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Christmas always

comes

Celebrations are full

Tuition trouble? Kitchener MPP says

early

unrealistic

it’s

to think tuition will stay frozen forever.

in

force around the

Newa 2

region as people get

ready

A

for the

million-dollar

The

holidays.

A

learning

newsroom

for journalism

students

on

problem

region spends big bucks

litter

cleanup each year.

9

Feature

Monday, November 28, 2005

Newa

Conestoga College, Kitchener, Ont.

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

37th Year

3|

— No. 26

Conestoga goes wireless By

MEGHAN KRELLER

more

limited than those in

LRC

This fall Conestoga College has expanded its technology once more and made wireless Internet avail-

rather for researching

able in key areas of the campus.

library catalogues

Students and faculty with proper wireless fidelity fWiFi) devices can

now access the Internet in the Learning Resource Centre (LRC), the Sanctuary, the blue room and all three cafeterias on Doon cam-

found

in the

When

the opportunity for wire-

less came up the college decided to focus on large, commonareas, said Catherine Wilkins, director of

learning resources. “Certainly one of the best areas for it is the LRC,” she said.

are set

up so

stu-

dents aren’t doing their writing, but us'ing

and the

the

Internet.

Now, if students are sitting in any of the wireless areas with the proper equipment they can be writing and researching

Wilkins “I

at

the

same

time,

said.

think the reason students are

coming

pus.

most of

The computers

the labs on campus.

to the library is

change because of

this

going to

new

Wireless tool, said

is

a great extra learning

Joey Shatilian, a first-year

management

studies student at the

is

Shatilian said his use of spare

areas including the newest addition

time has become more productive since he can now access the

throughout

of the

pretty well blanketed

the

LRC

but

library.

“We had this nice, new space where students like to come in and work in groups,” said Wilkins. “So we knew it would be a really supportive element to their research process.”

Wilkins said she thinks there

huge demand lot

to

a

for this service as a

of groups that

LRC

is

come

into the

work come equipped with

a laptop. “Students need that connectivity to the Internet in order to access

databases and other institutions to

do their work,” she said. Although the LRC does have computers on site for students, they are

in

Christmas cheer

Santa Claus came to town on Nov. 19 for this year’s Kitchener-Waterloo parade. A collection of and bands travelled down King Street and spread Christmas cheer. See pages 8 and 9 for

floats

more photos.

college.

strongest in the large, group study

is

Waving

ment.”

“We don’t always have access to open labs and this way you don’t need to depend on that,” he said.

Wireless

(Photo by Meghan Kretter)

ele-

Internet through his “I like to use

because

I

own

my own

have better technology it’s

have everything in one place,” he said. Wilkins issued one word of warning, saying students should have up-to-date security on their laptops before using the new means. “It’s the open Internet and, like any network, there is always a possibility of coming across a virus,” she said. “Students should be fine if

at

computer.

equipment

than the school computers and nice

Speeders causing concern If caught speeding

to

they just

make

sure they are

secure before they log on.”

Doon campus a driver could be criminally prosecuted

under dangerous By

BRANDON WALKER ADAM BLACK

and

A

girl

little

walks out of the

adjusting her oversized

building,

backpack.

under the Highway Traffic Act because the school is private property, but students can be punished under the student act. Tribe said. If staff at the college

She carries in her hand a picture she drew for her family. Her mother opens the car door,

resources.

“We are concerned that someone is going" to get

distracted.

She doesn’t see her daughter’s blown out of her hand by the wind or her walk quickly after it. She doesn’t see the car

killed.”

John

years and could serve a jail term of

up to six months. “We’ve had several people even racing (on campus),” said Tribe. “That could be a huge issue as well. We just don’t want to see anybody get hurt. It’s getting quite dangerous.” Tribe said security has to recognize the speeding vehicle to catch the driver.

Andrea Lewis, a

Tribe,

security representative

speeding toward her daugh-

first-year early

childhood education student, said she sees five or six drivers speeding

restrictions

a day, going between 40 and 60 km/h. The speed limit is 15 km/h. “(It’s) extremely dangerous espe-

this

cially

John Tribe, security representative for the college, said although no one has ever been hit on cam-

ty,”

“They get off the school bus first thing in the morning and there are cars that go speeding

pus, the possibility

to

that’s

“We would

ter.

Although

this is a fictional scene,

someone being

the possibility of injured on driver

more

campus by

a speeding

is real.

is

increasing as

Tribe.

large issue this year,” said

“We

someone

is

are

concerned that

going to get

he said.

Tribe also warned that

killed.”

caught

students but for the kids that are

legislation.

plate

number of

and then report If

it

prosecuted,

the car in question to police.

the

minimum fine of $200 and maximum of $1,000.

speed bumps because the buses and snowplows don’t want them. “It

a

makes

surcharge of between 20 and 25 per cent as well.

snow.”

The college

can’t give out tickets

because the driveways don’t

fall

That doesn’t include a victim fine

He

around here,” she said. The driveway near the

or she could also have his or

her licence suspended for up to two

ECE

build-

ing isn’t the only place that needs

speed prevention, Lewis

driver could

receive a

very difficult to clear the

are out

criminally prosecute a speeder

if

said the college is reluctant to add

it

who

around the bus. “So it’s dangerous not only for the

it’s

Security would record the licence

He

with the kids

here,” said Lewis.

possible for the college

speeding

under dangerous driving

drivers speed.

fairly

probably put some

on that person but if happened again (he or she) would likely be (asked) not to have (his or her) vehicle on the proper-

“Speeding drivers have become a

Joey Shatilian, a first-year management studies student, said Conestoga’s new wireless Internet access will make his spare time at school more productive. Wireless has now been activated in the LRC, the Sanctuary, the blue room and all three cafeterias.

speed they can

human

be punished by

picture get

(Photo by Meghan Kretter)

driving legislation

“I

think

it

said.

would be great

for

all

(around the college) because most of the time the cars areas

don’t stop

at the

crosswalks; they

just speed right through.

“So

if

(drivers) a

there were speed

would

little bit,”

at least

she said.

bumps

slow down


Page 2

News

— SPOKE, November 28, 2005

Now deep thoughts ...with Random

Tuition freeze By PAIGE HILTON

Conestoga College

questions answered by

random

students

Who

would you date in Hollywood and why?

aimed

between how much students should pay for tuition and what the Ontario government contributes is more imperative than debating whether or not tuition should stay

MPP

frozen, said Kitchener Centre

John Milloy.

“We

live in a

country where

we

have a system where students pay a percentage of the cost to their edu-

“Tom Cruise, so can murder him for stealing I

two of

my

Kidman and

(Nicole

Katie

Holmes.)”

Mike Cameron, third-year broadcasting

“Catherine Zeta Jones

because

I

balanced off by

is

“We

the government,” said Milloy.

want

keep tuition fees as low as

to

have

be

to

same time you

realistic

Fridenberg,

Canadian student

Swayze. Did you see his bum in Dirty Dancing?” Laura Bingeman, first-year recreation

that

is

how

stu-

it

know

all out. I

a student aid office

fast or

there’s

Conestoga,” he said. “Be aware there are a lot more resources (than people may

faster.

web

know

page,

ties

at

Ontario

dents are going to pay a share of

ty

“It’s

protest the tuition hike, said

important for students and

their families to really

show

this

government that this has wide support and this is a continuous issue they’ll have to deal with right

is

we made

of).”

the

ties, to

tuition for students

can be accessed by visiting www.reducetuitionfees.ca, is

for the

in

In

and training by 2009- ’10.

The average

which

website

said their campaign,

them.

“Check

Greener.

the

The Ontario chairperson

to

$6.2 billion for colleges, universi-

www.cfsontario.ca.

CFS

unrealistic

of

let

their

say for-

it’s

many

organizations,

to

to

going to stay frozen

In the last budget, the Ontario

Greener said the only question

Information on the premier’s

in

government invested approximately $1.5 billion in student aid, and Milloy said students need to be more aware of the services offered

or reductions.”

go up

is

same increases

sectors.

ever,” said Milloy.

would include

tuition will

think

tuition

either a continuation of the freeze

$1,820 per year for college and $4, 1 84 for university. Milloy said students have told him they appreciate the two-year tuition freeze and he would be shocked to find a student anywhere in Ontario who wanted to pay more tuition. However, he added, “as a socie-

according

“I

many

meantime, students can send fax messages to the premier and to Chris Bentley, the minister of training, colleges and universi-

The CFS was formed in 1981 in order to give Canadian students a unified and effective voice, “Patrick

cation faces the costs as

www.premier.gov.on.ca, states his government will work with colleges and universities to develop a new tuition framework for the 2006- ’07 academic year. It also promises to invest a collective

Federation

holding a campaign to Ontario government know dents feel about tuition.

management

framework

is

and proensure no

is ever turned away because of (a lack of money).” Milloy said post-secondary edu-

McGuinty essentially cut off at the heels any effective discussions by ruling out any kind of tuition fee

whether

other

third-year business

vide other (services) to

The Ontario government, led by Premier Dalton McGuinty,

The

The next question

set those rates

student

McGuinty wanted answered was

Students (CFS), along with

institutions).

how can we

ondary schools. “Students have been working closely with government officials around a tuition fee framework for September 2006,” said Jesse Greener. “We were profoundly disappointed when Premier

that balance.”

imposed a two-year tuition freeze for colleges and universities in the spring of 2004, but this September McGuinty announced tuition fees will rise again once the freeze

the costs (to attend post-secondary

th$

to

ers for people attending post-sec-

about finding

expires in 2006.

love older

women.”

Adam

cation and that

possible, but at the

girlfriends,

the message government that there should be no financial barri-

of finding a balance

task

a hot topic

sending

at

straight

The

still

through until elections,” he

“We know

said.

they’ve had thousands

of faxes coming through their machines.”

The CFS

is

also

working

to poll

students on Canadian campuses to find out how they feel about the

the decision that stu-

tuition increase.

and leisure

Celebrating with the world “Orlando Bloom because

By TARA RICKER

we’re secretly engaged!”

Cheryl Dewitt, second-year early

Canadian

and

provinces

85

countries around the globe celebrated one another’s diverse cul-

childhood education

tures during International Education Week (IEW), which took place from Nov. 14 to 20. Conestoga College participated in the week’s celebrations this

“Chewbacca (from Star Wars) because he’s tall, dark and hairy.” Hillary Greb,

second-year early childhood education

year for the

first

time.

“Being involved

in

IEW

helps

the college raise awareness

understanding education,”

of

Samantha

said

manager

Murray,

and

international

and

student adviser for international education at the college.

International students contribute to

Canada both

socially

and eco-

nomically, said Murray.

“Cher or Madonna. After that nightmare would never want to date anyone from Hollywood

“They

enhance our culture and provide for richer

diversity

I

learning experiences for

all

stu-

(Norumo) Brandt, Kiyoharu Dodo and Ishimatso Takehito.

Dodo and

dents,” she said.

Internationalization

again.”

(Photo by Tara Ricker) Students from the Conestoga Language Institute spoke proudly about their Japanese culture. From left, Shuji Naito, Norm

of educa-

tion also increases the opportuni-

Takehito are currently

in their third level

Naito,

of the English

as a second language program. Brandt is a graduate from the program and is now taking computer programming at the college.

ties to build international partner-

Tim Vanderspeck, third-year broadcasting

ships

and opportunities for research and development, which

the

Canadian educational institutions have been doing successfully.

program at the college. Programs at the college have attracted students from all parts of the world including Taiwan. Japan, Germany, Mexico, Indonesia and Thailand.

“International

education is a win-win situation for everyone

“Robbie Williams

because

he’s hot

and

I

love the British accent.”

involved.”

Currently there are 191 interna-

rise again,” said Pauline Shore, co-ordinator of the English

studies

“IEW

tional students attending the col-

Daniela Huber, broadcasting

first-year

lege. Out of the 191, 80 are enrolled in English language studies

and

1

1

1

are enrolled in inter-

us

to

celebrate

global learning opportunities that allow others to study in Canada, as

well

as

opportunities for students to travel

national diploma and degree pro-

Canadian

grams.

around the world and enjoy glob-

“International

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!

allows

ment dropped

SARS

student

enrol-

drastically after the

scare, but

it

is

slowly on

al

educational experiences,” said

Shore.

Students from The Conestoga

Language Institute spoke with Conestoga students and showcased artifacts from their homelands throughout the week.

“We want to teach students about our different cultures,” said Nancy Franco, a student from the institute.

a

“Even though Canada

multicultural

country,

is

many

Canadians do not know about

dif-

ferent cultures.”

Franco was born and raised in Colombia. She came to Canada in June 2004. “Being able to obtain an education in Canada will open so many doors for me.”


News

abound

Litterbugs By

SPOKE, November

“When you ask people they

was formed

litter,

in

2003.

Members of groups and tions such as

organiza-

Susan

Conestoga College,

Cambridge

long term.”

force.

She more

ter,

ask people

if

they

they say no,” said White.

lit-

said urban areas- tend to have

issues with

litter

White said roadways and downtown areas are of particular con-

force

cern to the taskforce.

to raise people’s

ness of the

aware-

problem

The region gives $50,000 each year to the group, and Kitchener,

taskforce has posted signs in

Cambridge and Waterloo each con-

in

The

schools, at bus stops and along the

highway with

“The They have even made radio commercials, which are played on Kitchener’s 91 .5 The Beat. In a 2004 media release, White only cure for

litter is

said,

“Changing the behaviour o/

those

who

litter is

This

you.”

is

to

White said the region spends about a million dollars each year on litter

cleanup.

alone spent $400,000 on street sweeping, vacuuming and litter

pen overnight; all the Organizations involved have made a commitment

collection.

issue over the

loo. on. ca

Danielle Howlett, a first-year general arts and sciences student, some litter at the college.

picks up

litter

if

a provincewide

management program was

implemented.

“We’re

interested

in

rallying

other municipalities into a provin-

White said a

lot

of

this

money

and litter managewsusan@region. Water-

at

(Photo by Adam Hannon)

could be saved

In 2002, the city of Kitchener

cial

program,” she said.

White

said other cities in Ontario,

such as Windsor, already have

litter

programs in place. “With litter there’s no geographic boundaries.”

White

said

Toronto has begun

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out of their

ticipate in the “20-minute makeover” in 2006. She asked that students e-mail

signs and commercials created

not going to hap-

to addressing this

money

is let

“It has a huge impact,” she said. Kitchener and Waterloo will par-

tribute $20,000.

their slogan,

specific

school to pick up

less dense.

the

litter

community.

a

everyone

is

something none of us admit to, but, it does happen.” She said the purpose of the task-

much

At

than rural

where the population

areas,

“It’s

of course is

White,

Litter Reduction Taskforce

and

Waterloo are also part of the task-

“When you

it

member of Waterloo Region ’s

boards and the cities of

Kitchener,

if

It’s

does happen.”

the University of Waterloo, local

school

they say no.

something none of us admit to, but, of course

Reduction

Litter

— Page 3

another initiative called the “20minute makeover.”

The manager of waste collection and diversion for the Region of Waterloo said litter is a big problem in the region. Susan White is a member of the region’s

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Page 4

Commentary

— SPOKE, November 28, 2005

Give to those in need this holiday season The holidays

are a time for family, friends and loved ones

and enjoy life. Some people are not as fortunate. About 17 per cent of Canadians live in poverty. While most families across the region exchange gifts to show appreciation, others struggle to put food on the table. In today's world it is sad that families can afford to spend to celebrate their beliefs

hundreds of dollars during the season but not donate a

sin-

gle dollar or can of food to a local shelter or soup kitchen.

For example, recent studies have shown the average North American family now spends more than $500 on gifts, including DVDs, video game consoles, board games, jewellry and much more. Aside from gifts, families “About 17 per cent of also celebrate by putting up Canadians live in poverdecorations each year. ty. While most families Although it may often be overlooked, decorations are a across the region major market. According to exchange gifts to show

www.marketresearch.com, market for decorations worldwide in 2003 was $14.1 billion. On top of that, it was predicted to grow by the total

thier appreciation, others

struggle to put food on

There

the table.”

The

4.5 per cent last year, reaching $14.7 billion.

The most wonderful time of the year should be about supporting everyone, not only those you know and love, but those who need help as well. While many gather with their families for a delicious holiday turkey dinner, others may have to scrounge to celebrate their dinner with sandwiches. For many, Dec. 25 is a day to celebrate. However, this year, people throughout K-W should make it a day for almost everyone to celebrate by stuffing the stockings of those less fortunate with donations, especially canned food. Remember, it is better to give than receive, especially when the giving is to those who are in need. Give generously this holiday season. The Christmas Bureau, a combined effort of the House of Friendship and Salvation Army, is currently looking for volunteers and accepting donations of money, non-perishable food items and toys. To help out call the Salvation Army toy centre at 745-2320. Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) offers a way for students, staff and faculty to donate without leaving Doon campus. The Christmas Wishtree helps students with children under the age of 15 by allowing donors to pick an ornament off the tree and buy the gift it says for the child. The tree is on display outside Door 4. Other drives such as The

Will you

is

no excuse for ignoring those

engagement

rules of

many me?

tive pills rattling in their bottle.

She finds someone who

perfect

is

Janet know

the tricky

dilemmas and impossible predicaments that soon follow an engage-

bride or

responsible to

tell

10

Opinion

minutes before the wedding ceremony begins and must remind them again 10 minutes after the

now

Something happens to people the news of an upcoming wedding spreads. Someone will

fantasy

through her child’s special day,

ceremony ends. 4. Even if you are being held at gunpoint you should still find time

always disapprove; someone will

complete with an expanding guest

to finish

laugh or cry, while most others are

list,

congratulatory and willing to help

cloths,

the I

new

couple.

has chosen to

just recently asked to stand

up

in

some new

friends of mine. I’ve seen the hap-

aren’t

piest of

moments, shared

in their

many

1

the other hand,

I

have been

to

share

if

.

A couple may

anyone else

not get engaged

in their

family

is

and downright

to steal the other couple’s thunder.

wedding so

noises must be expressed. This can

hand

be curled the day

be anything from the sound of a

www.therecord.com/howto-

help/christmas.html.

of.

The mother-in-law with financial

interest

in

the

a vested

match

wedding

glasses to deep breathing and seda-

welcome

Spoke welcomes

ISfc

for the ring bearer

be over the age of

tions.

For any young couple

who

the

and clinking wine

retain these rules for future refer-

ence.

Is published and produced weekly by the Journalism students

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be contacted

Advertising Manager: Janet Morris Production Managers: Steph Baulk,

of Conestoga College

be published. 500 words. to edit any letter

Letters should be no longer than

Spoke reserves

the right

N2G 4M4

Brent Gerhart

Jason Sonser

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

for publication.

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B1 4, Kitchener, Ont,

Editor:

Circulation Manager:

Melissa Hancock Jon Yaneff Photo Editors: Chantelle Timperley, Mike Bors, Denise Muller

for verification.

letters will

Spoke Online

Dr.,

Web

site:

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.

is

thinking of getting engaged, please

Editor: Paige Hilton

letters to

editor. Letters

No unsigned

wrong girl to

Spoke

r„

Letters are

the appropriate preparatory

igniting

10. It is

While some of the new rules may seem unconventional they are becoming the new standard in engagement and wedding tradi-

as not

Before any major commitment

made

pic-

25.

cur-

rently planning a

2.

You can never have enough

or flower

this

rather than allowing their locks to

visit

7.

tures with people’s heads cut off.

around for the weird, unpredictable irritating times.

Astaire.

of.

have decided

I

be

knowledge.

traditions.

On

aware

may

most people

rules that

While dancing everyone does to dance like Fred

6.

know how

Aside from the normal traditions of getting engaged there

invitations.

are barred.

the guests.

all

your

During the reception no holds

5.

hotdogs and straw cowboy

another wedding for two very good

planning and been party to

live her

vicariously

red and white checked table-

hats for

have been a bridesmaid and was

wedding

is

volunteer,

is

when

The gracious bride who insists on permed hair for her bridesmaids

a

is

either the

the other half about this flaw

ment.

who

groom

in

Morris

Food Bank, UNICEF, Tree of Angels, Kids Link Foundation and many more are also underway to help add cheer to the holiday season. For more information on donating to these drives or lending a as

wedding attendant who

aware of any flaw

ried.

does she

A

3.

for her and they decide to get mar-

Little

need.

in


c

:

News

SPOKE, November

Tech lab helps students with By PAIGE HILTON Students with disabilities can use

mote than

a dozen types of

Learning Opportunities Task Force and supported by the Ministry of

been used, not how many different

Training,

students use

Colleges -and and focused on comawareness, employment

computer software and hardware in the adaptive technology lab to help them

transitions, students’ transitions to

excel in their program, said the lab’s

college, study strategies,

computer technology consultant. “We have all our software place, we keep it up-to-date and

success through programming and adaptive technology support.

show it,”

it

said

in

es can all

academic

whoever wants to see Su Lyttle. “Anybody who

off to

come

in

and use the lab and

the software.”

An

munity

we

registered with disability servic-

is

Universities,

“I

be able function and keep up

don’t think

I’d

without this

to

engineering

The equipment, software and hardware he said was helpful is housed in the adaptive technology

Room 2A1 13. “Most of our software

lab in

is

either

speech to text or text to speech. So, if you have text on the screen, it’ll read it to you, or you can speak and the text will appear on

Among

most used programs Kurzweil 3000, a program that provides the user with visual and auditory displays of scanned text and images, meaning it can display a textbook and even read it to the user. the

in the lab is

Lyttle.

Dragon NaturallySpeaking is another highly utilized program,

“Reading and writing are the areas

allowing students to speak into their

(we) target.” Students can

computer and have what they are

explained

thank a project called the Learning Opportunities Project, which concluded in 2002, for the equipment. project

was funded by

the

saying typed out in front of them. Lyttle said usage of the lab for

September and October was around 550 students each month. She pointed out the number repre-

2005

— Page 5

disabilities

times the lab has

it.

first-year

mechanical engi-

neering and automated manufacturing student said he uses the lab

because

to study

it’s

one of the qui-

etest places in the college. “I don’t think I’d

be able to func-

tion

and keep up without

ity,”

said

Tim

this facil-

Joseph.

Joseph said he uses the technology to scan his textbooks to

He

read to him.

firsl-year mechanical

ing disability.

The

One

facility.”.

Tim Joseph,

article in the

screen,”

how many

transferred to the

Nov. 7 edition of Spoke described a man’s personal journey while living with a learn-

the

sents

28,

have them

said he specifically

Doon campus to be

and said facilities at other schools don’t measure up. Students must be diagnosed with closer to the lab

a learning disability to use the adaptive technology lab, Lyttle said, but gaining access is as

ices office in If

a student

Room is

(Photo

easy

as walking into the disability serv-

2A109.

already diagnosed,

they just register as a student with a disability. If a student has a sus-

Tim Joseph

is

one

by Paige Hilton)

hundreds of students who use the adaptive Room 2A1 13. He said the lab is one of the quiof

technology lab in etest places in the college.

pected learning disability, Lyttle said they will still have access to

National

Defense

Defence

nationale

the lab while they are waiting to be

diagnosed.

“Even arm,

if

someone has a broken

it’s still

They can

a temporary disability.

come in and use the lab or write their exams,” she said. still

For more information, visit www.conestogac.on.ca/spneeds.

Christmas clearance Students were able to dig through piles of discounted textbooks, merchandise

and

apparel at drastically reduced prices at the bookstore’s

annual sidewalk sale, Nov. that ran from 10 a.m. to 3

p.m.

1

7,

A CAREER I’LL

1AKE PRIDE IN

Want

a career that’s

some

bar-

gains for the holiday season. Events such as a textbook buy-back are coming up in the near future. For more

Une

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Forces

canadiennes, c’est plus

Forces offer you:

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a wide range of careers in

Partridge found

more

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than just a job? The Canadian

Conestoga students Jennifer Livingstone and Ashley

UNE CARRIERE

professional fields

Nous vous •

offrons

un vaste choix de carrieres

and technical trades

dans des domaines

specialized training

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To find out more about our part- and full-time

pour vos etudes

career opportunities, visit

your local Canadian

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Pour en savoir plus sur les possibility

a

upcoming events, you can e-mail the information on

temps

plein,

partiel

de carrieres ou a temps

rendez-vous dans un

centre de recrutement des

bookstore at bookstore @conestogac. on.

Forces canadiennes pres

de chez vous.

Photos by

STRONG. PROUD. TODAY’S CANADIAN FORCES.

DECOUVREZ VOS FORCES DANS LES FORCES CANADIENNES.

Kristin Grifferty C&NAQUUI FORCES

Canada

1 800 856-8488 www.forces.gc.ca


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News

Airport looks to be available

Flights will soon MOLSON

By JON

The operations manager

the

at

repair, avionics repair

and

aircraft rental

scheduled airline service to 128 destinations through Northwest Airlines, on site weather observation and air cargo as well as Just-in-Time freight serv-

premier regional full-service airport, serving Canada’s Technology Triangle.

responsible

for the day-to-day operation of the

He

ensures the

airport

operates within federal government

regulations

and guidelines. Campbell also makes sure preventative maintenance is done properly to allow for the

maximum

lifes-

pan of the planes.

focus has shifted service

now

to attracting

the

community,

for

the

The

airport

Fountain

St.

located at 4881

is

N. in Breslau.

Campbell said there to the airport being

are benefits

owned by

the

region.

“Since the region took 100 per cent ownership

all

the technical,

and legal support has become available to the airport,” he said. “This creates significant savings and efficiencies allowing airport staff to focus on enhancing

ties

Dominican Republic.” and was completed During that time five

in the late ’40s

gateway to the community. “People from abroad can now fly to the Region of W’aterloo International Airport to

region,”

Campbell

said.

visit

the

“The

air-

available

for

their

companies look for

needs.

challenge

adjusted to the Region of Waterloo

He said the Waterloo airport has changed over the years.

making the Region of Waterloo the sole owner and operator. It was

named an

officially

international

airport in 2003 with the commencement of scheduled air serv-

United States.

ice to the

The day.

for

airport is

open 24 hours a

moving

to a

“The airport has continuously grown since it opened in 1950. The steady growth over the years has

allowed the original airfield to develop into a regional airport, continuing to support the diverse business of the Region of W’aterloo and surrounding area.

“We

support the community’s

with hometown personality and convenience over driving to Toronto and being consumed by the masses and stress associated

Triangle,”

the

“Technology

which represents the

economic

region that includes Kitchener, W'aterloo, Guelph and

Cambridge. Approximately 28 aviation-related businesses are located throughout the Technology Triangle.

The

largest aircraft permitted for use

a regular basis at the airport

is

on the

Boeing 737 or Airbus A3 10, which can carry up to 1 80 people.

The services offered Waterloo

International

include a restaurant, control,

fuel

and

at

the

Airport

air

aircraft

traffic

han-

travel.

towards the airport.

Just-in-Time cargo delivery to

business and personal

Campbell believes the hardest is community awareness

desire to travel from a local airport

service

for

communi-

provides the infrastructure

It

it

Some

when Waterloo County was regionalized, the ownership was

in

lizing

local air serv-

ice prior to

to the region,

airplane flys over the Region of Waterloo International Airport, located at 4881 Fountain St. N. in Breslau. Kevin Campbell, the operations manager of the airport, would like to see area residents uti-

and

ty-”

the airport for $1

An

suppliers by having a local airport

municipalities (Preston, Hespeler,

and the City of Guelph. In 1996, Guelph sold its share

:

port also allows local companies to

Guelph, Kitchener and Waterloo County), owned the airport. In 1974,

A'rA;

fliii

(Photo byJonMotson) said the airport provides a

better access their customers

Construction on the airport began

_

and community awareness,” he

He

mandate,

this

:

services, such as airline opportuni-

or

Northwest Airlines started operations and winter charter airline operations will commence on Dec. 22 to Mexico., Cuba and the

1950.

ices.

said.

personal travel.

in

and charter servic-

es,

uti-

airport for business

Through

Cuba and the Dominican Republic

to Mexico,

:

ensuring the community can lize

even higher

fly

financial

“The airport has a master plan, which was approved in 2000 by regional council,” he said. “As part of the master plan, the main air

— Page 7

and

Airport says the airport’s strategic vision is to operate the facility as a

airport.

2005

sales,

Region of Waterloo International

is

28,

dling, aircraft repairs, flight training, helicopter flight training

Kevin Campbell

SPOKE, November

with a big airport.”

Campbell

is

confident about the

future success of the airport. “I have been here for 18 years and have seen nothing but growth,

with the economy of the Region of Waterloo growing at the rate it is,” he said. “Along with three promi-

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airport (two in W’aterloo and one in Guelph) I see nothing but continued growth and success at the airport.”

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Feature

— SPOKE, November 28, 2005

Page 8

J&tvE,

&

Jou,y CKaisfmi

(Photos by Meghan Kretter)

Kitchener’s Santa Ciaus parade brought holiday

spirit to

thou-

sands of K-W residents. Above left, the Burlington Teen Tour band marches down the street. Left, Canada Post’s mailbox mascot accepts a letter to Santa. Above, a fire prevention Dalmatian waves to parade supporters.

New

electronic toys top this year’s wish

MCCORMICK

By TIFFANY

good way their

Christmas

just around the cor-

is

for children to

occupy

time while amusing them.

A new

item that

is

getting a lot of

knows what that means. Bright lights, fluffy snow, the smell of pine and the singing of

consumer

carols.

Wal-Mart’s biggest sellers are also Young Furby and Roboraptor. Steve Pye, assistant manager, said the Young Furby is a big seller because it is “a classic.” He said the Roboraptor’s newness is what makes it a wanted item. However, over at Zellers, Lynn

ner and everyone

Amongst

all

the

holiday cheer

Christmas bestows, there is one aspect that many love and many more hate, Christmas shopping. Crowded parking lots, pushy customers, sold-out signs and the everquest to find

lasting

gifts to please the

the

perfect

ones you love.

Instead of fretting over the latest

DVD

or

Xbox game

teens, think about the

young younger chilfor

What

toys

will

sellers for children to 12 outside the

be the biggest ages preschool

computer and

Grassi, a service supervisor, said

who

for school-aged children.

new Fisher

Price

karaoke machine is very popular with parents for children in preschool.

last

now

a sales associate for

future superstars can improving their vocal skills at an even younger age with the development of this new singing machine. start

ages live to nine while Tumble Time Tigger is a select item for

believe these items will be the most

preschoolers.

popular

Cute and cuddly toys that make sound and bounce around are a

sumer reports and

Grassi

still

said

this

she

has

reason

Christmas due

back when they arc

to

lo con-

parents’

feed-

in the store.

all

games and games

the video

have not

lost their

edge

in the

market.

Everyone can recall “Go to jail, do not pass go, do not collect $200” and attempting to buy the ridiculously expensive Boardwalk or trying to uncover Mrs. Peacock in the kitchen with the knife or rac-

ing

through

Lollipop

Woods,

Peanut Acres and the Chocolate

Swamp. Suad Bazain, a customer service worker at The Bay, said board games such as Monopoly, Clue and Candyland are a popular item this Christmas season. Bazain also said Barbie and the Magic of Pegasus dolls seem to be

what they

The world’s

wouldn’t give his

Toys R Us. He said Young Furby is “making a comeback” for children is

Christmas toys

are Tamagotchies and Bratz Dolls

tel

evision set?

name,

dinosaur.

Grassi said a

dren.

Eric,

attention is Roboraptor, an interactive sensor-based robot

this year’s biggest

Amongst

battery-operated toys, board

He best

a lot of little girls

come

want when

into the store.

thinks these items will be the sellers

for

The Bay due

to

advertisements on TV.

Wendy, who refused to give her name, is a sales associate at Sears. She said for boys Mega Blocks dragons and pirates, and Bratz Dolls for girls “are what all the kids seem to be wanting." Shelley Schenk, manager of last

Conestoga’s day-care centres, said she

feels

parents

sometimes get

sucked into the advertising aspect of Christmas and the media presentation of toys.

Schenk said the

attitude parents

take

when buying Christmas

pres-

ents

is

“this is out there so

must

it

be good.”

lists

themselves time over time.”

Alongside toys that can build creand problem-solving skills, Schenk said buying toys that can be used for different purposes and will have a longer life are important. “Toys are expensive.” ativity

Schenk said electronic learning toys such as Leapfrog books are

She said although technological are what children seem lo have a great interest in. people should not get so focused on techtoys

useful but arc not always the best

thing for children.

“Children learned

we had

Schenk suggested

nology.

“Those toys don't promote social interaction and social skills," Schenk said. She mentioned that sometimes parents can get caught up with certain figures their children like

such

use the

to

read before

Leapfrog.”

money

that

parents

they had planned to

spend on electronic books and toys and buy their children regular books. This allows parents to spend

more time with

their children as

they learn to read.

Batman or Spider-Man, but they should not just buy them all of one

Schenk’s overall message for Christmas toys this year is to buy

thing.

things that serve a purpose, will

as

“Finding a balance she said.

Schenk remember ination

said

is

important,”

people

need

to

toys that allow for imag-

and creativity

like

Lego,

building blocks, colouring books

and crayons. “Some of those things are ageless,” she said. “They’ve proven

interest

your child and allow for

mind development and creativity. Toys such as Fisher Price kitchens and garages, blocks and paints

may have been

the

hot

items 20 years ago, but they are still in stores today and they are the toys that "stand the test of time.”


Feature

If $

...

fim

$E$f

tftE,

SPOKE, November

or fK&

28,

2005

— Page 9

yam

(Photos by Meghan Kretter)

Clockwise from top left: Kiwanis Club of KitchenerWaterloo members wave to parade watchers. Food bank volunteers gratefully collect

donations

for

Christmas cheer.

Toronto Police Pipe Band members serenade the crowd with their favourite Christmas

songs played on bagpipes. Santa Claus greets bystanders during his early visit to K-W on Nov. 19, exactly 36 days before Christmas.

City hall gets

decked with the holiday

By LEE EVANS

Reinhart,

wonderful,” said

Marg

one of the volunteers. She was

The volunteers

sell-

“The media

great,” said Merli.

was “They came here

noon and each

participant deco-

friends launch

Mary’s

ing raffle tickets at the display. All

at

General Hospital have been busier

the prizes were provided by local

rated a gingerbread house, and then

than Santa’s elves turning the city

sponsors, and included a wicker

those were sold to raise money.”

rotunda into a Christmas won-

chaise lounge from Hauser and a

Some

hall

at

St.

derland.

reclining

The annual

now

in

its

Festival of Trees

16th

is

year of raising

funds for the hospital and ran from Nov. 17 to 26.

The volunteers organized many activities

attraction

and events, but the main was the display of beau-

decorated trees. They are sponsored by community businesses and organizations. tifully

The volunteers decorate the and sell them to the public to

trees

raise

funds.

Money

raised this year will

go

to

chair

Tickets cost $2 each or three for $5. Other prizes in the draw included

diamond

place and a cappuccino maker.

Do you

have a sweet tooth for Christmas goodies and not enough time to bake? You may want to try the boxed shortbread cookies the volunteers baked up. They received a donation of 1 80 pounds of butter from Gay Lea dairy and worked two shifts in Angie’s Kitchen in Waterloo to whip up 1,500 dozen cookies. The tasty cookies are $8 for three dozen.

and for future services to heart patients from Waterloo, Wellington, Dufferin and GreyBruce County.

“The theme

The

festival

was

first

held

Victoria Park pavilion, then to

Seagram Museum and

in its ninth

“The

year

is

at the

moved in now

at city hall.

girls that

do the

trees are

of the local media sponsors Radio, 570 News Radio, Rogers Television, The are

CHYM FM

Record and CTV.

On

earrings, an electric fire-

the cardiac care centre at the hospital

from La-Z-Boy.

spirit

Saturday, they held a chil-

noon and craft-making session. Chloe Callander and Elisabeth Haddad from the Congress of Black Women provided story-telling dren’s lunch with Santa at

a

entertainment for the children.

“They are really fun,” said Merli. “They do a great job.” Other events were a luncheon with a Mardi Gras theme, a fashion show, a seniors’ tea and a cranberry card party.

this

year

is

retro

The volunteer

Christmas,” said Jan Merli, director of volunteer resources at St.

raise just as

Mary’s.

year.

She was referring

$80,000

association raised

last year,

and

much

is

or

hoping to

more

this

to several dis-

For further information about the

(Photo by Lee Evans)

plays that incorporated ’50s-style

association’s fund-raising activities

furniture and toys, as well as a jukebox and Elvis records along with the trees and ornaments.

and volunteer opportunities, contact St. Mary’s Hospital Volunteer Association at (519) 749-6558.

Jan Merli, St. Mary’s hospital director of volunteer resources, arranges the 1950’s family tree display at Kitchener’s City Hall. The tableau was assembled by St. Mary’s Hospital volunteers and shows gifts that may have appeared under a 1950’s family tree.


*

Page 10

News

— SPOKE, November 28, 2005

Men need By

TODD RELLINGER

More and more men

are venturing

out into the world of day spas and

Look

out ladies.

men may be

As

stands

now

taking over the one

thing you thought

time

it

was

all

yours,

at the spa.

are purchasing

see

how

be pampered

to

men’s packages

to

their counterparts live.

skin care specialist at Gina’s health

and beauty spa

Men come ments,

“About 30 to 40 per cent of our clientele is men,” said Julia Decicco,

ones

in

in

Waterloo. for various treat-

Decicco. The main pedicures, laser hair

said

are

removal, waxing and just to get

their hair done, she said.

“Once they come visit,

we can

Men

in for their first

them

talk

into other

they get there they see that she said.

come

“Lots of couples

it’s

not,

in togeth-

Decicco. “The girls bring in their boyfriends and then they’re

hooked.” It

when men come

in at

said

Bella

Chameleon

and spa in Waterloo. “Usually they come in for the first time with a gift certificate,” said hair studio

Skinner.

eyebrows, chest and back waxing, she said.

However, most men don’t pamper themselves, Skinner said. “They don’t know what they are missing.” of

men

think

world and don’t

treat

it’s

a

women’s

themselves to

the experience, she said.

and going

to

spas are just for women is no more! Men are following in women’s footsteps the spa for a day of relaxation, massages, facials, manicures and pedicures. that

The

difference between

women

are that the

men

men and

tend to

fall

asleep once they get on the facial table while

-

-

$ 2,000

student at Conestoga

my

appearance to go to the spa.” Stephen Bishop and Shane Parker, both second-year management studnitely both

“Men women

women

lay there and

go

would

suffer the

same elements “Our skin

do,” said Parker.

needs to be clean just

like theirs.”

Bishop said his friends rode him for months after his first spa visit but didn’t deter

him from going back

again.

“Taking care of yourself

is

like

a dirty guy.”

He

said he has gone to the spa for a pedicure but has never had a facial done. “If guys took care of themselves and went to the spa, they may get

lucky more often,” said Bishop.

Spa packages for men can range from as little as a half hour for a quick massage and can go right into a full day (six-hour) event to get the full

treatment of a manicure, pedi-

said.

hair cut.

actually get

more men

in for

said Skinner.

self-

respect,” said Bishop. “Girls don’t

cure, facial, massage, Jacuzzi

our hourly massage then women,”

defi-

for a treatment or two.

enjoy the treatment and relax, she

“We

ATTENTION ALL FIRST YEAR i((( STUDENTS, HERE’S YOUR CHANCE TO WIN:

management

it

Most of Chameleon’s regular male customers come in for their

lot

Swidrovich, a second-year business

ies students, said they

depends on the time of year

Skinner, eSthetician

A

“You would never see me go, I was paid,” said Eric

unless

College. “I don’t care enough about

er,” said

The stereotype

Conestoga College had difwhether or not they would go for a spa day. at

ferent responses to

treatments,” said Decicco.

Men think there is a stigma that it’s women only at the spa, but once

too!

and

The price range to treat yourself can vary from $50 for a massage to $200 for the entire package.

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Fall to From wet

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to white in only

two days, Mother Nature

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patterns consistent. With

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and lowering temperatures, a cold winter could way sooner than some hope.


News

SPOKE, November

— Page 11

2005

28,

Children of a Vanished World By LEE EVANS

and moving presentation at the Humanities Theatre Nov. 10.

The photos are presented on a 10x 14-foot screen to the accompani-

the children’s eyes, showing mal-

Joint

ment of a five-piece ensemble of pianist, cellist, clarinetist and two talented, young Canadian opera

clothes are ragged and threadbare.

wary, they have spotted the photog-

States and he began a

singers.

rapher and are not sure

letters

During the Second World War,

towns and villages

These

small

in eastern

called

through Poland,

scattered

shtetl,

Europe.

villages,

In

and

nutrition

In

some,

friend or foe.

photographer

then obliterated during the “ethnic

Matulewicz, and the tenor, Joey Niceforo, both performed the lead

cleansing” of the Nazi regime.

roles

were

sealed off and

at first isolated,

Roman

The

Marta

soprano,

Prague’s

at

Spanish

Judy Kopelow, a Toronto produccame across the book and decided to make it into a presentation, entitled Children of a Vanished World, for Holocaust Education Week. Kopelow also provided nar-

Synagogue in July 2005. The ensemble performed Yiddish folk songs that were common to that culture and would have been sung to the children by their parents or sung by the children in games. The songs were reminiscent of the music from the play, Fiddler on the Roof. While the pictures were being shown, Kopelow read poems, quotes from the photographer and his daughter, Mara Vishnia Kohn, as well as grim statistics from the many cities that were wiped out by

ration for the presentation.

the Nazis.

Vishniac, a Latvian Jew,

travelled throughout these villages

secretly taking photographs of the

children

He

lives.

going about their daily took 16,000 photos over a

three-year span.

A book of remem-

made of 70 of

brance

these photos

was published by University of California Press in 1999.

er,

“The pictures are so sad and powerful,” she said, “they really needed

Jewish culture, art and education before being obliterated forever by Hitler’s army. The numbers are

a powerful voice.”

The Waterloo Region Holocaust Education Committee and the Department of Jewish Studies, of Arts,

Faculty

University

thriving centres of

mind-numbing and seem

black and white photos of

the

of

children

Waterloo, sponsored the dynamic

to defy

at

play,

worship and

work.

Take the time

expressions

The

are

he

if

is

sight of a Jewish

was cause for suspicion, and so most of the photos were taken with the camera hidden under his coat and the lens peeking out from an in the late ’30s

Distribution

Committee

At the beginning of and

the war, he

his family fled to the

them

to

United

campaign of pleading for

officials,

to help the children in the

photos.

Even

his letter to Eleanor

fell on deaf ears; he received a polite thank you for the

Roosevelt

pictures, but she told

him she was

too busy.

heard Kopelow perform on “I felt

that the world

about to be cast

mad shadow Roman

of

was

into the

Nazism

...”

Vishniac,

all

some mischiesome exhausted, and some play,

to see her in person.

Pasternak,

woman

a

67-y ear-old

originally

from

Czechoslovakia, survived the Nazi extermination due to Christians her older siswhile her parents were hidden elsewhere.

of the photos, however, the

at

Lily

Jewish

came

ter

faces are beautiful,

vous,

radio and

CBC

who cared for her and

Russian photographer In

to

raise funds to rescue the children.

One of the audience members had

enlarged button hole.

exuberant

They were

The

dehydration.

their

Ewa

Hungary and Romania,

Russia,

you can

the photos

Vishniac meant for his photos to be used by the American Jewish

thousands of Jewish children vanished along with their families from

many of

see the tightly drawn skin around

unaware

their

soon to be snuffed out. “Why did I do it?” Vishniac asked. “I felt that the world was about to be cast into the mad shadow of Nazism and that the outcome would be the annihilation of a people who had no spokesman to lives are

record their plight.”

The area where they

lived

was

under the feudal system at the beginning of the war. Her father was an overseer for the aristocrat’s still

split

up and the

sisters

were con-

verted to Catholicism by a local priest in order to blend in.

“We were 1944

until

hidden from August March 1945,” said

Pasternak, “and then

we were

liber-

ated by the Russians.”

Her

family had already

aunt’s

immigrated

to

Canada, and her

family joined them in 1947.

“Canada was not very terrific about you know,” she said. The country needed farmers, so her aunt’s family posed as farmers letting in Jews,

in order to

be accepted. In their

wound up growing poppies, and were investigated by the RCMP for their error in judgment. “My father sat in the back of the Grade 1 class in older to learn English,” said Pasternak. “They didn’t have all the immigrant programs they have now.” She graduated from university and taught biology at the ignorance, however, they

University of Waterloo.

Now she spends her time going to

farmlands, and as such was desig-

schools to talk about the Holocaust,

nated as an “economically impor-

mostly to Grade 11 and 12 history

tant Jew,” said Pasternak.

students.

When

neighbouring Slovakia took over, the leader of that country was in favour of what the Nazis were doing, and the local Jews had to go into hiding. Their family was

something

happened in would you save your neighbour if you knew the penalty was you were going to be “If

Canada

(like this),

shot?” she asks the students.

see the world prices graduates can afford

for

to

By VANESSA PARKER

She

also suggests taking advantage of the

money on food costs and suggests checking to see if the hostel has a curfew if you are staying out late. Hostelworld.com is a site ideal for students because it offers all the hostels available in hostel’s kitchen to save

A common when

selves

question students ask them-

finished school

what do

is

I

do

with myself now.

For those of you who feel settling down and working 9 to 5 is still a couple of months or years away, relax. Instead, look into travelling around the world in a cost-efficient and educational way. determine where you want to go.

First,

Morytko, a

Megan

from Hostelworld.com, recommends checking out open-jaw tickets. These tickets allow you to fly into one place and out of another, giving you ample opportunity to see numerous destinations. If you are under 26, Morytko recommends asking your travel agent if there are any youth passes available. travel agent

Some recommendations

for students plan-

ning on backpacking are to learn about the culture of the country before

you

visit

it.

“Try

not to look like a tourist,” Morytko suggests.

She also advises students to visit local restaurants and bars. “These are much cheaper and you can try the traditional specialties and meet locals, said Morytko. Budget airlines and trains are the most cost-efficient and timely ways to travel. Morytko advises travellers to look into student discount packages and group rates if travelling with others.

The cheapest way to sleep in a foreign knowing somebody with a

country, besides

spare couch,

Not only

is

hostels.

good

for the

bank

account but they are also a great opportunity learn

more about

meet other

travellers

and

the city they are visiting.

was located downtown on High Street. I know what to expect at first. A friend and I had booked our beds through a travel agent for 22 pounds each, which is cheap compared to the 50 plus it would have cost if we stayed in a hotel or bed and didn’t

breakfast.

When tion, the

to

my

I first

same

walked

in I

as hotels,

signed in

at

recep-

and was then shown

room.

The room was more

like a large

common

area with 10 beds.

had no idea that there would be so many in beds so close together. We put our bags on our designated bunk and went out to forget about where we were I

people

residing.

We ended up going out that night and meeting many other travellers and acquainted ourselves with the Scottish culture by drinking pints and watching rugby. I

decided to disguise

my

voice and put on a

advantage for students because most hostels offer courses about the

you are temporarily

I could fool any Scotsmen. I ended up fooling a fellow Canadian who was not only staying in the

same

hostel

as

us

but

was

also

We all

Two fires - same cause

ended up touring around the United

Kingdom

together.

which are crucial if you want a break from lugging all your things,” Morytko

I stayed in I made room and have not stayed in a dormitory-style room again. Although sleeping in a room of snoring strangers was not the most desirable night cap, the individuals I met made up for the

advises.

lack of sleep.

visiting,” said

Morytko.

One

tip for

lockers

In the rest of the hostels

sure to request a private

students staying in hostels

remember your

lock.

is

(Photo by Brandon Walker)

from

Kitchener.

“Hostels are an

culture

were researched and experienced by Hostelworld.com staff. I have stayed in a couple of hostels, the first time being in Edinburgh, Scotland. It

Scottish accent to see if

are hostels

for a traveller to

The site outlines travel packages and has guides and tours available that

every country.

to

“All hostels provide

On

Nov. 19, for the second

Church Street apartment

A

in

weekend

in

a row,

firefighters

were called

Kitchener because of an overheated pot

to left

a on the

confirmed it was the same man who overheated a pot Nov. and two police cars responded to the alarm. With the Christmas holidays right around the corner, fire safety and prevention is especially important, since more electrical sockets will be used for twinkling lights, candles will be aglow and seasonal cooking aromas will fill the air. stove.

firefighter

13. Five fire trucks


News

— SPOKE, November 28, 2005

Page 12

Joseph Schneider Haus ‘hams’ By CHANTELLE TIMPERLEY

mer sausage

since they took longer

smoke. Herb Greulich is a retired butcher who has been volunteering for the to

The Joseph Schneider Haus

held a

Butchering Bee on Nov. 19 to show people how to not only make and cure their

own

meats, hut

how

to

return to a natural, seasonal rhythm.

The historical property, located at 466 Queen St. S. in Kitchener, has been in the same spot since 1816. It was built by Joseph Schneider, whose family was one of the groups of Mennonites to found the city of Kitchener.

It

is

the oldest

surviving dwelling in the

city.

yearly event since the opening of lic

museum which shows the pubhow people in the 19th century

lived.

Included are tours of the

"I

always loved the meat busi-

ness," he said. “I love being able to talk

to

people and answer their

questions.

I

know

everything,

draw on

the experi-

don’t

but I’m able to

ences that I’ve had.” Greulich demonstrated

how he

up hogs and said the leftover parts, like the head and feet, are what are used in head cheese. The skin on the head and the gelatin from boiling the feet are the cuts

The Butchering Bee has been a the

past six years at the Butchering Bee, and he said he loves to come out.

ingredients

used.

The head goes

the grease

comes

out through the

weave.

The meat then gets smoked for a few days, or up to a week, and if there is a ham or a shank then it gets brined and hung in the cooler. Kozlovic said her favourite part of working at the Haus is having no electricity

and getting back

ple living, even if

it’s

“When you come apart said.

to simanything but. here you’re

from the modern world,” she “But then you don’t have to and you can your conveniences.”

live like this forever,

go back

to

outside into a cooker, which takes about an hour and a half to boil.

is cut and prepared and seeing sausages are made.

to have a certain

from two centuries ago,

add flavour and that they are usual-

teaching people

A

bee refers to a gathering where

community would

the entire

get

together and help stock for the winter.

They were held

in

the

He

explained that the hogs have amount of fat to

the time they are born.

morning to gather a dozen hogs and one or two already-

Protein is the most important part of the hog’s diet. Too little protein causes the hog to have less fat, and too much causes them to be too pudgy.

butchered cows. After a full day’s work, each neighbour would leave

Sausage is made at the end of the day after all the cutting is done, and

with a fair portion of sausage and

the ingredients the pioneers used

fresh meat.

were ground pork, salt and pepper, coriander seeds, nutmeg, sugar and

fall,

before freezing temperatures set

Many

in.

neighbours would arrive

early in the

Smoking

is

a

way of preserving

and it also keeps other animals and bacteria from getting to it. It also gave the meat a distinct the meat,

flavour.

Smoke houses were usually located around the privy to ensure that the fire was always closely watched.

Meat was hung from

a plant that

Greulich

related to celery.

is

manufacturing wheat flour filler in their products, whereas the traditional sausage making does not, and the meat is wrapped in hog said

said

it

at historical

15 years and she

allows her to appreciate all

“I really like the

all

life

while

about history.

human

contact

because

people have different experiences, and for a lot of people it

allows them to reminisce,” she

said.

“For others who aren’t from frame or culture, it’s a

that time

real learning experience.”

The museum is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday, and 1 to 5 p.m. on Saturday.

Admission prices

(Photo by Chantelle Timperley)

are

Dave Cox, a member

Joseph Scheider Haus, and Liz Driver, a guest from Montgomery’s Inn Museum in Toronto, stand beside a boiling pot used to make head cheese.

$2.25 for adults, $1.50 for students, $1.25 for children and $5 for a family.

of the

plants generally use a

casing (intestine). He also said pork has certain trace minerals that

poles with iron meat hooks and wood ash was sometimes sprinkled

other meats do not have.

inside to keep the odours

less

down. Hams and bigger meats were hung higher than things like sum-

Kozlovic has worked sites for nearly

ly killed after five-and-a-half to six

months from

up

worker at the Joseph Schneider Haus and demonstrated how summer sausage is made. It is put into a cloth bag and packed in tightly so

smoke house, watching how meat

how

it

**** I

MPqr TANT REMINDER ****

“As

far as I’m concerned, regardof what they say, a little bit of

is good for you.” Nancy Kozlovic is a

pork

Application deadline to request tutoring

part-time

Is

A help

-

December 2, 2005

tutor

there

may be able to

is still

time - don’t delay!

Applications available in Student Services

Room 2B04 (Photo by Lee Evans)

Slippery This Toyota

was

involved

when wet

a crash on the Conestoga Expressway near the Homer Watson cutoff Nov. 17. The

snowfall of the

in

first

season caused many fender-benders on the

roads throughout the region.

icy


Entertainment

SPOKE, November

28,

2005

— Page 13

Online role-playing not just for nerds By JASON

SONSER

Imagine yourself a hero. In a completely different world, one of fantasy and magic, you battle mon-

and bad guys with your sword, wizardry or whichever form of battle you choose.

druid, hunter and paladin.

easy.

Aside from the fact that the Horde and Alliance are enemies, there is much more to WoW which

around

many gamers. The game has an elaborate

appeals to

sters

As

'

you travel around this fantasy world completing quests as assigned, aiding weaker townsfolk as you pass them by, exploring dungeons and generally this hero,

saving the day. If

you’re a video-game fan, this

sounds

a typical role-playing

like

game (RPG), doesn’t it? As a video-game fan, then, you may have heard about Massively

from both the Alliance and Horde compete against each other in a few different circumstances. Ragnarok Online, a MMORPG from Gravity Inc., is an animestyle game which has characters starting out as novices and gaining experience which allows them to acters

pick a job, also

As

as a charac-

character gains experi-

they

become

can

more

dreds,

advanced in their jobs which allows them to pick a second job class. This class is a more elite form of their previous class. For example, if a character chooses to become a swordsman, he or she can then choose to

Internet.

become a knight of a crusader later when they reach the appropriate

role-playing

game except

gamer usually plays

who

that the

as an avatar,

connects to a server on the

Internet.

The user then plays with huneven thousands, of other people who are logged on to the Users can complete quests and adventure with other * characters,

level.

Player (PvP) situation or simply

After that, as that character advances to the maximum level, the user has a choice to start the

chat with those around them.

character from scratch to

others

fight

World

Player versus

a

in

Warcraft

of

(WoW),

become

the ultimate class for that particu-

Blizzard Entertainment’s popular

lar job.

MMORPG,

Lord knight is the knight’s highest advancement, whereas the pal-

ment of

is

their latest instal-

their

popular Warcraft

series.

adin has the crusader as the highest

WoW

allows players to create a

character from a

number of

differ-

ent races, as well as chose from nine different character classes, each with different and unique fighting styles.

There are two enemy factions in WoW, the Alliance and the Horde. Alliance

races

are

humans,

advancement. Final Fantasy

Square Enix’s online version of their popular Final Fantasy series, follows much the same concept as WoW, where characters pick from a variety of different faces and character classes. Users can party with others online, completing quests and 11,

dwarves, gnomes and night elves

fighting others.

and Horde races are ores, tauren, trolls and undead.

Emile Beaulieu, 31, who owns the Frag Shop in Cambridge, said he finds MMORPGs is something

The nine

classes

players

can

choose from are warrior, rogue, shaman; warlock, mage, priest.

that’s not

“A

Japanese

whatever,” Beaulieu said. “Online role-playing games have so many different things about

hard to

sum up

sum

easy to

up. is

pretty

directors

Beaulieu said the important part

MMORPG

of a

is you create a character and you play that one

By JESSICA BLUMENTHAL

which you can only get of

tival

When

walking into the Princess

Twin Cinemas on King

Street in

Waterloo to watch any of the films shown at the Waterloo Festival for

Animated Cinema (WFAC), you can sense the innovation and uniqueness in the

air.

The theatre wasn’t packed as it would be for a Hollywood movie, but the excitement from the crowd was overwhelming. The WFAC fea-

this nature,”

start until

trying

get

to

weapons,

all

showed nine films from Russia, Denmark, Estonia, Hungary and Japan. There were so many different films with different styles from

is

There are a lot of interesting styles of filmmaking that aren’t exclusive to actors

and soundstages, said Karl

Zaryski,

who was

questing and killing monsters and bad guys,” he said. “The main

you create a character at the beginning, and you play that particular character that you’ve made until you get tired of playing the game or until whatever happoint

...

is

pens.”

Beaulieu said he likes the idea of picking one character and investing your time into leveling up and

making that one character better. “They strike the right chord with me, especially because so many of them are in the theme of medieval times and there’s always monsters, ores, dragons, magic and all that stuff, which has always been a genre that I enjoy when I read," he

“Mind Game (which played Nov. blew

me

away, and to think pencils with colours

wow!” said Zaiyski. The directors of Mind Game came watch

to

around the world that a person is never exposed to, said

Amanda Keough who

person that

festival

attended the

which was held from Nov.

17 to 20. “It really

made the piece of artwork you’re watching. Just having

the directors of sets off that vibe

opens your eyes to

new

and

cultures

theatre cial,”

added

Mind Game

that

Zaryski said.

he

Beaulieu said his favourite game is

WoW,

which

game

cessful

is

most suc-

the

in his store.

life.”

I’m going to play a game, I like a game where I feel like I’m progressing, where there are goals to accomplish and the character’s still there when you come back,” he said. “Getting really good at a “If

first-person shooter ing, but every

is very satisfytime you log on, you

off at the

start

same place you

started off yesterday

and the day

Beaulieu said he likes the goal of trying to level up the character to

friends and his wife complaining

said.

the

maximum,

instead of

games

where a player is shooting things over and over again and their stats are reset like first-person shooters,

every time they log

MMORPGs),

play, the stronger

in.

the longer

gets, the better things

you

get, the

more money you

get, that’s

really appeals to

me

games.

I

like

to

you

your character

what

about these

feel

like

I’m

WoW

that

ing

ed his

like

WoW.

“The challenges a

game

are pretty big in

like that,” Hall said. “I like

being with other people and being able to team up with and share the experience with others, it’s a lot of fun.”

Hall said in times

when people

are fighting a boss, their heart rate

goes up and they tend to get excited.

“There’s times you can get really angry at the game and feel frustrat-

much

time play-

ed. Especially frustrated, that hap-

not affect-

pens a

life

outside of the game.

MMORPG

“Myself, personally, I’ve had to curb a little of my game playing

because

it

was

my

actually starting to

grades

at

lot,”

he

said.

Blizzard Entertainment’s website

James Boissoneau, a first-year business administration student, said it’s hard to say if a can affect your life.

affect

Michael Hall, a Grade 9 student Jacob Hespeler high school, said he likes the challenges in a game at

MMORPGs have

he spends too it,

Boissoneau said. “These games can get pretty addicting and if you’re not too careful, they can start spilling into your not-online

school,”

www.blizzard.com. The website Ragnarok Online can be found at www.ragnarokonline.com and Square-Enix’s website can be located at www.squaresoft.com. Square-Enix, Gravity Inc. and Blizzard Entertainment did not respond to phone calls or e-mails. is

for

COUNSELLOR S CORNER: DEPRESSION us have experienced waking up

in a bad mood or “feeling the blues”. These and have minimal impact on our lives. Some people experience sadness, loneliness, hopelessness, self-doubt, and guilt for weeks, months and even years. These experiences characterize depression, an illness believed to affect one in ten.

of

Here are some signs which might indicate that you or experiencing depression:

someone you care about

is

FEELINGS - loss of joy in formerly pleasurable activities; crying a lot or feeling emotionally “empty”; hopelessness; worthlessness; loss of warmth towards key people in life; loss of sexual desire; deep sense of shame or self-doubt. PHYSICAL - overwhelming exhaustion and lack of energy; insomnia or sleeping too much; loss of appetite or over-eating; physical aches and pains; digestive problems; headaches.

BEHAVIOUR -

irritability,

withdrawal; neglect of responsibilities or appearance;

reduced concentration, memory or

ability to

cope

with daily activities.

their film so

they could get reactions and feedback from the viewers. “When you go to watch a movie you are never in the presence of the

usually

something,”

said.

before that, the month before that and the year before that.” Beaulieu said he plays between three and 12 hours a day and other than making some

could create such a masterpiece,

from Japan

accomplishing

a volunteer at the

festival.

19)

festival

story

very different from the usual North American way.”

someone using

The

a film fes-

way of telling a

the world

armour,

better

the best gear through

(Photo by Jason Sonser)

James Boissoneau, a first-year business administration student, spends some time leveling up his character in World of Warcraft at the Frag Shop in Cambridge.

she said.

film from Denmark isn’t going be the same as your typical block-

buster, their

it.

“You build up your experience,

feelings are usually of short duration

“A to

tured full-length films

from around which are unlikely to ever be seen again in a Canadian theatre.

at

from the time however far you’re

particular character

you

Most

at film festival

that it’s

hour.

“(In

first-person shooter

them

quickly.”

The Frag Shop, located at 295 Jamieson Parkway in Cambridge, is a computer gaming centre in which gamers can play various computer games for a set price per

willing to take

the

ence,

A MMORPG plays like a regular

known

ter class.

Multiplayer Online Role-Playing

Games (MMORPGs).

story-

thousands of quests, numerous dungeons to explore and a battlegrounds system in which charline,

You see your gun, you walk and you shoot stuff. Strategy, you build an army or

in the

something spe-

these symptoms persist, or if their intensity is causing you to consider suicide as an it is important to seek assistance with a knowledgeable professional. On campus, counsellors are available in Student Services; a nurse and doctor are available in Health Services (Room 2B06). If

option,

A Message from Student Services Visit

our website http://www. conestogac. on. ca/isp/stserv/index. isp


Page 14

— SPOKE, November 28, 2005

Entertainment

New

Horoscope Week of November

2005

28,

grows up too

Libra September 23 October 22

BORS

By MIKE Don't

the pressure get to you.

let

Everybody has

Once that big project is done this week you can sit back and breathe a sigh of relief. Just know you did

of admirers as you beat them off with a stick. Don't fall only for

your best and

fade.

that's all

by the

anyone can

flick

r Stay away from your ex-girlfriend or boyfriend this week,

November

Don't worry,

week

Taurus. Although you'll get frisky,

hitch, Scorpio.

they aren't the ones you want to

the next

be frisky with, so avoid them alto-

for

Lucky day: 4

harder.

know

among

in-

November 22 December 21

.

' •

Don't take someone at their word, whether it be your room-

mate or Someone's you've

your

loved

lying

known

one.

you

to

from the

it

and start.

Don't be harsh. Lucky day: 3

Cancer June 22

-

December 22

A major fight will

up, Cancer, you're acting

like a child.

Face the

break out this

looking for a place to live outside of your parent’s home.

Lucky day: 29

long time. Lucky day: 4

facts, you're

time to

It's

Voldemort provides a riveting climax that ties into the fear

greater challenge

of this character that’s been pounded into the viewers’ minds over the course of the previous three films.

start

is

girl that

he likes to the

ball

amusing and adds a new dimento

the

Potter series

that

in the series.

is

The

return of

wizard

his quest to find himself

while being haunted by a dream of his lifelong nemesis, Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes), once again plot-

That being said, when elements are combined,

ting revenge.

film

for

Each side story in the film works well on its own. The wizards’ tournament is great fun and has you on

the

these

all it

makes

most incoherent Potter

thus

far.

Director

Mike

Newell just can’t seem to meld the subplots together, which really takes away from the magic of

director Alfonso

Cuaron used the world as a catalyst for exploring the characters while magical

weaving

all

the subplots into one

cohesive story.

The absence of Richard Harris Professor Dumbledore didn’t tend to hurt The Prisoner of Azkaban (Harris died shortly as

before

the

release

Chamber of Secrets)

of

The

but Goblet of

shows Michael Gambon’s Dumbledore as a much less Fire

assured Harry.

and wise Whether this

Newell or but

in

some

Gambon

mentor for is is

all_ fairness,

big shoes to

the fault of

hard to

tell,

Harris

left

fill.

Musical production brings out the child in everyone By KRISTIN GRIFFERTY Looking for something you smile?

week, Capricorn. Make sure to Take a few minutes to gather your thoughts before you say something you'll regret for a

not a kid anymore.

explored further

older more experienced wizards in a series of deadly tests. But the the

was accessible

that

-

January 19

Wake

sion

Capricorn

July 22

end of each challenge. Watching Harry struggle to find the words to

wizard’s tournament which forces him to use all his cunning against

Take a few minutes this week to feel good about all of your accomplishments. You've come a long way, and you're getting clos er and closer to your goal. Lucky day: 28

Columbus

Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban,

mega mega

ask the

for

wonder

like

successful books by J.K. Rowling, has Harry unwillingly entering a

is

Harry

because the kid in all of us wanted to be there. In the third film, Harry

other

film, the fourth in the

prodigy

films,

Harry Potter and the Chamber of

(gasp!) a date to the ball. All this

Sagittarius

June 21

-

things will get

Lucky day: 30

Gemini May 21

a

Enjoy it, because few weeks will make up

Just

it.

be happy. This

two

introduced us to a world of child-

successful series based on the

21

come and go without

will

The

first

Secrets, director Chris

wonders of hormones.

things, the

-

in

back

of a wand.

his friends discover,

October 23

time

the

Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone and

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Harry (Daniel Radcliffe) and

In Fire,

Scorpio

V'V

all,

the real world can’t be turned

Lucky day: 29

ask.

:

gether.

the Potter universe.

to get older soon-

er or later, right? After

film

fast In

This week you'll be hot to trot, Aries. Try not to hurt the lineup

good looks because looks Lucky day: 2

Harry Potter

breathe.

make

to

Perhaps something to take your for awhile? My suggestion to you is as sim-

mind off school ple as this:

Try being a kid again;

it’s

some-

thing you’ll realize you’ve missed!

K-W

The

Musical Production the Musical

presented Seussical

Leo

Aquarius

August 22

July 23

January 20

-

-

weekend

past

this

Centre

everyone

in

Kitchener’s

at

Square, which helped

in the

attendance feel like a

kid again.

February 18

Director Gordon Davis and his

more than 70 performers sang and danced their hearts out to the classic and clever rhymes by cast of

time to

It's

love

life

in

start

over with your

a simple way, Leo.

Don't be so quick to jump into someone's arms. Dating is the best

way

to

get to

know

other

people and yourself. Lucky day: 28

This

is

your week, Aquarius, so

don't worry about bringing your

lucky rabbit’s foot to

Watch and giggle

have a sub-par week. to play the lottery.

The

school.

as other people

And be

sure

Lucky day: 30

boys

story begins with

who

two young

encounter the infamous

cat in the hat,

who encourages

their

young, creative minds to explore the inner shadows of their imagination.

From

Virgo

Pisces

August 23 September 22

February

1

9

-

March 20

A

rough weekend of abusing yourself again, Virgo? Time to look into

why you

party so hard

on your days off. What are you avoiding? Mayhc you need to let

Be mindful of your Lucky day: 30 loose.

health.

there,

Don’t be so naive, Pisces. You

going it's

to feel

this

than you're

week. Maybe

the colder weather or being

bundled up

in all

of those

warm

clothes. Try not to say anything

too

silly.

Lucky day: 3

production

the

showcases several different Dr. Seuss books and presents their themes and plotlines with colourful songs and dance numbers.

From The Cat

know you’re smarter

Hat

in the

to

Horton

the Elephant, Seussical the Musical is

a surprisingly fun and enjoyable

play for people of

Broadway,

this particular producdoes an excellent job recreat-

ing

the

for

its

is

a second-year

journalism student holding in the

palm of

his

hand.

fate

small town

With such a large cast it's hard to have any true lead characters, but there are certain performers who

include Charlie

were working on. and go to a place where you could be a kid amongst

lessness.

Young performer John McGill whose imagination is

plays Jojo,

what takes the audience on

whose

You’re

Brown,

a

past

credits

Good Man Man of La

Mancha and Guys and

Dolls, takes

the role of Horton the Elephant

past

credits

include

The Wizard of Oz and The Lion, the Witch and the Oliver!,

Wardrobe. Iley and McGill, along with their lellow cast mates, breakthrough stereotypical small-town theatre, by putting on a great production for children.

So,

lley,

its

musical journey.

stand out.

Malt

aside that essay or assignment you

layered hero.

McGill's

tion

show

and makes him quite the multiKids see Horton as the outcast elephant who is full of humour and heart, whereas the few adults in the audience view Horton as a teacher who possesses humble qualities like acceptance and self-

ages.

all

Originally a musical created for

audience.

Brandon Walker

(Internet photo)

Horton the elephant took centre stage at Seussical the Musical, held at Kitchener’s Centre in the Square.

Dr. Seuss.

I

why

rec time

as a student is

whose

precious, should

little

you

take the time to attend a musical at

Centre

in the Square? For one thing. Seussical the Musical was a great excuse to put

kids.

Not only that. Dr. Seuss uses rhymes and limericks to present great life issues and as an adult, it's fun to try and figure them out. Director Gold Davis, who has been in the presence of Seuss a little too long, says: “Laugh, cry, hum along, and always think. Because unless, someone like you, does a whole awful lot. Nothing is going to get better, it's clearly

not.”


Sports

SPOKE, November

— Page 15

2005

28,

Head-to-head: Manning vs. Manning have better stats when the Manning era is complete

Eli will

Quarterback

skills

and pocket

Eli

presence have been in the genes of the Manning family for two generations.

First father Archie Manning broke into the National Football League (NFL) with the New Orleans Saints in 1971 and went on to play an impressive 14-year career while registering 125 touchdown passes and 23,911 passing yards, along with two Pro Bowl appearances (1978 and 1978). Next came his eldest son Peyton

Manning, 29, who was drafted in 1998 by the Indianapolis Colts and has since thrown 236 touchdown passes and has made five Pro Bowl appearances in his eight-year career. In 2004 the pivot set a NFL record with 49 touchdown passes. Then there’s Eli Manning. The 24-year-old New York Giants quarterback has just as much talent as his family members, which could lead the University of Mississippi alumni to a more productive career than his brother.

compare. Both New Orleans natives were considered for the Heisman Trophy in their Let’s

is

Peyton’s career

younger brother’s

trying to

make

the playoffs

16-game season with the something his brother

Opinion

sister

Giants,

He

injured Kurt Warner. Peyton

made

the post-season in his second full

Chris

Snee,

Whittle, left

and

guard Jason tackle Luke Petitgout left

right

McKenzie

tackle

Kareem

(first-year with Giants)

have only played together with the

G-Men

for two seasons. With more time together they will reduce the number of sacks on Manning (19 sacks against) and give him more time in the pocket to get rid

of the football.

Having

a

prominent running

game with nine-year

veteran -Tiki

Barber and rookie Brandon Jacobs helps, so that Manning isn’t always throwing the pigskin and their opponents won’t blitz the Giants’ offensive line every play. Barber and Jacobs have combined for 11 rushing touchdowns as of Nov. 20.

but didn’t win his

season,

playoff

game

first

2003 where he threw for five TDs in a 41-0 pummeling of the Denver Broncos. Sure, right

until

now

NFL. The

-a

the

San Diego Chargers

Now

with

New

in

what a guy named Eli Manning has to go through. He has grown up playing footThat

is

He enjoyed

ball.

an illustrious col-

pulled his team to victory on

was

this

many

while his older brother, was setting records for

Peyton,

National (NFL).

Now

Football

who

Eli,

New

newaged NFL. If the speed of the game develops once again we could be looking at the Manning pattern continuing with Eli surpassing Peyton’s stats

NFL

era

is

when

the

Manning

complete.

York Giants

NFL

many

jump

throughout his career.

start

To name all of what Peyton has done would take up half an issue of Spoke, but I will point out some important a

list

of

credentials.

stats.

He

set the record for

touchdown

passes in one season with 49, and broke the single-season quarter-

back passer-rating record, with an outstanding 121.1 record. The previous record was well below that, at 112.8.

We’ll see

2004.

if little

brother Eli can

have a record-setting season

York, Eli, in his

like

that.

second season in the NFL, looks extremely promising with a great supporting cast surrounding the

Peyton’s most impressive feat at the end of last year when he won Associated Press NFL Most Valuable Player honours for the second year in a row. He joined Brett Favre and Joe Montana, two of the best quarterbacks ever, as the

came

only three to win the award in consecutive years. Let’s see if Eli can accomplish that.

Peyton has achieved everything a NFL can, except win a Super Bowl. But with the season over halfway complete, the Indianapolis Colts are heavy quarterback in the

(Internet photo)

The New York

Giants’ Eli Manning throws a pass during a preseason game against the Carolina Panthers. Eli has the supporting cast to make the Giants a powerhouse in a few seasons.

favourites to bring this year.

home

the

(Internet photo)

Peyton Manning scouts the field

oin a fitness class

Fitn

Judo 5:00

-

go undefeated

.

Tues 5:50pm

Body

Blast

6:00

Abs and

6:50pm

Glutes 6:00 - 6:50pm

-

Kickboxing v

Wed Variety Pack 5:00 - 5:50 P m

5:00

7:00

NTIRAi Ice

Step 5:i30pm

and get fit!

-

7:50 P m

-y i

Thurs

"\

Bootcamp O - 6:00 P m Innergize 6:00 - 6:50 P m

5:1

Judo 8:30

— 1

against the Cincinnati

Bengals. Peyton’s Colts could

title

ctivate

Mon

close to six

whereas in Peyton’s second he was well over 90. This year, Peyton has thrown more touchdowns and less interceptions than his younger brother: an automatic sign of supremacy. Eli will always be thought of as “Eli Manning, the younger brother of Peyton Manning,” and will live in the shadow of one of the best quarterbacks in NFL history

after sharing the

Pro Bowler, to

quarterback

year,

over the high, intimidating shadow of Peyton, Peyton Williams Manning is a five-time

Eli’s

is sitting

77.3,

has taken over the

duties last year, has to try to

second year,

points below the league average at

League

house back

his father’s stats in this fast,

his

passer rating

all

established the Colts as a power-

Peyton’s statistics have surpassed

Eli Manning is far from being the quarterback his older brother is. In

occasions. Sounds good, eh? But

starting quarterback role with the

in 1999.

Opinion

lege football career where he set many records for quarterbacks and

the

by

young superstar. He has many playmakers in his wide-out core including Pro Bowler and tight-end Jeremy Shockey, and wide-outs Plaxico Burress and Amani Toomer. The three have combined for 16 of Manning’s 18 TD throws this season. Peyton does have wide-outs Marvin Harrsion, Reggie Wayne and Brandon Stokley, but he has had receivers in the fold longer than Eli has had to work with his group of guys. Eli’s impressive offensive line of centre Shaun O’Hara, right guard

Tim Gedcke

at reading, better at everything.

Nov. 20) then the Giants’ 7-3 record could end at 133, which is the same record that tions (nine as of

Colts

trade after being drafted

at

together and reduce his intercep-

drafted Peyton in 1998, while Eli chose a different path by demand-

ing

probably better than playing sports, better

is

himself, but at the big-time level;

Peyton came in second in 1997 (with Tennessee), while Eli was third in 2003. Both were drafted overall in the

or she

you; better

Peyton’s Colts are undefeated at 10-0 (win-loss record), but if Eli can keep it

respective senior years in college.

first

you have an older brother or you may know what I mean.

If

in his first

never could do. Eli did play last year, but never could get in a grove, only throwing six TD passes in his nine games after taking over for the

Jon Yaneff

dominate over

will

this

season.

^four ^Lifei

U1FKE

Hockey: Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday 4:30 - 6pm

Fee: $200 cash

team bona

Ball Hockey: Monday & Thursday 4:30 Fee: $30 cash team bond

-

6pm

Co-ed Volleyball: Wednesday 7 - 10pm Fee: $30 cash

team bond

Basketball: Tuesday 4:30 Fee: $30 cash team bond

6pm

0:00pm,

reminder: to gain access to any of the facilities at the Rec Centre you must present your student card at the front desk


1

Page 16

— SPOKE, November 28, 2005

First

Sports

tournament fun

for all

But men and women ’s extramural hockey teams both come up short By JON YANEFF Close games, highlight goals and performances by goal-

stellar

tenders are the positives that can be

taken from Conestoga’s men’s and

women’s extramural hockey teams’ tournament

first

Nov.

Humber College

at

“Churcher

grabbed

puck

the

while Centennial was changing lines, so he carried it up the ice and let a slapshot go towards the net,” said Gould. After the

two games

first

teams were put into Condors were put in

divisions.

the

B

the

The

division

out of three possible divisions (A,

18.

was a fast-paced, one-day tournament as the teams played games consisting of two 8-minute halves It

1

instead of the traditional three 20minute periods. The men's team won two and lost

two games during their four tournament games at the Chesswood Arena, but first-year coach Todd Gould said he was really surprised how quickly the team came together because as a whole team they only had a couple of practices. The Condors lost the first game of the tournament 5-4 in a shootout

it

up.

down

“We

took some bad penalties

which led to three four goals coming on the

the stretch,

of their

powerplay.” Steve Lamb, Luke Glovcick and Chris Seary (two goals) each scored in the game.

The team went on to win the second game by shutting out Centennial College 1-0 on a goal

by defenceman Marcus Churcher at the beginning of the second half. Goaltender Josh Gander, who played games two and four, earned the shutout.

The team will now be getting ready tor the next tournament at the Doon campus Dec. 2. “I’m going

have a couple of high tempo practices and some drills to breed some more offence,”

Humber

against

College,

goal-

John

tender

Lamb

scored his second goal of

the tournament with left in

game)

the

game

18 seconds

to

said

replaced the absent players and are expected to remain with the team.

to seal the victo-

said Gould.

ple

come up

the better in

hockey

a long time,”

“We had random to us after the

peo-

game

to

Hockey League (NHL)

hall-of-famers

Tony Esposito, part in a fantasy

Bobby Hull and who were taking camp in the arena.

was one of the better hockey games I’ve seen “It

to

us after the

game

ning the

B

Seneca ended up windivision.

“To make excuses we had about four hours between games and Seneca had about an hour, so we were a bit flat going into the game,” said Gould. “I’m saying it was my fault as a coach because I couldn’t motivate my players any more than

but students at

Schneider and Brubacher assisted on Zettler’s goal in regulation.

the opportunity to hear a former

Athletic

picked up the victory. In the third

off and

puck

for the

women,

the

Condors’ 5-0 loss College.

weren’t prepared mentally,”

said coach

Twomey

about the lop-

sided loss.

women

lost

Durham

game

the

2-1

College.

Rookie Erin Cannon and Zettler on Brubacher’s second

assisted

goal of the tournament.

if

they had

three coaches,

won

their last

game

is

made

the playoffs,

happy with the team’s per-

formance. complaints,” he

“The whole team came

play and even

some of

to

the players

with a 1-3 win-loss record despite

some

hard.”

close

games

at the

Westwood

He

said the

The Condor women lost the first game 2-1 against the University of

exhibition

Toronto (Scarborough campus)

their next

a

team

games

schools so the

will play

some

against

high

women

are ready for

who

Prentice,

with

New

the

praise night in the Sanctuary.

am

“I

going to be talking about

happened and off the

to

the

ice,”

ice

who

Prentice,

currently resides

Kitchener with his wife, June. “And talk about the change in

hockey and how different have changed the game.”

The

who

scored

NHL

career,

said he will give

some

insight

in

how

players

deal

life

during his playing days.

we had

“Just like this

year

a big change

NHL), we had

(in the

changes back then too, like all the expansion teams coming in,” said Prentice. “And we had to adapt to different rules.”

players, so there sive

loss.

tournament,” said Twomey.

here, what’s ahead for

was good defenzone coverage and forecheck-

The Condor goal came from rookie Jen Brubacher, which was assisted

by

assistant

ting

the

with

and how he dealt with issues such as changes in his issues,

to

overall

rules

his

winger,

left

391 goals

more shots on net and getting puck out of our own end then maybe we’ll have a shot in the next

he was impressed with his team’s performance in the tournament. “We have a lot of smart hockey said

on

said

in

captain

Gould

me

stories that

Cortney Zettler and rookie Darcy Schneider. Rookie goaltender Jen Eby was saddled with the tough

Hull or Esposito did.”

nail-biter.

1

York

talk to students at the monthly Conestoga Christian Fellowship

tournament Feb. 1 7 at the Doon campus. “We have to work on our offence because our defence has been doing alright so if we practise get-

in

played for

teams, including

Rangers, will be on campus Wednesday, Nov. 30, at 7 p.m. to

we

thought were going to be weak picked up their games and played

Arena.

Hockey

player speak right here

NHL

years

into

“We have no

tournament

Dean five

would have been a chance

but he

they finished

their round-robin style

Eby couldn’t handle the

League

National

(NHL)

Conestoga have

at the college. fell

Mohawk

against

“We

game

the wheels

in

said.

As

Marlene Ford

director

they would have

Todd Gould, men ’s coach

doesn’t happen very often,

It

shootout.

there

out 6-0 by Seneca College in the semifinal.

game

said

victory”

GEDCKE

By TIM

after Zettler

second goal of (he when she scored in a

Twomey, one of

to

congratulate us on our

The Condors-’ tournament run came to an end after being blown

in

against

her

against

We

a long time.

2-1

McMasler University potted

the

had random people come up in

out on top

game

second

The final game again went to a shootout where Ford and the rest of

ry.

“It was one of games I’ve seen

The Condors came the

Cody Shewfelt

In the quarter-final (third

National

then pulled their goalie with less than a minute left in the game to tie

our

shutout.

C).

(Mississauga campus).

were ahead 4-2 with about five minutes left in the second half,” said Gould. Toronto crashed the net and scored to put them within one,

throughout

said.

Leonard equaled Gander’s efforts by earning a 1-0

B and

against the University of Toronto

was a big letdown because we

escalating

Gould. The team will have Steve Bithell and Dan Twomey (one of the women’s coaches) back in the fold after they were unable to play in the tournament. Todd McCauley and

congratulate us on our victory.” After the game the team met

“It

ing

games,” he

Ex-NHLer to speak at Conestoga

Prentice

is

coming

not

to the

college solely to share his expe-

He

rience as a hockey player.

message he has been sharing for more than 30 years

also has a

many

different people.

“I think kids are searching,”

he said. “They ask future?’

me in God has

think

I

answer and

‘Why am

that’s in the

Jesus Christ. So

I

my

why

life

story:

want I

I

the

an

Lord

to share

needed

Christ.”

(Photo by Tim Gedcke)

Conestogas mens extramural hockey team finished with a 2-2 record in a tournament at Humber College on Nov. 18. They met with NHL hall-of-famers Bobby Hull and Tony Esposito at the tournament. Those participating in the tourney included, top row from left: John Leonard, Eric Robinson, Marcus Churcher, Eric Bender, Dave Carr, Brock Cochrane, Todd McCauley and team representative Paul Osborne. Middle row: Steve Thibeault, Tony Esposito, Chris Seary, Bobby Hull, Steve Lamb, Scott Boettger and Cody Shewfelt. Front row: Kyle Leslie', Andrew Mills, Josh Gander, Coach Todd Gould and Luke Glowick.

(Internet photo)

Top:

Dean

Prentice

in

his

Kitchener home. Bottom: In his playing days.


Digital Edition - November 28, 2005