Issuu on Google+

.

Time to recycle that holiday cheer Christmas trees can be reused as nesting places for birds or turned into

wood

Monday, January

9,

chips.

Opportunities galore Conestoga and Wilfrid Laurier University offer another graduate program together.

Spoke A

learning

newsroom

for

Practise

makes

perfect

Nursing students use

journalism students

to gain

hands-on

life-like

simulators

piinir'ai

2006

Student centre construction

gear

in full By JANET MORRIS

h

is

squaic Construction of the new student at the college is on schedule, with the opening still planned

ol

in

lor

Dusick,

general

the

said

Judy of

manager

Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI). Dusick said the college and CSI are committed to bringing the student centre in on time in order to

,n,

A heady surprise from

.

provide services to students that will ultimately a.ssist in their success.

Hedtev

“For the entire college communiit will mean a fresh look at meeting the needs of students,” said Dusick. “The college exists to provide learning and career opporty,

T"'"®

ent Anioniak witr,„ Ji

New CSA

Hedlay

with

to

pres-

tunities

president says

will

for

students,

this

eentre

be the hub of that.”

<&ltor

combinalion of 12,000 led ol new space and

approximately 16,000 .square feel renovated space. Dusiek said people involved

centre

September 2006. “Wc'rc on time,"

a

project

weie

is at its midpoint nioniiis» woio Jspoiit

bit

October 2004

optimistie

about

the

for construction

but

the project

is still on schedule. At this point, it is where we expected it to be,” she said. "We’ll have to be aware that delays can occur due to weather and other unforeseen events with a project of this magnitude.”

She in a

said this project

is

innovative

number of ways.

“It’s the first such ‘partnership’ in the province between a college and a student association. That's

groundbreaking on

The

project

a

starting date

since

its

own.”

a difficult one to work with, said Dusick. site is

vv«,:'ro ''building a ’builcling; inside a building’ it means that this project is significantly different ,

he’ll By MELISSA

“We

strongly

deterred

believe

that

should

difference

Last year, Jackson said, both the CSA and CSl were highly involved

HANCOCK

citizen

(Ontario)

make a no be

from a post-secondary

new

education system,” said the president of the College Student

with the post-secondary education review and contributed to the $6.2 billion that

was invested

in

post-

secondary education by attending the meetings,

making recommen-

Matt Jackson, also the vice-presi-

dations and having a strong voice. “(The CSA) works well with the

dent of Conestoga Students Inc. (CSl) and a third-year business

government,” he said. “There is a respect between the two groups.

Alliance (CSA).

management student

at

Conestoga

College, said he is looking forward to working with Ontario students

governments student and improve the college system.

The

CSA

is

16

times federal, government. With the recent announcement

from the McGuinty government about a tuition thaw in 2006, Jackson said students have an idea of what the cost of tuition should be and the CSA is going to work with the government on a plan. He said he and the CSA want to see tuition capped at the rate of inflation.

Jackson's positions with CSI and

housed

ning.

Staff, currently

Falconer was also president of CSA at the same time and a

Dusick said concrete pouring will begin approximately Dec. 20

along the corridor between Door 3 and Door 4, will be relocated dur-

article written in

and continue to early April. “During that time frame there will also be work in the mechani-

ing renovations.

Last year, CSI president Justin

November 2004

Falconer was doing CSA work on CSl time and money. The CSI president s annual salary is more than $36,000.

Spoke

stated

that

does take timemanagement skills, but said he has total confidence that he can mainJackson said

it

in

offices

There will be an outside corridor people to move from one

built for

cal/electrical sub-trades,” she said.

side of the construction site to the

The addition will be built in the B-wing hallway between Door 3

other.

and Door

4,

extending behind

Room 2A101

“Dust, noise and activity will be seen around the campus during summer months,” said Dusick.

said he plans to run for

CSl

are voluntary but, he said,

all Ontario students belonging to the alliance fund it through part of the annual $90

association,

Matt Jackson

association fee.

Jackson said he has always been interested in politics and has a

Last year, students paid $1.89 per year to CSA out of that fee, but this

broad understanding of how things work, which made him a good

year

presidential candidate for

“Our voice most

active in

lege students,” he said. When asked what he had to offer to Ontario students that no other president has, he replied. “The passion - not that no one else has

CSA

-

but I’m determined to year one that will be

ever had

he does not have another part-time job because his passion is working

remembered.”

on behalf of the students.

ommends never

CSA.

probably one of the the province for col-

is

he receives a monthly honourarium as vice-president of CSl. He said

“As students, there’s enough (money).” he said.

Interior renovations will begin the winter semester ends.

when

“There is a lot more outside the view of Conestoga College and what I get from CSA 1 can give back to CSI,” he said. Because the CSA is a non-profit

colleges,

and more than 1(X),(X)0 students, speaking as the voice of the students to the provincial, and some-

CSA

this site before.”

president next year.

including Conestoga, 23 councils

the

Strong colleges.”

He

to

a non-profit associa-

represents

“Strong smdents. Strong leadership.

than any that have been done on

tain a balance.

tion that represents student-governing councils at Ontario colleges.

CSA

cussing the floor plan. The drawings are complete including the electrical, mechanical, architectural and civil pieces of work. The tender process is underway, and the site work is begin-

make

it

this

Jackson also said he strongly recthat students get involved

whenever possible because, as

CSA’s

mission

statement

the

says.

year. it has gone up to $5 per “With the $1 .89 per year we were performing, but just getting by, he paying said. “Now (with students

$2.50 per semester)

we

are

at

a

respectable operating level to better service students.”

Jackson said the

skills

and knowl-

edge he gets from CSA contribute to what he learns in the classroom and vice versa. He said he has even considered politics as a future career. For now, he said, “We have the

We’re leaving a lasting legacy behind and we’re not going anywhere. We’ll be

attention of the government.

here.”

(Photo by Tiffany McCormick)

A

memorial to remember

the lives of 14 women in 1989, students had Montreal killed at L’ecole Polytechnique in designed by the posters and buttons the opportunity to purchase law second-year a Peebles, Russ students. arts college’s graphic locatadministration student, stopped by the display

At the memorial displays to

commemorate

and security of the massacre. The ed at Door 5. “It’s a major tragedy,” he said $200 from the sale than more Women’s Resource Group raised yet. year best their of buttons and posters


Page 2

— SPOKE, January

News

2006

9,

Now deep thoughts Conestoga College

...with Random

questions answered by

What

College’s enrolment

the strangest

is

random

students

New Year’s

resolution you’ve ever

down

is

By VANESSA PARKER

made?

Conestoga’s overall enrolment

down

1

is

vice-president of

governors an admission update that

down

“To stop mounting photos

showed enrolment

and magazine ads on foam

year, but over the last three years

graphic

It’s

design craziness.” Cristina Copil,

Conestoga has two per cent. Conestoga is

is

this

still

one of the top

second-year

to

ing.

This

pete with the colleges.

decade

According to Tibbits another way enrolment is to recruit students at a micro level.

funding from the federal govern-

“If

enrolment

smoking Bill

move on

to

.5

is

per cent

down

cigars, just like

“Some

1.2

Sayed

second-year accounting

“Every year

make any

I

resolve not to

resolutions

dents with under a 75 per cent aver-

is

age,” said Tibbits.

under more pressure because

boom. in the

num-

to

another

you

offer

they will come,

it

adding the coFlege needs to be

is

in trying to attract

attract

there

is

and retain very good

a

significant

is

growth of

spaces in universities in Ontario. “Generally, the

universities

are

lowering admission rates and

try-

who would

ing to recruit students

it

now

is

a

more com-

Another item discussed was

1

years ago.

Edith Torbay,

Conestoga’s

president

John

opment

at

development, which included new

course offered

behavioural

what

on dealing

is

issues

the

in

Torbay said one major reason students differ reliant

on

“Students are

now

they are

is

their parents.

now more

willingly

to take direction

from

they’re not as

independent when

get

the

to

their parents,

college,”

.said

also said the high school cur-

Torbay.

“They’re not always

riculum has skewed everyone towards university and there are students who might have tradition-

starters,

problem solvers or good

gone

ally

are

now

to college in the past but

in

a curriculum where they

are not gaining the skills to

come

to

“The curriculum

is

better but the

.self-

decision-makers because they have not

had

to

do these kinds of

things.”

Tibbits said there are

room management

“Now we have

college.

more

class-

issues now.

how to how

courses on

deal with bad behaviour and

he

“The

col-

standards are lower,” said Tibbits.

to discipline,”

“Some

lege just had a sexual harassment

universities are taking stu-

dents in with a 60 per cent aver-

case last

age.”

dent.”

Tibbits does not believe that

all

said.

week dealing with

Tibbits said

a stu-

more than 50 per

cent

in post-

universities are “trollers.”

of the population takes part

what the University of and the University of Waterloo are doing by not lowering

now as education secondary opposed to 10 per cent 30 years ago. “This is not because people arc

“I respect

Guelph their

intake

standards,

but

other

down

into

a pool of students that don’t belong

more focus on apprenticeship programs. “The apprenticeship

programs,” he said. business

Tibbits

diploma

informed the board that

in the last

the bag,” said Tibbits.

that

are available to faculty and staff.

they

in

is in

Conestoga, presented a

report on Conestoga’s professional

with

Tibbits said the college needs to

put

chair of quality

One

more dropouts.”

He

rea-

why college students arc different now then they were 0 to 20

government

previous

universities are reaching

petitive business.”

Tim Bobwai,

far

apprenticeship

for

and existing funded courses

they did was create a system with

confident that Conestoga

be aware that

broadcasting

infrastructure

programs.

said Tibbits. “Unfortunately,

have traditionally come to college,” said Dinning. “Conestoga has to

first-year

was so significant Conestoga has been struggling to fund expanding said this

school.

post-secondary

this.”

because

more

said

“We’ve

Tibbits.

been pushing for

high school standards, and tried to change the curriculum to fix this,”

is

a big, big thing for the said

nent in recruiting students that apply to the college after high

students but, he said one problem

freaky porn.”

is

why

can

“To stop looking at

“This

college,”

ing difficulties in Ontario with the

that the website is a crucial

this

for training infrastruc-

new high school causing some problems.

“The

and means

Bentley,

ture.

compo-

.sy.stem is

Chris

according to Bentley,

classroom.

He

foundations

Education,

changed the system, with the best intentions, because they were hav-

perspective students to the campus.

second-year police

have been allowed

quickly.”

Tibbits says the

to

more aggressive

Adam McGough,

for skills training.

and a full-time faculty update and maintain Conestoga’s website. All of the board members agreed recruiter

said,

“To stop sniffing glue.”

aware

grow so

theory-based bachelor of arts In

other

getting smarter;

more people

are

participating and lower standards are the result,” he said. “I

would argue

that the literacy

and numeracy skills on average are lower now. Before, less people

would get

this far in school.”

/I VISION PROBLEMS

RECOGNIZE THE “To stop kissing

lots

vision^

^rtkulaHy' in one €>« of double vUi<m

my

SIGNS OF STROKE

boyfriend.”

Lorena Lopez, second-year office

Sudden

wraduicts,

linking

numbness and/or arm or I'K

in the Itce.

administration executive

HEART

AND STROKE /l TROUBLE SPEAKING

FOUNDATION

Tcmpofiry Iom of tpccch or (rouble urtdmianding tpeech

Seek Immediate j

r

)

1

,1

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent

a

assurance and professional devel-

“The Minister of Education is that it is a huge public policy

that universities

mentally no longer applies,” he

support worker

Ontario universi-

have been allowed to grow

lege.

“If

personal

to Tibbits, in the last

five to eight years ties

in

Ontario has received

sons

offered the board a enrolment plan to recruit students and keep them at the col-

of high school.

Liz Bechtloff, first-year

it’s

quickly,” he said.

year enrolment.

first

is

built.”

According in

more competitive now and there is a declining number of students traditionally coming out

I

“The system

over

schooling

have had great success in keeping that.”

every year

stu-

to

the first time

is

that

Tibbits talked to the Minister of

He

have gone

universities

province to recover from the dou-

Dinning

and

with

accepting students

are

an adjustment occurring across the

member

Ashraf,

Ontario universi-

that

ment

Ontario for skilled train-

more money

this year.

and reached down, accepting

He proposed adding

Clinton.”

is

lower grade averages.

is

College

Dinning

could

could

Tibbits agreed with Dinning that

up

Mohawk

strategic

I

was down

the college

we

calls

3 students that

1

Fanshawe College

Ontario had a decrease

so

1

ties

Fourteen out of 24 colleges

“To give up cigarettes,

we made more

much change.

ber of

is

to increase

petition has not seen

ble cohort

financial planning

come

one area universities cannot com-

a reason for Conestoga’s drop in

enrolment.

Dinning said it is important keep it in context and that there

Ryan Strome,

1,000 stu-

in this area.”

have had those

per cent.

Club.”

dents

a growth of

.seen

Conestoga’s geographical com-

and

“To join the Polar Bear

was signed with the federal government ensuring more money would

three Ontario colleges for net gain in

second-year graphic design

10 years a labour force agreement

will easily see another

Tibbits told the board that this

student affairs, gave the board of

core board.

“In five to seven years the college

.88 per cent for 2005.

Mike Dinning,

slightly

/

DIZZINESS

Unsteadiness or sudden falls, any of the abo>e signs

especially wirh

medical attention If you have any of these symptoms.


News

BA

program

As Conestoga College and Wilfrid (WLU) have

at

Brantford's

WLU

employers.”

prospective

Brantford. in

WLU

organizational

leader-

students

well,

Horton

tunities for

neously pursue the Conestoga cer-

“Our agreement should

tificate.

give students a definite

Brantford's organizational

College, and Susan

The

latest

Those

in

president of academies

leader-

advantage with

at

to

news

a

release,

human resources management program, who meet

graduates of the

Laurier academic

Wilfrid

she

news

rclea.se,

Horton said

of academics,

Conestoga

and

Our agreement should

tion.

arc

college's In the same “The need to

give

students a definite advantage with

the

release.

Burns

said,

establish links with

around

universities

us

-

ADAM HANNON

alumni relations and annual fund officer at the college. “People have

At ties

this

many

time of year,

She

college

the

has

been

more money each year. “We've had a very encouraging response,” said Himmelman. Ingrid Town, executive director

for donations.

raising

isn't

any

dif-

It has an annual fund, which development and alumni relations department raises money for, and then distributes to worthy proj-

CONESTOGA

ferent.

the

Connect

Ltle

and Learning

of development and alumni relations for the college, said a lot of

donations are

tions to the college.

ects.

Every year for the past three years, the development and alumni relations

.said

has

office

brochures and

letters

time employees encouraging them

at

to

the

expanded

college,

mally,” said

make dona-

at this

time of

year.

to include mailing those

"Prior to that,

made

She added that donors receive a tax credit of up to 45 per cent on any donations they make.

eampaign was

People can make donations of money, or by giving gifts in kind, such as equipment, to the college.

grads, as well as current faculty.

full-

all

the

brochures to about 37,000 1970s

out

sent to

This year,

people gave infor-

Monica Himmelman,

is

one of the

programs

This yea,. ,he Bo,a,y Ciub the Rotary Youth

o,

Cam^^

have

o1

rary studies.

raised

with

the

annual fund has been directed to

Town.

“If there’s an urgent need

new

boiler, it ean cover that, can go to bursaries, it’s wherever that money is most needed.” She said people can also specify

for a

or

it

what they want their contributions to be used for, such as the purchasing of new equipment, or for a cerdepartment. donors have the choice of being named in the annual donor report, which appears in the June issue of Connections, the magazine tain

All

produced by the development and alumni relations office.

man who lives in a home recently donat-

said a

Conestoga This past summer, a grads to graduate challenged other Tim college. the to give back graduated from the

Kingsbury business

resources.

.

people rYLA enables young

toV between generatio and to bridge the gap

The

residential

program

will

good cU.erfs. develop leaders and

-

®

^

^3

administration-materials

and operational

explore topics o1

management

gram in 1982. In 2005 he received

the

pro-

Alumnus

Award. of Distinction $100 to Kingsbury is donating year for the nex the college every

other he challenged 20 years, and

2 (^ 6 AH expenses,

contempo-

in

swing

in full

lege.

to get

WLU BA

towards a

money

agreement was signed

and general arts and sciences from Conestoga to apply for advanced standing

anally nioc»£>»y

is

initial

February, which allows gradu-

ates of journalism

because he appreciates the help he receives from personal care workcolers who graduated from the

18-24 years Tatented young people

agThave’ a

to

in

or university degree.

local nursing

Youth LoadorshlD Award

resources

which requires students

Town

Rotsirv

temporary resources.

our highest priority needs,” said

always been supportive.”

chari-

and organizations begin asking

Conestoga College

understanding of historical and con-

is

already obtained a college diploma

“The

organizational

lytical and communication skills, combined with investigation and

post-graduate

College’s annual fundraiser By

human

Brantford's

a starting

collaboration

management program

pleased with the agreement.

is

is

WLU

The

Conestoga's

and

leadership program emphasizes ana-

laboration.

Wilfrid Laurier

establishing reputations for innova-

stan-

will

'ice-president

recruitment

ment.

kx)king forward to this further colI

"Laurier

be able to seek advanced standing in the honours dards,

the

In

it

further

for

skills in

including

field,

the

between the two schools, and he

Susan Horton,

Wilfrid

Laurier.

According

point

resources

selection and training and develop-

pleased about

agreement becau.se

prospective employers.”

Conestoga

human

labour relations,

our students.”

he's

said

ness,

Horton, vice-

of academics

president

gram

at

the

Frank Mensink, the dean of Conestoga College's .school of busi-

attendance to sign the

agreement were David Bums, vice-

honours baccalaureate pro-

ship

— Page 3

The program focuses on

and

important

very

a

is

step for Conestoga, opening oppor-

agreement affects students in Conestoga's human resources management graduate ecrtincatc program and in WLU

struck another deal.

Guelph

Waterloo,

Laurier,

McMaster -

said.

ship program will be able to simulta-

Laurier University

2006

9,

and Conestoga team up

Laurier By JASON SONSER

SPOKE, January

(Photo by Adam HannonJ director Ingrid Town, executive of development and alumni relations for tne college, says donations are directed to

urgent needs.

He

said he

would make an addi-

donation to Conestoga for every other donation pledged. Kingsbury said if every graduate made this type of pledge, it would college $4.5 million a year

tional

give the funding. in additional funding “With this type of stable able to plan Conestoga would be and continue to profor the future technology and up-to-date the vide students, so that they tools for our

tomorrow

for are well equipped

workplace,” he

said.

same. grads to do the

.

CLASSIFIEDS The program

* .

includes;

r—

e

board

i”

pSations and discussions on

activities. structured recreational

.

Fellowship

,oS’'pa«icipan.

in

outstanding leadership issued by

.

daily

RYLA

for

committees; ooeration of several

PennsyivTnra^U^AcLe^

newsletter.

SfS' Wa,e« vv«f Cratts, oaiiiiiy,

.,3,ningando-ganirationa,d.e.^^^^^^^^^

pni Drivers wait

Why not consider P®tt'C'pat'ng can be January 15-. and

from Leanne no can be picked up 03 ONNEX) or Coordinator in 1C29.

due

exchange

1-519-625-1205

Northeast a

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and Offering free room baby-sitting S 6 rvic 6 s. Please contact Karen

student Life Website Brown. Student Life

.

^SjlhLfre.injer^ew^

Journey

l®fder=Wp The next step in your away. application an could be just

staff

T^atre, Radio, Video, ^ mor r n’q for our and .

le-mail ;

info@campwayne.cor^

.

.

s


Page 4

— SPOKE, January

What

Commentary

2006

9,

be

will

2005’s legacy? 100 years, what will people see when they look back on the year

In

2005?

They might see

the kindness and generosity of strangers that

was

sparked by hurricane Katrina tearing through Mexico and the southern

United States

in late

August.

They might read an obituary of Peter Jennings, the much-loved Canadian-born reporter for ABC News, who died from cancer on Aug. 7.

Maybe

they'd watch old television footage of the 25th anniversary of

Fox

the Terry

honour of and named for a young man

run, an event in

Columbia who vowed to raise $1 from in Canada, which was about 24 million people British

marathon of hope exceeded

for every person living at the time.

His original

his goal.

more likely to focus on the negwar and destruction by man and

Unfortunately, future generations are ative events of

2005

-

the death,

nature.

more than 1,000 people

Last year saw multiple hurricanes, killing

during Katrina alone and an earthquake

Pakistan

in

in

early October,

more than 86,000 people. The U.S.-led war in Iraq continued with no end in sight. The war is supported by a decreasing number of U.S. citizens, many polls reported. Civil unrest among thousands of youths due to economic and political distemper in France sparked violent riots with police from Paris killing

and neighbouring countries

at the

Many

beginning of November.

youths were of French Muslim background and the

riots,

Ignoring the gore

of the

more than two weeks, originated in a poor suburb of Paris two teenagers there. The Liberal's minority government was toppled by a non-confidence vote in late November. On Jan. 23, 2006 voters will head to the polls to after the deaths of

many

government. Canadians are frustrated, hearing

of the same arguments from the

We fumed

new Xbox

However,

all that glitters isn't

many of us

360,

gold, as

But when

came

it

gamers found out

after dis-

covering the Microsoft system had technical flaws. What lies ahead for 2006? At this rale, almost anything. Here’s hoping we've learned something not

It's

OK

and only pitch

to sit idle

money

Millions of people donated

to

when

the

have to look closer

meaningful ways,

We

like

our

at

media says

to.

contribute in

most important

for

It

isn’t

wealth, possessions or

who emerges

is

the

winner.

tion

is

are

by nature

in humankind for all time: compassion, some form of legacy behind. Let’s leave a peace, not waging a war of hate.

Society

images

disturbed by the news

is

and

hears

is

that are

outraged by the

shown.

are too violent, they are too

have the

final

I

starless

midnight of racism and

daybreak of peace and brotherhood can never

believe

unarmed

truth

and unconditional love will

word.”

vic-

tim of a street shooting in a body

TV

or a newspaper doesn’t

We

don’t see the

of a car

the tool for a

bombing.

aerial shot of a 30-car pile

the 401

is

that

An

up on

boring.

ing pain.

It’s

always seen.

something we have

Some may

argue that

to put

yourself in the place of his friends

ignition

sui-

random shootings

cide bombings,

and torturous murders

after

in the

having that third

beer?

That would, by

the air-

fill

far,

be a better

more evolved

reaction

than the “entertainment” of the

channel

Middle Ages?

because the images are boring.

Is this really

think

it’s fair

we can

say

gruesome

we

we have

to say that

evolved, but only a are

sights

little bit.

ashamed of

we

see

in

turning

or

where

information through

changing technology

mation

outrage over

the

images really

lies.

These

disturb

a

peaceful

numb

it

is

to

light,

suck

it

it’s

ever-

infor-

time

up, and

for

come

Don’t

tell

the

media

to stop print-

ing and showing violent images.

easier and

Instead,

go out and stop

the vio-

lence from happening.

rather than to feel.

of Conestoga College

Editor: Paige Hilton

letters to the

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be contacted

Spoke Online

Advertising Manager: Janet Morris Production Managers: Steph Baulk,

Editor:

Circulation Manager:

Brent Gerhart

Jason Sonser

Melissa Hancock

Jon Yaneff

for verification.

Photo Editors: Chantelle Timperley, Mike

be published. Letters should be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter

Bors, Denise Muller

letters will

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

for publication.

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

N2G 4M4

,

Dr.,

Web site:

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed: a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.

to

in the

world.

the viewer to react. But

in today’s society

safer to be

run-

bringing

is

terms with what’s going on

sleep and are etched in our minds.

They cause

to

humanity

images churn stomachs and break

They

is

new and

the

the

more and more images and

That’s

page

the

ning rampant and the spread of

news.

these

than just changing the

At a time when voyeurism

Now

Is published and produced weekly by the Journalism students

editor. Letters

No unsigned

coroner

Spoke

welcome

Spoke welcomes

the

twice before turning the keys

hearts.

We see blood, guts and excruciat-

today’s .society has evolved greatly

Letters are

before

an after-school special.

I

However, seeing a teenaged

street

and family? Aren't we supposed to think

waves.

gory and there are too many close-

became

refuse to accept the view that

the

from our darker past when watching a bear take on a dog was dinner theatre and a public execution was But have we really? Today,

everyday occurrence.

legacy of striving for

reality.

to

unbalance. People are

the

remains

become

sci-

way

ence, the universe finds a

anymore.

that the bright

Opinion

in

charred

war

turn.

came? Aren’t you supposed

affect us

As Martin Luther King Jr. said, “1 mankind is so tragically bound to the

viewers. Isn’t that the point? Aren’t

you supposed to feel for that teenaged boy who lay bleeding out

superseded by medical

bag on

what has been present

everyday may

to

be, they cause a reaction with their

Muller

violent.

these images that

world where natural selec-

love and the drive to leave

It’s

Denise

most

the

ups of the victim.

be time to gain a new perspective and realize what in life.

In a

They

volunteering our time.

peaceful and logical solutions. it’ll

Humans

it

must be more understanding of those around us and look

In 2006,

hardened soul’s stomach

help Katrina victims. But

own neighbourhoods and

make even

that

becoming more violent, guns more prevalent and brutal murders an

tragedies happen everyday, in everyone’s communities.

We

media

offset

in the past year. in

more and more

violent images are appearing in the

to

eagerly lined

As horrific as we are exposed

and

In a time of desensitization

sensationalism,

rather recent, federal election.

after the price of fuel skyrocketed.

shelling out big bucks for the up.

last,

your wishes come true.

all

which con-

tinued for

elect the next federal

happy, safe and

May your new year be


Nfews

Breathing better By CHANTELLETIMPERLEY months of u inpeople with asthma might Ihul

their eomlition worsens.

some

solutions to h ^'Ip >ou

hreathe bettei.

In Iho cold, bitter ter.

there are

in

No

worries.

eold air

is

one of the

triggers for asth-

ma and

that a basic •asic exercise to pracnracbreathing through the nose.

"Breathing through their nose ters the air aiul

humidillios

"One

wanms

as

It

it

it

goes

thing people- can

late their

li\

i

ng c|uaners

...i.i " -r. he said. fherc's no cure for asihm; a according to traditional medicines. Bureau saiti orthodox remedies,

fil-

up.

and also

such

in."

he said.

inhalenis.

do

is

as

to get rid ol

Asthma

a

is

ilisease

in

lot ol

to

environmental problems, sueh as dust and pollen, and afso by malfunctions of the body. A eonstrielon ol the muscles that control the size of the airways restrict air

in

flow

in

and mucus washes out the substances causing the body to overreact.

Asthma

is

measured by grades of

severity. Some people may just have a slight wheeze, while others may have constrietion to the point of being unable to breathe. Buieau said studies have shown that

people do not grow out of a.sththat regardless of the

ma, and

help

in

symptoms seeming asthmatics rely on inhalers

when experieS'"’'’*'

difficulties, learning controlled breathing patterns can the colder weather when breathing ie is difficult.

can flare up again

to disappear,

what

it

oral

risk."

Buieau

said

one

thing

he

encourages patients

to do is pracbreathing exercises as effectively as possible to reduce the tise

irritants

entering

their ir

systems, Performing certain breathing teehnic liques w'hile having an asthma attack can reduce the attack by controlling the amount of oxy

also

reeommended a the Bowen

called

IcLlinique, which relea.scs the

is a therapy that body's energy to heal

using gentle rolling move-

ments over the surface of the skin with thumbs and forefingers.

Accoiding

to

www.bowenasth-

maresearch.co.uk. 83 per cent of patients

experience ess asthma 75 per cent reported using less medication after receivI

attacks and

Bowen treatments. Studies on the effectiveness of chiropractic care show that nearly 77 per cent ol patients suffering from

bronchial asthma say bcnellted from the treatment Some signs that you may

they

have

asthma are shortness of breath, wheezing. rapid breathing and tightness in the chest.

campaign a go winter semester

it

for

By TIFFANY MCCORMICK

is."

week before those

The Women’s Resource Group go ahead with plans to hold a T-shirt campaign for this semester. It will infuse some life into the will

"

ATTENTION

Bureau ircatment

T-shirt

,

for

loss in

"Some

ling their asthma are actually exposing themselves to hioher

in the future.

it

those can produce a

W'omcn." said remedies are ineffective for asthma and people taking them in a hope of control-

"When you have asthma you have to deal with

controlled breath in

Itself,

ol

bone

Bureau.

is

nerve activity production, which

some

— Page 5

ing

and out of the lungs. There

also an increase

insomnia.

Some

believed to be caused by exposure

While

2006

gen and carbon dioxide in the blood. It is performed by holding your breath a while and I'cleasing the nr, and is called

tierosol

control

nausea and

the

that

and

iv)

include inerea.sed blood pre.ssure, thy mouth, weight gain,

things

might have been trapped warmer months.”

work

the but that thci'e are sidc to ihe mctlication that

cflecls

borne irritants, such as smoke and fumes, and get rid of dust and that

steroid;s

symptoms,

x'enli-

ail

breathing

9,

the cold for asthma sufferers tise is

Di. .lohn Bureau, a ehiiopractor at Aeti\e Health ('are in Waterloo, said

SPOKE, January

said student

halls,

tor

life

co-ordina-

Leanne Holland Brown.

The idea

for

the project was Wilfrid Laurier’s

by

inspired

dales. All students are invited to participate and design a T-shirt at no cost. The idea was first introduced as a contest. Each year the Women’s

Resource Group holds a competipromote amiviolence. Past contests have been a poster, photography or literary piece, and a cash reward was awarded to the winning students. tion for students to

.

STUDENTS FROM ANOTHER CULTURE

Clothes Line Project that was developccl by a coalition ot' women on

WOULD YOU LIKE TO HAVE SOMEONE TO

Cape Cod, Mass, in 1990. The idea was adapted after one of the coalition members saw the AIDS quiilt. SIto wanted to develop

a person’.s per.speclive of whtit antirclation.ship healthy violence or a niean.s to them. That decision will

a visual way to promote anti-violence toward women. Currently there are 500 projects nationally and internationally.

be re-evaluated next semester.

PRACTICE YOUR CONVERSATIONAL ENGLISH WITH??

By designing and hanging

a shirt women are able to tell their story, allow others to see their struggle and turn their back on

problems.

past

women

It

to

suffering

still

allows

also

know

they are not alone. The decision was made at the Tshirt project committee’s December

and

money

the

women’s

be relatively easy for student first run at the be faculty run but she

She said for the it

will

hopes to one day see

be necessary to give participants direction when designing the shirts. Possibilities include healthy rela-

lege-only

empowerment of women and anti-violence towards women.

grow

a priority as the group wants the most visible promotion for this event.

"We want

was

people

to catch

but to

who

notice.

have no choice Holland Brown said. Location ideas include the cafeboth teria and near Tim Hortons, high

traffic areas. In the luture the

group would held

in the

like to see the project

new

student centre. to display the

Members decided T-shirts

on Feb.

14.

A

the designing will ta

te

and 16 so place the

it

student lead.

“There’s more merit and credibildriven," she ity when it's student a said. “Ifs the students creating culture for students.’

location

a

involvement.

offered to pay for 10 of the shirts. The group decided a theme would

A

to

“Whatever comes of it, comes of Magazine said. Prior to the committee meeting. Holland Brown said the Women’s Resource Group is hoping to get students involved and this project

project

tionships,

given

shelter.

it.”

considering purThe group chasing 25 T-shirts and will use of that cost as well as the paint suphas plies. Conestoga Students Inc.

APPLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN STUDENT SERVICES (2B04)

sellor, said she would like to see the shirts auctioned off to students

will

their budget to cover the majority

TO MEET YOU

Looking toward the future, Joan Magazine, Student Services coun-

meeting where issues such as costs,, a theme, supplies, location and specific dates were discussed. is

PEER SERVICES HAS VOLUNTEER PEER CONVERSATION PARTNERS WHO ARE WAITING

However, incixitxer.'i lltiti were uncomfortable witli judging

The

project will begin as a col-

only with event. Conestoga's students, faculty and staff participating, but it could be a community event. with any potential

to

'^“There’s

Brown said. “Who knows what it could grow to be." The purpose of the project will be

event," Holland

to raise

toward

awareness of anti-violence but also to promote

women

healthy relationships and celebrating

women.

Holland Brown said she is really excited about the project. "1 feel anytime we can increase awareness on any issue which results in ties,

more

citizens

moving

positive

communi-

and relationships we

in the right direction.

re


-

Page 6

— SPOKE, January

9,

News

2006

New simulation By TARA RICKER

lab

offer

will

new opportunities

be able to time the contractions and actually deliver a baby.

You're doing great, just one more Congratulations,

big push.

you would

The.se are .sounds

girl!

expeet

ward

hear

to

prised

maternity

the

in

in a hospital,

a

it's

but don't be sur-

you hear them eoming

it'

from the new clinical simulation Conestoga College. The lab is equipped with clinical simulators, which are, anatomically correct computer-run manlab at

The

nequins.

designed

mptoms of

sx

respond

human

simulators

are

signs

and and

exhibit

to

injury or illness

treatment Just

to

as

a

does.

designed for child birth there

will help nursing

become

prepared

better

a

is

second high-tech baby which will allow students to conduct immediate

she

assessments,"

post-natal

baby does not have enough oxygen the lips will actual"If the

said.

ly turn blue." is

the first province to

this

important innovation

Ontario

embrace in

nursing education. It is

part

of the McCuinty govern-

ment's $ 145-million nursing strategy, which aims to improve access

employment opportu-

to full-time nities

"The simulators students

"Besides the baby simulator that is

and

to

enhance working con-

ditions for nurses in Ontario’s hospitals.

The government plans

through hands-on clinical experi-

to build a

system

ence," said Lois Caspar, chair of

better

health sciences nursing programs

delivers on three priorities, provid-

"Once students

college.

the

at

graduate and enter the workforce,

more and

they will be able to respond

all

nurses, keeping Ontarians healthy

and reducing wait times.

the simulators will guar-

students in a registered

lab will not be fully running until

quality patient care.

early this year.

students

to

medical emergencies."

program

nurse

will

witness

the

“We

of a baby and monitor the

birth

and

ing better access to doctors

The new

uncommon antee

that

The college received $600,000 from the government in 2005 for the simulation equipment but the

appropriately

Having

common

health-care

of training faculty on the various

guarantee an experience like that

Beth Stamer, a nurse technologist

“It's

in the lab

goes into labour. The students will

skills to

provide

Beth Stamer, a nurse technologist at Conestoga College, demonstrates how be able to monitor a baby’s heartbeat using equipment similar to hospitals’.

will

coming along and the faculty is showing a lot of dedication towards

Christmas trees are Leftover trees that have not sold

how

equipment.

video camera for each simulator to allow students to review their per-

ing

until the lab is

formance on how they handled and

to notice

running,’’ said

addres.sed different scenarios.

takes

“Allowing students to go back and look at how they handled a cer-

someone

to use the

and we cannot wait completely up and

at the college, said things are really

of the simulators

help practical nursing students gain valuable

a veiy exciting time for us

learning

types of equipment," said Caspar.

now."

One

will

are currently in the process

mother in labour, said Caspar. "The college could not always until

(Photo by Tara Ricker)

simulation lab

clinical

Stamer.

The

lab

also equipped with a

is

tain scenario is an effective learntool,’’

much more else

beneficial then

pointing out

season

generally be put

will

through a chipper and taken to the dump or can be left out to make nesting places for birds By TODD REULINGER Christmas is over and all the decorations have been taken down and put away, but what happens to those

leftover trees that

nobody wanted or

the trees that Just didn’t sell?

How

do vendors know how many trees to buy or cut? And for those that go un.sold, what is their fate?

Do

Christmas

tree

i

A

graveyards real-

ly exist?

We

bring in a transport truck-

full

which

is

about

1

four

season or the three or leading up to

weeks

Christmas.” Last year they had to

go back

to

Georgian Bay and get about 100 more trees because of the demand .sell

I

more.”

Any

trees leftover are usually put through a chipper and then taken to the dump where the city gathers it u.ses

it

for

compost

for the war-

dens, said Robillard. to

Sometimes we take them back Georgian Bay and u,se them on

the ice to guide the -so

snowmobilers they don’t get lost during snow-

storms,” he said.

don’t

know what

will

10 or 15 years (when the old growers are gone).”

grow so

it

much about “It’s in the

aren’t taking over,”

in

in

Waterloo.

to

“In the fields they are

of the old growers are getting out of it and the

happen

is

said.

over for a

lot

young fellows

shop

have less then 30 trees leftover each year, she

to

“However, a

gift

The goal here

while.

lose

still

going

doesn’t matter too

those,” said Demaiter.

pre-cut tree where

we

money.”

The trees that don’t sell make a famous bird roosting spot, she explained.

Benjamin

s leaves the unsold viewing tent on purpose so each year the birds come back and nest there, said Demaiter.

trees in the

“Sometimes we take them back to Georgian Bay and we use them on the ice to guide snowmobilers so they don’t get lost during

Each morning a flock comes flying out of the

tent.

“One year my

.son took the leftover trees to his paintball field and

made

barricades with them,” she “If it’s not one of those options then we take them down said.

snowstorms.” Neilson Robillard,

more

bring more,” he said. Last year we sold out around the 20th of December and we were too far away to go and cut some

and

farm and

to

wc knew we could

we would

JSfew Tillsonburg,” said Heather Demaiter, from the Benjamin tree

,

Robillard said he doesn’t think artificial trees will take

for fresh cut trees.

“If

^

,200 trees

each year,” said Neilson Robillard, owner of a tree lot on Bridgeport Road in Waterloo. “The trees usually last the

cut

It

load

*

industry, he said

he said.

s a toss-up to predict how many fresh cut trees will be sold each year.

f

few people come .]n and have had enough of artificial trees and want to go back to the real tree which is great for the fresh

tree lot

the recycling pile and let there.”

owner

them

rot

Waterloo Region has a recyprogram, where the city comes around and takes the trees cling

It’s not easy for local tree farmers cither; they face similar problems

as the farmers from out of town. The local tree farms have Just as much of a guessing game as to how

many

trees they

need to cut for the

season.

And, they have

many

to estimate

how

specialty trees to purchase from other farms.

“We

get our trees from Nova Scotia, Georgian Bay, Barrie and

to

the

regional

landfill

to

be

mulched.

Then in the spring, the city gives mulch away for free, said

that

Demaiter. Artificial

trees

competition,” she tree growers.”

“Benjamin’s ever and

we

is

are

.said.

still

our main “Not other as bu.sy as

never experience an

overload of unwanted trees,” said Demaiter.

A Benjamin

their

mistakes for them.’’

useful after the festive

still

is

she said. “Allowing them their mis-

and pick up on

tree farm employee uses the automSto^eeth™ remove loose needles before the family fakes feco

“o


News

SPOKE, January

9,

2006

— Page 7

Weathering the storm By TIM GEDCKE We’ve

experienced

all

comes with

living

in

year business administration-man-

it.

just

It

the

great

white north: bad weather, horrible driving conditions and being late

agement studies student. Bad weather ilocs not students to allects

aged close

"I

40 centimetres of snow per month from December to

(Internet photo)

The Canadian Public Health Association has launched a website to try to get people more involved in stopping pot smoking while driving. This image of two airline pilots smoking a joint is on the

will

affect

samples

salvia mo.si people ihink of

ing under the intluence

iv-

(DUl) they

think of drinking and driving.

often what's overlooked

But

smoking beeoming

is

pot and driving, a

tli

whieh is growing problem in Canada. Aeeording to the Canadian

Puhlie Health A.ssociation

use

paign.

One

many of

these users get behind the

real

concern

is

how

ner, “If

to the

same dangerous

alcohol and driving. Sylvia Fanjoy, the

It

leads

results as

director of

the national programs for

CPHA,

to amend said they’re attempting section of the driving impaired the offiCriminal Code to allow police

cers

to

do

a

standardized

field

a driver they feel

On it

why does

wheel and drive. All around the country drinking and driving is seen as morally wrong because of But its dangerous consequences. why is .smoking pot and driving seen as more acceptable?

if

the

to

combat

a

little

safer

friends

who

into school for the day.

iiiorc

normally

a

which

20-minutc

Jeff Livingstone,

method

students

make

leave

their

to school

“If

car

as

"It

the

it’s

drive

to

an

hour earlier

in

took

first

scary.”

a .second-year

for

deciding

whether

to

the trip to school or not. I

is

1

if

I

can’t

won’t come,” he said. “If it’s bad I’ll still come, but if it’s that bad won’t risk it. 1 would leave about half an hour sooner just in case there is bad traffic or an accident or something.”

bad

1

I

me

an hour to get here

snowstorm of

utes,” said

it

takes

15

(in

the year) and

or 20 min-

Bethany Rigby, a

first-

“I

a second-year

is

on the bus

for

than an hour every morning.

leave

anywhere from

minutes earlier .so

and

that’s if the

1

.50 to 45 bad conditions)

(in

can make

just

it

here on time,

bus arrives on time

and there’s no guarantee of he .said.

that,”

A number of students say they would like to be told if their class is cancelled so they don’t have to risk driving into school.

should tell the on the website if there arc cancellations because of weather, because it is kind of frustrating if you have to come in and then you get here and things arc “I

think

they

teachers or post

walk outside and sec my covered in snow or the

sec in front of me, then

weather.

this issue

marketing student,

police foundations student, has his

affect

Greg Rasmussen,

students are not able to even

roads just look bad, or

close

come

tests

bad enough,

is

ing student, lives in Guelph, is

Hven students who take the bus have to worry about how ba(lweather will affect their transportation to school.

weather

I

students arc forced to leave

normally

way

is

sobriety test on under the influence of a drug. “What it means is an officer will

a blood or ask the driver to give “If the Fanjoy. said saliva sample,” she would driver fails the test he or driving. be charged with impaired

drive?”

main page

the

image of two

the

world.

in

charges back negative. arrest

it’s

my

commute

to

Some

wrongful

face

the

If

sec in front of me, so

well.

drinking.

.Iordan

she said.

it

cancelled,” said first-year business

administrationies

management

stud-

student Hillary Cain.

“The roads arc really bad coming from where 1 live (Ayr) because they don't plow them."

through education. The CPHA has launched a website to promote their anti-pot and driving cam-

1

of pot

may

Otticers also

best

been

has

time

houses

take

student

child

thing in the morning, especially the swipe card parking lot with the ramp that makes your tires s|iin because it is so steep and slippery,”

is

and studies of cannabis use across the country, Canadians between the ages of 4 and 25 have one of the rates

person

a

The

(CPHA)

highest

they

that

is

first-year early

I

older brother drives a four-

Bad weather conditions

time to process, unlike a breathalyser which gives an instant result if

over an

“If it’s too bad then don’t even bother risking coming to school,” she said. “.Sometimes can barely

what

When

to

drive small cars,” she said.

The problem with blood and

me

Alyssa Loewen, a student in level one nursing, says weather determines who she drives in with.

than driving with

ADAM BLACK

the

away.

wheel drive van, so

from driving while stoned

at

usually a 20-

school.

“My

discourage people

their transportation

the

Nicole Jackson, a level two nurs-

may wonder how weather

students

also

Hast way.

always a possibility during winter,

New campaign hopes

By

hour,” said

some come

conditions

is

minute drive home took

Kitchener- Waterloo.

weather

it

in

do placement on campus

daycare, and what

hood education

bad

home

drive

February. Throw in an average temperature of -6 C, and we have a pretty nasty winter here in

With

main page.

to

to

the

just force

earlier,

evening.

for school as a result. In recent years, this area has aver-

wake up

Rigby said she would like to see plowed sooner. “They need to be plowed first

the parking lots

an

is

pilots with the ban-

make sense here, make sense when you

doesn’t it

This

is

referring to the

smoking

social acceptance of pot and driving.

Fanjoy hopes

this

campaign

will

get passengers of impaired drivers

more involved. “There’s so much focus on drinking and driving, but no one thinks in drivthere are the same dangers

We

ing while high,” she said.

are

take hoping that passengers will they would the same (precautions) get driver was drunk and not if

the

in the

vehicle

if

the person

is

driv-

ing while high.”

people will become It is hoped about more involved in discussions informore For driving. drugs and driving mation on the anti-pot and

campaign,

the

visit

website,

www.potanddriving.cpha.ca.

m,

m

-s

I*

(Photo by Jason Sonser)

Hocus-pocus riam Ashfield

left

jchnician student,

a first-year and Vince Ashfield a

rammer/anaivst. take

r

engineering and automation

some

The time to play Magic.

'

Gathering.

s

^

-

(Photo by Tim Gedcke)


— SPOKE, January

Page 8

9,

The By ERIC MURPHY

Entertainment

2006

suippcd down

When

The

ing but a

lo

Monty

Full

bare

iis is

pa\nients

support

child

Inspired

noth-

by

the

era/e

of local

Chippendale dancers. Jerry decides

hit.

own

lo

wrenehing laughs, toe-lapping musie and dynaniie danec roulines al ihe Cenlre in The Square No\'.

lusting

pockets and into his own.

29

there

.

This Broadway rendilion is based on ihe big sereen hil of ihe same name slarring Roberl Carlyle, howlakes plaee in BulTalo, N.Y.

il

risk

his

The east of The Full Monty pul on a speetaeular show full of gut-

e\er,

or

boy Nathan (Connor Austin James) again. seeing

ne\er

nocossilics

Monty a comedic

Full

inslead ot'ShelTield, England.

resull of a sulTering sleel induslry,

an induslry residcnls

in ihis

bare essentials

BulTalo

suburb are dcpendenl on. Wilhoul a regular souree

in front

of

King Street

has something for everyone Trio

By TOM KALBFLEISCH

to their

of scream-

women? good

Bukalinsky (Joe Cools)

unemployed and, with

friend

who

Dave

is

also

reluctance,

agrees lo the stripping scheme.

After

ineome, Jerry Lukowski (Jeremiah Zinger) needs lo come up wilh

down

duo

ing

on

much

.searching, the danc-

finds others to

their team.

They

till

the spots

MacGregor

Malcolm

that he has friends in a hilari-

song on suicide called Big-Ass Rock. Malcolm also finds love and satirical

companionship

(Steve

in

his

newfound

friend Ethan.

Harold

learns

that

wife

his

(Penny Larsen) truly loves him and will always support him no matter what and Horse shows the crowd that age truly

Jeanette

doesn't matter.

Horse also dismis.ses the stereo-

mom,

Monty performed

at the

Centre

in

the Square

Nov. 29. tak-

ing families just trying to survive

and deserves swinging G-strings. So Ring that G-string of uncertainty to the corner, throw all your inhibitions to the side, relax and enjoy what it truly feels like being

Big

Black Man. that

being a true

man

not the

life,

treating people with respect.

learn

the is

meaning of

not being

some

It’s

his

Full

ing care of our responsibilities and

a funny song called

well-endowed physical specimen.

with

The

have but living an honest

in

DcBruyne), a suicidal homosexual lives

cast of

man

who

still

(Internet photo)

The

types that go with being a black

We

are:

ol'

Dave prevent Malcolm

Jerry and

him

nuts and bolls to strip

wilh the help

from committing suicide, showing ous

But he has Just one problem. Is anyone else, any other unemployed steelworkers, who have the

man

loving wife, Geoigie (Flappy

MeParilin).

of dancers

groii]')

Jciry turns lo his

LayolTs and unemploymenl are a

his

w ith the hopes of dancing women's money r>ut of their

put his

together

ing

being a larger

hit

amount of money we

This musical, comedic the

hit

crowd on an emotional

takes roller-

coaster not just through Buffalo but

through the lives of

all

hard-work-

in

The

Full

Monty.

Harold (Chris George), the dance teacher and former boss who hasn't told his wife that he's been

unemployed

for

the

last

six

months, Ethan (Gary Brintz), the well-endowed, two-left footed klutz, and Noah (Troy Scarborough) or more commonly

know as "Horse,” an elderly black man that can really cut a rug. Yet with much practise this group faces a major problem. How does a group of regular guys who are obviously not physical speci-

still

For some gelling lo cat

most exciting

restaurant isn't the

event. For others, sitting

music

orchestrated

fancy

at a

down

and

lo

fancy

menus is the best thing going. At King Street Trio there is something

mens gel women to their show? The answer for this group of misfits is to do something that the Chippendales would never do, take everything off which,

for everyone.

which

Located at 65 University Ave. E., Waterloo, the upscale restaurant

of course, adds to the stress of the

plays host to live bands, has friend-

The Full Monty covers issues such as .self-image, suicide, stereotypes

ly

customer

.service

and offers

fine

dining. The restaurant provides two sep^ arate menus for lunch and dinner. Included on the lunch menu arc

items

such as

wrapped

baked prosciutto

scallops,

trio

is

lacklustre lads.

(Photo by Tiffany McCormick)

and what it truly means to be a man, through great music and humour.

The robust Dave overcomes

his

poor self-image and insecurities of

Christmas

irst

gift givers Sarah Coniin, Katie Payson, Tabitha and Michelle Ageyar donated gifts to the CSI wish tree.

year early childhood education students (from

LaFlamme,

Kelly Vieira

left)

tapas,

organic baby spinach .salad, Angus beef melt and the cla.ssic soup of the day. Items on the lunch menu range from $6 to as much as $34. The dinner menu includes appetizers, salads, pastas,

main courses,

seafood and side dishes. Diners can try escargot bourgignon and hazelnut appetizer pasta

or

fritters from the or penne primavera picant shrimp linguinc

glazed pork tenderloin for $21. On the seafood menu King Street Trio prepares such dishes as tem-

grouper

for

sesame salmon

for

$21,

sweet

$23 and

a

szechuan shrimp dinner for $26. Every Wednesday through Saturday King .Street Trio is home lo

live

dinner entertainment.

On

Wednesdays and Thursdays from -6:30

p.m. until 9 p.m. a pianist plays classical tunes. A live jazz

trio takes the IJoor

7 p.m. until .Saturday,

I

I

on Fridays from

p.m.

And

on from 7

llnally.

a pianist plays

p.m. until 10:30 p.m.

The meals

at

restaurant such as

an

upper scale King Street Trio

are expensive but are well worth price. Reservations can be

the

made by

Western Sydhey ^Inoho kroirtad|}fiiD lAi

brie

list

Irom the entree menu. Other main courses range from Angus beef ribeye for $26 or honey and cumin

pura

\r' r

Ur»vBrsftyof

calling S84-I507.

Articulate, Transfer,

Success


1

5 3

'

E ntertainment / ^ AiV

'

vV

^

®

I'Dl l^eek of Janiiaiy 9

Aging rocker packs house

2006

.

By LEE EVANS

Aries March

2

Libra

1

Bruce Cockburn made his lOih appearance at Centre in the Square on Nov. 28, and he can still pack

September 23 October 22

April 19

relea.sed in

the house.

Second semester is here, Aries, and prepare to buckle down.’ School will only get harder from here on out but keep in mind, you're getting clo.ser and clo.scr to being done. Lucky day; I

I

Something traumatic happened over the break, Libra, and it's still on your mind. Maybe you should speak to someone about it, whether it be a coun.scllor or just a

Lucky day;

friend.

Taurus April 20

-

May

October 23

November Welcome fully

back. Taurus, hope-

you worked a

over the

little

holidays, bccau.se financially things will be rough this .semester.

Expect

to

buy a few more books

than last .semester.

Lucky day;

13

21

and

some

of

bubbles.

on .some relaxing music. Lucky day; 9 to turn

special place the great Canadian landscape holds in his heart, and like a true

balladeer, his

image

words paint a vivid you there.

ihul takes

He .showed his political stripes with his well-known .song about the

deforestation

of

the

tropical

rainforests called If a Tree Falls in

the Forest.

I?

^

I? •

Don't be surprised

a certain

if

someone from your past shows up tor a visit this

week.

might be someone you really don't want to see; Just grin and bare it, they'll be It

gone soon. Lucky day;

15

Another popular song that drew plenty of applause was If had a Rocket Launcher. This song came

Sagittarius November 22 December 21

1

Don't

forget about your friends, Sagittarius. Sure, you've met your special someone, but your friends have been there all along, it's no

time to drop them

now

happy. Lucky day;

that you're

1

XX j

June 22

July 22

-

December 22

k

-

January 19

j someAfter a night of partying the ne will want to get behind To Cancer. week. /heel this don't nsure you both arrive alive, seat drivers the Hop in

et ir

them.

call a cab.

1

Your birthday or

it's

least,

July 23

-

go get a massage.

January 20

August

you

Throw an

ice-skat-

have some ing or skiing party and up on hot stock to sure Make fun. chocolate.

Lucky day;

1

Your birthday that

up,

parprepared for the hard-core No up. Rest coming. tying that's

partying

even a

that time

till

little.

Lucky

comes, not

day. 12

Pisces

lattime to give up on your isn t hapest interest, Virgo, it just goes, pening. So the saying It's

in all you've been looking for love wrong places. Maybe it s time

the

making the same misLucky day; 12

stop

coming

is

February 19 March 20

August 23 September 22

takes.

is

and you know what means. Make sure your liver

Aquarius,

Virgo

to

-

February 18

22

can.

You'll feel

Aquarius

work After a semester of hard money, and a holiday of earning loose a little, while it's time to let still

shop-

Lucky day: 10

I

I

Go

At the very

ping, or to the spa.

Leo

1

on the horizon

way, you're feeling old.

reborn.

Lucky day; 12

is

just past, Capricorn, either

-

that's There's a certain religion

Dont be afraid to Pisces, even something believe in your family if it's something intriguing you.

might disagree with. Remember, thoughts no one can impose their

on you. Lucky day; 10

Brandon Walker

is

a second-year

fate journalism student holding hand. in the palm of his

about after his

visit to

refugee

in

camps

Guatemalan Mexico, and see-

ing the people being attacked by

own government’s helicopters. One of his show-stopping pieces

their

was

from

his

newest

is

a

collection

of instrumentals, and one called Elegy showed the influence of Spanisfi guitar

it

lait of

the

aitist s talent

from

lock

to

folk,

to

wrongs has seen Cockburn lending his

voice to agencies Friends of the Earth,

album.

such

as

UNICEF,

OXFAM and the Unitarian Service Committee. He spoke to the audience about spending a week in Baghdad, Iraq year with four friends on a pervisit.

“You don’t get much of a .scn.se fiom the media ol people trying to normal

lives,” .said

Cockburn.

He spoke

about his driver having to wait in line for 36 hours for gas. “In Iraq, it’s very noticeable what wasn’t bombed,” he .said.

“The

oil

ministry and the ministry of the interior.

But most were glad

Saddam was

that

gone.”

Cockburn spoke about the ceriness of waking early one Sunday

to the

hotel

smoke I

sound of an enor-

balcony

billows

in the

to

out of

sec

huge

distance.

here were people out on the

streets,

because Sunday

isn’t a hol-

iday there,” he said.

“No one even in

political

world traveller with reggae, blues and Spanish infused niusic. Yet he has never lost his simplicity and delight in being a Canadian. His passion for righting

last

the

Juno award-winning has been his evolution

protest, to

sonal

morning

mous explosion and looking

was very haunting, multi-

layered and displayed the depth of Cockburn ’s guitar skills.

live

"

gf

It

political

o( his music.

His .second song. Going to the Country, speaks ol the

for yourScorpio, to breathe and relax. Maybe stretch out in the tub with

book

held the audience rapt for almost three hours with a blend of old and new selections from a repertoire

poignancy

Take a few moments

Remember

strode

and the

-

self,

a

guitarist

onto a spartan stage with only four guitars and an amp set-up. He then

more than 25 albums. Cockburn proved why he is one ol Canada s best loved performers today - variety, simplicity

1

Scorpio 20

The 60-year-old

.September 2005, called

Speechless.

twitched or paused

what they were doing.” This

visit

spawned one of

newest songs Baghdad.

called

his

This

i.v

He afso showed his self-depreciating side with the words, “I was built on a Friday and you can’t fix me, even so. I’ve done OK.” Cockburn has done more than OK, having been nominated 29 times for Juno awards and winning nine of them. He’s been inducted

into the

Canadian Hall of Fame, the Governor General’s Performing Arts Award and is a member of the Order of Canada, one of the highest awards a Canadian can receive. Not bad for a former busker and received

college dropout.

The hall was filled to capacity with a mostly baby boomer-aged audience, who sang along with

Wonder Where the Lions Arc and. gave the solo performer two standing

ovations.

He rewarded

their

appreeiation with three additional

songs and proved once again that things do get better with age.

some


— SPOKE, January

Page 10

9,

Sports

2006

NBA

Head-to-head: Pistons have the tools to win their

second championship The children

(NBA)

arc

The conventional pick for the team in the west would be San

and becoming the young men who _oncc loved basketball for the sake of the game, not just the money. NBA Commissioner David Stern has been doing his best to clean up the mess the Detroit Pistons and

Sure,

Jon Yaneff

great

Opinion

they aren’t

Nov.

ping them. Billups was the NBA championship MVP in 2004. With the Wallace combo helping out by hitting and blocking shots, the teams in the East will be hard

8 brawl in the stands of the

Detroit last season.

in

The players arc now behaving more like adults, but arc still being by Stern,

drcs.scd

who implement-

ed a dress code before the start of the .season. This means the players

no longer look rather have a

thugs,

like

new more

San Antonio made some moves in the off-season, pick-

pressed

come

to

who

Richardson and Joe Johnson to other teams and Amare “Little Shaq” Stoudemire to injury.

But they picked up some good players in exchange.

court Just in case the players are

points, averaging nearly

Thomas from New York and

thinking of fighting with the fans.

per

NBA

riot

started

Eastern Conference, but

it

seems

remainder of last season, Artest decided to release a rap CD, so hopefully he’ll start talking on the court instead of with his mouth. The Heat boast a lineup consisting of superstar Dwyane Wade and veterans Jason Williams and Antoine Walker. Shaquille O’Neal has just returned from his injury, vi/hioh makeji; the Heat iust aS

4) and Pacers (third place) have

learned their les.son and arc looking impressive in the Central divi-

sion in the East early on this season.

The

Pistons revved their team to

NBA

championship

in

2004

against the Los Angeles Lakers and

Spurs,

who squeezed^Tty

'^he

Pistons 4-3 in their be.st-of-seven

The Cavs have LeBron James. Enough .said. James is third in the

This year the Pi.stons have a new coach. Flip Saunders. He came to the team after a 10-year tenure with the Minnesota Timber

league averaging over 28 points per

game.

The East is more dominating this year with four of the top 5 leading

Wolves.

Saunders replaces the fourth-wincoach in NBA history

.scorers in the

-njngest

Larry Brown,

who

NBA

the

led the Pistons

If

Saunders can continue Pistons

Richard Billups,

Rashced

starting

Arenas and Michael Redd), but the Western Conference could have its fair share of teams contending for the champion.ship.

Hamilton,

to lead

lineup

of

NBA

and physically in in Phoenix while Tim Duncan and Shaquille O’Neal take the wear and tear of

a dark

point last year.

But that was with Johnson and Stoudemire in the lineup and at the time, both players had been with Phoenix for at least one sea-

gym somewhere

the season. 1

believe Stoudemire’s resting his

body from

the beating

Brian

and work-

ing the team’s fast-paced style of

ing with a

play.

strength not having Stoudemire

coach

in

ity to still

get

win games, although they’re

offensive output in the league

in

-of three

seasons (averaging over 21 points as of Dec. 4) and if the guard continues to gel with fellow guard

Angeles

102 points per game, behind only

preparing

the Philadelphia 76ers (stats as of

himself to knock Duncan and the

defensive intensity, and Raja Bell

Dec.

Spurs out of the semis the way he

from Utah, who brings even more speed to the lineup. The Suns haven’t won as many games so far this year as they had

Can any other team say losing their number

Lakers,

from

who

the

Los

2).

1

that after

scoring

machine they’d still be in the top two or even three in the league for

HOW WERE YOUR MARKS

nearly did last season. I

know

the obvious

been conventional.

IN THE FALL

WOULD YOU UKE TO IMPROVE YOUR GRADES???? DON'T DELAY APPLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN STUDENT SERVICES (2B04)

the lineup, the Pistons will be

on all cylinders no matter what team they face in the champifiring

onship.

EXPERIENCE STUDENTS HELPING STUDENTS

Peer Services Eastern Conference again

answer

Check us out on the College wehsite the Central divisiorin me'^'°'

this year. i

is

that

he had knee surgery, but I’ve never

YOU cyw HAVE A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF YOUR COURSES THIS SEMESTER

The Pel r^ Pistons are dominating

my

In

mind, he’s

at

champion. There is no doubt with the depth

Hamilton has been the team’s best playmakcr for the better part

to

even

stronger.

averaging the second highest

East

in three years.

last

this past off-season are still learn-

Phoenix Suns and the Golden State all have looked impressive and could nab playoffs spots and try to compete against the

at

took

season

Warriors

champion.ship

it

The players Phoenix picked up

the

Tayshaun Prince, Wallace and Ben

second

imagine him preparing

The Spurs, the Dallas Mavericks, Los Angeles Clippers, the

Chauncey

Wallace, they could be looking their

league coming from (Allen Iverson,

conference

Jame.s, Gilbert

championship

since 1990. the

I

son.

.series.

to their first

They got Kurt

not hurt

both bring size and

Grant

each.

After being suspended for the

the Pistons (first place as of Dec.

a

game

20 points

the

in

Instead,

the lineup hinders the team’s abil-

The Pacers’ Jermaine O’Neal and Ron Artest are racking up the

The

at this

And

the

Cleveland Cavaliers.

think not?

him.self mentally

son.

are

I

I’d like to think is that he’s

Opinion

will be looking

to

and polished look. Stern is also keeping a watchful eye on his NBA children by instituting more security around the

West

at all.

choice.

playoff time.

make some noise in the East the Pacers, the Miami Heat and

presentable

my

I’m taking the Phoenix Suns. 1 know, they haven’t played great this season, having lost Quentin

have a better record

Other teams

but

Bran(don

Walker

ing up Michael Finley and Nick “The Quick” Van Excl, but again,

Billups, there will be nothing stop-

1

for the

Stoudemire is suppo.sedly doing rehab on his knee after having surgery in early October because of a defective knee surface. But what

Antonio, but I’m not conventional.

the Indiana Pacers left after their

Palace

points

best

UJ

slowly growing out of their diapers

The Phoenix Suns have a top-secret plan

three years

National

the

in

Basketball Association

in

East vs. West

w»w.conestogac.on.ca/jsp/stserv/peerservicesflndex.jsp


.

-

News

SPOKE, January

Men’s hockey team goes By JONYANEFF Famous scoring

lines in

been

have

history

of two, lO-minute run time periods

hockey

notorious

tor

racking up points.

Legion of Doom (Eric Lintlros, John LeClair and Mikael Renberg) and the explosive Wayne Gretzky line, which included Jari Kurri and Lines

such

as

the

Mark Messier, have made defences break down for years. Conestoga’s men’s extramural team has a top line of its own which has been lighting up the scoreboard in Conestoga’s two tournaments. Forwards Chris Seary, Steve Lamb and Luke Glowick don’t have the same talent as the National Hockey League (NHL) stars, but they do have chemistry.

The

trio

combined

for six points

and four of the team’s five goals in the Condors’ one win and one loss in the

ment

one-day, eight-team tourna-

at

the rec centre Dec. 2.

First-year coach

Todd Gould

said

he as.sembled the lines not really

knowing what would

result

after

only a few practices together.

and one. 12-minute stop time period. In the last tournament at Humber College Nov. 18 there were 18 teams competing and the

games consisted of two, 18-minute halves.

"The setup was similar they run intramurals

at

how

to

the col-

Gould. "It provided us the opportunity to play a real

The tournament games eonsisted

and

let

a

good, hard slap-

go that found the back of the Forward Ryan Walkom and defenceman Eric Robinson assisted on the goal. Conestoga didn’t look back from there as Seary and Lamb (two shot

“Their

net.

everything

goalie

players.

chances of Conestoga mounting a comeback was put to

because

Gould.

minor

leads the team with four.

.semifinal

allowed for more chances to battle

back."

the

tournament were Durham

College (University of Institute Technology), Humber College (Lakeshore campus), St. Clair

played only one it’s

tough

for

game so

them

to get

into the groove.”

Fleming College (Peterborough campus), Seneca College, St. Lawrence College (Brockville campus) and Sheridan College (Davis campus). The tournament style had the winning teams from their quarterfinal games put into one division and the losing teams put into a separate division, prior to two separate

Todd Goidd,

their first

game

Condors coach

team’s

third period.

was a well played, hard-nosed

midway through the second period to tie the game at one after one of

game," said Gould. “We didn’t have a lot of shots on net, but the ones we did have were quality shots.”

powerplays had just expired. Glowick had one goal and one assist in the tournament.

the semifinal against Sheridan.

their

though

said

with

there will be a

goalies,

he

team’s

his

is

play,

number of things

the

team will work on for the last tournament of the season at the Doon

“The goaltenders both played only it’s tough for them to get in a groove,” he said. “They allowed only three goals in our two games and in the last tournament

campus Feb. 10. “The bigger ice surface at the campus allows us to skate better so

they each

said.

one game so

every time they’re

use that more to our advantage,” he

“At practice I’m going to

Humber

more so we can work on two-on drills to develop more odd-man

one

outlasted

Fleming 4-1 in the consolation game. Forwards Steve Bithcll and Brock Cochrane and defencemen Dave Carr and Jeff Jones

sat

down

rushes

on

this

come

out next tournament firing on

The team Monday at 4

out of the

at 7

a.m.

we

better

Athletic

tournament

the

will get,” said third-year

veteran Dempster.

Marlene Ford

director

said there will be a

lost in the semifinal

the

ferent teams

Humber College and

tournament.

in

every

practises

p.m. and Thursday

“The more we play together

one.

6-0 against Seneca College

we improve why we won’t

the ice. If

don’t see

I

cylinders.”

all

tournament to make room for forward Dan Twomey and defenceman Nathan Dempster, who were back in the fold this tournament after being unable to play in the last

The Condors

try to

enforce players to drive to the net

in net."

beat Sheridan 7-4 in the

while

finals,

next tournament we’ll try to

at the

recorded a shutout, so

Durham Lawrence’s Ca.scy Reilly broke up goaltcndcr John Leonard’s shutout on a pass from Ryan Becker near the end of the game. The Condors lost the semifinal against Sheridan 2-1 after Matt Morris scored one minute into the St.

Glowick scored Conestoga’s goal

Lawrence, which led them

“It

Gould impressed

said despite losing in the

the

to

they

if

he said.

a

game.

they both give us a chance to win

to

St.

Gould

the

two-

a

with

outstanding.

“The goaltenders both

College (Chatham campus), SS.

Conestoga won

left in

took

penalty

be

Judge the players show up to the practices, work hard and perform well, then they deserve to play,”*

Leonard and Josh (Jandcr, played

The seven other teams eompeting in

Shcwfcit

after

rest

tough

“It’s

Any

game with

which

at

might

for the next

tournament because of the extra

stopped

just

shot

overall.

Gould said there some lineup changes

him,” said

minute

three periods,

we

1-1

went 2-2

failed to score.

Condors. Scary has three goals in the two tournaments, while Lamb

4-1 in a hard fought battle against

well."

blue line and

minute,

guy who could chip

and Glowick could set things up," said Gould. "So, if you can get a goal scorer, a crasher and a playmaker on the same line your team will play

The team had two, two- man in the game

advantage powerplays

goals) finished the scoring for the

semifinals being played.

in

the

lege,” said

knew Lamb was a slick centre. Seary was a good, hard-working “1

Cody Shewfell opened up

scoring after he skated over the

— Page 11

2006

9,

number of

competing

dif-

next

in the

Ww W y the big shaft at

V

CAREER SERVICES Tiuployowm SoocoM. Ym, f

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To

jAtention Graduates/

After

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contract

$ 21 -million fans were with Boston, Bruins their Iranassumption under the up lighting player would be chise the

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scoreboard

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for

pummelcd Bruins are getting "Tn

Sharks.

were The San Jose Sharks

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game

forward your resume

ingrediis the key solution to turn Shark’s the ent in

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season around. playing in Thornton has caught

their

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exclusive to Conestoga of job postings, hundreds out check Oon’t forget to onlinestudents and graduates,

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of Bruins.

The numbers speak for

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wearing a Sharks jersey. been able to Primeau has barely in an entire points 30

muster up

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fire,

conhis first three five points in three to Jose San

quantity.

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to quality over

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of chess.

measly pawns.

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also

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compared to th This trade can be

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organization. the Boston

c....,,. ^trurm exchange, Marco Stuart Brad and Primeau Wayne Boston to were shipped off shocking aftermath of this

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all reality,

thi.

the past three Bruins in points for of cornerstone seasons and was the

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any

in the NHL. said Joe wasCritics in Boston with the burning n’t playing and is partially desire he once did once the reason the

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.

Page 12

— SPOKE, January

Music

9,

The music business has its up and downs. One moment, a band can tccl like they arc on top ol the world. Then,

become

shortly alter, they

day

Much

news.

s

the business

Very

itscll,

litc

like

become

bands

big

Bands

straight out of the studio. arc often on the road lor days,

weeks, months or even years, while attempting to attract an independent and dedicated Ian base while doing one of the most stressful, yet rewarding activities profession.

in the

student By JON YANEFF

are itching to

mer Tim Thomson,

get back on the road to pertorm

Punk-rock band Hedley stormed

their latest creations.

ready tor it and think in January we will be on the road tor 1

re

for

believes the live clement

is

so cru-

band, cial that in order to feel like a a group must be on tour and play-

“You can be

the .studio and

in

the record and all that,” said Bucchino, "but you want to go out

make and

tour.”

touring

believes

Bucchino

Although

Flashlight

cs.sential.

is

been on a full schedule tour in almost two years. Since the Toronto-based band’s last mini tour with Ajax rockers Not By Choice, Flashlight Brown

Brown has

'CiTui tS' Vi'i'io'

to follow

debut

My

not

recoi uTng' a n e

up

w

a iDU lii

2003 major

their

label

Degeneration. Hughe.s, Flashlight

Matt Brown’s vocalist and guitarist, said the album may have taken longer than expected but it allowed the band to become introspective and figure out what their music was now about. “We’ve always did what we wanted and Hughes.

happened,”

things

“I think this

time

we

said

actual-

is

rock band has had many memorable moments while on the road. Thomson said one of the band’s best moments came when they parrate tbiirs to pfbfhbfe their last

album. toured with Sum 41 across Canada then went straight to Japan for a week,” said Thomas. “Right

“We

after that, it was straight on Warped Tour for two weeks.” Over the years the four have had their differences and arguments, however, the band accomplished something they never thought possible on California’s coastal high1

not

is

one of those bands that changes their .style of music just to get pop-

“We

don’t want to be one of

those bands

who

react to a scene

or type of crowd,” he said.

a rock

“We

arc

band who plays rock music. It comes in and out

’n’ roll

’n’ roll

of style but

we just have

we to

can’t react to that,

do what we want

to

do.”

arc not as easy to

make

as they

were prior to signing their deal Hollywood Records. "There is a team behind us now and they believe in the band, it’s a combined effort,” he said. “In order

_^with

come

for the record to

,J:iody needs to feel

it.

It

out, cvery-

was good

to

Los Angeles (with the label) because we became a team with the be

in

label

again.

Before creating

record, that team

^ack

little

was

“It

was

together

Brown’s release.

second Blue.

major label The album is

prc.scntly .scheduled to

come

out

in

last

place

I

would

(Photo by Brent Gerhart)

Brown

Flashlight

and

released

in

first half of

the

*.

travel to

hew

places.

“I would say it’s the best experience. We’ve been to the east coast twice and there is no better way to .see

than touring with your band.”

it

Hawdon

said although the four-

piece genre exceeding

band has opened for recognizable Canadian acts such as Matthew Good, Treble Charger and Sum 41, there is always a potential for .some shows to be empty. “We’re still at that point,” he said. “But we always have a good time. We do this because we love to play. Regardless if it’s completely packed or empty, we still have fun.” Since independent bands do not have the support of a major label, it is much harder to draw a bigger crowd, especially on shows farther away from home. Patrick Finch, vocalist and guitarist

of the

K-W

rock band

The

band also had a to small

crowds.

“We play through it,” he .said. “We remember to get drunk, dance, play loud and own the bar or town

bands arc

regardless.”

still

looking

for

the

the

in

music business.

Mike Hawdon, who as rotates

sings as well

between playing guitar

and drums for the Toronto-ba.sed band The Inner City .Surfers, said he loves touring and everything

it’s

about.

new

never been

I’ve

"I also

faces and in,"

love sitting

said in the

van with, three of my best friends talking about whoever we want and talking

The

Here has loured across Canada, from Victoria to Halifax, and Finch said it is impossible to keep your composure during such a Stars

time,

“You

(all

drunken, exhaust-

into a

ed quagmire,” he

said. "However, at end of the day, all you have to do play songs you love with your best

bad

about

whoever we

want."

Hawdon

said being in the indc-

is

friends.

It

he said. “It’s also incredible to hear a song you wrote for the first time after it’s been recorded. Then it no longer belongs to you and people can hate or love it as they

see

fit.

can’t be that hard.”

Sometimes

it

is

the old classics

crowd’s attention and the new stuff. Finch said playing a new song live for the Urst time is a remarkable expe-

It

can be stressful, but

you are proud of It is

levej

which can create a between bands and

that pride

of

trust

their fans.

Jason

drummer for the rock band The Evil

Darby,

Toronto indie Doers, said they have been lucky becau.se there is chemistry between the band and their audience.

“They understand us

ward,” said Darby.

you closer

get a

“It

many

suggestion that led to the change.”

Darby

.said

even though playing

and recording an album are two .separate feelings, they always do their best to make their live performances sound like the studio album. live

u.scd

whistles

none of the

with

Show (The

bells

and

Welcome To The Evil

Doers’

latest

album),” he said. “What you hear

over

all

age

also includes bassist

Chris

Crippin and frontman Jacob Hoggard. Rosin, MacDonald and Crippin were previou.s]y in the Kor,H Fverything After, while Hoggard got his break after placing

third

Canadian Idol

at

in

2004.

“We

wouldn’t

him

let

band

in the

unless he entered Canadian Idol and in the Top 4,” joked Rosin. Hedley recorded their self-titled album with two producers. The

placed

was with Brian Howes

half

first

(Hinder, Closure) and the second

was with Garth Richardson (Rage Against the Machine, Trapt, Red Hot

Chili Peppers).

was

“It

really cool

our album a

and

it

gave

of variety and colour,” said Hoggard. Hedley has released two singles

from and

also brings

your audience, especially when they hear the music change and wonder if it was their

their

lot

album, including Villain

On My Own.

Hoggard said

On My Own it

the band released

at the

end of July and

reached number

the beginning of

in

I

Canada

at

December.

“It’s been gradually building as opposed to hitting number right 1

away, so we’re impressed with the way it’s growing,” he said. “Our next single. Trip,

is

going

to take

over the world.”

Hoggard different

said the

musical

when they makes one

arc

all

whole band has influences,

put together,

so it

ultimate influence.

go

Hedley was touring across Ontario, while opening for head-

fix anything. Thai's not what wc’rc about.”

their surpri.sc visit to the college.

what you get live. back and digitally

We

didn’t

Nowadays, some bands anything to get ahead

will

in the

is

do

music

business.

However, even work is put into

after all the hard it,

bands,

especially

Ontario,

who

rience.

we

to

that get the

is

.so

of positive and negative feedback, which helps us move forlot

others

it

if

you shouldn’t

it,

care.”

“We

the

love playing to

fans

(from

Tom MacDonald, drummer

2006.

have had the privilege of touring across Canada and the U.S., other opportunity to take the next step

we have

groups).”

The band

chimes in with some Mike Conroy, Flashlight Brown first performance in 10 band’s Toronto the backup vocals during is scheduled to be Blue, album. new Their London. in months guitarist,

few experiences of playing

other .southern Ontario bands

get a

age,” said Rosin. “It’s

map

the

wasn’t expected.”

many

own

our

exciting that

Stars Here, said his

clubs

Flashlight

to

we drove across wilderness Canada and managed to not hit anything, it

for

"team”

in

strange.

the

Hawdon.

result of getting the

Thomson.

have thought about hitting a deer,” he .said. “With the amount of times

the

the past year or so.”

The

rence a

"1

was broken up

an

that’s

said he found the occur-

While

Bucchino said with the band now being on a major label, decisions

said

ride,”

on

“Then, suddenly a deer Jumped front of our van and we hit it.”

Hughes

ular.

commenting

.started

we

good reaction from people closer

U.S.

After travelling across Canada and the U.S. for about 10 years, the

kind of cool that

“It’s

later.

playing at smaller shows to prepare for an extensive festival circuit of

awesome

Flashlight

sented a prize to a student at a col-

Cunently, they are warming up by

“We

band pre-

the first time the

was

it

“do

to

than

sooner-

way, Highway

dis-

play .screen and eight gigabytes of information that takes thousands ot photos and holds 4,000 songs. Hedley guitarist Dave Rosin said

lege.

Brown hopes

in the

MP3

radio and

(OLED)

light-emitting diode

ic

doing your job.” job”

a

is

FM

voice recorder, which has an organ-

what you do and when you're not getting to do it, you don’t feel completely fulfilled and you’re not

touring

once,” said Antoniak.

photo viewer,

player,

of

live to other people. It's a part

Hughes

said

a

scared, nervous and freak-

all at

The Zen Microphoto

"It's painful

their

was

"I

ing out

the world.

Mother Nature because

at

won

shocked to learn she had

difficult things in

had some time to sit back and look our music and our me.ssage.”

ly

was

24,

Antoniak,

Amberly

held by 91.5 the Beat.

said he thinks touring

Hughes

Flashlight

ing live shows.

technology student with an early Christmas present Dec. 6.

ever happy.”

and depressing, but can it's also more laughs than you Hughes. said litc,” real in have "Still, we spend all this time on the record so we can play these songs

Bucchino, bassist and vocalist Brown, said he

Doon

Conestoga’s

at

to pre.sent an information

campus

lour again. Basically, you re never

bands are lorecd to look elsewhere and just be grateful to be on stage, entertaining an audience by playing music and doing what they

Flashlight

Building

Zen Microphoto after naming two Hedley band members in a contest

one of the most

Fil

Student Client Services

the

into

almost the entire year,” said Bucchino. ”lfs hard but fun. There’s always the situations where you're on lour and you can’t wait to get home then when you gel home, you really can t wait to get out on

Sometimes the endless devotion and hard work results in a record deal, but more often than not,

love best.

^

With all the time spent on recordand away from the road, Hughes and Bucchino, as well as guitarist Mike Conroy and druming

"We

unpredictable.

is

few

yester-

sur'prizes’

2006.

first hall ot

the

Medley

stressful but rewarding

life

GERHART

By BRENT

Entertainment

2006

allowing

there are in

still

southern

love the business for

them

to

sec

the

world

while doing what they love, playing music.

liner

Simple Plan, when they made

They had

a date at the John Labatt Centre in London Dec. 6 and ended their Canadian tour at the

Halifax Metro Centre

in

Halifax,

N.S., Dec. 17.

"Simple Plan

is awesome,” said “They have a great live show and they’re a good band to learn from so we’re happy to be

Rosin.

opening for them.”


Digital Edition - January 09, 2006