interesting "I went farfinds," said Ceechin. ther down the street and looked up and realized 1 was surrounded by pig carcasses.

1

felt like

I

horror movie. Everywhere

was 1

in a

turned

were pigs hanging by their Ceechin said it is popular in Taiwan to buy whole pigs from meat markets. "There are specific meat markets there

hind hooves.

in

“This Taiwan," said Ceechin. definitely not the kind of shop-

was

ping

I

was trying

to do.”

Currently living in Tai’ Chung, a with a population of just over a

city

million people but with a popula-

shortage of things to do. "1 live in a city

with a population

comparable to Toronto’s, so there never a dull moment," said is Ceechin. "Tai’Chung never

true Languages (TESOL)

certificate.

Rachael Cabral, a Cdobal TESOL college teacher said, you can obtain a TESOL certificate in three ways, in-class, online or by correspondence. "The in-class version

most popular and

is

is

the

comprised of

The

sleeps, there are constant night fes-

three different parts.

and you can shop at the night markets till 3 a.m." According to Ceechin. the Taiwanese nightlife is never dull. “Taiwan has every type of bar.

35 hours of in-class instructorled lecture and teacher training in class,

There’s clubs, pubs, theatres, every

of-class or creative lesson planning,

tivals

type

of entertainment." Ceechin

has a diploma

in

advertising from

Georgian College but being in Taiwan has made her want to coneducation when she to Canada. In Taiwan Ceechin never walks by a stray animal without trying to help it. Stray cats and dogs wander the streets in Tai’Chung and Ceechin takes it upon herself to find these animals homes. “People here fall into trends when certain animals become poptinue

ular.

then

but

when

the

novelty

wears off they abandon them on the streets,”

she said.

home and them is

them

take

to the vet for checkups."

According vet

"I

bathe them, then take to

Ceechin a

not expensive like

trip to the

it

is

here.

After she cleans up the animals and makes sure they’re not sick, she takes them to a park where peo-

go if they want to adopt pets. "Every Sunday at the park is kind of like a day at the humane society," she said. “People come here if they want to adopt an animal or if they have an animal they don’t want anymore.” Ceechin has helped more than 20 animals find homes and currently lives with two dogs and four cats. When Ceechin comes back to

ple

part

where you learn the fundamentals of teaching," said Cabral. "Then you spend five hours of outpresentation

preparation,

readings

be done during the week of the course," she said. “This

and exercises

to

prepares you for the classroom.”

Cabral said then you have to

her

comes back

first

is

fulfill

own

that

she

time and finish with an exam.

by earning your TESOL ceryou are guaranteed a Job placement. "TESOL has resources all around the world to help teachers find employment.” Conestoga College has its own that

tificate

well-recognized

TESOL

certificate

program. You must have a college or university degree to get into the twosemester-long program, which is a combination of 375 hours of in-class instruction, 45 hours of observation of ESL classes in the area and a teaching practicum of 20 hours. “Our program is so much more rigorous because by the time you are done you will be ready to walk into an adult ESL or EFL (English as a Foreign Language) classroom of any kind, anywhere in the world and start teaching with confidence,” said Laura Stoutenburg,

Conestoga’s program. "This means that your certificate will be honoured in Ontario and around the world.” If you’ve always wanted to travel but have never been able to save sufficient funds, try working while

co-ordinator

of

not as complicated as it might seem. For college graduates you

you see Ceechin

said she

need a diploma from a reputable educational facility and a Teacher of English to Speakers of Other

$3,000 a month and is able to live well and still have money left over to send home and pay student loans.

to study veteri-

narian science. a teacher overseas

Taiwanese artwork

Cabral assures interested students

certificate

Becoming

front of

about 20 hours of readings on your

TESOL

Canada she plans

(Photo by Vanessa Parker)

Janna Ceechin stands in brought back to Canada.

is

As a teacher makes just over

the world.

(Submitted photo)

Taiwan, funerals can be seen at night and are usually bright and a spectacle of lights. In

(Submitted photo) (Submitted photo)

Mike Schram, a former Guelph resident who now teaches English phonics in a Taiwanese kindergarten classroom.

in

Taiwan, teaches the children

Kindergarten students play a

game

of tug-a-war.


Page 12

— SPOKE, February

Bon

Jovi fans

By KRISTIN GRIFFERTY The Air Canada Centre

in

down-

town Toronto was the place to be on Jan. 30, as '80s rock band Jon

a style

full

too familiar for

all

of fans

6-60, sporting

Bon

Jovi

The act, which was meant to bring the singer closer to his adoring fans,

turned into a distracting

International

for only

a

select few.

runway Hamilton

off the at

the

Airport,

these

alive.

Mullets,

were the and beer flowed

sang

at

their

who came in

and

outfits of choice,

and almost three

superstar during one of his most

All in

p.m. and kept the fans on their feet

set just

for

more than two hours of and on-stage

guitar

antics.

Jovi busted out with classic songs

Bed of Roses, You and Dead or weaving in new hits

four years

powerful ballads. Bed of Roses.

hits.

the stage at 8:30

riffs

select

few, as others strained to see the

Be There

such as

I’ll

for

Alive, while like

all.

Bon

at college

Jovi performed a

as powerful

and ovation they did 20

worthy as the sets years ago. Because of that they will always have fans keepin’ the faith.

Have a

By TOM KALBFLEISCH Bachelor of science in nursing (BScN), an eight-semester program, has only been a program at the college for four years.

the

woman. Bon

many

But, Marilyn Kelly, a level one

swooning

co-ordinator in the

Jovi led a sing-along

rative

who

with the packed house of fans.

BScN

collabo-

program, says the students have attended the program

There were some moments that

group

didn’t quite hit a high note, like

have been extraordinary. “All of our students are here to

when Bon

learn,”

to support the

unison to a collection of old

at

and

like water, as all

and new tunes. While most bands stage

jackets

leather

fringe

fans

instruments on centre stage.

meet and greet for only a

Jovi brought guitars,

tight pants

encores

Jovi started off their electric

Jovi himself taking the stage, while

skateboarding

celebrated

ing fans, turned into a distracting

After three costume changes, two

by surprising the audience with

band plugged away

to

bring the singer closer to his ador-

Nice Day.

40-

something rock stars proved that their fans still want them, dead or

Bon

meet and greet

each performance.

landing

Bon

The band took

The band took the stage for four shows in Toronto and had fans on

during

bevy of special from fireworks to

hours of musical

love songs.

After skidding

a

marching bands midgets.

Jovi took centre stage.

their feet for

along

bring

effects ranging

some

have been entertaining fans with their hard rock ballads and melodic

his

1

fans.

For the past two decades, Jon Bon Jovi and his misfit of a band

set

age from

in

BScN

on a Prayer’

‘Living

still

The audience was ranging

Bon

News

2006

13,

that take centre

Air Canada Centre

Jovi took a second platform in the middle of the crowd, and was swallowed by fans. The act, which was meant to

Jon Bon Jovi

said Kelly. “They know what they need to do and they go ahead and get it done.” BScN is a university program that

taught

is

McMaster

at

Mohawk

University,

College and

Conestoga. It

was developed because

professional

nurses

all

the

in

province must have completed a baccalaureate

university

The

program.

nursing

McMaster,

Mohawk, Conestoga BScN

pro-

gram is one of the largest programs in Ontario. Even though the students take countless science courses, at the

beginning of their second year students job shadow nurses, learning the “ropes” of nursing. “As a co-ordinator I have to

checkup on students who are job shadowing,” remarked Kelly. “It’s a process that

I

tant so that

know what

I

feel is

very importhey are

learning and so that the students

can share what they have learned

and accomplished.” Being a fairly new course, faculty from the three sites continue to work together to enhance the goals and objectives of the program. To ensure that the program is always up to date, regular meetings are held between the co-ordinators said Kelly. She said the meetings are about what works, what doesn’t work and what improvements can be made to make BScN an all around better program. In order to overcome challenges such as the great distances between the three sites, certain course lec-

and other resources are

tures, notes

offered to students on

CD-ROM.

Also,

access

can

students

McMaster-based

server

a

called

Learnlink. This provides both stu-

dents and faculty access to online resources, conference, e-mail and

much more. “The three

sites are

working very

closely together,” remarked Kelly.

“We

try to

make

the accessibility

of the program as easy as possible

www.canada123go.ca 1-877-go123go

TRAVEL &

WORK ABROAD

for students, but,

it’s

not always

possible.”

Changes, not always very big ones, are quite often occurring in

VOYAGER ET TRAVAILLER A L'ETRANGER

BScN,

said

years old

it

She

Kelly.

because the program

is

basically

is

said

only four

always

changing. “In

1

0 years

I

can almost say for program will be

certain that this

more Foreign Affairs

Affaires etrangeres

Canada

Canada

stable,”

Kelly

said.

“The

technologies and technicalities of

Canada

nursing might be different, but the overall It

program will be the same. be more firm.”

will just

^


News

Good By JON

SPOKE, February

2006

13,

— Page 13

food spices up culinary arts programs

MOLSON

means back

into

industry

this

1

went.”

Good food can difficult to find as

The college

be, at times, as it

make. But

to

is

thanks to a rising interest in the culinary arts,

many forms of

train-

ing are being offered through

currently accepts 42

students into the

first year of the food and beverage management program and 30 students can enroll

program. Both

in the chef-training

all

Conestoga College offers two

good math and communication skills arc recommended. Students

programs, chef training and food

graduate with a diploma from food

and beverage management, which

and beverage management, which is a two-year, co-op program, and receive a certificate from chef training, which is a two semester co-op program. Both programs will be taught at the new Waterloo campus on University Avenue this

of education.

levels

allow students to acquire the skills

needed to become successful

in a

culinary arts career.

"Most of Canada and the U.S. have been investing a

culinary

lot in

which has definitely been

arts,

main focus

Philippe

said

instructor

a

in the last three years,”

Saraiva,

a

both the food and

for

beverage management program and

chef training program

at

"1

I

what

believe

Conestoga. call

‘the

MacDonald’s generation' kind of phased out. Everybody kind of got sick and tired of eating out and peomaturing a little bit in their culinary knowledge. We see that on ple are

TV, we look

at

magazines and we

teaches both theory and prac-

baking at the Waterloo campus and has taught at the college for the past six and a Saraiva has been half years. employed as a chef since 1980 and, well

as

tical

as

thanks to his culinary elled as well as

skills, trav-

worked

Conestoga

main

in countries

focus

at

to teach culinary arts

is

to students in both programs.

“That particular sector of educahe said. “So if you look, like 1 say, through high tion has a big growth,”

colleges

schools,

there

demand

(Photo by Jon Molson)

Philippe Saraiva, a culinary instructor at Conestoga’s Waterloo

more

the ovens, not burning themselves,

interested

have to cook

at

not hurting .someone else, by

come down and check it out. “Just come on down and talk to us or sit down in the restaurant and

He

said the college

need a

food,

more demanding of

facility that is a lot larger,”

Saraiva

sanitary manner,

now

their staff, so

forced to get an

said

it

“The

is

easier to

make

it

as a

opportunity for students,” Saraiva said. “I have many of my

great

who open their own company, open their

students

Club. Saraiva was also the assistant

ing

manager of a restaurant supply store, which allowed him to spend more time with his daughter. “Sometimes this industry is basically a bad mistress, you know, you can’t run away from it,” he said. “So when my daughter was at a young age, 1 switched careers a lit-

restaurants

tle bit just to

more of she

is

allow myself to have

a family life

a bit

and now that up, by all

more grown

who

cater-

own

are very successful

and they are all around the world. Even if you don’t speak the language, good food is the same.” Saraiva believes there are a lot of

scary.

college’s objective

relief

is

is

that

we

come here and take maybe two to three

So

challenge, but

He

is

I

in the next four

where we

is

yourself

want

very important,”

“We found

a lot of

these courses are beneficial.”

Saraiva takes satisfaction in the cleanliness of the college’s facilities.

“We

have a perfect record when it comes to health inspectors and we pride ourselves on keeping one of the cleanest kitchens in Kitchener-

Waterloo,” he said.

“We

get lots of

safety instruction,

teach the students

make

believe University

said kitchen safety cannot be

sure nothing goes wrong.”

program

the

in

are to

is

have yourself a meal and view what all the students are doing and ask

in a

recommendations from the health inspector as a model to be followed. The students spend almost two hours a day just cleaning. That is a big part of what our course is about, maldng sure the facilities are impeccable and the food is impeccable and we go through many steps to

going to be a good move

“We do have we have to

Saraiva said.

His advice to people

treat

can make at home, like just defrosting meat or keeping things too long in the fridge, so even for life skills

time,

over-emphasized. as

make people sick, so how you how you process food

kind of

same

that is

safety

people realizing the mistakes you

are now, in trying to see how we can accommodate the original layout of University Heights to accommodate our special needs for the food and beverage progranri and chef training which is a bit of a

for us.”

of students

is

on and sanitation. When you deal with food you can definitely also have a very strong focus

all

will require a lot of space

to five years.

Heights

the course and

the

at

be able to grow

to

cooking

in a

and

to

The reason that we are movnew location in September

program. “These types of programs are what I call a life skill,” he said. “A

advantages to being

lot

was a

those programs, which

ing to a

Guelph, the Walper Terrace Hotel and the Westmount Golf & Country

it

basically double the intake of

education.”

He

said.

John Tibbits purchase of

all

that is part of the curriculum.

are going to

we

“In Canada, they don’t see you as you are young, they see you as how much do you know and that is a

France, moved to Canada 20 years ago. He has worked at the University of

means

because

the

University Heights,

and

in

looking to

We

President

announced

exciting

who was born

is

behave with knives and with

restaurants, so the restaurants are

“When

culinary chef in Canada.

Italy.

everyday.”

the program.

including France, Spain, Portugal Saraiva,

home

to

grow

it

who

may not be in anymore, but you still

how

this industry

on TV, look at it on the Internet as well as in magazines and say ‘why not me,’” he said. “So people are more demanding in

is

better,

nutritious food.

years later on, they

better food.

the staff

campus, says people demand

new

are

cooking schools everywhere.” Saraiva believes people now expect more from restaurants and

“They see

get excited about food again.”

He

September. Saraiva’s

culinary

is

‘is

this

would “Lunch than $10

something

I

to do?,”’ Saraiva said.

quite inexpensive, less

for a four-course meal, so

it

is

a

great experience.”

Lunch

is

.served

at

noon on

Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday and dinner is open to the public on Monday and Tuesday night.

Saraiva also recommends having good math and communications skills.

“You have to work with people in demanding and stressful job, so you have to be good-hearted. Things are going to go bad, but deal a very

with

it,

and

the

in

end everybody good

laughs,” he said. “Just have a

sense of

life,

work

hard, study hard,

party hard and basically just enjoy If you like to eat good food, more than likely you would like to cook good food and pass it on to life.

someone

else.”

(Photo by Janet Morris)

(Photo by Melissa Hancock)

(Photo by Janet Morris)

like snow business was hammered with the white stuff. One

There’s no business Students were reminded what snow looked her

way

to class.

The weather

like

forecast for this

on Feb.

week

4,

when

the region

calls for highs,

above zero and snowfall

lonely traveller (above right) braves the icy cold on

at the beginhing of the week., ^


Page 14

— SPOKE, February

13,

Feature

2006

Radar detectors not worth the By JONYANEFF You're driving your car on a road

deserted

and get home, so you

late

you’re looking to

Moments

speed.

night

at

police

a

later

you over and gives you a hefty speeding ticket. Thousands of tickets are given -each day to unexpecting drivers in Ontario. For many, speeding is a normal part of their lives. Some drivers will do almost anycruiser pulls

thing

avoid getting a

to

ticket,

including buying a radar detector.

Though radar more popular early

in the late

they are

‘9()s,

were 980s and

detectors 1

it all depends on make, year and model of the car. Larochelle said he can’t speak for

of driving a motor vehicle with a

convictions because

they don’t often get a break for

ally found, that is

radar warning device.

the

being

drivers’ attention.

“Under subsection the set fine

is

HTA

3 of the

$140, including the

victim surcharge, the fine

comes

$170,” said Larochelle,

who

came

to

has

other police officers, but

all

offend-

he has stopped with devices have happened to be male. ers

A

across four or five detectors

radar detector owner,

who

did-

Nov. 23 three demerit points are given for having a radar detector in

want his name used, said he has been using a radar detector for four years, and has saved at least $300

your vehicle.

in

during his 12-year career. “As of

“My

personal belief

is

most,

if

n’t

speeding

so the fine and demerit points are

was travelling long distances on Hwy. 40 and I thought it would be a good idea to have a

affected proportionately.”

warning system

not

all,

drivers in Ontario are

aware

radar warning devices are illegal,

because

“The only time

I

1

my

in

vehicle in

I’ve given a break

for a radar detector

is

when

I

pulled

some have

(the police)

know

was illegal in Canada and they had it on the dash, but

didn’t

it

it

Peter

of Waterloo

"Viol

regional poliee said the force does-

keep

statistics

on how many

vehicles are stopped and checked for radar detectors, but the

number

“Under the

right circumstances

the police will stop a vehicle they

wave

drivers’ speed.

by

waves

a radar

detector finds a signal, such as a

and flashing,

know

letting

the

driver

time to ease up on the

it’s

for

(Photo by Jon Yaneff)

This Cobra Nine-band radar/laser detector detects a radar signal detectors are illegal in Ontario and most parts of Canada.

in

the streets of Kitchener. Radar

who

Karen,

her last name,

did not want to give is

an office manager

case police would be detecting for

suspect

speeders,” he said. “I usually take

tor,

it

is

operating a radar detec-

but they won’t stop the vehicle

have a radar detector conviction.

vehicle.

violator

could be beeping and

~ Though

radar detectors are legal

Columbia, Saskatehewan and British

in

Brunswick, they are

illegal

every-

a vehicle.

Drivers don’t

have to be using a radar detector to be fined, since it is illegal to have

your possession.

Const. Chris Larochelle of the

Waterloo regional police said under the

Highway

Traffic

Act (HTA) the

offence for getting caught with a radar detector

is

if

warning

rise in insurance to cus-

they get caught with a

device

if

they

already

“After three years on the higher

seen

in

no

is

they

New

Canada and are conby the police if they are

one

There

if

receive insurance from the company.

else in

in

State

Alberta,

fiseated

where

for

tomers

the time.

a minor conviction

is

also a feature to allow the

switch, which reduces the frequency of false alerts in densely popu-

Canadians can get

radar detector

all

A

their

radar

detectors in the U.S. and on the

said when a police officer comes across a radar detector, the

it

convenience.

lated areas.

attached to the windshield of a

flashing

driver’s

driver to select a city-to-highway

a higher price rating plan

model,

has

It

screen to enhance night driving.

garage door openers, so unless the a less-sensitive

the

There

alarms, other radar detectors and

other frequencies, such as burglar

The

dim-mode switch allows the driver to dim the radar detector display

down when

is

proves the use of the radar detector

by the offender.”

matically mutes the alert of a signal

Farm insurance agent Kathleen McLachlin. She said new customers to the company start with

Radar detectors also detect

gas.

them afterwards.

our radar detector

an auto mute function, which auto-

beeping

starts

bring

ing to detect radar detectors.

mid-1970s X-bands were the only frequency used for police radar. K-bands arrived in 1976 and Ka-bands appeared in 1989. Radars send out a pulse of radio waves which, when hitting a moving object, changes frequency depending on the speed and direc-

it

“We

detector can be bought $62.50 US on www.wapgear.com. This detector also provides immunity from "VGtwo detection when police are try-

Until the

police laser gun,

police just destroy

for

1

When

held

they are not lawful in Ontario so the

ards.

radio

at certain frequencies.

tion of the vehicle.

is

evidence and

laser signals and warns drivers of emergency vehicles and road haz-

The four frequencies police use to measure speed are X-band (10Gigahertz), K-band (24 Ghz), Ka-wideband (32-36 Ghz) and Ka.super wideband (33.4-36 Ghz). 1

said the radar detector

provides 360-degree detection of

These guns

transmitting

He

until disposition for

by

police officers’ laser guns used to

measure

and detain them for the

search

sig-

nals such as the ones given off

operate

persuaded that we have the authority to

to be

The anonymous radar detector owner owns the world’s first nineband radar detector, a Cobra Nineband radar/laser detector, which

tracking

detectors scan for radio

at

detector on the court date, which

not large.

is

good

device,” he said.

wasn’t on,” he said.

Const.

brought to the

drivers are pretty

who

warn drivers when police are the speed of cars. The

to

“Most

^

giving up the units at this point, but

over vacationers from Kentucky,

n’t

tickets.

“I started using a radar detector

possession of one.

in

used today

still

risk

customers can switch to the lower price plan as long as their record remains clear,” said Karen. “There can’t be any minor tickets on a drivers’ record in the last three years on the higher price plan. If there is any major or

price

plan,

the

Criminal Code convictions

it

detects a police offi-

he

cer’s radar gun.”

The radar

detector

is

usually

said.

'Viol

U.S.

the

in

except

for

Washington D.C. and "Virginia. Some companies will only ship to a U.S. address.

Other radar detectors that are

close

with the Waterloo regional police

being caught with the radar

service policies and procedures and

and Canada are the Escort Passport 8500 X50 ($300 US), the Bel Pro RX65 ($200 US) and Valentine One ($400 US). There is also another laser countermeasure found on the streets called a Laser Veil, which is a

said he has

come

HTA

detector.

“I’ve

my

put

glove-box just police cruiser

detector

in

my

time before a

in

came from around

a

corner on several occasions.”

According www.gocanada.about.com glove department police look

detector

is

if

the

is

to

the

first

place

they believe a radar

in a vehicle.

years customers can’t be

regulations.

“Things of

this

nature are not

likely to surprise or cer,”

he

there

is

said.

to

“Most

shock an

offi-

officers realize

a small segment of the driv-

ing public

who would

rather resort

measures such as radar detectors

comply with regulations that have been set up with public safety then

in

Larochelle said as far as offences

is

mind.” Larochelle said

when a person

is

go, having a radar detector carries

caught with a radar detector he or

some mens

she

She said she couldn’t give any examples of rate increases due to

offenders are usually quite aware that

rea,

which

having a detector

means

is illegal,

so

Winter crash Joel

Columbe from

Towing prepares last

car involved

to in

Active

remove the a three-car

accident at the intersection of

Ottawa Street and Westmount Road Feb. 6. No one was seriously injured. Driver error and icy roads were to blame for the pile up, which closed the intersection for half an hour. (Photos by Lee Evans)

paint-on coating that gets applied to

a

person’s licence plate

and

makes them

less

headlights reflective.

that It

doesn’t totally prevent

laser lock, but

insured by the company.”

last five

legal

highly popular in the United States

the

in

down,”

dealt with in accordance

The man to

for only suddenly slowing

Internet because the detectors are

it

buys the driver

sig-

more time to slow down. “However, these methods of laser

nificantly

is made aware of the fact they have been detected with the radar

deflection are of

detector warning device or

while speeding,” said Const. Viol.

if

visu-

purpose

is

little

value

if

the

preventing detection


News

SPOKE, February

Red Planet

‘Unearthing’ water on the V

CHANTELLETIMPERLEY

The possibility of life on Mars is becoming more likely as more evidence

is

pointing to the presence of

water on the

Red

Planet.

hosted

lecture

a

In

by

the

Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics on Feb.

John Grant spoke to a packed Waterloo Collegiate Institute auditorium about the recent discoveries and developments on Mars. Grant is a geologist hailing from the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington D.C. He has been 1,

involved with the

Dr.

Mars

E.xploration

Rover missions since 2002 and is one of six Science Operations Working Group chairs who decides w’hat they will do on a daily basis. Grant also co-chaired the selection of the landing sites for the two

and Opportunity, and helped to calibrate the cameras that send back images of the planet. Currently, Grant works out of his office in Boston using teleconference and lab equipment .set up for him. He works with other scientists rovers. Spirit

many time zones through six and eight hour phone calls, web casts and web cams that show him over

what they are doing

CA, where is

Pasadena,

Lab

space crafts for the

that built the

rovers

in

the Jet Propulsion

located.

Grant said seeing both rovers land on the planet

was

his defining

moment

in the project, because almost all missions over the past 30 years have failed.

go you

“I did get to

to

both launches

and I can tell that your heart is pounding, because this thing is literally sitting on top of a controlled bomb, and you’ve put your heart and soul into it over a period of time,” he said. “Until the thing lands on Mars, you really don’t know what’s going to happen.” The rovers are each about the size of a golf

cart,

with solar panels that

power them and a series of different cameras attached. They each include a robotic arm that gives scientists ture,

information about the tex-

composition, history and ther-

mal composition of the rocks, as well as instruments that grind or

brush away surface materials.

On

a typical day scientists use the

instruments to look behind them at

interesting targets, and use the sixwheel mobility to drive over to the targets and place tools down to get information on the geology of the surlace. They can only move between ime and a half and two

forming,

resolution

travelling

last

information from a planet its

closest distance,

over

is

lectures, said he

km

that, at

glitch about the wire,

mil-

G

to the space

it

the

rover

"This ship carries the brains of an entirely new generation of explorread

Grant's

Hucton ing (Photo by Chantelle Timperley) Dr. John Grant is part of the science team that gets to decide where the two Mars rovers. Spirit and Opportunity, will go and what they will do on a daily basis.

John Matlock. “Unlike Armstrong, Aldrin and 10 other astronauts, one of them a geologist who set foot on the moon, and unlike Columbus, Magellan and other navigators who set foot on shores, today’s explorers are

working by remote control from behind computer screens.” Spirit and Opportunity were placed in locations about 12 hours and 20 minutes apart, and the land-

floor of the crater.

The formation of many of rocks

telling scientists a lot

is

Mars’ geology.

Some

the

about

are

coarse, and others look as

if

It

Bedrock with unlike

in jewellry

orbit, intriguing the scientists

because

it

is

a

texture,

fine

been discovered at the base of one hill, as well as sand ripples. Fragments of rocks formed by lava are also scattered all across certain surfaces of the planet.

Crater,

location

approximately

the size of Connecticut, and

was

chosen because of the large valley (Marte Vallis) that flows into it. Scientists have figured out that if water helped form the valley, it must have gone into the crater. Is that is where the water disappeared to, it probably carried sediments and deposited them on the

them called

little

vesicles,

how much volatiles and were in the lava when it erupted, meaning there were lots. which

tell

If the water did exist, scientists have discovered it has probably disappeared in to the polar ice caps, in to the ground, stripped off the surface by winds, or lost to space. As for life on the planet. Grant said is still

a far

way

off.

“This mission was really not designed with these kinds of instru-

“Today’s explorers are

working by remote control from behind computer screens.”

ments to go and test that hypothesis,” he said. “But we are seeing places where over distances of kilometers,

the sulfuric

in

Perimeter Institute

over the surface, similar

what happens on Earth when water percolates through rocks and to

pushes out certain minerals,

Many

hematite.

very

little

which

is

to

why

like

of the rocks have

no hematite hematite

is

in

them,

important

to the search for water.

Bodies of water leave behind what is called evaporate when they dry up. Normally on* Earth there

Snow Job a heavy snowfall, call in contractors K-W Cornerstone Paving for snow removal. Left: After

the college had to

(Photo by

Adam Hannon)

Right: While the recent blanket

more than 20 centimetres snow may be frustrating for of

of

and shovellers, children and the young at heart can use it to express their creative

drivers

sides. (Photo by Steph Baulk)

is

a better

way

to

absorb

details.”

Carmeta Abbott, a friend of both Coats and Hueton, said the group

work

what intrigues her. community of people workon this have to work together and is

’’The

ing

they have to agree, and they developed it together and they have to

continue to work on said.

it

together,” she

‘The minds and the working

together,

I

think, is just stunning.”

what we’d expect

currently has a “President’s Vision”,

seem

to

have been

to be necessary if

was to get going.” However, if life on Mars does

all

person

what he is seeing. “They have a good website with lots of photos, but this is even more complete with the description and

able to have been in the ballpark of

life

spotted

in

visitor of

you are wondering when man will set foot on Mars, it will not be happening for a while yet. NASA

conditions at least

John Matlock,

Spherical granules have also been a

in

figuring that out

water.

Gusev

rocks also have lots of

gases

often associated with

Spirit is in a place called

degrees centigrade

the lectures, said seeing the images

Some

the coarse rocks, in other

and was spotted

used

there.

“We’re finding bugs at the bottom of the ocean now that they didn’t know could exist in hundreds of

ing with sulfate materials.

bubbles

areas, has

didn’t

from

it’s

climb-

up on Mars?” David Coats, another

they

had been weathered the way many

a semi-precious stone often

is

Everest,

like

would be .salt traces left behind, but on Mars the same thing is happen-

very

rocks on Earth have been.

reasons.

want to put all our science eggs in one basket,” said Grant. Opportunity is at Meridiani Planum, which was selected for its abundance of the mineral hematite.

Mount

Mars

exploring

atmosphere,” he said. “So what’s

ing spots were chosen for specific

“We

said

him because,

interests

introductory

speaker,

new

and then they

Hucton. “It’s amazing. Little boys have lovely toys, and big boys have even better toys.”

Once

forces.

were cut and bounced to a stop.

ers,”

the

said

in the Mars atmosphere, the airbags padding the rovers were inllated,

the tethers attaching

way

get around that with .some other fix,”

per hour and sus-

craft

amazed by how worked since

fascinating the

"It’s just

After launching from Earth, the rockets carrying the rovers travtained close to eight

is

machinery worked the first time with no mistakes and has gone on working and working, apart from that

lion kilometres away.

elled 27,()()()

simple Martian something. You

being on Mars.

more

.35

or

well the rovers have

dis-

back

feeding

great

a

wouldn’t want to interfere.” John Hucton, a frequent audience member of I’erimetcr Institute’s

sending back high-

photos,

and

tances

even

microbes

90 days, but they have continued functioning for over two years. Although some processes do not work the way they used to, the still

like

but right

there’s

tor

rovers are

sounds

it

now you have to kind of wonder about whether idea,

kilometres a day. Originally they were built to

— Page 15

2006

13,

need to be careful contaminate it with fragments of our own planet. “There’s a lot of concern that microbes and other things that may make it through the cleaning

exist, scientists

not

to

process,

that

are

on the space

If

which includes another

moon and

visit to the

space flight before con-

quering Martian grounds.

As

a planet with one per cent the

atmospheric density of earth that is cold and made up of carbon dioxide, mankind needs to first figure out

if

able for our

conditions are suit-

visit.

could in the right conditions

In the long term, the goal remains

end up gaining a foot hold on Mars, and we don’t want that to happen,” Grant said. “So going there and growing plants, Terri-

to determine the climate, the pres-

craft,

ence of water, and figure out what role water played in the geologic evolution of Mars.


Page 16

— SPOKE, February

TV

Entertainment

2006

13,

helping increase

By JESSICA BLUMENTHAL reality

and television can be astounding. Shows like Miami Ink and Inked are popularizing the art of tattoos.

The new reality TV tattoo shows good for the industry, said Paul Oliver, a tattoo artist at Lucky Souls tattoo shop at 799 King St. in are

said

By making

tattooing

stream, society can tattoos

more main-

now

and the people

them shouldn’t be

see that

who

have

feared.

Victor Navarro, one of Oliver’s clients for the past five years, said

he gets a

lot

of comments and

The

art

ing

or

of tattooing

apprenticeship

is

“There are a lot of good artists 1 0 times as many bad

artists,’’

A

said Oliver.

of people don’t wait to

lot

sure what they want

The

he has

a lot of firefighters, police officers,

lawyers and doctors

who make

artist. “I I

can’t

come

in needing a name covered.” Izumi said he had a lady who was married for 28 years and got her husband’s name tattooed on her.

Later that year, they were divorced

come

to

in to get a

cover-up.

Deciding what tattoo to get as

“It’s not just for sailors and whores anymore,’’ he pointed out

artists’ portfolios is crucial.

requested.

the

more accu-

how

shop really

rate account of

a

When picking a common sense

for

artist.

Is

good vibe from the her shop?

Do

Is

there a

and his or they have an auto

Do

wrap good

Darren and Yoji, who’s the appren-

toos from the consultation to the

packaging? It’s not easy deciding on something that will be on your body forever. Taking time is of the outmost

final result.

importance.

their

customers and show the

tat-

desire.

artist

The show is about a tattoo shop in Miami Beach, Fla. The cast includes Ami, Nunez, Carver, Kat, the stories of

what they

things advised

clean?

it

clave for sterilization?

They document

alter the tattoo to get exactly

shop just look

runs, he said.

tice.

change and

“The person should be looking whose style of tattooing matches what you want. The lines should be clean and solid. And don’t base it on price (which vary from shop to shop depending on each individual tattoo),” he said. for an artist

portrays a

just

(Photos by Jessica Blumenthal) Paul Oliver (above), of Lucky Souls tattoo shop, works on a customer. Prior to each appointment Oliver consults with each of his clients. This step is important because customers can decide to

Oliver said that checking out

(Chinese characters adapted in Japanese writing), butterflies, flowers, hearts and loved ones’ names may have been the most asked for tattoos, but not anymore. Oliver said the tattoos shown on Miami Ink or Inked for that week’s episode are the most

Miami Ink

is

important as picking a good

artist.

Kanji

tell

have someone

appointments.

with a chuckle.

tat-

tooed on your body,” said the

and she had

local tattoo artist said

really

name

get a significant other’s

Waterloo tattoo

detailed tattoo.

is

what they’re going to want, he said. Jamie Izumi of Tora Tattoo on 7 Young St. E. in Waterloo, said he does a lot of cover-ups. “It’s almost like a curse when you

you how often

calves, lower

why

is

needed.

but there are

include a half sleeve (half of his

arm covered), both

artist

isn’t like paint-

drawing, which

questions about his tattoos, which

and upper back and sides. Navarro said he always goes to Oliver because he knows that Oliver will produce a beautiful

the

who’s been tattooing for 16 years.

make

Cambridge.

for tattoos

also stresses the importance of

It

apprenticeship,

The mimicking between

demand

the tattoo after and give after-care

instructions?

they take everything out of

they

you

Do new

The Conestoga

c

CONESTOGA Connect

Life

and Learning

Dining

Room

Waterloo

Campus

435 King

Street, North

(519) 885-0501

The Food and Beverage Management and Chef Training students are proud to offer delicious four

course lunches and dinners.

Dinner:

@

am Monday & Tuesday @ 5:45 pm

Lunch: Tuesday

to Friday *

1 1

:45

$B.95 $11.95

excluding specials

Licensed by A. G.C.O

RESERVATIONS REQUIRED 885-0501 to book. For Lunch/Dinner menus, visit our Website: Call: (519)

(Photo

Custom

by Jessica Blumenthal)

grown in popularity. About 60 per cent of the Paul Oliver of Lucky Souls tattoo shop does are cus-

tattoos have

tattoos that

tom. Flash tattoos (“wall pictures”) don’t offer the

touch as custom tattoos.

same

personal

http://www.conestoQac.on.ca/isDAiisitors/foodmenu.isD

S


7

7

Feature

SPOKE, February

13,

— Page 17

2006

need plans for Valentine’s Day?

Still Aries March

21

Libra -

September 23 October 22

April 19

-

By VANESSA PARKER You've

something impor-

lost

And

you, Aries.

tant to

not

it's

something you can find under your bed, either. Perhaps it's your faith,

or your

Lucky

integrity.

day: 14

The days of having someone hold your hand while you cross the street are over, Libra, so stop

complaining about how hard life is and grow up. It's time you get a part-time job.

Tomorrow is Valentine’s Day and many people probably don’t hav6 any idea what to do for their significant other.

Lucky day: 14

You shouldn’t

stress,

however,

becau.se there are plenty of

ways

celebrate the day of love in a last-

October 23

minute way.

November

-

The

21

easiest

way

to

do something

thoughtful that doesn’t take a

planning If

way

you're looking for a

relax,

Taurus,

sauna

in

the

Not only

check

out

to

the

recreation centre.

will

provide .some

it

soothing relief to sore muscles, it'll

keep you wami. Lucky day:

18

to

Scorpio

making

is

lot

of

a romantic din-

ner for two.

You've been neglecting your loved one, Scorpio. Make it up to him or her this wqek by doing something special flir Valentine's Day. Take him or her out to a re.staurant.

Lucky day: 17

made

Pick a recipe you’ve never

This doesn’t need a reservation and isn’t as costly as going

before.

out for dinner.

Guelph resident and Valentine’s

Day

procrastinator,

Robert Gray,

Day he made handmade card and

said last Valentine’s his girlfriend a

Gemini May

21

Sagittarius

June 21

-

November 22 December 21

a

homemade “She loved

Sagittarius. Your attitude is only making you more stressed out. It's time to become the Court

weekend

get you’re friends.

Lucky

be back.

will

Don't take things so seriously,

Jester of your

life.

And

don't for-

Lucky day: 16

day: 16

PWra

Cancer June 22

any week.

throw

Don't

-

July 22

temper

tantrums this Cancer, although you'll be tempted. Hold your tongue or beware the wrath of another. Keep your eyes front and centre. Lucky day: 13

Be

Capricorn -

the person you've always

wanted

to be, Capricorn, if only

week. See if it's something you can carry through for the rest of your life, or at least for seven days. Lucky day: 13 for this

Leo

Aquarius January 20 February 18

August 22 -

week,

If your birthday falls this

This is the time for love, Leo, your favourite time of the year.

Aquarius, try not to drink your-

Single

self into too

or not,

eertainly

you'll

have some fun

this

week.

And

remember

to match the tops and bottoms of your lingerie. Even if you're a man. Lucky day: 14

And

^ems

far

you don’t want

Virgo,

even

Pisces

Procrastination

will

if

get

it

you

nowhere, so turn off the television. But, don't

Lucky day:

1

work too

-

March 20

distance.

hard.

your birthday is this week, Pisces, happy birthday. If not, it's fast approaching. Maybe you should start planning how you If

want

to

to just

fool

lates or flowers

add a mixed

CD

to

Hallmark employee, McAnulty, said she gets

Erin

of shop-

lots

last-minute Valentine’s Day “I don’t mean to generalize but many of the customers rum-

maging through the Valentine cards on the 14th are males.” McAnulty said she’s amazed at how hectic it can get on the day of “It’s

a strange holiday,

it’s

Day

definitely didn’t

candy

into existence to sell

The

hearts and plush pink bears. history of Valentine’s

The holiday St.

is in

Valentine and

Roman

Day

is

actu-

complex.

ally quite

of both

the present.

love.

Valentine’s

come

is

Christian

The

Ages where began

to

a combination

Britain

tradition.

than those with wives and families,

and therefore outlawed marriage for young men. Valentine, realizing the injustice

the early

in

1800s when

they started to be mass produced in

These Valentines were

factories.

The Saint that Valentines is based on was a priest in the third century in Rome. During this time Emperor Claudius II decided that single men made better soldiers

or sang

said

appear after 1400. Paper beeame popular in

Valentines

ancient

lovers

their Valentines. Written Valentines

recognition of

and

of sending Valentine

act

greetings dates back to the Middle

blaek and white with pietures paint-

ed by workers

the

in

factories.

Valentines started to be distributed in Ameriea in the early 1870s and

became mass produced by one of first greeting card companies, Norcross, in the early 1 900.s.

the

If

do

you’re

still

without anything to Day you could

this Valentine’s

supposed to be the day of love but many people just purchase a gift without any thought put into it,”

of

she said.

were discovered, Claudius ordered that he be

always share a bit of history with your loved one and embrace the true meaning of Valentine’s Day. You should also be happy that you live in a time where you don’t have

put to death.

to

“I bet

this law, defied Claudius and continued to perform marriages for

young lovers Valentine’s

most don’t even know how

Day came

to exist.”

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

in

secret.

When

actions

marry

in seeret.

Relationships

Being a student and in a committed relationship can bring enjoyment and pleasure and also feel conflictual in terms of responsibilities and demands on time. A healthy relationship is more likely to withstand the pressures and changes that being a full-time student bring. A local Individual, Couple and Family Therapist, Barbara Pressman, developed a list of primary principles for a healthy relationship.

Here are a few paraphrased ideas: Respect for the other person - no put downs, no insults, appreciation of different needs and beliefs and recognition of the possible need for separate February 19

project should be

off in the

a stupor.

day; 15

Virgo

^tarted soon,

much of

you have class the next day, maybe you should save the partying for the weekend. Lucky if

August 23 September 22

An upcoming

was

it

you’re valentine and actually do .something thoughtful, personalize an ordinary gift. If you buy choco-

Valentine’s

July 23

and thought

pers.

December 22

m

it

so thoughtful,” said Gray. “She had no idea it was last minute.” If

Take things one day at a time this week, Gemini. Make sure you don't miss any classes, as mid-terms are slowly creeping up. Before you know it, the

meal.

(Photo by Vanessa Parker)

Department stores stock their shelves with pink and red stuffed animals and heart-shaped candy boxes to help shoppers celebrate the day of love.

celebrate.

Or,

maybe

someone's already planned a surprise for you.

Lucky day:

1

as well as together time. Safety is of utmost importance

even

--

no emotional or physical violence.

If

there

is

fear, there already Is hurt.

Caring behaviour and emotional support such as listening without judging or blaming and encouraging each other’s interests. Inclusive decision-making regardless of earnings, compromising differences avoiding a win/lose result. including the capacity to share feelings, to be listened to attentively without giving advice (unless sought), and willingness to be

Open communication

assertive about expressing needs.

Brandon Walker

Communication includes affection and sexual expression. These need to fit the needs of each couple and be mutually

a second-year journalism student holding fate in the palm of his hand.

satisfying.

is

The counsellor at your campus

A Message Visit

is

available to assist

you with relationship issues.

from Student Services our website httD://www. conestoaac. on. ca/iso/stserv/index. iso


.

Page 18

— SPOKE, February

13,

Sports

2006

Conestoga soccer teams BRANDON WALKER

By

Seneca 3 to 1, the varsity team 2 and Canadore 5 to 0.

to

A

from

player

Alimini

womcn'.s

ihc

soccer team said she

II

thinks the annual alumni tourna-

ment should add a semifinal round because it a team loses one game

make

they probably won't

it

to the

"Once you lose you're pretty much out," said Rebecca Miller, an alumni player and also the coach of

women's

team loses

still

the day.

It's

team. "If a

varsity

have

to play the rest

of

not to say they should-

work hard (if they) lose a game but there would be more incentive n't

play hard

to

they still had a would spruce (the

(if

chance) and

it

tournament) up too.”

The tournament was held Feb. 4 and 5 in the recreation centre. It showcases the college’s men’s and

women’s

team

and the men’s and women’s alumni I and II teams against seven other Ontario varsity

The entrance

colleges.

money

fees raise

for an indoor soccer bursary.

Humber,

This year Canadore,

Seneca,

Niagara,

Sheridan,

Fanshawe and George Brown participated in the event.

team beat The men’s Alumni to to win the tournament. In women’s play, Canadore in the chambeat Fanshawe 2 to pionship to end the day without a 1

I

1

loss.

Winners received a plaque and a and the second place team

team was undefeatFanshawe 2 to 0,

beating

ed,

was just meant

to be.

After playing playoff-like football since

Week

13, the Pittsburgh

concluded their twomonth-long stretch by winning Super Bowl XL with a 2 - 0 victory over the Seattle Seahawks. In an eight-game winning streak that saw the original playoff underdog Steelers defeat the

Steelers

1

NFL

champion

regular season

Indianapolis

1

and second-

Colts

place Denver Broncos (both on the road), Pittsburgh rolled into

with

Detroit

Lombardi

the

Trophy in their sights. The only score of the first quarter came in the form of a 47-yard field goal from Seahawks kicker Josh Brown. The game remained 3-0 until Steelers quarterback Ben Rocthlisbcrgcr scored on a controversial one-yard touchdown run where the ball barely broke

1

lost to

to 0, but tied

1

team

varsity

1

to 0.

Miller said she’s proud of the

way

team played

the varsity

in the

his

name

in

NFL

longest Super

history with the

Bowl rush of

all-

time (75 yards) and padded their lead to 14-3. Seattle

managed

to

make

it

14-

10 when quarterback Matt Hassclbcck threw a touchdown pass to tight end Jerramy Stevens,

but they picked

tournament

is

good

them time

gives

She said nament.

“It

it

up. This

for them,

Steelers put the

Antwaan

when wide

game

out

receiver

Randle El faked a reverse and received a handoff

“We

usually try to give

we know

out to

it

are going to repre-

sent the college well and (will be)

good alumni and

that in turn are

in the event and help out with Conestoga events,” Ford said. She said the tournament is always fun, especially for the alumni play-

it

“It’s like

Some

a reunion.

tour-

first

know

helps us get to

of

here,” she said.

“We’ve got graduates from prob-

to gel as a team,”

the team’s

it’s

way up

to people

who

all

the

graduated

By STEPH BAULK was a sad night

It

the

many

for

Ultimate Fighting Championship

(UFC)

fans

Randy

as

“The

Natural” Couture announced,

age of 42, his retirement

at the

in front

of

crowd at the Mandalay Bay Events Center in Nevada, Jan. a sold-out

rushing yards on 20 carries, but

scored no touchdowns.

said Couture, at

the Steelers

defence. Alexander ran

The

for

95

were not only the

UFC

57, after los-

well. But, the records don’t stop

and final fight to Chuck “The Iceman” Liddell. “This is the last time you’re going to see these gloves and these shorts in this octagon,” said

there.

Couture,

first

Steelers

sixth-place .seed to get to the

Super Bowl, but with the victory, they became the first to win as

was

Pittsburgh

al.so

only

the

team in NFL history to win Super Bowls as they joined the San Franci.sco 49cr.s and

ing

the

third

who

fighter to

the

is

and light-heavyweight

five

The mixed

was

It

al.so their

first

While the Lombardi Trophy may have been Steelers head coach Bill Cowher’s first of his 14 years with the team, perhaps the most .sentimental

favourite was, of cour.se,

running back Jerome After

years

13

Bettis, the

league’s

less.

was

fifth

was

cham-

his

the final

Hall of

Fame

XL

stop of his future career.

their

is

UFC

titles.

the world’s leading

which competitors use judo,

karate,

opponent

in

next tournament

Seneca College

at

Couture, with a bloodied

kill.

giving him fight in the

The Iceman of Round

his

to the

mat

for the rest

second round both fighters

stuck to their

game

plan, Liddell

throwing hard punches and Couture countering the attacks waiting for the right strike.

moment

to

After about a minute into

the fight Couture

went

in

with his

hand and Liddell countered

left

landing a hard right to Couture’s

him to the mat. jumped on the opportuni-

head, sending Liddell ty,

landing follow-up shots on the

fallen Couture.

opportunities

to

autographs and thanking his loyal

1

In the

the

UFC, he walked back to change room while signing

nose, quickly recovered and took

At one minute and

fans for their continuous support.

While

many

it

inducted

Fame

has not been confimied,

say Couture can expect to be into

UFC

the

of

Hall

one of the but one of the

for being not only

greatest

greatest

UFC

fighters,

men

UFC

in the

as well.

fans can expect to see

more

great fights.

On March 4 on Pay

Per View for

UFC

58

it’s

USA

vs.

Canada.

The main

fights

for

UFC 58 UFC

include American and cunent

Couture took the loss like a champ and after hugging his girlfriend and thanking everyone for

World Middleweight champion. Franklin versus Rich "Ace” Canadian David "The Crow" Loiseau and American BJ “The Prodigy" Penn will take on Georges “The Rush" St. Pierre.

Randy Couture and Chuck

went head-to-head on Jan. 4

28 seconds into the fight referee. Big John McCarthy, called a stop to

it.

a

boxing,

the octagon.

The Iceman held on light-hcavyWeight nical

title

to his

UFC

after a tech-

knockout of Couture during

the second round of the fight.

This win gave Liddell the 1

final 2-

victory in the trilogy between the

ised.

done, he admitted Super Bowl

And

wrestling and more to overcome

all-time

finally a

the regionals.

martial arts sports associa-

in

jiu-jitsu,

As

own hometown no And, when it was all said and in

in

variety of fighting skills including

NFL,

the

UFC

two light-heavyweight

Bettis.

in

tion

only

win both the heavyweight

third

Dallas Cowboys.

I

be playing

last year.

4 on Pay Per View. “I’m retiring tonight. This is it for me. I feel blessed to have been able to come in here and compete,”

to breaking through

(Photo by Brandon Walker)

Heather Dranitsaris, from the women’s varsity soccer team, drives to the goal against Laura Jarnovic (left) and Susan Gander from the Alumni team. “It’s good for our own college coaches enjoy it because they get to (varsity) team to host a tournament see some players they haven’t here and get to see some of the seen,” Ford said. other colleges that they’re going to The varsity teams will play their

Randy The Natural’ Couture says goodbye to UFC

off

from Roethlisberger. Randle El then threw a 43-yard touchdown pass to fellow wide receiver and eventual Super Bowl MVP Hines Ward. As the clock ticked down, the Seahawks could not mount a scoring drive. Even the NFL regular .season rushing leader and MVP Shaun Alexander had no solutions

leading rusher,

The

candidates.

ably (as far back as) 1990

pion,

of reach

year before

them have been playing in it since day one. Some of them used to play for Conestoga in this tournament when they were varsity players

NFC

get.

the

ers.

however, that was as close as the

champions would

ordinator at the college and

The team beat Niagara 2 to 0 but lost to Humber, Fanshawe and the Alumni I team. “They had a slow

terback to ever win a Super Bowl.

saw

quarter

third

have to be in their graduating year,” said Marlene Ford, the athletic co-

tournament.

Steelers

The

the

(the

going to come back and participate

,

running back Willie Parker enter

left in

the score 7-3.

win

to

Fanshawe Niagara and beat the 1

dynasty years. Rocthlisbcrgcr, 23, also became the youngest quar-

make

someone

“In order for

indoor varsity soccer) bursary they

people

1

first

half to

she’d pick playing. "I’m very play-

er-minded.”

game against Seneca, all. The women’s Alumni I team, on the other hand, lost to Humber 3 to tied in a

championship since 1980, which concluded the franchi.sc’s

the plane with 1:5.3

had to choose between

we gave out $800, the we gave out $1,200, it depends on how many people apply and how many are deserving

Super season It

.said.

she

“Last year

was happy with how the women’s Alumni II team played. They lost to Canadore 1 to 0 but beat Sheridan 3 to and beat George Brown 2 to 0. They also Miller said she

Steelers cap By BRENT GERHART

If

also received T-shirts.

Miller said. I

indoor (soccer) than outdoor,”

Miller

organizer of the event.

2 to

The Alumni

(at)

T-shirt

start

1.

to

We’ve

there.

playing and coaching. Miller said

The men’s varsity team beat Canadore 5 to 1, beat Fanshawe 8 to and lost to the Alumni I team 1 ,

and learn

field

out

tournament

always been a team that does better

Niagara with one goal

with

each.

morn-

thing in the

first

ing they

1

Humber 4

championships.

the

The Alumni II beat George Brown to 0, but lost to Humber 3 to 2 and to Sheridan 3 to 2. They tied

each other on the

communicate

1

battle at

fighters.

promremember. Both

for the fight itself as it

was one

to

Couture and Liddell circled the octagon, trying to feel each other out for about the first two minutes of the three-minute round.

Near the end of the round Couture got rocked with a blow to the face and as Liddell went in for

(Internet photo)

Liddell

determine the ultimate light-heavyweight.

to


Sports

Who

Head-to-head: *

Another Czech-mate

back. Rough,

is

With Olympic

high-flying and full of story lines.

Olympic hockey at its best and Team Canada will once again puck drops

the

in

Canada’s

Olympics against

Canada

that

dominate on the

Italy Feb. 15.

The Canadian men’s team looking to win

To say

Opinion

Of

fetched.

1

is

cheer

is

ice in

my

for

country

won gold

.927 save percentage.

about barely squeaking by a lackluster German squad with a 3-2

2002

Lake City Winter Olympics, in 2003 and 2004 Canada won the World Championship title and they also won the World Cup of Hockey 2004 tournament. Canada has many key weapons at both ends of the

Salt

has loads of

ice,

and each team member is presently having an excellent National Hockey League (NHL) campaign, so there is no doubt that all other teams in the tournament will have their hands full. international experienee

Despite

such

players

Yzerman

Steve

as

Mario Lemieux removing their names from the eligibility list and Vancouver Canucks defenceman Ed Jovanovski missing the Olympics because of a lower abdominal injury, Canada didn’t need to worry and

because there were several other healthy players who have just as much fire power. Anaheim Ducks

defenceman

Scott

Niedermayer

might also pull out of the tournament because of an injury. Many key contributors from past tournaments, such as goaltender Martin Brodeur, defencemen Rob Blake and Chris Pronger and forwards Joe Sakic, Jarome Iginla and

Simon Gagne,

going to be their superstar level and

playing at

are

all

Henrik Lundquist,

who

has been outstanding for the

whole picture must be looked at. How much did Canada dominate in

New

York Rangers with 22 wins, a

2002’.^

zle

If

he can daz-

during international

and

play

teammates, such as the Leafs’ Mats Sundin and the Philadelphia Flyers’ Peter Forsberg, can score

counts, the at

a

Swedes

The

their

silver medallist U.S.

are always contenders, but this

year they

may be

too old.

Team

U.S. captain Chris Chelios years old,

but

own. squad think

is

44

forwards such as

Mike Madano and

Bill

overall draft pick in 2004) in

taken a major

the

lineup.

pipes

and

NHL

leading

scorer

Jaromir Jagr (78 points as of Feb. 4). The 1998 gold medallists from the Nagano Olympics, the Czechs will expect the

same type of play

in

into the

medal rounds once again.

The Czechs won’t

get in the

way

Team

of the Canucks, since Brodeur can

Canada, Bryan McCabe, could take Jovanovski’s spot on the roster and Tampa Bay Lightning defenceman Dan Boyle could make the team as

handle anything that Hasek can. The only difference between the two tenders is that Brodeur will be wearing two gold medals around his neck, while Hasek will only

reserve

on

well.

Teams

that will challenge

for the gold are

States,

Canada

Sweden, the United and the Czech

Russia

Republic.

Sweden

^

finally

has a top goal-

home

Although

Brendan

my

22

NHL

good.

Remember, hockey is our sport. But. when Canada only has three of 30 point-getters in the NHL and is without such leaders as .Steve Yzerman and the recently retired Mario Lemieux, it the top

on

their roster

is

impossible to look past other

the Czechs also generate arguably the best one-two punch in net with one of the most decorated

hockey nations. And, it is especially impossible to look past a former gold medal winning Czech Republic that won gold

NHL and international goaltenders of all-time (Hasek) and quite possi-

Canadians

In addition to the

play-

ers,

shortly after breaking the hearts of in the past.

first

hit.

it was eight years ago, Shannahan’s missed

shootout opportunity in

Nagano

1998) and Dominik Hasek’s semifinal winning celebration still burns (

fresh in ly

my

mind. And,

I

personal-

believe that famous leap will

make one more final appearance. As the previously mentioned bug looms evidently over most other countries, the Czech Republic has produced another strong team. With the exception of injury

Petr

Prucha,

MCL

on Feb. remains intact.

who 4,

sprained

his

Czech Rep.

the

Former Hart and Art Ross Trophy winner Jaromir Jagr leads an offensively gifted

the current

Czech squad. Up

NHL

joined by his

teammates

the gold.

“shootout specialist” Marek Mailk.

that

anywhere near 100 per cent even if he decides to play, Sweden has

entertaining ing

fire-

sore groin and Forsberg not being

have his one from Nagano. Team Canada is ready for an

tournament and shouldn’t have any trouble bring-

43 games this season. There Is not a doubt in my mind that if this Czech Republic team can rekindle some of the chemistry it had in Nagano, it can easily go on to be 2006 gold medal winners. On paper, the team is

declining the invitation to rest a

are always

contenders with world class goaltender Dominik Hasek between the

team,

However, with Naslund

sidered a favourite.

The Czech Republic

Predators

third with

Lundqvist,

originally

call in net.

is

why hockey comes from Canada. a

Henrik

in

Sweden was

San Jose Sharks goaltender Evgeni Nobakov gets the

Turin and they will compete well

man and

tender

Even with superstars such as Mats Sundin, Daniel Alfredsson and Niklas Lidstrom, Sweden is missing too much talent to be con-

Khabibulin

tremendous

power.

backed by power play .specialist Marek Zidlicky and also includes Filip Kuba, Pavel Kubina and

ond

injured, so

will help provide

And, if it wasn’t for 2002 Swedish goaltender Tommy Salo’s infamous brain cramp when he misplayed a red line shot from Belarus defenceman Vladimir Kopat that went off his head and in the net, who knows where Canada

choice.

goaltender Nikolai

Marlin Rucinsky. Robert Lang, Milan Hejduk and Ales Hemsky, who is enjoying a breakthrough .season of his own in Edmonlon,

The Czech defence also features an impressive lineup. The group is

It

is in

in

Opinion

wasn’t

always keep the U.S. contenders, even though 1 believe they won’t come close to a medal during this year’s Olympic games. Russia could be a contender with rookie sensation Alexander Ovechkin, Pavel Datsyuk, Alexei Kovalev, Alexei Yashin and Evgeni Malkin (Pittsburgh Penguins’ sec-

should once again prove to the world

Toronto Maple Leafs defence-

How

might have finished? With top performers such as Markus Naslund, Peter Forsberg and (finally) a top quality goal-

Guerin

Chicago Blackhawks

night?

game?

victory in the next

it

1

the 5-2 loss to

pretty.

be looking

will

medal (not gold) of

when

Remember

Nashville

27 wins and has posted a .920 save percentage

the

but.

Sweden on opening

rookie

Vokoun

Gerhart

course. I’m going to

2.09 goals against average and a

the

ciated

Brent

is going to Torino is far-

tender,

at

NHL, Tomas Vokoun. While playing on an underappre-

in the

in

second .straight Olympic gold medal and its fifth straight gold medal at an international tournament. The Canadians its

— Page 19

bly the most underrated goaltender

not.

first

2006

store

in

r

of the conversa-

been about who is the tournament, but rather who

Jon Yaneff

2006 Torino Winter

the

hockey taking

tion has not

i

when

be a force to be reckoned with

game of

f

icc

much

centre stage,

That’s

13,

win Olympic hockey gold?

will

Back-to-back golds excitement

SPOKE, February

(Internet photo)

front

scoring leader

is

New

York Rangers Martin Straka and

The 2002 Swedish goaltender Tommy Salo misplayed a

100-foot

shot from Vladimir Kopat that led to a 5-4 Belarus victory, which

became one

of the biggest

upsets

in

Olympic hockey

history.

V

Consmtulatlons and good luck to all badminton players who qualified for the provincialsl^brtiary 1 7th

Mon

Fi1:i~iess

Judo 5:00

-

and 1 8th at Seneca

5:50pm

La.

Wed

Tues Latin

Dance

5:00

5:50pm

Thurs Body Pump

Variety Pack 5:00 — 5:50pm

5:00

Abs and

Strength

Glutes 6:00 ~ 6:50pm

6:00

facilities at

5:50pm &

Hockey, Ball Hockey, Co-ed Volleyball and Co-ed Soccer

have started, checkout the Rec Centre boards or online for schedule.

/

Stretch

6:50pm

Judo 8:30

reminder: to gain access to any of the

Ice

- 1

0:00pm.

the Rec Centre you must present your student card at the front desk


Page 20

— SPOKE, February

13,

2006

CONESTOGA STUDENTS

INC. PRESENTS

HEART

AND STROKE

1

FOUNDATION OF ONTARIO

J

.1

‘i

ALL PROCEEDS WILL BE

DONATED

THE HEART & STROKE

fO^


Digital Edition - February 13, 2006