Issuu on Google+

Market brings cultural diversity Kensington Market

Spoke

TO. demonstrates how different

in

ethnic groups

can happily

United Way misses target Campaign falls short of goal

co-exist.

A

learning

newsroom

for

during a year of natural disasters.

Ntwt College plans more parent nights

2]

Event gives parents a chance to

journalism students

investigate possible paths for their children.

New* Monday, January

2006

16,

Conestoga College, Kitchener, Ont.

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

38th Year

— No. 2

Federation of Students fears Liberal grants backfire

will By

BRANDON WALKER

spent $13 billion a year for childcare and

Leader

Liberal

promised into

his party

if

power

known

Paul

Martin voted baek

is

they'll introduce grants,

make

as the 50/50 plan, to

post-.seeondary

education more affordable. Martin said the grants could put an extra $3,000 in students' final

A

pockets

in

their

and

first

year of school.

two-year tuition freeze will be

lilted

in

groups,

September and some such as the Canadian

Federation of Students, have concerns the Liberal's grants could actually

promise

re-elected the Liberals

an additional $6 between now and 2015. They currently have an agreement billion

with Quebec that supports the development of early learning and child-care for families, and other provinces have agreed in principle. Conservative Leader Stephen Harper said one of the problems with the Liberal's child-care plan is funding goes directly to the

the

day-care centres and wouldn’t help stay-at-home parents or tho.se who hire a babysitter.

rai.se tuition.

"That's entirely possible and

it's

definitely a concern." said

Soule, the

George national chairman of the

Canadian Federation of Students, in a story in the Toronto Star. The Canadian Federation of Students' website said they represent more than 500,000 students

The Canadian Federation of Students’

website pro-

vides students with a unit-

ed voice

dealing with

in

the provincial and federal (Photo by Jon Yaneff)

government.

Irom over 80 post-secondary institutions acro.ss Canada. They pro\

if

to invest

Model of success

ide students with a united voice in

with

dealing

provincial

the

and

into the

federal government.

On

the other hand, the president

Student Alliance

of the College

Matt

(CSA),

Jackson,

said

he

would help boost

thinks the grants

Harper promised to put funding hands of parents instead. If the power, into voted Conservatives would give parents $100 a month for each child under six years old.

would go

It

tow'ard

Jackson, also the vice-president of Conestoga Students Inc. and a

“formal daycare, a babysitter, neighbourhood child care or helping one parent stay at home.” NDP Leader Jack Layton prom-

management

ised to invest $1.8 billion in child

student at the college, did agree

care this year, with annual increases of $250 million over the next

wouldn’t

and

enrolment

cause

tuition rates to climb.

business

third-year

that

each school

power “But

to set their 1

hope

that

have the

will

own it

tuition fees.

wouldn’t (raise

the cost of tuition),’’ said Jackson.

NDP

website says

be “targetthe federal funding ed at licensed, high-quality, nonwill

Students should

“Up

of 16 col-

(child-care) spaces annually after

Conestoga,

23

sometimes federal, government. David Naylor, the University of Toronto president, was quoted in the story saying the grants could be

taken into account

when

the school

determines tuition costs.

The New Democratic Party (NDP) put $1 .5 billion toward making tuition and worker training more affordable when they rewrote the last Liberal

budget and their website

said they “have

more work

would put

at

toward post-secondary education if they’re voted into power. With the upcoming election, Jan. least $1.5 billion

They would

akso increase the

by $1,000 “phased in over four years in order to help lower-income families cover child-care costs and meet

federal child tax credit

other essential expenses.”

Layton also promised

to stop the

dismantling of Canada's medicare. On top of that, he promised to stop federal

money

transfer

going

toward any profit-making, private insurance system and going to any doctors in that system. Martin promised that the Liberals will

to do.”

Harper, on the other hand, promised the Conservatives

that.”

not only maintain medicare

but also reduce wait times in hospitals by adding more doctors and nurses.

The Liberals

also plan to

expand home health-care

services.

The Conservative’s website says one of

its

goals

is

to reduce long

23, party leaders are trying to persuade voters they can steer the

wait times in hospitals by implementing a maximum wait time

Here are some of their promises if

guarantee. There

they’re voted into power. Martin said his party has already

care

country in the right direction.

was no mention

if

Harper intends to privatize health if

his party is voted into

or maintain medicare.

power

paying close attention to due

As of January 2006, students are being penalized with a fine for any overdue resources.

a non-profit association

including

start

tee.

ty,”

councils and more than 100,000 students, to the provincial, and

MEGHAN KRELLER

dates set by the Learning Resource Centre (LRC), said Tessa Dueck, chair of the LRC’s fines commit-

According to the website, this investment “would create 200,000

I’d envision (the

that acts as the voice

leges,

The

By

profit child care.”

how

effects of the grant).’’ is

three years.

LRC implements new fines

so

“That’s not

CSA

Architecture/construction engineering technology students, from left. Shaun Smith, Aaron Engel, Maria Maschio and Seb Urban presented their retirement home model in front of family and friends during an elaborate presentation in Room 1E05 in December. For additional photo see Page 5.

until

now

there have not been any library fines

students had overdue books there

if

was no penal-

she said. “This has proven to be a problem

because there is no incentive for the books to come back in.” Instead of students paying attention to the return times, they were holding onto the resources until they were finished with them, she explained. Obviously other students were getting frustrated because the materials they needed weren’t available. “So we actually had a lot of students asking us to

have fines,” Dueck said. The main problem the LRC was experiencing was with the shorter term reserve items.

“They tend to be high-demand items,” .she said. “They are usually needed by a whole class at the same time.” These fines should not be taken lightly, said Dueck. As long as a fine is on an account, that student’s library privilege will be blocked. Fines range from as as 25 cents per day to $l per hour for some of the short-term reserve items. All fines accumulate to

little

varying

maximum

(Photo by

amounts.

“Once the maximum fine has been reached and the book still hasn’t been returned it will go to the collection agency,” she explained. “That reflects

on the

Meghan

Kreller)

January 2006, the Learning Resource Centre has implemented fines for overdue

As

of

resources.

student’s credit rating for seven years.”

The money

collected with the

new

fines will

go

fund administered by the college. If the LRC needs any resources they can access some of the funds from that reserve. into a reserve

“Indirectly, the

money

gets used to purchase

new

materials for the library,” she said.

Conestoga’s library to

LRC

implement

is

the last

fines.

community college


Page 2

— SPOKE, January

16,

News

2006

2006 United Way campaign

Now deep thoughts ...with Random

Conestoga College

questions answered by

may

By PAIGE HILTON

random students

year as chair of United Way campaign, Darcelle Watts did something new. In the second last week of November, two weeks after the official end of the campaign, she sent out a reminder to all full-time her

In

What do you do

benefit from early planning

last

Conestoga’s

to beat the

winter blues?

faculty saying

make

and party. It’s too cold to be outside and don’t want to be in school.” Matt Rideout, second-year mechanical engineering “Drink

was not too

it

late to

a pledge.

emphasize

to

that

your

just as important to help out local

community

as

com-

to help

it is

it’s

munities elsewhere,” Watts said. “It’s

something

we might do

again in

future years just as a reminder.”

The

final

tally

for the college’s

Way campaign

is

$37,260.

as

well

Conestoga

as

The

organizations,

hockey game.”

the

Kyle Burrell, first-year

LASA

it’s

too

late,

but

it’s

never

approximately $37,000. Before passing the torch

to the

The Chartwell’s events

at

all

campuses raised $575. CSI

also held fundraising events with

make some suggestions

to improve campaign and include more students in the years to come. She said she would like to see CSI included in campaign planning in the spring and pointed out the

the

school could run fundraising activstudents

for

ities

starting

in

September instead of only during the two-week campaign. “(We want) to continue to work on a good thing,” she said. “We have a lot of advantages working with stu-

House, a women’s

services students volunteered their

dents including social services stu-

name a few. The initial

crisis shelter, to

Watts said two second-year social

We

dents.

have close

human

time during the campaign to raise

dents,

goal for the campaign

money

community

was $45,000 and Watts said there are a few reasons the target wasn’t

Kristin

tion of things.

Shawn Cooper,

A

lot

who

of people

Door 4 on Oct. 27. Beimes and Dana Chmielak inside

Way.

raised $7 1 for the United

we

to

6,000 stu-

services students and

services

students

could get more involved

that

in help-

ing with this campaign.”

Watts said she did not realize they could collect that amount in a short period of time. “If we had students to do that every day of the campaign we could rai.se much more (for the charity),” she said.

Watts said for students

would be beneficial working on the cam-

it

paign to take bus trips to local United Way organizations to see

what they are working

first-hand for.

CSI Christmas Wishtree best ever

first-year nursing

By TIFFANY MCCORMICK

whelmed by

students’ kindness.

“People were very generous

Conestoga Students

was successful with

“Put

amount of contribuwhich was

for the

tions received to date,

next campaign chair. Watts plans to

too late.”

three

Award

next campaign.

“The United Way is down in most communities by varying amounts depending on what their initial target was. It’s probably a combina-

boots.”

over and

“Within this sector, we were awarded the Education Award in recognition of the effort and enthusiasm displayed this year in expanding the campaign to actively include students, CSI and retirees,” Watts said. Conestoga also received a Merit

of Waterloo Region, the Ontario March of Dimes and Anselma

reached.

wear my rubber

“If

someone can help out, great, if not it’s by no means downplaying what we’ve received. Sometimes people think our two-week campaign is

similar event will take place for the

local non-

schools

social services like the

response from her reminder.

and

The United Way helps profit

and watch

its

Food Bank

Way; by the United Cambridge-North Dumfries, Waterloo Region, GuelphWellington and Perth-Huron.

“Stay indoors, drink beer

Kitchener- Waterloo surpassed

including a barbecue, haunted house and a Halloween bash. The United Way Games planned by the First Year Council were cancelled because of a lack of students signing up for the event. Watts said, but with more advanced planning a

college supports four regions

helped

foundations

of

proceeds going to the United Way,

Students Inc. (CSI) events.

Jim Barlow,

school boards and the college.

Way

However, the United

mately $14,000 this past year. Watts said she received a good

we’re trying

campuses

first-year police

Laurier University, the two local

it.”

goal of $5.55 million by approxi-

That includes the Chartwell’s events held at Guelph, Doon and Waterloo

tobogganing.”

so that could

be a part of

been a very unique year for

“It’s

United

“Play pond hockey, snowboarding and go

of) the earth-

(in Pakistan),

port, (as

quake

people contributing to charities and

I

technology robotics and automation

do victims

Conestoga College was also recognized by the United Way with the Education Award at the United Way donor breakfast on Nov. 25. The college belongs to the education consortium consisting of the University of Waterloo and Wilfrid

normally contribute to one charity maybe have spread it out this year because there have been so many natural disasters worldwide and it’s still going on. (Victims of hurricane) Katrina still need a lot of sup-

in

get into

a good movie and

my

pyjamas.”

Janie Baker, first-year nursing

Inc.

(CSI)

their

2005

Christmas Wishtree. Each year CSI puts up Wishtree to help Conestoga dents in financial need.

dren ages newborn to

1

It is

2

stu-

for chil-

who might

not have a very plentiful Christmas.

CSI

office

Renwick,

said

The campaign has been least

10

in exis-

years

and

Renwick said the 2005 campaign was the first year CSI did not have to buy any gifts. There were 58 cards placed on and all of them were taken.

the tree

manager,

Janie

The cards contain

she

over-

gender and a few

feels

tree

CSI donates a

R Us

Toys

year.”

tence for at the

cards are not taken from the

If this

a child’s age,

gift ideas.

so

gift certificate to

that

every child

receives a present. “It’s

amazing not

anything,”

Of

Renwick

the Wishtree

Renwick “It’s

said

it is

to

have

to

buy

said.

campaign

itself,

a great idea.

a perq at Christmastime.”

Renwick

said money around Christmas can be tight so the Wishtree helps families with kids.

“Get active, go running and go to the gym.”

Jason

Bartlett,

first-year

LASA

“Go and play with

in

the

snow

my friends.” Meghan Pembleon, first-year human resources (Photo by Mike Bors)

A Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!

Jason

Bartlett (sitting),

Nixon, a

massage

a

first-year

little

to the

left

law and security police foundations student, relaxes with Darren Zone held in December.

therapist, at the Stress Free


News

16,

2006

— Page 3

Two

Is re-gifting

graphic design students win first place for logos

tacky?

really

SPOKE, January

By VANESSA PARKER With all the presents unwrapped and the holiday season behind us. the beginning of the new year

some ot us wondering what do with those gifts received that we know we’ never use, or just leaves

By DENISE MULLER

to

As

1 1

plain don’t like.

The act of .saving a gift given to you and then pa.ssing it on to .someone ekse may .seem tacky and a social taux pas, but

both

used.

they each

University

said

it’s

nice to have your

"That’s our logo.

Guelph

and

It’s

there for awhile,” .she

student

she doesn’t

.said

called

for Hespeler

McCoy’s for a Cambridge

work displayed for an actual company and it’s a good opportunity.

category.

ot

Lane

Tricia

2005 when

place for their

was

Softball and

McCoy

Giving gifts already enjoyed should not be participant

28.

first

Solutions.

not a w'ay to get rid of

in this

won

company

hand-me-downs.

Re-gitting

community.

Giehler’s logo

Minor

has not been opened or

included

it’s

your

logos.

has

It is

.sec

Gichicr and Lisa McCoy, second-year graphic design

$250 each) on Nov.

been universally adopted by North Americans. The act of re-gifting is giving a that

be able to

to

students, got that opportunity (and

1

gift

in the

Li.sa

becoming

is

it

work

more widely acceptable. The temi re-gifting, llrst coined 0 years ago by the comedian Jeiry Seinfeld,

a graphic design student,

always good

going to be .said. “I’m

kind of honoured, actually.”

feel

guilty about giving a gift already

“Once a

given.

gift is given, it’s the

recipients’ gift to

CAMBRIDGF.

do with as they

wish," she said.

solutions

inc.

already have a certain item and are given it again, what’s the

Gerald Ford, the president of

point in keeping it?" asked Lane. She said her piirents will keep

Cambridge Solutions, said he used to work at the college and has

"If

I

unwanted gifts and all they do

in their linen clo.set

always had a fondness for the

take up space.

is

graphic design program. “So, when I started

d rather be tacky and re-give a

“I

pre.sent then store

it

in

thinking about logos, 1 knew that there was a graphic design department,” he said. “I have someone that works

a clo.set for

years.” If you are hesitant to re-gift there are certain guidelines that etiquette experts have laid out to ensure that

for

know

something you

if it is

Second, make sure the item i^ its

goes

to the col-

job designing the logos.

“There were So many to pick

instructions if applicable.

summertime,

“Whereas, Solutions)

Burt said the students did a great

box and

original

still

committee as Burt.

the recipient will really like.

new with

who

Craig Burt, president of Hespeler Minor Softball, got involved through Ford, who is on the same

pass on the rewrapped

present only

...

lege here.”

the act of re-gifting goes smoothly. First,

me

Craig Burt president of Hespeler Minor Softball, and Gerald Ford, president of Cambridge Solutions^"^ Inc., awarded graphic design students Lisa Giehler and Lisa McCoy $250 each for their logo designs. from,” he said. “It’s unbelievable “And what was the really interestthink about what it was really what we had to go through to try ing thing about (the Cambridge going to look like.” and get a winner, but these two Solutions logo) was that we really Both logos will be printed on girls have done a fantastic job.” didn’t have a consensus of opinion shirts, hats and letterhead and will There were 30 different designs because a whole slew of people appear on websites. for each logo. liked different things.” “You’ll actually start seeing them Ford said it was easier to pick the if you go to Cambridge. You’ll see Hespeler Minor Softball logo people wearing them in the malls,” because there was a specific target he said. “If you go out to any of the in mind. ballparks in the

Ford said they took an hour and a half to look at each logo, and got other people’s opinions and feedback on them. “What I did was put them all on a pool table and had people walk by and kind of vote on them,” he said.

is a little

Ford

ic,”

(McCoy)

said.

ended

(Cambridge bit more gener“That’s why up winning,

because I picked it.” Ford said he and Burt wanted to use the logos for marketing and a certain target audience.

“Therefore,

we

really

had

to

you’ll see the Hespeler Minor Softball ones on all the kids.” Ford said there will be about 500 kids and 100 coaches sporting the

logo next season. He said new gear be printed with the logo every

will

single year.

“So, after awhile, there will be thousands of them out there.”

Next, do not re-gift something

was handmade or created

that

per-

@

sonally for you.

and probably the most

Lastly

remember who

important rule,

gave you the present originally so

Ontario

you do not end up giving the pres-

The minimum wage is going up.

ent back to the original sender.

Smith,

Kelly

a

of

resident

Guelph who has been re-giving rewraps

said she

years,

for

gifts

impersonal

chocolates or

items

like

toiletries.

much

always get so

“I

only

chocolate

which I don’t need include one of the extra

for Christmas

so

I’ll

'

boxes as part of a birthday present,” said Smith.

know

me

I

will

If

someone I more than

“If

enjoy the

have no problem re-giving the

General

Minimum Wage

item.”

Smith gift

.said

she finds re-giving a

easier than

exchanging

returning

it

per

or

week

Liquor Server

Hunting & Fishing Guides: five

than

consecutive

hours

or during

for less

in

a day

a school holiday

“Re-gifting

convenient

is

Hunting & Fishing Guides: for five or more hours in a day whether or not the hours are consecutive

Homeworkers

(people

doing paid work

home

tor

in their

an employer)

Current

wage

rate

$7.45/hour

$6. 95/hour

$6. 50/hour

$37.25

$74.50

110%

of the

minimum wage

$7. 75/hour

$7. 25/hour

$6.75/hour

$38.75

$77.50

110%

of the

minimum wage

you already have a nice presFeb.1, 2006

ent ready to give,” she said.

new eBay survey of more 500 Americans, more than

In a

than

Students under 18 and working not more than 28 hours

it.

because you save time shopping since

you're an employer, here's what you need to know.

gift

wage

rate

half said they’ve re-gifted presents

they didn’t want.

And

1

1

per cent

of those surveyed said they sell

those

unwanted

now

On

February 1 2006, the general minimum wage will increase to $7.75 per hour from the current rate of $7.45 per hour. Another increase will follow bringing the general minimum wage to $8.00 per hour on February 1, 2007. ,

To find out more about how the new minimum wage guidelines affect employers and employees, call or visit the Ministry of Labour web site.

presents

online. If

you

just can’t

stomach the

Paid for by the Government of Ontario

idea of rewrapping and handing off an

unwanted

always donate utable charity.

it

gift,

you can

to a local rep-,

1

-800-531 -5551

www.labour.gov.on.ca/info/minimumwage


— SPOKE, January

Page 4

The year With each new year comes

common among

feeling of hope.

New

year's resolutions arc

many

people, but w'hat about the institution that so

students

second home?

call their

Conestoga College

is

changes. Not only has a to

change

for

new

a

Commentary

2006

16,

welcome

any other, where plans and actions make

a place, like

new semester begun,

new year has opened

but a

a

door

these changes.

One of the

2006

hottest topics for

up and students

don't

still

is

the tuition fee thaw. Costs will be going

know by what

percentage.

Students are supposed to trust that college systems are

when

but feeling blind

There are people

it

comes

to placing a dollar value

in this college

who

and reasonable,

fair

on education

is

unjust.

have the power to ask questions to those

with high-standing government status and sometimes

seems

it

as

though these

questions have been ignored. increase will students be facing in September? Students

What percentage

deserve more than last-minute responses and college officials should be get-

some answers.

ting

Another topic up for discuss

year

this

whether or not Conestoga

is

going to be expanding as President John Tibbits has said

For nearly four years there has been University Heights campus. Last is

desired on vacant land across from

Talk will only go so far until that

supposed

is

Conestoga purchasing the

Now

happened.

Highway 401,

it

becomes

banter.

expansion

as well as expanding the

No, expansion

something

isn’f

to take five years to

If college officials are

where

the

The

to give students opportunities to

more time than some students want

taking

have

talk about that finally

really

Guelph campus.

college’s

is

week

is

in the past.

that

five-year strategic plan

advance

their education is

to wait.

can happen overnight, but does

it

really

Watch, as for their next trick these clowns try to win an

do?

thinking of expanding everything at once,

problem of time and money

maybe

that

evolving from. Start sooner and

is

Playing with health

expand quicker.

who would like to advance their education now - not from now when they are already working and trying to pay loans.

There are students years

There

is all sorts

new

Construction of the

and a

labs

The

bistro,

centre

five

of land and campus space Just waiting to be developed -

do something with

this year,

among

- which

student centre

other things

will cost

-

will contain

new computer

the next 10 years

-

something students are paying for out of a mandatory $60 fee that can be found on each students' tuition bill. Progression of the centre was

made quickly. It was discussed, - and construction began.

students voted

a majority in favour of the centre It’s

how something like when the money for

interesting to see

be turned into action ets.

Perhaps,

when

it

comes

to

the idea of a it is

new

coming out of

students’ pock-

system

is

feeling generous, but

it

is

not

is

be complaining. Sure I was in some pain, however, the little girl

arm

many

a chance that Conestoga

may be rated No.

community colleges

other

in this

1

for seven

again this year, but after

I

giving students

education and to

The new year

some answers,

start

is full

having a

to start

far.

In

is

2006 Conestoga should

expanding

real standing with the

of promise and so

room

we

in

hopes of advancing

new government.

Conestoga College.

lay in the

procedure like

floor

rotating

it

U.S. it

cost for a

an American hospital

in

don’t have insurance?

I,

if

you

for one,

am

glad that I’ve never had to find out. I

suppose people can argue that can’t put a price

would put

my

in

me

tage of their

But with

be the

own system

that

may be

own

health.

trip after

have to hand out dollar

needs defi-

Perhaps

if

we

obliged to take

delivering

few seconds past

life

but one of these days

more than a

unnerving.

expectancy,

is

but for those

guilty of

it,

we

love.

when we

step

who

may

not be there anymore and there

isn’t

any amount of money

can pay

all

Is published and produced weekly by th0 Journalism students

that

you

to fix that.

of Conestoga College

Editor: Jon Yaneff

letters to the

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be contacted

Advertising Manager: Steph Baulk Production Managers: Chantelle Timperley

for verification.

Janet Morris Mike Bors

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke ©conestogac.on.ca

for publication.

N2G 4M4

Editor:

Circulation Manager:

Photo Editors: Brent Gerhart, Melissa Hancock, Jason Sonser

be published. Letters should be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

Spoke Online

Paige Hilton Denise Muller

letters will

Dr.,

Web

site:

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.

1

as are others,

son that you loved most and

likely

them

life,

cradled you under his or her arm

my

could schedule

to skip

if

off that scanning bed that one per-

Hours of business for emergency rooms are another thing I don’t

would prefer just

be more

not just for the simple fact to live a

know I’m

more than

don’t

of ourselves,

healthy

I

I

after dollar.

we would

cai'e

injury or death could be redirected to

I

emerge,

did have to hand

out a few dollars

another emergency room, and thus a

understand. If

to

l^i'ip

needle. I’m grateful that

first to

or a loved one from serious

little

it

scan after scan and needle after

improvement. The idea that the

emergencies,

on your health

I’d

our system makes

if

easier for people to take advan-

dollars, $5,000,

camera?

say that our

remarkable.

How much does

perhaps

$10,000 for each pass through the

how

would have cost just see a triage nurse if I was living

in the

this

One thousand

ambulance

to

scanning bed

wallet anywhere else.

should have been thinking of

how much

CT

Spoke

editor. Letters

No unsigned

is

I

wondered what kind of a dent a

nite

welcome

Spoke welcomes

are

I

Perhaps instead of complaining,

you

Letters are

but as

Band-aid, painkiller or inoculation

province.

All talk and no action won’t get anyone very start

under her mom’s

embarrassment for vomiting

advantage of without realizing

seven years in a row in the top spot, Conestoga doesn’t seem to be better off than

in

on'the emergency

as saying the Ontario college

1

venous and a plastic urinary tract, coughing and hacking as she enjoyed her smoke, 1 wondered

really should-

I

that

When I passed an elderly woman hooked up to an intra-

when

n’t

lucky

was quoted

article, Tibbits

- which have rated Conestoga the No. college in Ontario in a row - are supposed to help bring funding to the school.

There

think that

more convenient time

adheres to the hospital’s schedule.

surroundings

a form of motivation. One-time funding

this as

(KPIs) years

made me

my

accompany my discomfort. The amount of things that we take

one of the worst-funded systems and Key Performance Indicators

is

the reality of

a

was

brought some feeling of guilt to

enough. This should be a year for change.

2005 Spoke

it

money, students are more easily persuaded than

and grants are great when the government

In a

about the amount of time

that hid cradled

student centre can

the government.

College officials could see'

together rather than hold off until

of a local

taking to see the triage nurse

started last year.

more than $3 million over

is

-

sat in the waiting area

I

emergency room complaining

it.

- which

election.


Commentary

Recently

someone who was

lost

I

a very important part of

life,

was and who

am

I

ing exactly what he while he was doing it. haled him for that.

my

who

I

1

today.

would approach

the

was doing felt that if

1

it

was

his loss

he would have to deal

other to

me

to

or acknowledge that what he did

was wrong, then

Opinion

and

with his

actions.

apologize or to forgive. 1

many

realize

Some

to share in

from

the

I

never had the chance to say

goodbye. Nov. 13,

2(K)5,

I

1

in. I

and

have come to learn and

1

that I

would like no one makes I

wrong

has already been made.

First,

have

I

learned

I spent so much time being upset with this person for what he had

me

to

over the years.

He had manipulated me, used me as leverage or to manipulate others

and he had hurt

my

feelings

know-

times,

me and do

times he tried to love

by me. This brings me to my most important point. right

and

final

which

son,

I

now

I

loo short

realize

born,

it

person weren’t

he

is

wasn’t

I

knew

.so

stub-

so proud

would have apologized

he

for every-

thing he had done.

But he was stubborn and proud and knew it would prevent him from making things right. never I

I

got past that and

I

was

remembered

that

angry

so.

sorry,

that

and

was

1

me

he

eouldn't be the

1

1

I'm writing this because want people to remember that time Hies. Holding a grudge or being angry with someone doesn't do 1

anybody any good and

it

never

resolves anything.

belter person.

Life

couldn't

bring

myself to approach this person and tell him didn't care about what had happened in the past or what he had done to me. couldn't tell him forgave him for everything and how we should just move on, and that was my biggest mistake. missed out on my chance to have a real relationship with this 1

held a grudge because

that if this

life

for.

was

between us, but do know that sometimes somebody has to step up to the plate and say "I love you."

never too early or too soon to be the bigger person. is

1

1

the

apologizing to me, telling

held a giudge against this per-

I

you

that

good

the

any good.

^nuch

should not waste your emotions being angry.

remember

person and have spent a lot of time thinking about why. don't blame mysell tor what happened

to

absolutely hell-bent on this person

1

have, or hope-

fully has the time to rectify a

done

This loss was the hardest thing have dealt with at this point in my

hopes

same mistakes

that

changed my life forever. Since that day have had a lot of time to sit and think about what went wrong and how would carry on with my life from here on

life

— Page 5

I

myself

britig

had drained myself, of energy lime and time again because was so angry. know now it did nobody 1

of these things

forced to a hospital bed, and then this life.

things.

thought of him.

I

couldn't

It

1

The last time saw this person, he was a strong man. But then he was

every lime I

come apologize

he wouldn't

Steph Baulk

had not .seen this particular perin over live years. We had left things on bad terms and neither of 1

son us

2006

16,

too precious to be stubborn

Life is once a very important part of

SPOKE, January

I

I

I

I

My

is too short and loo hard to without the people you love. take what I'm telling you and

live ,So

someone

that special

tell

much

they

mean

to

you.

one you're sorry or

how

just

someyou for-

tell

that

give them.

Don't make the same mistakes waited much too long and was too late. You don't have to 1

did.

1

I

be.

pants:

life in

hand-me-downs to personal style Over winter break I had the chance to see many movies. King Kong was awesome but 1 figure out how Naomi Watts went through the whole three hours without a scratch and an

couldn't

(Photo by Jon Yaneff)

Proud presenters Tristan

Harwood, Chris Beach and Dan Twomey present

Taking pride The

Who ultimately

step to solving your prob-

first

lems is admitting that you actually have a problem. During the past Conestoga semesters at three College, I’ve finally realized what

mine

My

is.

1

have to

predicament

say,

it

that

is

wasn’t easy. I

am

7.

suffers in the

end?

a jour-

Opinion ism is that you need sources to give you information for your stories. Real people are the meat and bones of every story a journalist writes. What’s so bad about that, you ask? It’s

when

games Like waiting two

those sources play

mately his or her career, suffers if people withhold or give inaccurate information.

When

the editor sees

son gives the journalist false or con-

reporter will be reprimanded at the

reporting on.

flicting information, then blames the journalist for not doing an accurate

very

be

fair

I’ve taken pride in every story I’ve

written over the months, though

I

admit there were some that didn’t meet my standards of quality. Nonetheless, I’ve put my heart and will

soul into

what

I

if

Or when

staff juggles

a corpora-

the journalist

previous para1 I

have misled you. The harsh reality about joumalI

tion’s

a per-

about the company, despite the story being about that corporation’s prod-

graph has led you to believe that actually enjoy being a journalist, apologize.

research job.

Or when

that, I

do and, for

the

decline the interview.

five or six different people, only to have the final person say there isn’t any valuable information

take pride.

However,

the journalist back, merely to

between

uct or services.

These are happened to with Spoke.

all

situations that

have

me in the time I’ve been

of

the

who

survive a

summer

sep-

and

This was

Travelling Pants, the story of four

when

the anti-fashion

the height of fashion and an

was

missing information or there’s a question about how accu-

the story

rate

is

or credible

least. It’s

get around this

the

story

is,

the

hard for journalists to

when

they have daily

or weekly deadlines, and sources

games with reporters. What’s the moral of this story? Journalists may be informationhungry, hounding pitbulls who don’t leave people alone and can’t take no for an answer, but they have jobs to do. Reporters don’t want to be that way, but they have deadlines to meet. So, be nice to reporters. Not all of them are jerks. play

choice in I

girl. I

“Looking back

now

was required

pants I’ve worn and where they

first

didn’t get

my

first

with

golden back

the

of miles behind those greasy

By far my favourite work pants were the maroon pleated-front and tapered leg number from Tim Hortons, nothing made me feel more like an old lady than those

much

pants.

outgrown them

use before

I

had

much of

a factor

of

growing up since my siblings had worn most of my pants before

tle

they landed in

my

Hand-me-downs

my

suits

let

me

before

either that or the

middle

shins.

I traded in the uniforms for and dress pants to fit in with the office environment I worked

wear.

are pretty stan-

dard in a family with four kids. It was around the age of nine when I began to express myself

was

skirt that fell to the

Heading into college I got a litmore serious about what to

dresser.

my mom would choose my own pants

It

granny

as a baby.

Fashion wasn’t

after

at

pair of pants probably

have taken me.

My

many uniforms

wear

counters.

many

think of the

the

best

pocket. Those pants went through a lot

to

to

arches embroidered on

go with everything.” started

the

attire.

can’t forget the

number complete

I

flower print stirrups don’t

I

Army was

jobs, including a high-waist grey

understand why red

the paper, people will

cal!

to

school.

Sisterhood

the

until,

scrubs

each

weeks

is

was

of course, hospital tear-away warm-up pants took over the halls at high find

should be important to them. Some would argue the newspaper itself, because if people are ques-

and accurate in every story I write, no matter how I feel about the topic I’m found,

Heading into my teen years the key to looking cool was the tightest, flared-leg, black pants I could

Salvation

important thing about being a journalist, I’ve

together.

were big in films like Madagascar and March of the Penguins and made me wish I had one as a pet. Surprisingly, the movie that made me reflect on my life most

old pair of ’70s jeans from

with

past the story’s deadline to

they

brushed

arated but linked through a pair of

any sort of question. The most

reporters.

noise

legs

jeans they take turns wearing in hopes the pants will bring luck to

few fun-

be balanced in my writing. I’ve been advised to never hesitate to ask

Penguins, a stout and stately ani-

cool

the

of the accurate information, they lose out on the information that

end up not of reading the paper anymore. I would argue the reporter suffers, because his or her story, and ulti-

to

made when your

Corduroys were a fun choice

friends

tioning the credibility and accuracy

the college. I’ve learned a

ulous.

necessarily go with everything.

would say the readers, because when a story doesn’t have

my two-and-a-half years at

damental things about what it means to be a journalist. I’ve been taught the ethics of an honest reporter and

considering

Opioioo

Some all

Jason Sonser

nalist.

During

left,

criticized profession

a

in

their

immaculate hairstyle. Vince Vaughn was hilarious in the Wedding Crashers, which also included my favourite up-andcoming actress, Rachel McAdams, who always looks genuine and fab-

mal,

Jess French, Josh Blackler, models in the E-wing cafeteria Dec.

Architecture/construction engineering technology students, from

Janet Morris

in.

wonder

I

this

if

time of

what

I

I

my

back on and cringe at

will look life

wore or

if

I

will

think

heading into a new school year. Looking back now I understand

about the places I was and the people I met and all the memories

why

I

red flower print stirrups don’t

made.


2

— SPOKE, January

Page 6

More the

MOLSON

than 600 people attended

held

night

parents'

first

Conestoga College on Dee.

The

News

2006

annual parent night successful

First By JON

16,

at

7.

was

objective of the event

to

pro\ ide parents and future students

with an opportunity to learn more

about

programs

different

the

offered

Parents'

college.

the

at

night also gave Conestoga's faculty

and cuiTcnt students an opportunity to con\erse with interested high school students. Every program was represented as well as many of financial

student

services,

disability

aid,

CSI,

life,

including

services,

college's

the

All parents

etc.

with children taking Grade

English

the

in

Avon

Waterloo and school boards

were

1

1

or

1

Wellington,

Maitland invited

to

attend.

“Applications for

post-secondary education are due early 2006, so

students are busy comparing schools, checking out academic programs

and

trying to

choose the (Photo by Jon Molson)

best option.” Leanne Holland Brown, student

Leaune Holland Brown

al

student

life

fund

Paul Osborne, Conestoga's director of marketing, said parents’ night

college

goal of selling the to both parents and stuits

dents.

"Judging

comments from

by

grateful parents, the night

was an

enormous success,” he

“Many

of the parents

I

said.

talked to

seemed

Work

came up

Initiative,

with various ideas to showcase Conestoga's appeal as a post-secondary provider. Osborne, who is also the director of athletics and recreation, said there

was a very good reason

holding this event for the ‘Parents are the

encers

when

it

first

number 1 comes to

for

time. influ-

their

for the

said parents’ night allowed for questions and concerns to be properly addressed. “Comments I received from fac-

child’s future

ulty were very positive. Unlike VIP day where a couple of thousand students come onto our campus and

life

Osborne

basically

he said. “So

tunity to ask in-depth questions of

guidance and a place to ask questions, because their children aren't

said.

to

sure which educational path to fol-

sets

plan the entire evening. Osborne,

opening the college to parents would be an excellent opportunity for them to investigate possible pathways; and

faculty.” at parents’ night

was

along with a co-operative program

between

the

college

and

local

school boards, called the School-

low.

So we decided

that

grab some information

and run, parents’ night allowed

child's post-secondary education,"

are looking for

“As parents become more and

more

left and have had the oppor-

many

college to showcase our

excellent programs.”

were

His role

relations

and annu-

parents’ night.

officer, at

almost relieved as they thrilled to

Himmelman, alumni

co-ordinator at Conestoga College, converses with Monica

co-ordinator College

accomplished

life

in-

depth conversations to occur,” he “So, a faculty

member may

that

only makes sense

it

we cater to that and

them

invite

answer their questions.” Leanne Holland Brown, student

is

planning on

an event like

this

new

men-

specifically

tioned that she

she

felt better

having

felt

reassured that he heard the

same things she did, so they could talk more about it later.”

“When

students, friends, families

CONNEX,

the cuiTent Student Life website, as

of study,” she said. “Events like

coming

questions

new

this

show

Conestoga cares

that

2006. She also

about students and their success

highlighted things to look forward

new

and that we take active measures to provide new opportunities that

student centre, an expanded orienta-

contribute to a positive experience

new

model

in early

year, including the

for

new

“Students

were

opportunities

for

the college, and

students and the life

committee. all

at

Conestoga, right from the very

first step.’"

of the

Despite the success of this year's event, Holland

interested

in

involvement at had specific ques-

around leadership, volunseemed intent on getinvolved and making the most

Brown

hesitates in

suggesting that this event should nin

same in years to come. “The wonderful thing about post-

exactly the

tions

secondary

tcerism, and

ing.

ting

continue to educate family and

of their experience

at Conestoga.” Holland Brown believes the timing of these types of events is important.

1

is

that

definitely

it

is

always chang-

think

we

should

friends of prospective students, but I

would suggest

that

we

evaluate the

event's success and impact yearly

“Applications for post -secondary education are due early 2006, so students are busy comparing

and make the necessary improvements to ensure that we continue to

checking out academic programs and trying to choose the

opportunities,”

schools,

on Yonge Street in Toronto where 15-year-old Jane Creba was shot and killed on Boxing Day. The shrine was removed last week by the City of Toronto because of safety concerns. People had to walk on the street to get around the crowd of people gathered to mourn.

interest.

such as information on

answering

She was impressed with

at the shrine

holding

said

Conestoga’s best

is in

Conestoga,

at parents’

interest in student life.

left

Brown

Holland these events

life at

was

creation of a student

of the items

programs and options for students that they may not be aware of.”

and the general public are well educated about our college it allows for informed decisions and enthusiastic selection of programs

tion

A time to remember

all

said.

“Additionally,

to in the

some

Brown

helps educate the public on

site

closer look at

college and

has to offer,” Holland

“One student

well as information about the

A woman has a

it

dents, as well as parents,” she said.

night

Photo by Brandon Walker)

involved

students'

in

when we market our

“This event certainly benefits stu-

regarding student

(

much more

such, are an important component

Holland Brown’s role

future.

“Parents are

more

type of event benefits

than just parents.

questions she didn’t think of, and

said Conestoga

changed along with

the target audience over the years.

co-ordinator at the college, said

this

of parents but they were quali-

He

the concept of marketing

decision-making processes than ever before, and as

her dad there because he asked

holding more parents’ nights in the

She said

the college has

in to

have only talked to seven different ty recruiting opportunities.”

ary education.”

influential in deciding their

provide

meaningful she

and

best practices at

provided Conestoga with the chance to showcase our many won-

ensure they are the best,

programs

and

services,

while generating positive energy and excitement about post-second-

“It's

important to constantly assess our

best option,” she said. “This event

derful

timely

said.

Conestoga and, it

to

usually

means tweaking them from year to However, there is no doubt that in 2005 this event certainly year.

appeared to be very successful.”


SPOKE, January

pAN VALKOs Psychic

16,

2006

STUDENT CENTRE CONSTRUCTION SITE TOURS AVAILABLE Conestoga I

^*•66

students INC

I

Reading*

Hilary

you would like a tour of the new Student Centre construction site please contact Judy Dusick at jdusick@conestogac. on ca and book an appointment today! If

.

Sanctuairy

— Page 7


— SPOKE, January

Page 8

16,

News

2006

College serious about winter closures Cambridge, Guelph, Stratford and

ADAM HANNON

By

Wingham. “It’s a situation

The

hand of grounds

lead

at

Conestoga College said the sehool takes w inter school closures very

Schlei.

it

Schlei said on

clo.sed (only)

one from

12-15 times in the 25 years I've said. “Some years don’t close

him at around 4 p.m., to see what the weather conditions are like around the Doon campus of the college. The Doon campus depends on contractors for major snow removal, since the two fulltime grounds crew can’t maintain

at all."

when

said

forecast

is

the

of physical resources

monitors

weather

calling for w'inter storm

conditions, Barry Milner,

manager

at the college,

available weather net-

all

by themselves. The grounds crew usually looks after the sidewalks, while contractors look after snow removal on road-

roadways

up in the middle of the night to check weather conditions in the area.

need be

ways. he’ll contact the vari-

municipalities

ous

kilometres of sidewalks and

the

works, including TV, radio and the Internet. He said Milner even gets

"If

get

to

Schlei said the grounds crew

their

use salt to

reports," said Schlei.

Dinning discuss the situation and if

they

should close the

a collaborative effort,” said

“It’s

If the

weather

but

it

is

starts

nice during the to

deteriorate

toward the evening, Dan Piedra, director of continuing education for the college,

make

Peter Schlei, lead hand of

is

consulted.

He

helps

decisions about class cancel-

grounds

Conestoga’s evening

for

classes.

He added

Schlei.

day,

(Photo by Adam Hannon)

lations

school.

make

the

still

roadways

safer in the winter, but use a product called Blue Heat around the

Milner thinks that closing the college might be necessary, he calls vice-president of student affairs Mike Dinning. Milner and If

decide

snowy days some-

K-W Cornerstone Paving

calls

been here." he Schlei

so

in place.

together.”

lege alTects a lot of people. bet I've seen

why we have

Those peoplace and they all work

ple are in

Peter Schlei said closing the col-

we

“That’s

many systems

seriously.

"1

where you can’t window,” said

just look out your

when

that

they look at

weather forecasts, they don’t just look

at

what

it

will

be

like in the

morning, they have to take the whole day into account.

He

said they try to

make

these

decisions as early as possible, usu-

at

Conestoga College,

main entrances of the college. Blue Heat is more environmentalbecause it contains less and sodium than the salt used

ly friendly

salts the front of the recreation centre.

salt

messages about any school clos-

on roads. This makes

“Basically as soon as the decision’s made it’s out to the various

ings to the media.

sive to the buildings than salt, but it is also about three times the cost

media,” said Schlei. “You don’t want people trying to get on to the campus if it’s not

Education Catalogue

safe.”

These

ally before

He

7 a.m.

said John Sawicki

from the

college’s public affairs office relays

The 2006 Conestoga Continuing lists

of

the seven

stations include 96.7

own

88.3

CHYM

Kitchener and the college’s

FM,

salt.

“It

weather-related class cancellations.

in

less corro-

pays off,” said Schlei. “We spend a little more on the newer stuff, but it saves us on building maintenance and replacement of

radio stations which will announce

FM

it

parts.”

as well as stations in

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Dance

5:00

5:50pm

Variety Pack 5:00 - 5:50pm

5:00

Body

Blast

Abs and

Strength

6:00

6:50pm

Glutes 6:00 - 6:50ptri

6:00

-

-

\

reminder: to gain access to any of the

facilities at

-

5:50pm &

Stretch

Ice

2nd t 16th

Hockey - Fee: Sio^asbj^ bond

Boll Hockey - Fee: $30 cash team brnid

Co-ed Volleyball -Fee:$30cashteambond

6:50pm

Judo 8:30

»AMU

- 1

Co-ed Soccer -Fee: $30 cash team bond

0:00pm

the Rec Centre you must present your student card at the#ont desk


News

SPOKE, January

— Page 9

2006

16,

Life-changing course

allows fresh start By LEE EVANS

to

each

ihe astonished students.

ol'

For some, there were tears .Sixteen

women who

ened the door of

hadn’t dark-

classroom for

a

many years graduated I'rom Focus for Change in their first step on the road to independence. The preparastudies program offered through Conestoga College is a bridge to get back into a learning tory

mode through which

16- week

Women

Waterloo

in

receiving Ontario

(Photo by Jessica Blumenthal)

found around the Kensington Market work on the outsides of shops, as well as in their studios. of art are

in

Toronto. Local artists display their

Mother’s Allowance, can overcome obstacles getting back to .school or work through the program, which is offered at the Waterloo campus. Jerri-Lou Nowak, program facilitator, and other staff welcomed the 16 graduates to their ceremonies held on Dec. 23, 2005.

“You

The

secret market

By JESSICA BLUMENTHAL

market

stalls

and

wafts through the Despite the black eye Toronto and multiculturalism received after

Boxing Day shootings, there is where a mixture of cultures meet harmoniously right the

a sacred place

their

smell

air.

vibrant.

bright

what To

it is

the Kensington Karnival. Held in the late afternoon of Dec. 2 1 every year, the district comes to

attend

options.

life to

Indian, Portuguese and Canadian cuisine. For those on a tighter

dlelit

The Victorian houses intense

reds

are

and

change from street to street and mix in the middle. Curry, nutmeg and yeast line the

budget,

there

today.

really experience the market,

places for every palette. There’s organic vegetarian, Chinese, West

sunshine yellow. Shops and cates have fresh food while others display shirts, pictures, rugs and tapestries on their front lawns. The smells

tures has

curi-

blues,

cultural diversity

The combination of the culmade Kensington Market

tries.

Walking around the market works up an appetite. There are

ous are strong. The

Many

of the

women

had left abuconquered self-

parents struggling to get ahead.

The

are

a

plethora of

family-owned grocery stores to pick and choose meals or snacks. Fruit and vegetable stands line the narrow streets. Kensington has one of the only cannabis cafes Canada.

in

in a

celebrate the winter solstice pageant with a traditional can-

mummer’s

parade.

In

the

parade gigantic eight- to 10-foot costumed people walk the streets to cultural music. The streets are busy

with holiday

shoppers after the

It is

a feast for the eyes, and after

purchasing sonie delectable for the

destructive

make

lifestyles

a better

life for

their children. 1

in

They ranged

in

age

6 to 47 and most were single

Several of the staff

on

order to

themselves and

stomach as well.

fare,

Nowak

read affirmations collec-

by the students as each graduate came up to claim tively written

their certificate. As the comments about each

the incredible changes they see

while teaching and mentoring their

through such courses as prepatory math, English and com-

clients

puter studie,s. Caroline Welsand

is a counsellor with the students four days per week and has been with

who works the

program for three

“I love

my

years.

job” she said, “I love

what I do.” She says Andrea Leis, program co-ordinator for prepatory studies

programs, fought for funding to get a counsellor for the program. Leis address the specific concerns of in the program to make the outcomes more successful. The Region of Waterloo supports the position, but they must apply each year to renew funding. Some funding dollars also come from the

people

Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities.

Welsand says the clients going through the course make great transformations as they gain confi-

dence

themselves and hope for

in

positive

student

were read out loud, there were tears in the eyes of

many

in the

room. The graduates talked about

overcame

they

struggles

the

progress through the program.

many of them,

was

it

the

first

to F’or

time

they had been in a classroom

.set-

ting in years after lacklustre high

school experiences.

Rae Orth,

the Ontario

with

re.sentative

funding

the

Works

region,

rep-

said

provided through the pro-

is

cover transportation and

to

child-care expen.ses for the participants.

Money

also

is

available

for

support, such as the

cost of suitable clothing to go for job interviews or a haircut. Comments made by the graduates as they accepted their certificates were very positive. Most of the women did not wish to be iden-

privacy reasons.

tified for

commented

said they needed a counsellor to

parade.

I

employment

sive relationships or

cliildrcn

task.

“Now can buy a turkey,” said one woman.

gathered for the event.

1950s when people immigrated from the Caribbean, East Asia, Vietnam and various African coun-

cent Jewish.

I

income with young

gram

one-of-a-kind clothing, accessories

in the 1920s the Kensington community was 80 per

Kensington entering the feelings of being colours are

women,

from

many

Market, overwhelmed, intrigued and

incredible

of the market expanded after the

around.

When

all

fixed

can be a daunting

wish you could see what I see when I meet with you,’’ said Nowak, addressing the women, their families and friends who had

Initially,

Kensington Market has a long history of cultural diversity and demonstrates how different ethnic groups can happily co-exist. Don’t forget to notice the artwork that’s all

Ontario’s capital.

are

as

Visitors to the community can spend a day shopping at stores like Courage My Love, Dancing Days, Exile and Clic-klak which all offer

and houseware. The shops are a trove of bargains which is great for students on a budget. If someone is looking for a place to go to get something special for a fancy night out, Kensington Market offers

in

The market is located in between Dundas and College streets.

Region

Works funding,

known

formerly

Many forms

classes,

started Sept. 6, 2005.

ol joy,

preparing for Christmas on a

as

One woman

in her 40s mother of seven children.

was

“I

just a

mom

is

the

for 17 years,”

got to the point where I had no life in front of me, so I came here. I got a lot of good information to base decisions on.”

she said.

“It

Another woman, who emigrated from a country in South America, said, “I gained selfhere

used to feel like nothing, have my.self back.” “Every one of you touched my life in some way,” said a young,

esteem. but

now

I

I

slightly built all .so

woman.

“I love

you

much.”

Some of the students had words of praise for the teachers as well. “If there were more teachers and like

facilitators

Jerri-Lou

and

Caroline there would be more people staying in school,” a participant said. Even math wasn’t so scary any

more. “Brian is the best teacher,” said another student, referring to the program’s math instructor. “I like math now. When I started, I thought I wanted a job at Shopper’s Drug Mart, but now I want to be a

are at the first

personal support worker.” Elizabeth Cressman, a graduate

day, full of potential,” she told the graduating students, “and I see you

with a 16-month-old daughter, said she is planning to take business

growing day by day and reaching your potential. Remember that you are worth it. You are wonderful caregivers to everyone else and I

administration

the future. “I see

where you

want you

to

remember

to take care

of you.”

Town, the executive director of alumni and development Ingrid

relations at the

Doon campus

finds

awards and scholarships. She announced to the group that a woman, who wished to remain anonymous, had read an article about the Focus for Change Program in The Record and decid-

money

for

ed she wanted to help. Town distributed Christmas cards containing Zehrs gift certificates for

$100

College and

is

at

Conestoga

enrolled for further

upgrading programs in September. She used to work in retail, indicating one of her strong points was making customers feel comfort-

During maternity leave, she decided she wanted something better for herself and her daughter. Now her goal is to open her own able.

company. “I

am

a big dreamer and I’m

going to make it,” Cressman said. For further information about the program and how to apply contact the facilitator Jerri-Lou

Nowak

jnowak@conestogac.on.ca phone 885-0300, ext. 243.

at

or


Page 10

— SPOKE, January

16,

2006

CONESTOGA STUDENTS

FEBRUARY

16th,

INC. PRESENTS

2006

-

NOONISH

PLEASE VISIT THE CSI OFFICE IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN PARTICIPATING OR HELPING OUT!

ALL PROCEEDS WILL BE DONATED TO

THE HEART & STROKE

FOUNDATION OF CANADA


Entertainment

SPOKE, January

— Page 11

2006

16,

Annual holiday tradition continues By TARA RICKER

The

Kitchener

Waterloo Jorgen Canada to continue the annual Kitchener- Waterloo Nutcracker

Symphony

Lively toy soldiers, dancing sug-

arplums and battling mice are what brings

magical

the

Nutcracker to

talc

of The

performed

Founded

over the world.

all

Ballet Jorgen

the

Centre

in

the

tale at

Square on Dec.

28, 2005.

in

and Susan

Canada Ballet

Canada presented

of the magical

their version

Ballet

tradition.

life.

Every holiday season numerous productions of The Nutcracker are

joined

is

1987 by Bengt Jorgen Bodie,

Ballet

the fifth largest

Company

Jorgen

Canadian

has

built

his

own

innovative

choreographic company, has

attracted

the

which

attention

of

dance lutninaries Arnold Spohr, artistic director Emeritus of the Royal Winnipeg Ballet, and E\'elyn

Royal

Hart,

Winniireg

Ballet.

currently .serving

“The company's goal opporliinilies

to create

is

for C'anaJian chore-

ographers and original new works in classical ballet,"

said Jorgen.

The Nutcracker is the magical tale of young Klara's Christmas dream. Her beloved Christmas gilt, a nutcracker doll, springs to

Ballet Jorgen

Canada has grown

the nation.

to

Formerly a highly regarded dancer with Canada's National Ballet Company, Bengt Jorgen

dance company and progressively a national centre of choreographic development.

become Ontario's

handsome

.second largest

life as

“As

embark

journey to the Kingdom of ,Snow and the Land of

Sweets.

with the company,”

from dance schools in the Kitchener- Waterloo area were selected by Ballet students

Jorgen Canada to join the company's professional cast for the Kitchener- Waterloo performances

and on

The Nutcracker ily

Katie Stammer, of Waterloo, was one of the 30 students ch( 1

perform

in the

1

all

fam-

over the

years to come.

Jorgen Canada will be to the Centre in the .Square with the classic love story Ballet

returning

Romeo and

on Feb.

Juliet

Tickets are on sale now.

Centre 1

14.

They

are

and $18 for children.

lor adults

For more

,

show.

Jorgen.

a popular

story will surely be

its

many

told for

$36

tour.

.said

is

holiday tradition

world and

Thirty

pleased

opportunity for local dance students to perform and tour

mystical

a

we our

years past,

in

offer an

to

Together they win a battle against

to

September.

a

prince.

ferocious rodents and then

on

“Being part of the production was ama/ing and I’m grateful for the experience," said Stammer. The students were cho.sen from a group of more than 100 children who auditioned for the show in

information

the

call

.Square at (519) 578-

in the

570.

a new ‘Dogg’ in town

There By MELISSA HANCOCK

line of

new hotdog

food products.

cer’s

meat counter.

Well-known rap artist. Snoop Dogg, is putting his, well, name on the package of a new hotdog brand call Snoop Doggs, which were

(Photo by Tara Ricker)

young and the young

at heart, the

magical Nutcracker

Jorgen Canada performed the timeless tale at the Centre

in

is

a family

tradition. Ballet

the Square on Dec. 28.

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: Coming Out Everyone has a sexual orientation. to

someone of the opposite

Sometimes, we and then

feel

may even

sex,

We may feel

attracted

someone of the same

feel as

though

we

-

emotionally and physically

Conservative estimates suggest that one in ten people are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgendered. Typically, while heterosexual people participate in dating throughout

adolescence, people of an alternative sexual orientation

may

begin to explore their

sexuality only after they have left the formative years, their family,

His

time.

-

confused about our attractions to others and our choices for a partner.

hometown, or

previous personal identity.

coming out smoothly: accepting one’s sexuality may feel like a period of finally “coming home.” However, for others it is a task filled with pain, self-loathing and lack of support. This may be complicated by feelings contrary to messages received while growing up, one’s definition of “normal,” or one’s religious the transition in

Gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered people need a supportive environment that nurtures positive feelings about their sexual orientation. The road to understanding,

and celebrating one’s sexual orientation often cannot be traveled alone. If you confused about your sexuality, need support, or would like to know of resources

accepting,

available in the

community and

A Message from Student Visit

into

partners

are

Franco

a former owner of a popbusiness in hotdog Massachu.setts. called Joe and Nemo’s, which was started in

Earp

is

ular

1909.

According to the Boston Herald, Snoop’s brother and business manager. Bing Worthington, .says he tition in the

much compe-

is

hotdog market.

in

order to live up to these

new hotdog

at the

College, counsellors in Student Services can help.

Services

our website http:/Avwnv. conestosac. on. ca/isp/stserv/index. jsp

At

standards.

least

Wow,

that’s

I

enough

few heads turn. Herald The

to

make

a

Snoop.’’

Oh

dear.

Being

What

el.se

discretely

can be said?

suggestive

.something obviously of the past.

is

taking on this

who

Pimp

Juice, that

was named, “best

energy drink" by Vibe magazine. A lot of celebrities are diving into fashion

Stefani’s

industry,

new

line

like

Gwen

L.A.M.B., or 50

Cent’s G-Unit Clothing. Britney Spears, Jennifer Lopez

and most recently, Shania Twain, are among the many stars who have

own

fragrances

on

store

Hotdogs may just be the spot to draw the line though. But, who am I to say what should or should not fly

quoted Worthington saying, “Imagine a long, skinny hotdog just like also

is

Rap artist Nelly came out with his own energy drink last year, called

shelves.

“Hey mom,

Snoop

knows, maybe this will open the door for more celebrities.

their

foot-long!’’

with

Snoop’s footdon’t think I could take top

to

project with pride and

with her 12-year-old daughter and

want Snoop’s

Hancock,

.seriously afterwards.

she walks through the grocery store hears her exclaim,

1

like

come up

could

I

long, but

new

name

last

something

the

Sounds like the Weinermobile may need some slammin’ or pimpin’

With a I’m sure

myself

Just imagine a mother’s ears as

upbringing.

are

him

Petrucci and Jeff Earp.

doesn’t think there

Some people make

signed the

deal with Snoop, bringing

sex, or to people of both sexes.

king.

some time?

One Media

the foot-long business for the first

are a gender different from that of our birth

Newman Some

all.

Platinum -

brand of peanuts? That might be gelling a bil racy for Ihe Fig

Now, that’s something to wrap your lips around. For years, music artists have been endorsing products and using their songs to bring fame to certain items, but this one really tops them

to hit .store shelves this

month. delight for the

Newman’s Own nutritional What would he call them if he came out with his own

say Snoop’s celebrity bank account may be in trouble and that is why he is delving into the world of processed meat. However, his status in the spotlight doesn’t seem to be dwindling with an upcoming movie role and ongoing hit singles. If you were a celebrity and had more money than you knew what to do with, what kind of products could you come up with to kill

expected

A

took the lighter

1982 with his .self-made

in

Move

over Oscar Mayer, there’s in town. Believe it or not, the world of rap and hip hop has branched out again and this time it’s to your local groa

Newman

Paul

road

when

products.

it

comes

to

celebrity

_

All I can say for sure is you will never catch me tossing a package of Snoop Doggs into my shop-

ping cart due

image

I

product.

get

to

the distasteful

when thinking of

the


8

— SPOKE, January

Page 12

91

7

Entertainment

2006

16,

Horoscope Week of Januan'

Vertically strutting

2006

16.

Aries

IM

March

punk

their

-

21

October 22

April 19

stuff

By JASON SHERRITT This doesn't have to be the win-

of your discontent, Aries, try on your face. If you still feel sad and alone, phone a ter

to put a smile

friend,

what they're

that's

Lucky day:

for.

up early this weekend, Libra, and get some much-needed cleaning and laundry done. Not only will it give you some room to walk around, it'll help your studies. Lucky day:

Get

1

1

Scorpio

Taurus April 20

Are you always

May 20

-

a guest at

come and

Taurus? Your time will

deep down you know Lucky day: 20

fB

wed-

dings and starting to feel as if you're never going to get married, it's

true.

It's

^

May 21

fe

out of your

fall

Sagittarius November 22 December 21

someone who’s always been them

Lucky day: 19

ISff

near and dear to your heart. Don't let

phone you to up plans, instead of vice-

latest interest

try to set

versa.

You're starting to lose touch with a close friend, Gemini, and it's

time you learn some dating and only les-

son, start playing hard to get. Let

your

do

life,

something. Lucky day: 22

-

Sunday

is your day, Sagittarius, back and relax. Get everything done on Saturday, including your schoolwork. Sunday throw on your favourite childhood movie and reflect. Lucky day; 22

Capricorn m

July 22

December 22 January

it

turns out to be even bet-

Surprise ladies and lads, that’s what I’m talking about. Here I was at Call The Office, a bar in London, to interview Cincinnati band Thee Shams. Being a rhythm and soul-drenched blues-rock

band,

was

I

-

excited.

There’s a drunk person

bar and barely acknowledged the

strangely.

as

ordered a pint of Stella Artois. Then as he handed me my Belgian brew I heard the

“We’re seeing a straight boy in rather tight jeans doing the squeaky dance.” Laughter bursts out, cutting through the poppounding stereo, and it’s clear to see where the charismatic and amusing stage performance comes from. It's no gimmick, no cheap trick, what you see is what you get. Truth is stranger than fic-

announced us

tion as they say.

band is that, man, Raymond has found a way to work with me, a gay man, to make the band queer. And I think that maybe, 1 could be wrong, that might be new.” The Struts are on tour to explore, to see if what they have is

I

opening band tuning their guitars and making sure the microphones were all set to par. “Yeah!” screams the singer and within a fraction of a second the band rips into the most abrasive, face-slapping shock I’ve experienced next to being brought into this world. The lights haven’t even been turned on yet and they’re playing

being a

fast,

hard rock

’n’ roll

to

Which, Tuesday night sadly, was will

listen.

week

You're one

and

swamped

already.

ball starts rolling

regain

into

second

of that

worked for other people, but you can do better than that. Hold out for something better. Lucky day: 19

my mouth

again

it’s

time to last

it's

not worth

Leo

,

August 22

4;

Sure,

it.

^

Aquarius January 20 February 18

^

-

it's

up in your always tends to around this time of year. It's time to put your foot down and make a choice. You have to choose your own path in life.

Have you ever done the funky chicken in your underwear, Aquarius? Somehow the answer

Lucky day:

blinds.

is

flaring

again, Leo, as

immediately ran to the nearest

Cancer? As the

July 23

life

I

table by the stage and stood with

focus you had Lucky day: 19

The drama

any

for

fall

Internet dating stuff, Capricorn,

the

semester.

Don't

feeling

you're

it

21

to that is obvious. Well, to

do things

Just

make

it's

time

more often. you close the

like that

sure

Lucky day;

wide open. The powerful and mighty sound was coming from a duo, just guitars and drums. They played two straight songs without pause, reminiscent of The Ramones’ performance style, and announced themselves

The Vertical Struts. The band went into their third number and 1 smiled to myself as the guitarist jumped off the stage to play for a bit. Then as he knelt to pour as much raw emotion into the song as he could, I knew life was still a gas. as

Raymond Anderson Vertical

Biesinger and Trevor are

Struts

a

tasty

slice

Pisces

August 23 September 22

A

trip to the

bring a

bar this

week

February 19

March 20 Be

will

new person into your life, Don't jump in too quickly,

careful walking in the snow,

Pisces, as this

week

is

looking

him or her. and cons as you can’t rewind your life. Lucky

dangerous one. Don't walk under any ladders or break any mirrors either. Maybe you should wear a helmet this week, just in

day: 16

case.

Virgo.

as you've just met

Weigh

the pros

like a

Lucky day; 16

Brandon Walker

is

a second-year

journalism student holding in the

palm of

his

hand.

fate

ahead and decided to find out just whom it was that blew my mind. They hail from Edmonton, Alta., and it was their first time east of Saskatoon. Biesinger, the lead vocalist and guitarist, stated, “We’ve been around for four years. It’s just really about time that we got out of there. If you stay at

home

in

Edmonton,

the

crowds are quite finite. “We’ve seen lots of bands who have decided to stay in town or not tour around that much. They discard a lot of really good ideas. The reason we needed to get out of Western Canada was that. We also really need to see interesting we’re seeing right now. Trevor can you please describe what we’re seeing.” things,

like

acting

pare them to The puts

it,

“even

Ramones

or

The

Biesinger

as

but,

if

we were

trying to

be imitative of other things, it simply wouldn’t happen. There’s a filter in effect that is Trevor and

my

limited abilities.

“1

guess

and

it

started out that

it

starts to

become

kind of specialization.

I

way

a strange

don’t play

guitar like a guitarist. Trevor doesn’t

play drums like a drummer.”

The

I

a

During the show Anderson took moment to announce The Struts couple.

a

Later he

said,

“I

queer band because my definition of queer is coalition. Raymond’s straight and I’m gay and we’re both from Alberta trying to make rock ’n’ a

as

roll.

"A

lot

of the gay music that

I

see

solo-singer songwriter or a kind

is

of electronica made in a bedroom, one person working alone. What I really like about this

Real. The Vertical Struts don’t hide behind a fagade or guise, even when describing their sound. One may try to com-

Humble.

Struts don’t even

dream

to

immediately ran to the

nearest table by the stage

and stood with my mouth wide open.

as a straight

in

new. Relatively new to

fact,

rock

’n’ roll in the past five

years

been the two-piece band. World renowned and popular are The White Stripes, which Biesinger and Anderson don’t view as a comparison as they both have different influences. The Struts draw from visual art, drama and minimalism. “Taking as little as you can and making as has

much

as possible with

main

idea

“There’s is

also

known

is

the

says.

movement

a

Edmonton. There

trend in

what

it”

Biesinger

as

or

exists

as the holy trinity

of two-pieces.

“There’s Whitey Houston and Twin Fangs and think all of them

of

band, constant interruptions and a tornado warning in effect, I went

Virgo

on the

bar

the

in

what make The

cake. With no knowledge of the

21

dance floor

White Stripes

but a baker’s dozen of people.

semester

(Internet photo)

Edmonton-based Vertical Struts is a two-piece garage-punk band whose songs rarely exceed three minutes or three chords.

expect not to see them. Despair. What was I going to do now? I slowly walked back to the

whomever

1

plenty

However, upon arriving I was told they were being held at the border due to improper paperwork and to

bartender as

to sit

Cancer June 22

»

but

ter!

N ovember 2

June 21

-

for,

-

tricks, Scorpio. First

Gemini M

October 23

Have you ever arisen Christmas morning to open a few gifts only to be completely disappointed because the gift you were expecting wasn’t there? But wait. What’s this? The last gift you open still is not what you asked

1

how much

be the biggest band in the world. They’re just a couple of guys who enjoy expressing their thoughts and feelings through music. What they do express as noted on their debut album, which is self-titled, is queer politics, want, socialism

even within something that could be defined as rock. The lack, the minimalism forces you to con-

and straight

face.

politics.

Biesinger says, Struts

are

a

“The

federal

Vertical

entity

in

a

way. The sum persona of Trevor and what is a concern to Trevor and what is a concern to me is put

and then expressed through my mouth, i.e. Washington, DC.” As is well known and controversial, same-sex marriages were together

made

legal in Canada in the past The cover of The Vertical Struts’ album depicts a wedding cake with two grooms at the peak, the grooms being Biesinger and

year.

Anderson.

are testament to is

possible

within

a

variety

two-piece,

front adversity.”

With nothing but adversity to The Vertical Struts are making sure they stand behind what they believe in. As the band name suggests, a standing framework or brace of strengthened force that resists compression. The coalition of opposites working together to

one end. Peace. Unity. Arcadia.

The

best physical representation

as described in their

words

is that

of Biesinger being East Berlin and Anderson being West Berlin. Biesinger says, “We’re still regional,

there’s

tension

some-

times, but largely and inevitably,

separated as

it is, it

is still

Berlin.”


Sports

SPOKE, January

— Page 13

2006

16,

Head-to-head: Will Petes steal the cup? Knights

will

win again

year

this

Downie’s return means victory

Anyone could capture the Ontario Hockey League (OHL) championship come spring, but at about the hallway mark in the 2005'06 season the London Knights look to be

Those who watched the World Juniors Tournament over the break know ihe name -Steve Downie.

Downie played a pivotal role in Canada’s gold medal-winning performance in Briiisli

once again. The Knights won the Memorial Cup last .season beating Sidney Crosby and the Rimouski Oceanic 4-0 in the llnal May 29 and appear to have the weapons on offence the favourites

C'olumbia.

OHL and Memorial

and defence to repeat as

Cup champions. Right now the Knights

have one of the best goaltenders league

are ranked second

in

Adam

the

in

Dennis.

They

behind the Peterborough Petes with a 25-9-0 record for 52 points (as of Jan.

lost their goalie from last year (Gerald Coleman), but Dennis has been spectacular with a 25-5-0-2 record, posting

4).

a 2.75 goals against average.

Coleman

now

Lightning’s

OHL

the

in

The Petes have

a 29-8-1-0 record for 55

points and have looked impressive so far this

Now Downie is ready to help his Ontario Hockey League (Ollf.) club win the “gold medal" of its league; the Memorial Cup. Downie, a first-round pick of the

with

the

Tampa Bay

American Hockey League (AHL)

season.

The Knights

lost

Corey

leading scorer from

last

After coming over from the Guelph Storm season Dennis posted a 9-1 win-loss

Perry, the league’s

season (47 goals

and 130 points), who is now in the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim farm system. They still have several key components that took the team on a 31 -game unbeaten streak last season, such as forwards

Rob

Schremp (78 points), David Bolland points) and Dylan Hunter (61 points).

(71

record in the playoffs. His playoff experience should help the Knights in clo.se games

Every other player on the team has had to produce in the absence of their star, and have pulled through in the clutch as shown by their

it

counts.

put together impressive campaigns and

OHL-leading record (29-8-1-0). The incredible thing about the Petes balanced scoring. When you look at

end up contending for the

-scorers

may Memorial Cup if

these players continue to rack up the points they will all finish in the top 10 in

the Knights start to slip.

scoring for the second straight year. Quite

experience from

an accomplishment.

won’t matter what the Petes or any other team accomplishes this season because the Knights will be at the Memorial Cup for the second straight year and, if everything goes

The Knights

If

also have the leading rookie

who

scorer, Sergei Kestitsyn,

has chipped

in

with 17 goals and 48 points. At the defensive end of the ice the Knights

every player on the Knights

right, they will

last

win

it

just

it

is

game

this year.

Compare

is

going

to

have a big game.

right there to

Last time the Petes had a record like they have this year it was the 1992-1993 .season. the OHL championship that year, and were finali.sts in the Memorial Cup. With Steve Downie back with the club, you can expect Peterborough to improve on their

They won

To put that in perspective, consider the National Hockey League (NHL). Only four players on the Ottawa Senators are averaging a point per

who

having an off-night,

Peterborough has a balanced scoring attack, and if one player has a bad day, others are

their

the top

point per game.

again.

Peterborough’s

are

score for the Knights?

in the league, a player from Peterborough doesn’t arrive until 29 (Daniel Ryder, 45 points after 37 games). But they have eight players who average more than a

u.ses his

year to his advantage,

The London Knights

ing well most of the .sea.son without their star player.

Other than the Petes, the Guelph Storm, Kitchener Rangers and Barrie Colts have

If

main competition in the OHL. London, however, has what could be called the Pittsburgh Penguin syndrome: they depend on all their offence from a few guys. In the case of the Pens, it’s Sidney Crosby, Mario Lemieux and Zigmund Palffy. In the case of the Knights, it’s Rob Shremp, David Bolland and Dylan Hunter. Those three players, as of Jan. 6, combined for 217 points. If those guys are shut down due to injuries or

last

when

that’s inctty

Peterborough Petes.

automatic boost of scoring can be counted on. Credit goes to the rest of the team for play-

affiliate,

the Springfield Falcons.

and

for the Petes,

impressive for the tn)ys from Peterborough.

This impressive stat, however, comes with him only having played 13 games for the team. But with Downie back in the lineup, an

is

do

eight that

Philadelphia Flyers, has averaged clo.se to two points per game this year with the

OHL-leading record, and,

if

goes as

all

planned, surge right into the Memorial Cup.

that to the

Olympic hockey team should win gold again ADAM BLACK

By

Let’s look at the team:

Moving on from the goalies, we have the Team Canada blue line (defencemen). Starting with Rob Blake: This will be Blake’s third time playing for Team Canada in the Winter Olympics. Very experienced defenceman, and a valuable leader in the dressing room. He couldn’t be overlooked. Adam Foote: He’s having a bit of a rough season so far after being signed by Columbus in the off-season. Still, like Blake, he has experience that will be vital for the team. He’s a big man and a hard competitor. He’ll prove his worth

Starting goaltender, Martin Brodeur: Arguably one of the great-

on the blue line. Ed Jovanovski:

The Winter Olympics

are just

around the comer, and there’s one event most Canadians won’t be missing: hockey. Since the gold medal wins in 2002 for both men’s and women’s teams, Canada has had lots of success in international hockey events. Will this team con-

same steps? With all the talent on the -men’s team you have to think there’s a good chance. tinue in the

There’s a

lot

ence, which

of winning experi-

was

the

team management

est goalies to

main focus of

in the selection.

ever play the game.

There was no doubt

in

mind that he would be guy to start. Although

the

possibly because of

number

1

he’s having a

of a rough season

bit

anyone’s

in the

the

all

NHL,

new mle

changes, he should be back in form with Olympic hockey rules in place.

Backup goaltender,

Roberto Luongo: Very solid backup for Brodeur. He has faced more shots than any other goalie in the

and

better

team playing

in

NHL

he had a front of him

could be argued

it

if

(the Florida Panthers) his statistics

would be outstanding. With Team Canada’s defence helping him out, he’ll have very little problem staying on top of his game.

Backup

goaltender, Marty Turco: There was much discussion about who would be the third Jose Theodore is having a of a rough season; Curtis Joseph playing great and was a possible

great season in

playing from the point, has a great

work

ethic that can inspire a team.

ing to notice a theme in the selected defencemen? They are all obvious choices and full of experience. Niedermayer is no different. He was the NHL’s top defenceman in 2004,

has a load of experience playing for

Team Canada. Another just couldn’t

having a

player

who

be overlooked.

Chris Pronger: Another big man

on the blue

(might play with Foote for a large defensive pairing). Another premier defenceman

selection.

suspension

line

attacking

for

Moore from

behind, that

Moore’s career of the matter

After the

still

in question.

is,

The

fact

the league feels he

what he did, so why would they not select one of the greatest power forwards in the NHL? He can hit, he can skate and he can score. We’ll take him. Shane Doan: Another great leader (captain of the Phoenix he’s been punished for

Had

OK

ing an

have

to

a career season in

of the sea-

his presence felt

since his return. Finally gets a chance to represent his country (wasn’t able

play in the World

great season for the Dallas Stars

to

and couldn’t be overlooked. Avery strong third person to have in net for Canada.

injury).

Cup due

People question

to

this choice,

but he’s one of the best defencemen in the

league today.

Robyn Regehr:

Martin

St.

Tampa Bay

line-mates

Louis and Brad Richards.

Rick Nash: This is

my

in

opinion

He

a bit of a weird choice.

has

been injured through most of this season, while players like Eric Staal have been lighting up the score sheet consistently but aren’t

on the initial team. Should maybe be on the reserves, but who knows? He can score goals, he’s proven that.

Time

1

was a

will tell if this

wise choice or not. Brad Richards: Stanley

line

He

centres the

for the defending

Cup champions, and he be with the same line at Has great chemistry with

will also

Bay

After having an outstand-

line.

2004 season, he has been

ing

silent this season. this line, but

don’t

I

three guys, let’s see

the top 10 in points.

He

excellently.

season for the Flyers.

team.

One

player

be overlooked Dany Heatly:

n’t

who

I

think that could-

in the selection.

Another player

an outstanding offensive season. Should play on a line

is

having

with Gagne to create a great

high scoring forward for this pair to score

Jarome er.

line.

many

Watch goals.

Iginla: This is a no brainEveryone knows what he can do.

number

1

line,

and is a great leader in the dressing room. No one else on the team deserves to wear the C more. Ryan Smith: Or as I like to call him. Captain Canada. He has done so much for Canadian hockey, leading us so many times in the World Championships. He plays with such heart; just watching him play can inspire a team. Gives 10 per cent every game he plays. He should wear the third A for team Canada. 1

Martin

member

St.

Louis:

of the number

The 1

third

Tampa

.sees the ice

should be centring line.

NHL

(two others were his Ottawa linemates, Dany Heatly and Daniel Alfredsson). to

ability

He has the amazing know exactly where

is on the ice. Can set up If a centre gets amazing plays. injured watch for him to centre the Heatly and Gagne line.

everyone

With Mario Lemieux not playing will centre the

He

top three point getters in the

year.

his jersey.

impossible.

It’s

up he was

There will be three players following the team on the reserves. Don’t get me wrong, these three players are amazing, and very easily could be starting for the team. Jason Spezza, Centre: Before he was injured he was one of the

He

on

without Joe Sakic?

if

they live up

if

Gagne

the Heatly and

A

line.

Joe Sakic: How could you have a Canadian men’s hockey team

know

so well and sets up his wingers

amazing season

be a great playmaker for that

will

man-

to break

Joe Thorton; Arguably the best playmaker in the NHL this season. Leads the league in assists and is in

he will be the captain of the squad.

He

Louis.

ralher

that

to expectations.

possible candidate for wearing the

St.

know

the wisest of choices. They are expecting great things from these

Turin.

Lecavalier and

1

agement doesn’t want

guys focused. Kris Draper: Not a great goal scorer, but what he lacks in the scoring department he makes up in experience. He’s a key leader for one of the best teams in the NHL, the Detroit Red Wings, and is a get

he will add valuable offence to the

made

the line with

good guy dressing room to help

point,

to injury through part

and also is a strong contender for wearing the A on his jersey. Vincent Lecavalier: Fie played outstanding in the World Cup, winning the MVP trophy. Will play on

number

who can

set up players on the which will be very valuable on the power play. Wade Redden: Was questionable

1

He’s hav-

points.

season, but a

in the

In the 2002 Olympics he played outstanding for Canada, and the management could not overlook that. He should play on the number line

Steve leaves

Simon Gagne: Having a standout One of the top three goal scorers in the NHL,

son, but has

is

start-

a great overall

This was a very

Bertuzzi:

2004 getting 68

due

But Turco

Todd

controversial

Coyotes).

Scott Niedermayer: Are you

is

defenceman. Will most likely be paired with Redden. Now onto the offensive talent of the Canadians. Here’s where I think a few questionable selections were made.

line.

bit is

offensive talent, but

Another given choice for the blue

goalie.

candidate.

He’s having a Vancouver. Great at

Like Redden, he has a very strong ethic. Doesn’t have great

work

He

Eric Staal:

talent.

I

Carolina

this

think he should be

Nash, but once again

starting before I

just having an

very hard to overlook this

It’s

young

is

in

could be wrong. Watch for this kid be a starter in the 2010 Olympics.

to

Bryan McCabe: leads the

men

NHL

with 15.

He

in goals

Many

currently

by defence-

think he should

be a starter, and with good reason. His one-time shot from the point on the power play is amazing. He’ll fit

someone gets hurt. The team has their first game on The against Italy. Feb. 15 in great if

Olympics open Feb. 10

in Italy.


Page 14

— SPOKE, January

16,

Sports

2006

Canadian Juniors home

National young guns win on By BRENT

GERHART

Once again Canada rang in the new year as champions of the junior

hockey world. But, unlike

Team

WJHC

While under-20 tournament. Toronto Maple Leafs goaltending

players like the often-called “best

prospect Justin Pogge was not

player in the world outside of the

the

last

NHL,” Evgeni Malkin and

considered a

had Ru.ssia and

was not favoured to win the World Junior Hockey Champion (WJHC). dominating the 2005 After

jected No.

WJHC

pools and battle for gold

year.

such

with then 19-year-old stars

Bergeron,

Patrice

as

Carter,

Canada

Corey

Perry,

Jeff

I

pick in the 2005

Entry Draft Sidney Crosby,

Canada was forced

NHL Team

to reload.

the pro-

selection in the

2006

the

summer

at

camp and long shot to make

evaluation

team prior

to

the

2005-’06

ward Steve Downie quit the Windsor Spitfires, was traded to Peterborough

the

both countries were pre-

Calgary Hitmen of the Western

it

dicted to dominate their respective

Hockey League (WHL) and December selection camp showing made him a lock for starting goaltender. Perhaps there was

the

final.

With defenceman being

the

lone

Cam

Barker

player returnee,

second-year head coach Brent Sutter and Team Canada brought forward 21 fresh, new faces to the

only one other selection that gained more publicity. After coming under fire for an early season hazing incident, for-

he

Americans with an empty net game-winning goal and went undefeated throughout the round robin portion of the tournament and earned a berth

Team

helped give Canadian hockey into tears of joy.

in

turn the

“black-eye”

ever-publicized

season, his 22-5 record with the

Initially,

made

Petes,

Team Canada and helped

Entry Draft pick Phil Kessel.

Dion Phaneuf

and captain Mike Richards as well as the No.

NHL

1

tournament history

ice for the third time in

the United States boasting talented

The 2006

once again

strike gold

However, he did not do

alone. Instantly, captain

Kyle Chipchura

the

tournament

underdog Canadians

to a convinc-

(forward)

led

Team

ing 5-1 victory over

Finland

and did not look back. With a little from Team Switzerland

earlier help

(who

tied

defeated

USA

the

Canada

2-2),

heavily

favoured

in the semifinals.

USA’s

was

failure

Canada’s gain as the U.S. faced Team Russia in the other semifinal, a matchup which many predicted

would take place

the

in

Russia scored four goals third period to defeat Team

finals. in

the

USA 5-

and coast into the finals. Canada’s semifinal game was against a familiar foe. Although they defeated the Finns 4-0, it was 1

not

defenceman

until

Kris

Team momentum.

Russell’s heads up play gave

PERFORMANCE ANXIETY GROUP

Canada

the

full

Russell skated to join a rush and

made

2-on-2 into a 3-on-2, a pass from forward Dustin Boyd and then put the puck between Finnish goaltender Tuuka Rask’s legs for what was eventuala

accepted

game-winning goal. Forwards Blake Comeau and Andrew Cogliano and defenceman Kris Letang also scored. Pogge made 19 saves for his second ly the

shutout of the tournament.

Canadian fans packed the sold Place in Vancouver to

out

GM

support

Team Canada

WJHC Gold

DO YOU.... © Blank out or struggle on tests? © Avoid/ fear presentations? © Panic while being supervised or evaluated? © Feel anxious when performing in academic

for

the

Medal game and they

were not disappointed. Downie set the tempo of the game less than a minute in by hammering Russian defenceman Denis Bodrov, but he was penalized for neither charging. However, Downie nor Team Canada slowed down. With less than three minutes left in the period, Russia allowed Downie to redeem himself as he skated out from behind the net untouched, and slid a shot Anton between goaltender Khudobin’s legs and into the net. Downie’s goal ended up being the game-winner. Comeau added the insurance marker for the second game in a row, forward Michael Blunden added two power-play goals in the second period and Chipchura <-

scored his fourth goal of the tour-

nament

made 35

in the third period.

Pogge

saves for his third shutout

of the tournament.

For the second year in a row, and first back-to-back time since

the

situations?

five in a row (1993-’97), Canada celebrated. Team Canada was World Junior Hockey Champions. Team Canada akso produced two media team all-stars in defenceman Luc Bourdon and forward Steve Downie. Marc Staal was also

winning

JOIN A PERFORMANCE ANXIETY ^ROUP!

named

tournament’s

the

defenceman.

To register bring a copy of your timetable to

STUDENT SERVICES

(2B04) by Mon., Jan.

23'’'^

Comeau

(three

assists) lead

Forward goals

Canada

in

top

Blake

and

four

scoring and

captain Kyle Chipchura and Dustin

Boyd

lead the team in goals (four

each).

The group

4 weeks

will

begin the week of Jan.

(time to be determined

&roup Facilitators

- Keith

30^'*

by student

Martin

&

will

run for

schedules).

d Shawna Bernard

Head coach Brent Sutter also home two prestigious hon-

took

first head coach in Canadian junior hockey history to go 12-0 and also the first to win back-to-back World Junior Hockey Championships. Canada will defend its championship at the 2007 WJHC in Leksand, Mora, Sweden. The puck is scheduled to drop on Dec. 26.

ours, being the


Sports

Hooping

SPOKE, January

16,

— Page 15

2006

up for Canada

it

Conestoga student member of country’s Under-22 team BRANDON WALKER

By i

H

he dribbles the basketball,

S

twice,

once,

She

times.

three

it

medical

heads for the rim. ,Swish.

it

wheels her chair after

.She

A

up.

it

regular

A

recreation

lege's

and

it

at the col-

Katie

centre,

at

all

of that

with doctors.”

Barbara said the physicians who have helped Katie in the past are

ketball.

supportive and proud of her accom-

wheelchair

a

since

Harnock has spent thclast

1

1

birth.

plishments. She said watching the

years

fierce competition

game she loves. This past summer Harnock,

playing the

between teams

incredible.

is

a

“The

best part of (Katie) getting

.second-year business student, spent

together (with other players)

Birmingham, competing for Team Canada in the Under-22 World Junior Wheelchair basketball

competition." just

championships.

level.”

Aug. 4 England

to

14

in

Wheelchair

Basketball

in the

starter at the tour-

"It

was

the first year the

A

sixth

women

out of

12

as a personal fail-

“She’s always been very good at handling a basketball," she said. “She spends a lot of time at it but she does have a natural ability.” Barbara .said Katie was encouraged to try tennis and track but she

Harnock

liked

true

feels they're her fault,

"1 internalize

my

it

part."

Canada was

although her

at

said.

a disadvantage in

The lack of

a national standard

basketball league in Canada, like

one

in

Europe,

and her teammates

left

in

She said Katie’s

Harnock

said.

well at

rational cards

all,”

"The other teams

never

played against each other. were sort of thrown in there not

she

all

i.sn't

(Photo by Kevin Bogetti-Smith, Bogettl-Smith Photography)

Katie Harnock keeps her eyes on the hoop while driving the lane. Harnock is a second-year business student at Conestoga College who competed for Team Canada in the Under-22 World Junior Wheelchair basketball championships last year and plays in the Canadian Wheelchair Basketball

n

I

late

November Harnock for Team Canada

competed again,

this

time

in

As she fell she passed the ball off to a teammate for an easy basket. The crowd erupted in

women’s senior team, held Colorado.

applause.

the U.S. to

be

the

point

Canada

the

for the in

second behind

The other countries that participated were Mexico and Brazil.

ute (the ball) first

She said she learned a lot from the more experienced players.

ond.”

“Mostly court sense-jhings

when

like

when to roll out when we should push

to set picks,

for a pass or

Harnock said. Basketball has been a major

for a fastbreak.”

of her finished

guard,” she said. “It's to distrib-

and shoot sec-

terrific

holding her back.’” Katie was three years old

they were at the physician's office.

Katie was sitting in her chair while Barbara

physician the best learn to u.se

league.

Olympic qualifying games

is

how

my

When

over by a defender.

job

Katie forget

she said.

1

In the last play before halftime

"My

gets inspi-

.sends them, she

daughter is in a wheelchair, they always say ‘Oh, I'm soiTy.’ And I always reply ‘Don’t be sorry, you should .see the things •she’s able to do. The wheelchair people

Team Canada opened the tournament strong with an easy victory against Turkey, winning 55-34.

I

lets

is,”

“Maggie and

I

questions."

She brought the ball up court, weaving in and out of people. As she got closer to the hoop she put the ball behind her back once, brought it around in front with her other hand and put it behind her back again before getting knocked

Maggie,

“Katie’s a good inspiration for young people. work as a physiotell therapist's assistant and when

knowing what to expect. "When you go in with certain expectations and they aren't fulfilled you always ask the ‘what if

Harnock amazed the audience with an incredible move.

sister,

has been very supportive and inspi-

for a sur-

rational to her.

"We didn't shoot very

better.

times.”

Harnock

prise.

We

team sports

“Our whole family is so proud of what she’s been able to accomplish. It seems like a dream some-

the tournament.

have

two

her

Chris.

to her doctor’s appointment,” Barbara said. “She was dribbling in the hall for a while until the doctor asked her to stop because she was

coaches disagree.

the

Mike and

(it)

champion. Harnock takes the losses personally and

on

a gym. She

in

with

plays

bothering other patients.”

Canada placed

ure

isn’t

She added Katie always has a ball her hand, even dribbling around the house. “Once, she even brought

to play."

teams.

Katie

in

(of competition),"

Under-22 (team) allowed

driveway or Katie

brothers,

nament. "I've been the only girl on a lot of the teams I've played on. (the Birmingham tournament) was just she said.

the

“It’s

playing with a team she’s playing said

a bigger scale

when

Barbara said

league,

playing in Burlington, and was the

woman

is

said.

amazing how much impact is and how intense it is. It gets better and better at every

only female player on her team and the only

Barbara

there

She's a veteran of the Canadian

I

of time

lot

and I’m always

facilities

Harnock doesn't hesitate in challenging anyone to a game of basIn

!

the

her tlaughter can

things

and seeing her perform at such a high level," Barbara said. “She's had about 17 surgeries; some of them were major and some of them were minor. Watching her compete is a lot nicer than appointments

player's favourite sound.

.scoops

Barbara,

amazed by

struck by the contrast ol

with perfect rotation, like a yo-yo,

while

said she’s

do on the court. “Wc’vc spetU a

up in front of her head, keeps it on her fingertips in proper form and fires it. The ball spins smoothly in the air pulls

mom,

arnock's

life for

the past

1

1

part

years.

“Everyone in my family played a team sport,” she said. “Basketball sort of presented it,self. It’s what I grasped quickly. It’s sort of what I was supposed to do. “People always said I had a nat-

mind

for it and a natural abilsoon as 1 picked up the ball knew what to do,” she said. Harnock’s coach, Chris

ural ity, I

as

Chandler, compared her to NBA legend John Stockton. “She’s a true point guard,”

“And

Chandler

said.

He

said

Harnock

is

probably the

best under-22 female player in the

world.

wheel-

way

the

for her to

it.

Barbara and the physician looked away for a second and Katie was gone; they found her down the hall.

“The chair really is a part of her body and if you apply it to a sport, amazing things happen,” said Barbara.

She

she’s got the best ball han-

dling skills I’ve'ever seen.”

first

was asking

said Katie

is

aiming to play Olympics

basketball in the Beijing in

2008 and

after that

maybe

she’ll

play professionally in Europe.


Page 16

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; SPOKE, January

16,

2006

WED.

limnST 25TH

DOORS OPEN AT 9PM

19

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students INC

I


Digital Edition - January 16, 2006