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OPSEU

Halloween bash a blast

They are focusing on unionizing employees in Ontario.

Conestoga College students stir up a

part-time college

fright with

College temperatures fluctuate

and scary costumes Oct. 27.

creative

7,

Classrooms and A

learning

newsroom

for

journalism students

offices vary greatly

throughout the college.

it

Feature

Monday, November

launches campaign

2005

Conestoga College, Kitchener, Ont.

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

— No. 23

37th Year

Student organizes

Parking

fundraiser

permits

BRENT GERHART

By

atives

back

They worry

there, too.

about them. They have no

With massive relief efforts after the destruction of Hurricane Katrina and the tsunami, many people have overlooked the fact that help

needed

desperately

is

also

elsewhere,

including Pakistan.

Jabran Butt, a second-year elec-

telecommunications student, hopes to change that, at least at Conestoga. “Things are not right. What is supposed to be done is not getting done,” said Butt. “The United Nations (UN) is providing the relief through the Red Cross, but the budget they have for the relief fund is not enough.” tronics engineering

On

was

northern Pakistan

Oct-. 8,

crippled by an

earthquake that

measured 5.5 on the Richter scale, and has since seen its death toll rise above 80,000 people. The earthquake also left 3.3 milhomeless and the

lion Pakistanis in

UN

urgent need of $500 million to SI

billion,

Butt,

according to www.un.org.

who

who

are

still

located in his

homeland have lost their homes, but are “OK.” However, he worries

who may

about others

The

student

not be as

he

said

shelter,

hopes and fac-

Conestoga students, staff whatever they can. “I’m here and I have everything I need.” he said. “I want those peo-

“There are two or three other students from Pakistan (at Conestoga) who I talk to,” he said. “When I talk to them 1 realize they have rel-

available

They deserve it.” was surprised

ple to get help.

Butt

By STEPH BAULK

he

said

Conestoga did not organize a relief effort on its own. “One week passed and I wondered if the college would do something about it,” he said.

Are you

so

are

parking

still

September

may

not be

were

there

on the list were recently called and given the opportunity to pick up a pass.

dissatisfied with

not his duty

John Tribe, security represen-

to discuss politics.

my job is to my country,”

do he

tative at the college, said there is still a quantity of annual permits available for sale for. any-

said. “That’s it.”

p.m. on Nov. 10 in

12:30

Room 2E05

Pakistani relief effort.

(Photo

for

those interested in supporting the

will

who

approximately 730 people on the waiting list for a parking permit. All the people who were

the lack of relief Pakistan has been

something for

many

are one of the

illegally, a permit such a bad idea.

something. Even a penny would

student,

available for sale,

still

you

if

students

help,” said Butt.

“As a

a

Parking permits for the college are

In

was

a

trying?

“If only everyone could donate

it

lots

pass at the beginning of the school year and just gave up

would be appreciated.

getting, he said

parking

you don't have pass? Were you unable to get because

including blankets, water or food,

is

getting tickets

still

school

the

in

“Then, another week passed and nobody stepped up. Then, the third week came and I had a meeting with (student life co-ordinator) Leanne Holland Brown and 1 thought I might do something about it.” Butt said any type of donation,

A meeting is scheduled for

fortunate.

still

little.”

ulty will donate

Although he

lived in Pakistan until

he was 14 years old, said his relatives

no roofs, they have very

Donations

be given to the Red Cross.

by Eric Murphy)

one

who

hasn’t purchased a

still

pass. If interested,

Students to the rescue

go

Room

to

2B0S.

Second-year pre-service firefighting student, Greg Dempster, is rescued by his classmate, Matt Hetog, in a rescue training exer-

The permits

are sold on a prowhich decreases by eight per cent each month. Tribe said students have the rated basis,

cise Oct. 27.

Remembering Remembrance Day

opportunity to switch permits they don't like the

if

they

lot

are currently in, but they will

By

VANESSA PARKER

veterans. There

The poppy,

a

symbol

associated

with

to most,

immediately

Remembrance Day.

is

It

became

Mcknight-MacNeil,

rec-

the

McCrae by

McCrae House

at

respects to those

St.,

built in 1858,

the birthplace of John is

now

a historical site

McCrae open

to

the public.

McCrae

(Photo is

one of Guelph's most

recognizable figures; he fought in the First

World War, as well as the

Boer War

in

World War he was appointed brigade surgeon and was responsible for a field dressing station and treating those wounded during the Second Battle of Yprcs

As

spring of 1915.

well as performing his duties

as surgeon, he also served on the

guns when needed and occasionally performed burial services. It

ice

was

The

historical

author of

In

McCrae house

Flanders Fields,

by Vanessa

Parker)

war

in

the the

Guelph Amateur Radio Club which 7th season of sending and is in its receiving remembrance messages. The radio club will be talking to radio enthusiasts, from around the world about their thoughts on

Guelph is where John McCrae, was born and raised.

performing the servfor a friend, Alexis Heinier, that after

inspired to write In

Flanders Fields. The written In the

was

May

3,

poem was

1915.

summer of

1915,

McCrae

transferred from the artillery

Brigade to the

Number

General Hospital he was second

in

in

3

Canadian

France, where

command

of

medical services.

While France,

at

the Canadian hospital in

McCrae became

ill

so.

“You have

purchase the

to

you want to and then you have to refund the permit you already

permit for the

park

lot

in

have,” he said.

“When you

refund the permit,

even though you’re purchasing at a pro-rated price and you’re selling

pro-rated

a

at

price

$16 administrative you’re losing money.” minus

a

Tribe said able

blue

lots are avail-

purchase except the

for lot,

all

The

Students as well as the general public are invited to leam about the

with

pneumonia and then with meningi-

tis.

He

died on Jan. 28, 1918.

McCrae,

who was

the

which

is

the lot

by the

security

representative

first

Remembrance Day the McCrae house offers a short Remembrance service at 9:30 a.m. in the gardens beside the museum. Everyone is welcome to come pay their respects to McCrae and other

Also,

said there are a lot of people

throughout

Guelph museums

who

park

inappropriately

November,

Because people continue

have a display featuring information on John

ty

McCrae

tickets a day.

at

will

Stone Road Mall.

This

exhibit will offer family and group

passes to the

and

McCrae House along

to

park illegally Tribe said securi-

hands out approximately 100

“We have a designated ticket who hands out tickets

person

with detailed information about the

everyday,

house and the veteran. This display is one among others to acknowledge the Year of the

unless

Veteran.

who

don’t want to pay for parking or

that is a no-no.

thoughts.

Canadian appointed as consulting physician to the First British Army, was buried with military honours at Wimereaux Cemetery in France.

On

their

fee,

E-wing.

Remembrance Day.

equipment and come voice

McCrae was

end up losing money by doing

in

South Africa.

In the First

in the

died

to

their

1

The McCrae house, and

who

come

pay

During Remembrance week McCrae house will be housing

visiting the

Guelph.

is

to

on Remembrance Day.

Day pay your

108 Water

McCrae House

many

says

people, not just veterans,

respect to veterans and local veter-

an John

11.

a.m. to 5 p.m., and free admission. McCrae attendant, Cameron

ognized as such because of the poem In Flanders Fields, by, Lt.Col. John McCrae. This Remembrance

be from 9

also

will

extended hours on Nov.

day,” he said.

all

she

is

something else does.”

So

occupied doing that

is

all

she


Page 2

— SPOKE, November

News

2005

7,

OPSEU

Now deep thoughts

fights for college part-timers hours or six hours, and you're thinking eventually a full-time job will come up and you can

By CHANTELLE TIMPERLEY

...with Random

Conestoga College

questions answered by

The Ontario Public Service Employees Union (OPSEU) is

random students

apply for that, then everything will be fine," he said. “Whether or not they keep on working there is really beside the point in the sense that what we’re talking

heading a campaign to allow college part-timers across Ontario to legally unionize.

What does Remembrance Day mean to you?

Ontario

Canada

is

the only province in

about

that currently bars college

part-timers from membership, even though they outnumber full-time

1

underpaid positions, according

to

dealt with

OPSEU’s website. The legislation,

praising our

Ashley Corbett, first-year police foundations

union,

including

hours

a

week,

reminds

me

for

our country.”

Joanne first-year

business

management

me

it

just

means remember-

It

especially

my

means a

lot

grandfather served

in

is

put forth,

mem-

will elimi-

it

nate the five clauses in the current

politicians accountable,

costs,” he said.

“Of course, the

is

faculty

members, but staff

that

may

the door, or because there are

I

it

Rosario

a private

human rights is an argument that’s been used on every issue, from pay equity to the minimum wage, to actually the abolition of slavery,” he said. “We’re

these conditions to get their foot in

made.

getting in touch

NDP MPP

respect their

Robinson said people work under no

full-time positions.

“For instance, with the faculty,

you might

not the sacrifices people

also

Ontario

Marchese brought

union.

afford to.

seems more like a remembrance of war and

is

actually wanting.”

advantage of hiring outside the

be eligible for them, depending on what college they work at. The only drawback is they have to pay into pension plans when they can barely

“It

to

ernment does nothing OPSEU will keep pushing for equal rights for

are

first-year pre-services firefighting

the

keep on using so many part-timers, because a lot of those jobs can be converted to full-time and these people can have careers as educators, which is what they’re

employer

and universities. Robinson said the government tends to use the same budget argument for many issues. “This whole argument that we can’t treat people properly and

Robinson said part-time workers do not receive benefits if they

Kerr,

take

out of a union.

some support

Josh

is

for

law that keep college part-timers

ing the situation to

staff.”

war.”

motivation

OPSEU

the first place they look

the

the

with the government and putting pressure on the premier, the minister of labour and the minister of

on

because

away

27. If

and

“As the colleges feel more pressures, they start looking for ways to save money and cut back

ing and respecting the men and women who served our country.

he said. “One of the

them and telling them what they can do about it.

librarians

cost

“To

rules,”

things we’re trying to do

ber’s bill to the Legislature on Oct.

problem has been ongoing for 30 years, it has only been in the last decade that employers have taken

Trudell,

the

contact with part-timers, explain-

year period. Randy Robinson, a spokesperson for OPSEU, said although the

sacrifices veterans

made

long time

because it becomes less for employers to manage, and it keeps them from cutting corners. “It’s extremely complicated to manage a system like this where you’re continually having to dodge

ers

than six

ing less than 24 hours a week and full-time lecturers working less than 12 months in a two-

of the

in a

that

counsellors, support staff work-

“It

time

makes more

it

mem-

faculty

who work fewer

bers

be treated

Robinson said

sense to have more full-time work-

we’ve decided we’re going to put some resources into this, and we’re going to slick with it until it s done,” said Robinson. The campaign includes getting in

Colleges Collective Bargaining was instated in 1975. Act, Within it are five clauses that outline who is excluded from the

veterans.”

to

first.

“It’s the first

the

called

them

Organizing the campaign was something OPSEU had been pursuing while Mike Harris was in office, but they found they had many other issues that needed to be

workers by nearly 1,000. Close to 6,000 part-time workers are working in short-term, temporary and

“Remembrance Day means

for

is

equally."

pay for, and they have bills to pay, and they shouldn’t have to be working for free,” he said.

start

working three

training, colleges

saying,

sure there’s going to be but that it,

Robinson hopes

“We’re going

to

lege

and what

that the 16,000 col-

part-time

workers and the

15,000 full-time workers will get together with their family and their friends and their neighbours and

McGuinty

deal with the ethical issue here,

attention to.”

stu-

continue

is

we’re hoping

form a

the workers, but the

to

organize and continue to mobilize, and we’re going to be holding our

doesn’t get you out of having to

affects

results

the gov-

if

part-timers.

costs associated with

which is equal rights.” Robinson said the ban not only

see

to

immediately, and says

Dalton

political force that

will

be forced

WHAT YOU CAN

to

pay

DO:

dents they are teaching. He said they do not get paid for evaluation time, preparation time or for time spent being in contact with stu-

1) Get informed by www.opseu.org.

dents outside the classroom. “They do spend a lot of their free

2) Visit www.collegeworkers.org to sign the petition.

time working for nothing, so that they can provide some sort of a

nearest cabinet minister or the

decent quality education, but these are people who have child care to

3) Contact your

visiting

MPP, your

premier.

hate war,

it’s

stupid.”

Larry Stuart,

second-year robotics

“(It)

reminds

of

my grandma

was her birthday and remember those who

because also to

me

it

fought for us.”

Destiny Balazs, first-year general arts and science

“To soldiers

remember

all

the

and people who fought for

freedom.”

Leeya Leonova, (

first-year office administration

Chowing down

for United

Photo by Paige

Hilton)

Way

chairperson, serves a juicy sausage to Janeen Darcelle Watts (left), the college’s United to raise money for the United Way. This barbecue Oct. 26 the at registrar, Hoover, Conestoga’s campaign ran from Oct. 24 to Nov. 4 and raised $367.

Way

year’s

Smile Conestoga you could be our next respondent ,

/|


News

Volunteering

is

A

GEDCKE

lege should be run.

number

of students at Conestoga College enhance their portfolio, take advantage of opportunities

to

meet new people and

give their opinion on

how

the col-

They do

this

by

volunteering their time and skills in a variety of different ways across the college.

Melissa Turner es administrator

the college,

a peer servic-

who

helps organ-

ize peer conversation partners in

and

skilfs

where an English-as-

is

You name to volunteer

tion skills

and their interpersonal and it is an excellent experience to add to a resume as far as

a

win-win situation. “The students who are volun-

community

teering (as peer conversation part-

ment,

Students can assist with events or sit on committees. When people make a large donation to the col-

student life involveshe said. “They also get a to learn

lege. Himmelman said she always looking for volunteers help with the recognition event.

about other cul-

tutes, benefit as far as

new person and

meeting a

building

some of

“And

those social skills.”

And

the students they help have an easier time adjusting to the cul-

more confident with

ting

English verbal

and feelin c

skills

more connected

their

the campus,"

in

said Turner.

According

to Turner,

tion pai tners in a

ronment,

in a

one-on-one enviclassroom setting or

as part of a group. Interested stu-

dents

can

go

to

the

Student

Services office.

“There’s an application form they fill out,” she said. “We also require they have an interview with peer services and provide refer-

would

ences.”

Volunteering for peer services takes about one hour of commitment each week. Currently,

approximately

computer programming analyst student, David Henry (left), and Adam Frank, a first-year advertising student, volunteer for CSi by setting up a haunted house in the Sanctuary. On Halloween, students had the opportunity to donate to the United Way in the haunted house. Fir st -y ear

Important Information from the Registrar's Office

20 students involved in the program.

^

Leanne Holland Brown, student co-ordinator, also has some volunteer opportunities available for students to impact how the college can be improved. “In the next year we will be looking for student volunteers to life

help make decisions and prioritize our direction and to gather input on the changes that we are adopting,” she said.

“You

you have

made an OSAP

or

wants

split

payment arrangement with the Registrar's Office, your due date for fees

November

9,

2005.

Overdue fees will be assessed a $50 late penalty. Payments can be made

person at the Registrar's Internet banking or by mail. in

The college

mailing address

Office,

is:

to volunteer

I

can

Opportunities to volunteer with are not finished for the year either. Albasel said if people are interested in helping to advertise

CSI

the services and activities of CSI or help put up posters, these options are always available.

People are always welcome for security and we take people to help

up and clean up events,” he

set

Anyone ing

with

CSI teers'

also records

some of

right

from application

lege

through

the gaps

to the col-

graduation,

and some chances for improvement. "A lot ol research is happening right now and then the recommendations and changes will start to take effect September 20^,” said Holland Brown. “It’s an important initiative because all the changes that will happen in the next few to

largely

providing

in

Himmelman,

alumni

relations and annual fund officer

development and alumni

ways

in

there

are

rela-

plenty

of

which her department can

use volunteers.

talk

to

all

their volun-

“We issue letters to saying how long they vol-

students

However, volunteering events can be done

cial

departments

for

spe-

for other

too.

day

and

provide

Explore volunteer

“Student leaders are recruited for

through

said

should

hours.

year,

in

CSI

Albasel.

to critique the entire college sys-

tions,

said.

interested in volunteer-

tem: to identify

Monica

Office of the Registrar

who helped run games and helped with setup and cleanup.”

said Holland

and recommendations on changes around the school should contact Holland Brown at ext. 2269. this matter.

(the concert) who did security, wrist banding and ticket sales,” he said. “Also at the carnival (we take volunteers). We had volunteers

Recently, student focus groups provided students the opportunity

Students interested

your attention to

and events programmer. “We had about 45 volunteers for

days, which gives students a chance to welcome new students and answer questions,”

input

for

For example, the whole Thornley concert was run by volunteers, said Maher Albasel, Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) bar manager

special events

the focus groups.”

N2G 4M4

happen sporadically that you can volunteer for.

opportunities.

fund officer

are

and thank

call

If providing input or setting aside time every week isn't for you, there are many events that

VIP/CIP Conestoga

a position.”

Monica Himmelman,

ON

Thank you

someone

if

going to-be a result of the input that we’ve had in

299 Doon Valley Drive Kitchener

it,

alumni relations and annua!

years

Registrar's Office

who would

them,” she said.

unteer in case they want to put that on a resume,” Albasel said.

name find

is

are

have people

make donations to the college and we really like to have a stu-

...

there are

more opportunities available for students to become peer conversa-

we

because

that

dent

“They benefit by strengthening their communication skills, get-

is

to

m also looking for student

I

callers,

ture.

if someone wants can find a position,”

it,

I

Himmelman.

said

skills,

chance

If

— Page 3

more confident

feel

ners), have the opportunity to strengthen their own communica-

a-second-language student is partnered with a volunteer. She said volunteering in this capacity

is

2005

7,

a great experience

Strengthen your communication By TIM

SPOKE, November

Brown. At the beginning of every school students

generally

orientation.

are needed to

make

go

Volunteers

orientation run

smoothly. “It

people have questions about

orientation assistants, they can get in contact with me, said Holland Brown. According to Holland Brown,

there

is

visit if

also a Web site students can they want to check out vol-

unteer options in KitchenerWaterloo and area. “It is an absolutely incredible site, she said. “You can go in

and

tick off

will actually

pull

up

all

your interests and it go into the bank and

the volunteer opportu-

nities that are

of interest to you. There's a real opportunity here if students are looking to get involved in the area in terms of volunteering.”

The

website

teerkw.ca.

is

www.volun-


— SPOKE, November

Page 4

Commentary

2005

7,

Ad guru way off base We’re

only human, which

all

because we're human,

we

is

why we make

mistakes. But

someone

also take care not to offend

something our parents have preached to us since day one, and as adults, we do our best to live up to our parents' expectations. Maybe this was ad guru Neil French's problem, when he accused women of “wimping out’’ on their careers by having children on Oct. 6 at an ad conference in Toronto. Maybe, because his mother was too career-oriented, he never received a or hurt people's

feelings.

It's

proper upbringing. Or, could

be that his parents were too busy with work to

it

mouth and saying whatever is on your mind? Perhaps French's mother-dearest had a job she refused to copout on and thus spent less time with her son. That could breed instil

the importance of not just running your

some resentment. At the age of 61, French has had a lot of time to become bitand he’s had a lot of time to analyse that long-ago childhood. Parents should be by their children’s side for baseball games and childhood firsts, instead of at work. Either that, or they just ter,

shouldn’t have any kids

The caveman era

Because, as he said himself, “everyone themselves fully to the job is crap at it ..." But, wait just a minute now. Neil,

how

is

who

doesn’t

your kid?

commit

How

old

Avian

That’s right, the

man

in his

own who

has one of his day planner.

probably takes

“You can't be a great creative director and have a baby and keep spending time off every time your kids are ill,’’ French said at the

conference. “You can’t do

So, Neil, does that

mean you

the.

spent your days flying across the

your parenting

as far as

full

well your child

skills go,

you’re “crap at

seems French subsequently learned something along the way, since he resigned from his position at WPP Group PLC It

after his battle with foot-in-inouth disease.

However, it would have been more appropriate if the company had dropped him like a dirty diaper instead. Now that French has more time on his hands, he has time for pursuits.

He should

ing that will teach

with a course in sensitivity train-

start

him

to

overcome

his ignorance

and male

chauvinism.

And

end of a long day of classes, he can come home, spend some quality time wiping his child’s nose and administering some cough medicine. Then, over a cup of hot tea, he can finally come to the realizaat

the

tion that he’s

now

in the 21st century.

obvious French’s common sense went out the window when he decided to start a family. If he lived according to his own words, he shouldn’t have had any kids due to his focus on It

is

people

be

should

women

differently.

hope a family-oriented

woman

gets his former position.

able stock will be saved for use

If

in

only a little bit. the avian flu (H5N 1

by

carried

is

),

birds,

which

regularly w-ork with poultry they

butchering

flu

appeared for the first time in China, infecting many people and killing 18. Now people are stocking up on the anti-flu drug Tamiflu, just in case a pandemic blows up in Canada. Tamiflu is not a vaccine that protects against getting the it

is

a

pill

know

flu

and preparation of contaminat-

flu, but

Before anyone has to panic they should

the avian flu during the slaugh-

ed poultry for cooking. avian In 1997, the

and

the

vims may be fatal and a pandemic could be triggered. There have been .cases where humans have been infected with defeathering,

facilities

hospitals.

infects

humans while they have human flu, then the avian

ter,

high-risk settings, such as in

long-term care

patients can

take to reduce flu symptoms.

his career.

Let’s

Maybe If

it.’’

new

at

flu

chicken.

job."

world and flogging Chivas Regal, knowing

was sick? Which means

we looked

epidemic should be taken seriously

is

he or she now?

up some space

over. It’s about time

is

at all.

In an Oct. 26 article in the Toronto Star, Paul Brown, vice-

that if they

should get a regular president of marketing and sales for

Roche Canada,

prevent seasonal

who

people

said height-

are

flu shot to

The more immunized the flus.

ened awareness and a flurry of media reports of the avian

less likely the avian strain will

moving through Asia and Europe has boosted

strain

demand

is what people immedido during a crisis. Everybody panicked after West

ever meet up with a regular

influenza virus

12- to

for Tamiflu, causing a

mutation

that

trigger a pandemic.

Panic

18-month backlog.

ately

Since people are panicking,

Canadian

Nile and

retail sales of the drug have already surpassed the country’s supply for last year’s

SARS

respiratory

(severe acute

syndrome)

made

headlines, but each crisis eventually disappeared, as the bird

entire flu season.

epidemic will. anyone can do is keep informed about the avian flu and know what to do in case of infection. while hoping to God that a

think people should be con-

I

the

for

would

flu

cerned about the bird flu, but they should know Canada is being proactive and is preparing an action plan. When distribution of Tamiflu resumes in Canada, the remaining avail-

All

domino of deaths doesn’t occur across Canada and the world.

Spoke Letters are

welcome

is published and produced weekly by the journalism students

of Conestoga College

Editor: Paige Hilton

Spoke welcomes

letters to the

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

editor. Letters

contacted

No unsigned Letters should

Spoke

Brent Gerhart

Jason Sonser

Melissa Hancock

Photo Editors: Chantelle Timperley, Mike

Bors, Denise Muller

be published.

be no longer than 500 words.

reserves the right to edit any

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

letter

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke @conestogac. on. ca

for publication.

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

N2G 4M4

Editor:

Circulation Manager:

Jon Yaneff

for verification.

letters will

Spoke Online

Advertising Manager: Janet Morris Production Managers: Steph Baulk,

,

Dr.,

Web

site:

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.


M SPOKE, November

CSI SELF SERVE AREA

-

7,

2005

— Page 5

ROOM 1B2

MONDAY to THURSDAY 8AM- 8PM, FRIDAY 8AM- 4PM, SATURDAY 10AM-

wwrow com//vq wow

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NOVEMBER 28TH

AIL MOVIES START AX IIMOAM 2I» IS THE SASCTVART fcr


— SPOKE, November

Page 6

7,

2005

IMPORTANT INFORMATION REGARDING THE

CSI

STUDENT HEALTH PLAN

Conestoga College has moved to a new student information system and is billing students by semester. This change has affected This year

some

areas of the CSI Health Plan. If you are a full-time student, enrolled for two semesters (fall and winter) your fees were billed to you in July including the $ 90.40 which represents the student health plan fee. If you have not opted out of the health plan and continue with your studies there are no changes at this time to your service. 1

you are a

completing your program in December of this year, you have paid for coverage until December 3 only, as you have paid the "per semester" fee of $95.20. You may continue your coverage until August 3 1, 2006 by opting back into the plan through the CSI office for an additional $95.20. If

full-time student,

1

you are a full-time student, enrolled for two semesters (fall and winter) and you have opted-out of the student health plan, you will receive your refund in two payments pending the final verification of fees paid If

in

If

January

in

accordance with the per semester fee schedule.

you withdraw from your program you

will

receive a refund of the

health plan fees through the registrar's office in accordance with the College fee policy. Students withdrawing prior to September 20th will receive their Health Plan fee back through the registrar's office and would not be entitled to use the Health Plan. Those withdrawing after September 20th would not receive their Health Plan fee back for Fall Semester but would receive Winter/06 fees back (if paid) and would be entitled to use the Health Plan until December 31/05. This same process applies if you switch from full-time to part-time status.

previous years, the health plan fee was "not refundable" and your coverage continued until August 3 of the following year. This has changed this year. We regret any inconvenience this may cause you. In

1

Our

staff

is

available to assist

questions you

may

You may contact

you

in

any way possible and

to

answer any

have.

us at listen@conestogac.on.ca or

call

748-5 131.


,

News

SPOKE, November

2005

7,

— Page 7

Car-sharing

another way to conserve The People's Car Co-op

is

now

receiving federal funding after being

recognized as a component of the government's energy-saving One-Tonne Challenge strategy By

MEGHAN KRELLER

changed or worry about

get the oil

repairs, Steffler said.

(Photo

Keep

it

by Melissa Hancock)

clean

Did you know that about half of Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions come from transportation? As the amount of vehicles on the streets is slowly damaging our environment, people are looking for

If you're planning to get a new piercing or tattoo is important for your health that you go somewhere clean. Deacon Matheson, of Tora Tattoo in Waterloo, unwraps packages of the sterile tools he needs to do a piercing. Matheson says the aftercare and cleaning of a fresh piercing is the key to it

more

ways

efficient

to travel

such as

money as well, become recognized means of lowering air

The concept

simple; car-sharing

is

an organized system that allows to rent a car for as

little

is

It

members of

In turn,

more

alternative,

access to a car

when

to

car-sharing organiza-

first

The People’s Car Co-operative

ager.

“Therefore, they help reduce

emissions.”

The concept Europe

in

maintained lar

first

became popular

in the early ’90s

and has

popularity as a regu-

its

means of transportation

there but

hasn’t quite taken off yet in North

Although

there

different

are

organizations throughout Ontario,

it

has taken a while to catch on here,

people hear car-sharing

they automatically thing of carpool-

"That’s

list

of

owning

and maintaining a vehicle goes

much

further, said Steffler.

“Our alternative is cheaper than owning a vehicle and also maintains flexibility,”

he

said.

This service is not meant for a commuter, however, as the car must

be returned to the original location for the charges to halt. It is most

who are going on a more limited

convenient for people to use a vehicle

basis, explained Steffler.

for

insurance

purposes,

members must be over the age of 25

G class

and must possess a

licence.

Since the People’s Car Co-op was in 1998 it has grown to more than 130 members with

serve six

cars

not

cities.

always an attractive concept for

The make

he explained.

everyone.”

throughout

located

the

People’s Car Co-op hopes to car-sharing

more

utilized

in

and are trying to become more widespread throughout the area, he said. “Our hope is to continue to provide vehicle pods throughout K-W

two are very different. The People’s Car Coop has a self-serve system that works around the schedule of their members. The co-op provides vehicles throughout the city, all equipped with a universal lockbox containing the keys. Members can reserve the car most convenient for them

Challenge, the government’s ener-

via telephone or the Internet for as

gy-saving strategy.

then up to the

People’s Car Co-op

However,

in

long as desired.

SERVING KITCHENER-WATERLOO

member to

A rvd

to the

Witmot and Woolwich

long

founded

Steffler said.

ing,"

like a

dollar signs, but the cost of

Also,

America.

“When

may seem

This

home

is

“Members tend to drive less,” said Dave Steffler, project services man-

of

concept for everyone.” Dave Steffler, project sen -tees manager

have

necessary.

Inc.

Township#

not always an attractive

means of

always

but

car-

think of carpooling. That's

car-sharing

efficient

transportation

tion,

United Wfcy

“When people hear

organizations are encouraged to use

Ontario’s

a difference!

Also,

are automatically entered

sharing they automatically

potential.

Kitchener-Waterloo

Your support and generosity makes

refundable security deposit.

as

designed for people who want the convenience of a vehicle, but wouldn’t use one to its full an hour.

United Way.

$400

pollution.

members

for contributing to the

and members must supply a (or $500 for two people) fully

fee

travelled.

as a practical

and learning

Way Campaign Committee

To become a

a $25 application

is

car-sharing has

Although not only

car-sharing.

is

United

there

but to save people

lesser-known alternative that

designed to help the environment,

behalf of Conestoga College’s

not a free sendee.

on the insurance policy of the organization which costs approximately $14 per month. Upon taking the car out members are also charged a rate of $3.50 per hour of use ($4.50 on weekends) and $0.25 per kilometre

is

On

is

member

portation.

has been in Ontario for seven years

life

order for the organi-

members

One

Connect

in

biking, carpooling and public trans-

preventing infection.

CONESTOGA

Of course,

zation to maintain their vehicles, this

reality

It is

the

take the car and return

it

same place and in the same condition when it is due back. There’s no need to

fill

up on gas.

the region

and become more accessible more people.” said Steffler.

to

Car-sharing has been recognized as a

component of

federal

the

In is

One-Tonne turn,

now

The

receiving

funding that will

help

in

expansion, Steffler said.

For more information www.peoplescar.org

visit;


Page 8

— SPOKE, November

New By

technician program begins next

JON MOLSON

Kitchener- Waterloo area.

A Conestoga

will

be offering a new

technician program next year that will give students the skills

needed

meet the increasing con-

to help

struction

demands

News

2005

7,

the

an

the program. program requires Secondary School

into the

Ontario

Diploma (OSSD) under the age of

in the region.

of

year

first

Admission

individuals

for

19.

Another require-

The renovation technician program will provide students with a

ment

combination of both practical as

Applicants without an

well as theoretical training required

required

to secure a position within the resi-

more years before the entrance year into the program must pass a profi-

dential

and commercial renovation

sectors of the industry.

they

1

math and English

or advanced level.

OSSD

English and math.

60 students are

w'ill

registered,

year of the program

nician level course in addition to our

of 30. The

will train students in areas

White, chair of trades and appren-

renovation carpentry

pus.

“We

just

want

Doon cam-

to be able to help

our local industries

finding

w'ith

cal

teaches

will be broken into four semesters, over the course of two years, with

tions.

a

summer break

starting in April

and ending in September. The program will potentially be offered at a new Waterloo campus, able to purchase the

if

the pur-

before

December. If

acquisition then the

be moved to another venue

in the

after the first all

of the

skills

of a level

carpen-

1

try apprentice. If successfully writ-

exam he

ing the exemption

may

or she

enter a three-way apprentice-

ship partnership with an employer,

confident the program will

two semesters,

first

I

would

planning,” he said.

about 60 per cent hands-

it is

who

Balodis,

will also co-ordinate

on and 40 per cent in class. When they come back for the third and

said

fourth semester

capacity with current programs.

about 80 per class and 20 per cent hands

in

He

is

it

a necessary bal-

is

technician training.

Guelph campus

the

“The move

much

us

said this in

the renovation technician program, at

is

its

Waterloo will give and safer working

to

better

space and allow us greater flexibil-

our building projects,” he

in

ity

“We

they are apprenticeship,

into a design office or a dif-

skilled trades or renovations tech-

may not be as physdemanding,” White said. “A

nician, without conflict.”

cover a

lot

of

carpentry,” he

a technician level

we want to increase their math skills, some of their computer but primarily the

carpentry

1

“The guess

the community and by attentive and careful

move

“We

that

we

will

are confi-

be able to fill 60 seats.” excited about the pro-

excellent shops,”

level

industry,

the student

but after that they might want to

year of the program

A

the

tical leaching.

to ensure

the needs of

fils

oped close ties and relationships with our local school boards and

Waterloo high school. “One of the advantages have in our new campus

skills,

our program

ance

White said the program serves a number of purposes. "What we want to do in the first

is

do our best

will

that

on,” he said.

is

“We

White said there is a good balance between theoretical and prac-

cent

He

new programs.

launch of

should inherently have.”

as a level 2 apprentice.

be successful.

tradespeople

that

skills

and the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities student

White is gram being offered

it

the

to

framing,

first

year

is

devoted to hands-on carpentry.”

making the program would

the college fails in

program year they would have to exit the

and

logic skills

work

Graduates will receive a two-

“Since

successful

were

a student

training periods. If

year technician diploma.

said.

is

week in-school

rela-

program,

Conestoga will know

“All

of their eight-

first

agement. marketing and client

school.

chase

be challenges associated with the

completed the

industries,” he said.

1

in the

Guelph

campus, said there would always

dent just through word of mouth

former University Heights high

is

at the

be able to work

man-

including level

the college

carpentry department

keting department and has devel-

among

is

Andris Balodis, a professor

trades, excellent

together as a team,” White said.

or

other

students,

all

she also has to have successfully

Colleges and Universities.

things, business ethics, project

skills

if

He

required for

is

fundamentals

metal cutting and welding. Year two

some qualified people,” The renovation technician program begins in September 2006. It

of Training,

“The college has an excellent mar-

renovations,

to

such as

Ministry

the

basic electri-

1,

plumbing

and

related

first

and

the

be divided into two classes

apprenticeship training,” said Greg ticeship at Conestoga's

or the

marks achieved three or

test in

If all

lege that extra dimension of a tech-

1

general

ciency

“This program will give the col-

Grade

is

the

at

“Certainly their manual dexterity

ship with an employer, the student

of 60 seats are available for

total

fall

student

someone who has entered

White

move

to

White

things in and

confident Conestoga2s

is

new campus

be

will

successful. is

into a

three-way apprenticeship partner-

He

they

said

who

applicants

looking

are

for

display the charac-

valued by employers.

teristics

or 15 years,

ferent area that ically lot

of the courses

in

second year

enable people to do

that,

will

“We

program.

like to think that all

said.

more

He

programs are demanding on students and that is why they choose Conestoga," he said. “The risk is coming to the college and being challenged and the reward is the skills students gain by overcoming those challenges and being educated in our programs.”

be able to run two or

said dividing

women

in

up the program

benefit the students.

“Two groups of 30

students

allows us to ensure that everyone gets to participate in

aspects of

all

practical projects, as well as receiv-

ing adequate individual instruction

such as drafting or com-

in areas

of our

will

classes in the shop, whether

would

giving

will participate in the

out in order to teach classes.”

purchase of the

in the field for 10

might

“The

said.

will

rooms won't be crowded, so we won’t have

industry

some

we is

the

in

them options such as moving into estimating or some other design.” White believes there is a high risk and high reward for students who

the former

at

“People

puter labs,” Balodis said.

Balodis's advice to students

who

are interested in entering the pro-

gram

to get

is

some

practical expe-

rience.

“Get a summer job

in construc-

help a relative build a deck or

tion,

even a birdhouse,” he said. “Get a feel for the process and the tools.”

Degree completion programs promoted VANESSA PARKER

By

Conestoga is increasing its efforts to promote its degree completion programs to high school students. Director of marketing Paul Osborne spoke to Conestoga college’s board of governors on Oct. discussing the

24,

place

initiatives

in

promote Conestoga’s

that

degree completion programs.

Osborne

said there

to

list

their parents

factor in deciding

1

as the

where

to continue their education.

Osborne wants to inform students and parents early on in high school that there are lots

the cafeteria at

on Oct. 27 after 21 years Conestoga College.

of being a

degree

to obtain a

“A

of opportunities at

pomiciPdCTion tTiont*

y.

www.paguide.com *

yy

v .

meets the needs of the make up the large percentage of applicants. “It’s our number 1 publication to this age group,” he said. The degree completion programs are given high priority on the left

it

website, residing

hand corner so

it

is

in

the

easily

accessible. This link tells students criteria are

needed

“We

need to expand the educasystem to accommodate the needs of a higher skilled workforce, we need to place more emphasis on leaching and learning tional

Tibbits also added that

that

19 to 24 year olds that

top

learning.

then just research.”

Osborne advised the board

school's

like to

to get into

looking

start

we have to

competitors and

at

start selling the fact that the cost

of

your degree through programs at applied degree Conestoga is less expensive then getting

getting a degree through university.

spoke

In other business, Tibbits

to the board about his attendance at

the Ontario

Economic Summit

Niagara-on-the-Lake.

He

said

in it

was beneficial because the need for a more trained workforce was addressed.

university

Commerce came

considering their role.”

but no one could really keep track

apprenticeship

of them, they were

Tibbits. “I

a chance to

place.

seize

talk

“Student Services would send the student off somewhere to find

Conestoga’s programs.”

Osborne said getting parents

degree

1 888-334-9769

takes time to get the message

out to everybody,” he said.

would

be able to do is say to all students that whatever program you take there is a pathway to advanced

According to Osborne, Conestoga has always had articula-

to

.At

great programs.”

President John

degree programs.

Tibbits said what he

each program..

and that’s it," said Osborne. "They say this without

y

“why

and “This is just how my son or daughter wants to learn, these are

what

Conestoga.

of parents say to their chil-

lot

dren that they are going to go to

Cj

say,

heard about these before,”

current so

number

in

I

about the programs.

per cent

Shirley Sebastian retired

Osborne said parents haven’t

the college’s website needs to be

ondary applicants are under the age of 24 and of these applicants, 36

cashier

grams.

dents and inform them early on Eighty-five per cent of post-sec-

Bidding adieu

of the option of applied degree pro-

“It

was a need

reach parents of high school stu-

(Photo by Jason Sonser)

Osborne said he is both excited and scared at the majority of the parents’ comments when informed

that

starts

at

the

their

message

children’s

Conestoga

the

is

real challenge. “It’s a

major

we have

shift in

thinking that

work on,” he said. change the idea that

tion

agreements with universities

information

and

all

over the

would lead “It was a very

it

“The

Chamber

Ontario

on the need for more trade and

He is

graduates,”

saw this as the day and

said

College liaison officers are now attending more parent nights at

found on the website."

with no skills agenda."

high schools and have been allowed

portal to be

versity

is

the best

way

“It’s

uni-

to go.”

to mail personalized letters to par-

ents of five invite

all

area

Grade

12 students in the

high school boards to to information sessions

them

about applied degree programs.

Conestoga that

working on a parent added to the website

is

shows parents the options

Conestoga has

to offer in

an easily

accessible way.

Board

members

agreed with Osborne's ideas on promoting the

about

one of the main problems

eral

to

to

said

the lack of funding from the fed-

nowhere,” he said. confusing setup. Now all information and contact information is

lough

of

out with a report

government.

“The

federal

government has

taken a major position Tibbits agrees with

in

research

Bob

Rac, a

former premier of Ontario, who

was

also

Ottawa has

the

at

to

get

Summit, that engaged and

develop a national trades training strategy to meet the needs of Ontario’s economy.


News

SPOKE, November 7, 2005

— Page 9

P©er services here to assist students By MIKE

BORS

es.

Almost 100 peer

tutors

hired and trained over the

Not doing as well as you thought you were after mid-terms? Peer services at Conestoga College is here to help.

Peer tutors are available for students

who need

help

in

a certain

The tutoring student will be someone who has taken and been course.

with this service.

to help

program this year called the Peer Conversation Partner Service is for English as a second language students. They will have one-on-one time with a tutor that will help them brush up on their English verbal Students tutor can office in

are trying to recruit

from a variety of program

areas because

some

we want

diversity.”

Melissa Turner,

There

is

also a service called peer

like a

peer

the peer services

2B07 and fill member

thinking

‘1

didn’t

administrator.

not too late to get a tutor. hurt just to

come

in

out a request

that peer services

and check out

when

looks for

hiring a tutor are strong

communica-

and

tion,

organizational skills.

ices will then

take

a

to find out just

before being matched with a student.

A

staff

in

peer serv-

meet with the student what the student needs a tutor for and match them accordingly. Some of the matching criteria would be gender and/or age the student has a preference or

if

"We

six'-hour

are trying to recruit

want some

Most

peer services

recruitment drive where

who

ordinators

asks they

tutors, but are

still

asked to become

ning of December.

interested in

have just wrapped up mid-terms and they

becoming one, can

ices office.

STALKING Stalking

worked

all

day cleaning up the

fallen foliage

in

the general

population.

Autumn may make for pretty scenery but once those leaves fall makes for quite a mess. Tibor Olah, junior maintenance for the college,

a crime that happens more on college campuses than

is

it

behind the

What

is It?

rec centre.

Researchers in a national survey of college students in the U.S., defined stalking “Repeatedly following, watching, phoning, writing, e-mailing or otherwise communicating with someone in a way that seemed obsessive and caused fear or concern for personal safety”.

as:

Web CT

is still

Who

going strong By

MEGHAN KRELLER

of

The students of Conestoga have played a large part in making Web

CT

the success

it

is,

according to

education technology co-ordinator Elizabeth

Bowman.

Web CT for

just

has been

over

five

more than

for

1

years

after five its

three years because

convenience and availabili-

ty-

“Students and faculty aren’t always available at the same time

and

this is a

way

for students to

.

Ex-partners:

at the

college

years

and.

said, its usage has grown between 85 and 92 per cent per

phenomenal in terms of numbers,” she said. “The student influence is where this is

in

an intimate relationship with the victim little or no contact but are under the

Delusional stalkers: frequently have had

3.

Vengeful stalkers: are angry with the victim over some slight, whether or imagined (could be argument, poor grade on a paper)

delusion that the victim

is in

love with

them it

is

real

Statistically most stalkers are males who have been rejected by women but males can be victims too. College women are more likely to be stalked by someone they know; either someone they had an intimate relationship with or with whom they had casual contact (i.e. a classmate). Male victims often feel more menaced than endangered. Stalking is seen as a way to get power and control over a victim.

What Can You Do?

hours a day,” she said.

good

have online sources of material so people don’t have to It’s

to

carry paper with

them

all

the time,

The

following are

thing

“If students forget notes, they

is

1

Web

2

more about it, she explained, and when the faculty get turned onto it, they end up loving it. This e-learning tool allows facul-

faculty in creating online courses

positive feedback from stu-

dents drives faculty to go and find out

password-safe page

that are

more dynamic than

text.

include anything from assignments and class notes to online discussion groups and interactive les-

faculty

with time and so are

sons.

only get the base-knowledge,” she

Susan Hartley, a professor of

come

explained.

pitfall is that in

“We

liberal studies at the college, said

the design as

she has used the e-learning tool

at this point.”

when

they are limited

we

as

some

suggestions

if

you are being stalked. The most important

be aware and get support.

.

3.

4.

6

.

Do

not minimize or ignore unwanted behaviour.

Respond

firmly that you do not want further contact. Report threats to Campus Security and/or the Police. If the stalker is a Conestoga College student, their behaviour is against the Student Code of Conduct and college sanctions may apply. Campus Security can also help you in dealing with a non-college stalker. Protect your private information (home/cell phone no., e-mail address, address) Gather evidence (e.g. save e-mails, unwanted gifts, voice mail) and document what you have tried to do in the situation. You may need support in dealing with the stress of being stalked. Make an appointment to see a counsellor in Student Services for support and advice.

so they

can’t take part in

much

.

just

for their students to access that can

“The biggest

to

can

always access the information on CT,” she said. Although the response to the classroom enhancer has been positive, there are always improvements that can be made. Bowman hopes that, in time, they will have enough staff to help

growth started for sure.”

ty to create a

into three categories:

2.

said Hartley

year.

“The growth

fall

were

access grades and assignments 24

Bowman

The

are stalkers?

Stalkers tend to

we'd

like to

A Message from Student Services Visit

fill

out an application in the peer serv-

(Photo by Meghan Kretter)

Raking up the leaves

to

not

Tutors are available until the beginstudents

program co-

recommend

who were

mediated by a tutor and allows

“Some

we

tutors are hired through a

and requires a tutor who has expewill

from a

diversity,” said Turner.

summer

The student

course

training

variety of program areas because

the student has a learning disability

rience with that.

intra-per-

All tutors are required to

be tutors. Students

on a weekly basis and go over the week’s materials for certain cours-

“It’s

doesn't

Tutors must have an overall program average of 75 per cent and an average of 80 per cent in the course

get five hours of tutoring for $15.

is

It

the service.”

supported learning groups, which students to get together in groups

do as well

thought,”’ said Melissa Turner,

sonal

form.

if

peer services administrator

to

I

they will be tutoring. Other qualities

skills.

who would go

may be as

peer services

A new

successful in that course.

“We

were

summer

our website httpd/www. conestogac. on. ca/jsp/stserv/index. isp


— SPOKE, November

Page 10

A

Feature

2005

7,

freakishly

good time

in

the Sanctuary By TIM

GEDCKE

was when people

part

As you walk by the college,

the Sanctuary in

you usually hear music

and the crack of pool

On

ing.

balls collid-

Halloween, however, you

heard shouts of fright and terror as students enjoyed the haunted house set

up

Conestoga Students

by

The haunted house took

a long

time to create, but, in the end. CSI president

was

all

"It

Justin

worth

Falconer said

it

He

does, however, have a sugges-

on how

tion

was tons of work," he

said.

“Three long days in a row, but everyone seemed to really enjoy

“1

thought

should be darker,”

it

he said. “Like pitch black. Have tle lights

on the bottom

Although

it.

it

CSI doesn't

why

three times."

food and candy

of joy. fright, or appreciation for first-year

CSI council

set

up.

along with

the council.

there w'ere pails of

end of the

at the

house.

“We from into

Darcie Whitfield, a first-year

of

Falconer

said

first-year advertising student

explained

Students responded with shouts

it.

member

everyday,

some members of The

of work,

lot

a

council,

there

lit-

guide

regret that they did

Ashley Graham,

was

that

didn’t want people running the chainsaw'

the hallway

heads

room

Graham

off,”

straight

screaming their

we dowm room

said, “so

public relations student, said the

decided to put a cool

haunted house was worth her

with some creepy foods. There’s

time.

lizard eyes

“There was a guy with a wolf

mask and he

leading us for

Graham of work,

peared." she

“Then out of

said.

nowhere he got on knees and

started

crazy and attacked

his

hands and

running

my

like

leg: that w'as

and just gross stuff

in

general.”

awhile and then he just disap-

w'as

(Photo by Tim Gedcke)

Students entering a CSI haunted house on Halloween had to brace themselves as representatives from CSI would jump out of the dark at any time.

to go."

was a

People were coming back two or

what

could have been

it

scarier.

first-year

it.

at just the

right time.

where you have

Incorporated (CSI).

masks

in

jumped out from corners

said although the

reactions

from students made “I

hear

a lot

means

w'e’re

posed

to

it

it

w'as a lot

they

got

worthwhile.

of screaming which

doing what we’re sup-

be doing,” she said. “I

think the chainsaw' guy at the end

scary."

Kyle Maher, a

first-year market-

ing student, said that his favourite

really gets you.

worth

It

was

definitely

it.”

(Photos by Tiffany McCormick)

Costumes Children

in

aplenty!

the toddler and

pre-school rooms of the building

show

off their

ECE

cos-

tumes on Halloween Dress Up Day Oct. 28. Above, Reece and Caden are ready to fight fires in their bright fire-

costumes while Hannah, Victoria, Erin and

fighter (Photo by Tim Gedcke)

Students shrill

who walked

through the haunted house reacted with

shrieks and shouts.

Alexa,

left,

princesses.

are picture perfect


Feature

Halloween party a By

BRANDON WALKER

by around

II

p.m. The

first

SPOKE, November

7,

2005

— Page 11

good time

frightfully

10 or

15 students at the party took advan-

A

pimp, a penis and a priest walk Sound like the opening to a joke? Maybe. But in this

into a bar. line

was three students attending Conestoga Students Inc.’s (CSI) Halloween party held in the case

it

Sanctuary, Oct. 27.

There was also a out

condoms

(she

fairy

made

handing

sure to give

to the penis), the Hamburgler, a guy dressed up like a keg of beer, a girl dressed up like a bunch of grapes and no party would be complete without Batman. One trend was girls dressing up like referees. There were about four or five that night. There were also girls dressed up as little angels and little devils and one that was half and half. A popular costume for guys and girls this year was the

one

tage of the free pool tables.

Shaykhan Dipraseuth, a human services student, Little

dozen students dressed

in that

all)

1

Matt

Anderson, a

first-year accounting student,

he

was

nitely

old style fashion.

The

(giant bal-

and his two friends were a cop and a 970s tennis player. They enjoyed a few quick games of pool before hitting the dance floor. Attendance at the event was less than the Toga Party, mainly because this was a 19 and over event. CSI bar manager, Maher Albasel, said there were about 270 people at the party. Capacity for the Sanctuary is about 350. The pimp. loon breasts and

1920s style gangster, complete with fedora. There were around a

dressed up like

Red Riding Hood

said “defi-

having a

good time.”

night started off

slow but pick u

(Photo by Brandon Walker)

P

Dan

on Oct. 27, which raised $380

ASvUjm

for the

His friend, Bryan Sooley, a firstyear architecture student, dressed

ner

United Way.

was

Left,

chosen

Hamburgler

Halloween party CSi president Justin Falconer shows his spirit.

Marvali, a first-year broadcasting student, dressed as the

by

audience

Lisa Motayne, a second-year law

seemed to enjoy the attention he was getting because of his cos-

and security administration student, was dressed as the cowgirl and she won an MP3 player for

but

tume. Five students were selected from the audience to participate in a best

costume contest. The contestants were a guy wearing an inflatable outfit that made it look like he was riding on Frankenstein’s shoulders, the penis, the Hamburgler, a cowgirl dressed in pink and a guy dressed like a keg of beer. The win-

having the best costume. Hillary Greb. a self-serve supervisor for CSI, said she was pleasantly surprised by the turnout. “It wasn’t really advertised as much as our previous events,” she said. “Last minute (the day of the party) we ran around residence and handed out a bunch of flyers and I think

said she’d like to see next

all ages event “as long as (CSI) can keep it under

year’s party as an

control.”

working apparently age of 16 or 17 for all ages events. "Well, the formal (in March) will be an all ages event, so by that point in time (we should) have something concrete,” said Greb. She said the minimum age will be advertised on posters for the

CSI

is

towards a

minimum

event.

(Photo

(Photo by Brandon Walker)

A French maid cleans up at the Halloween party, while doing her best Stayin’ Alive pose.

helped too."

Greb

applause.

and didn’t say much,

as the penis

that

at CSi’s

CSI’s Halloween party party

like

it

was 1999.

was deemed a success and allowed students

to

& Brandon Walker)

dress up, dance, sing and


Page 12

— SPOKE, November

7,

News

2005

Popular fitness craze Pole dancing

is

a

new approach

to trying to lose By

you

II

TARA RICKER

are looking for a

way

to

Pole-FIT Flare Fitness. “All our staff members arc

winter months approach, pole dancing might be the perfect tiling for

fied

you. associated with exotic

dancers, pole dancing

recognized as a fun

now being and unique way is

workout for all women of different shapes and sizes. “I've always found that it’s a great workout and it's very empowering

women,”

said

in

"Pole

dancing

do

with

ing classes in Ontario

come

Or

fitness

those

in fitness

who

have a certification

to instruct properly.

“(Pole dancing)

ering for

between the ages of 18

“Once

clients start to get the tech-

down, they start developing strength and from that they get nical part

pretty confident in themselves,” she said.

"They develop curves and mus-

cles

they

didn’t

even

know

had.”

Pole dancing

first

caught Tao’s eye to school in the

when she was going by Tara Ricker) Instructor Evelanais Tao demonstrates the strength pole dancing requires. Tao teaches pole-fitness classes

"It’s

been practised

very long time,” she said.

hobby there.” Tao earned

“It's

a

pole-dancing

UK

and

she has taught in Vancouver and Toronto. She ended up in Waterloo five years ago to work on her mas-

Waterloo.

at

the

gym.

have a male instructor to

prove that

it

s

not just a ladies thing,”

who often assists Tao’s students with strength and conditioning, is

Our muscles work in a certain way. our strength and flexibility develops in a certain manner and a

and a wrong way

ight

t

to

do

is

it.”

lao has visited numerous strip clubs and has noticed that many, if not

exotic dancers don’t always do moves that are safe. all,

trial

of exotic dancers learn by and error,” she said. “They get it lot

down,

but

through her

instructor's licence in the

in

UK for a

will find they will break

sweat faster doing pole-fitness then

one of the few

they

a

put

themselves of pain doing it

lot

because they don’t

know how

to

do

properly."

it

1

ve always believed

strength of your out,

said Whalen.

people have

that pole

is

just for strippers, but

it’s

dancing

is

not.

Tao hopes that pole dancing will be the next Olympic event. "As, people

much

skill

it

come

to realize

takes and

how

how

impres-

sive it can be, whether for a femaie physique or a male physique, pole

dancing could get competitive,” said “It could be the next big sport-

Tao.

For more information

visit

the

Pole-FIT Flare Fitness website www.evelanais.com.

at

life

ing

it and having fun. Smith loves seeing how much students can accomplish during their two-hour classes. “They come in with a blank slate and come out having learned a new

routine.”

sounds are from students performing a routine they learned in

the

the belly dancing course offered

look

to

celebrate joyful

together.

With

Hollywood,

they do that but

to

commonly

is

believed to be a dance of seduction that

course because she used to at a video and think how do

Eastern

“It

has shown it’s

belly dancing class (which

"It

has

shown me

said

(

it

s

that exercising

a

good

that

and

a good time.”

belly dancing student

There are many different moves is

offered twice a year) is always full to capacity at 20 students, said Jen Smith, the course instructor.

can be Inn and

me

Cindy Jarvis,

very social and a learn about Middle culture while getting is

exercise.

The

she’s the one

exercising can be fun

was performed by concu-

The course good way to

now

doing the dances.

times

thanks

it

Jarvis says she’s impressed with

bines to arouse sultans.

APPLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN STUDENT SERVICES ROOM 2B04

lift

can and cannot do.”

hear the sounds of Middle Eastern music, jingle and laughter. The

ones

MOST

work-

dancing lessons

belly

Traditionally, belly dancing is a social dance created for loved

IN

to

you can

with Middle Eastern

through continuing education.

TUTORS STILL AVAILABLE PROGRAMS

“If

ing thing.”

Walking down the E-wing halls on a Thursday night at the Doon campus, one wouldn’t expect to

EXAMS

using the

in

your own weight all the better to you because your body knows what it

The biggest misconception most

By JESSICA BLUMENITHAI

YOU MAY BENEFIT FROM WORKING WITH A TUTOR NOW BEFORE YOUR FINAL

on

to take

own body

Shake up your WERE YOU AS SUCCESSFUL AS YOU ANTICIPATED ON YOUR MIDTERM EXAMS?

men

the pole.

A in the

to

Shane Whalen, a former personal

pole dancing instructor

United Kingdom. (Photo

workshop

trainer

with every athletic activity there

they

ones to experiment “We’re going to

said Tao.

women.”

Evelanais Tao,

and 50 participate in classes, it’s something that women of all ages can do, said Tao.

lirsl

out with a couples’

they do

empow-

is

men

said Tao.

Most guys a

who

Women

this,

We

boosts their confidence like crazy.”

just a ladies thing but

February and then slowly begin

in

Evelanais Tao,

recently started offering poledancing classes in Waterloo. “It

flexibility

cater to guys.”

but not pole-fitness will not

know how

is

We’re the

them don’t

background.”

extremely

is

strength,

loo.

it

muscular endurance,” said Tao. ‘Many others who teach pole-danc-

have a

in

and physical performance.” Another misconception is that pole

in

know what

dancing

impressive

certi-

and trained

pole-fitness

they’re doing but a lot of

to

for

those pesky winter pounds

ter's degree in architecture at the University of Waterloo. Recently Tao put her studies on hold to open

keep those extra pounds off as the

Once only

not X-rated

is

time."

indy Jarvis, a belly dancing

student.

Belly dancing, which is one of •he oldest forms of dance, doesn't have to be done for an audience.

Smith told her students they can practise on the phone, in the shower or anywhere. It’s about enjoy-

using different

body

parts.

The

dancer uses his or her torso, hips, stomach, arms, hands, legs, feet and head to perform. The number of moves is endless. There are

shimmies, figure eights, twists

among

rolls

and

the possibilities.

The

dancer can also use veils, candles and swords as props. C lasses

and

workshops are across Ontario. Aziza Sa ill. a popular dancer, is coming to Sarnia in April to teach a workolfered

shop.

all


News

SPOKE, November?, 2005

Page 13

Learning differently

speaks at Grand River Collegiate

University of Toronto doctorate student

how

students

telling

to

OK, says researcher

is

use technology

to

make

Institute,

learning easier

By LEE EVANS

What do you get when you have a room full of learning disabled children and a speaker with an auditory sequential learning disability? Motivation and inspiration.

Todd Cunningham spoke

a lec-

in

200

ture hall to approximately

stu-

dents and their teachers about his personal battle with learning dis-

Grand River Collegiate on Oct 24. The 27-year-old spoke with enthusiasm and passion about his experiences and is now working on his doctorate in clinical psych

abilities at

Institute

research

the

at

University

of

10- to

15-

Toronto,

The room of mostly

year-old boys listened attentively as Cunningham used humour, over-

head visuals, body language and high-tech gadgets to convey his

message of hope. "Learning disabled means learning different," he said.

Cunningham shared

his path to

emphasizing how much help he needed to get where he is success,

now.

He was bom

was a

principal

his masters in special edu-

and had cation.

well-educated

to

parents. His father

By Grade

3,

was

it

Cunningham was

clear that

struggling

in

.school. After a bout of psycho -edu-

cational testing, that

it

he had dyslexia. This disability

memory

The

and work-

storage.

information

receives

“My

brain

his

filing-cabinet

dude

is

lazy,” he said, provoking laughter from the students. When he looked up the dictionary definition for “disability.” he found it

described

as “unable” or “inca-

it

Cunningham also learned that his brain was wired differently, and so he needed to learn different ways of storing and retrieving informaHe stressed to the audience tion. that this is not a physical disability,

usually

disability,

affecting those with above-average intellect.

his research, he discov-

During

ered out of 300

millionaires world-

wide, more than 40 per cent of them have documented learning disabilities.

“Therefore,

become

want

you

if

rich,”

researcher at Toronto Sick Kids Hospital, speaks to an audience at Grand River Collegiate

growing up with learning

he said. “It took the pressure off and allowed me to feel better about

he said,

to

“have a

year,”

myself.”

went on In

of these obstacles, he

spite

to enjoy

very

a

many

successes.

animated

described performing

voice,

he

Joseph's

in

Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat at the Elgin Theatre in Toronto while

in

Grade

He sang

pable.”

but a hidden

trials of

was a wonderful

“It

In

disorganized.

is

little

about the

Institute

disabilities

disabilities.

was determined

affects reading, writing

ing

Todd Cunningham, a learning

sometimes hilarious mistakes. He related an incident where he typed the word “buttfull” when he meant to type “beautiful” in an e-mail to a girl

For the first while in high school, if he had questions after reading something out loud, he would write them down, but he still couldn’t

keep up. he became energetic in proving he was smart and so reviewed and rewrote his

7.

twice for sporting events

at

anthem Roger’s

said

also uses spell check and reads

it

all

now working on his doctorate in clinical psych at University of Toronto. He works at Toronto Sick

cle

Kids hospital in learning disability programs.

could not keep up with the volume of reading, and his old support network from high

What

did

it

take to turn things

around for Cunningham? The education system daily tests reading, writing and memory, the

Cunningham hit upon entering

where “the

first

university,

two months were

He simply

school was gone. By the end of October, depressed,

minute and found

Cunningham laughed

at,

described

being no

bullied and having

which the students in the audience seemed to identify with.

friends,

The students cation stupid

In

edu-

classroom” were labeled by other children and

Cunningham

home

in the “special

relates often

coming

Grade

6,

he

was

home

to

“utilize

his

strengths

bridge his weaknesses.” So he developed a support net-

work of key teachers, friends, his parents and new technology. Although Cunningham still misabout 68 per cent of his words, with increasingly sophisticated computer programs, it no

spells

longer matters.

He

in tears.

schooled.

had

to

often substituted

words

for

understand,

writing

which

names and

he

couldn’t

resulted

in

it

useful

to

longer a problem.

reach for their goals.

store pictures for later

Cunningham

my

tion better,"

brain to store informa-

he

said.

The following devices and programs helped Cunningham in his weakest areas: reading, three organization and writing. A computer program called Kurzwell 3000 scans text and uploads it into your computer. Small portable scanners two pencil widths wide are now available that do the same thing. The computer then reads it back to you. You can even adjust the rate of speed, and Cunningham said he found 120

“and

For better organization of infor-

young man succeed. discovered “assist-

his experiences,

Cunningham said technology has allowed him to become very independent. He encouraged students develop strategies to learn, develop a support network of family, friends and teachers and to

“Just use a digital camera,” he

for the next

back to you. summarizing

to

he finally asked for help and a pro-

committed

In

Complicated diagrams and displays on the whiteboard are no

record lectures.

organize

told the audience he

Cunningham

types 75 words per

Cunningham

hell.”

ing disability meant.

9,

useful

Alpha Smart.

frustration for him.

said.

out a docu-

It

listen later.

records into a pocket-sized computer, know also as D.A.N.A. or

ed technology” with Texas speech programs. “They helped me to

he

map

consisting of a mini-keyboard that

another obsta-

esteem, and this was the first time he really understood what a learn-

teeth pulled than

visual clues to

self.

and

He was now

were still successful in their lives. Grades 4 and 5 were years of

my

program organizes links on a timeline and builds paragraphs later. Cunningham spoke of using

has an honours bachelor of science degree from Trent University and is

to oral testing

his grades improved.

yet

all

to just

word prediction software, which guesses what you will write next.

often.

He evolved

use.”

in school for an hour,”

how

old enough to advocate for him-

work

said,

sit

told the students

gadget

young achievers in Canada to meet the Queen. He graduated high school with a 90 per cent average,

few

and have

He

brainstorm ideas, get them on the page and organize them later with a program called Inspiration. This

Cunningham showed the audience was a small device called a PDA,

stadium, and he was one of 40 top

years to helping this determined

would

Highlight and

how

has to be trained to individual voice and speech patterns to be effective. it

ment, save and transfer them in to Microsoft Word and later use

player and Another

fessor

“I

com-

computer, upload it into an audio playback device like an MP3

he met the “most amazing teacher in my life,” he said. He was suffering from low self-

rather go to the dentist

the

the

very areas he struggles with. In

Einstein,

to use this technology, as

computer will read the definition back to you. You can also download scanned information into

Grade

including

sections

the

displayed a long list of famous people with learning disabilities,

later. It

in

Unknown word?

takes a while to learn

program

notes.

learning disability.”

He

it

dictates in ideas and edits

He

him.

a separate document to be used later for study

puter will store

he liked.

Cunningham

the national

words per minute best for Other features in this allow you to highlight while you are reading and

mation, he displayed maps of data designed like flow charts to help him visually organize information.

He it

says

and

it

out loud while drawing

this helps

him

to better store

the information in his head.

Palm pilots can be used to remind you of key events and appointments, and can also store directions downloaded from Map Quest, an online

Another

map

writing.

helps

Dragon

Natural Speak, a voice recognition

program, allows him to talk into the computer and interprets all his commands, stores them and can print

them out

later.

“It's still writing.”

When questioned about the predominately male audience, he said that boys with this disorder tend to act out. whereas girls tend to be more passivfe. “Boys are identified sooner,” he said.

INFORMATION

service.

technology

Cunningham with

In response to the question, "What’s the hardest thing for you to do?” Cunningham responded,

For more information about learning disabilities visit:

www.leamdifferent.org


— SPOKE, November

Page 14

News

2005

7,

Cemeteries not By LEE EVANS

sounds whether you are

Visiting the local cemetery

is

not

you were to visit, however, you would find much more activity taking place than you might have thought possible for a park full of, weH, dead people. City of Kitchener Cemeteries list.

If

windows

face

that

The

labyrinth

stone, twisted

a

is

narrow, cobble-

walkway

that spirals

toward a centre obelisk. This type of path has been used as a tool for mediation

and healing

for

than 3,000 years

mation

times

cultures. Visitors to the

several

options, but to acquaint

ial

with

them

the features available for

all

those of us

and kicking to enjoy, including fishing, hiking and still

alive

gardening.

The

six

Of these, Williamsburg newest and most unique. It was opened in 1995 on the far end of Fischer Hallman Road, just past the new Williamsburg subdivision the

Wcstmount

intersection of

the

at

and Fischer Hallman.

ies is

due

find

many

useful

it

more

different

cemetery

for practising

relaxation techniques and reducing anxiety.

Did you know you can do garin this cemetery? Unused 20-x-20-foot plots of land are dening

most

gardening, and unlike most com-

munity plots

traditional cemeter-

to the fact only half the land

in the city,

have much

less public traffic.

How

about fishing

The pond

in a

cemetery?

stocked with bass for

is

recreational calch-and-release fishing.

The idea

The cemetery is approximately 50 acres and has many more features than

may

in

available for rent to use for general

owns and operates

city

cemeteries. is

or

tative labyrinth.

infor-

seminars

pond,

the

whether you are walking the medi-

staff Tricia Yates organizes

throughout the year, not only to inform people about different bur-

sitting in

which has

the dedication chapel,

usually high on anyone's

an

to

is

enjoyable,

families

to

make

the cemetery

relaxing

visit,

place

not the

for

sad of

the

In

many

there are

birdhouses for the

numerous species of found throughout Students

in

birds that are

the

*

“Any death that does not occur under long-term

year.

care

woodworking

their

in

gram and came help

install

On any will

to the

The

suspicious.”

pro-

cemetery staff

given day or evening you

find people walking through

They

are

enjoying

the

which is covered in bark chips, making it perfect for a 20-minute hike through the forest. The trail is open to the public and Trillium

trail,

has a picturesque

wooden bridge

actually

an

early

19th

itself

is

century

the solid

and stained glass windows. The centre can be rented out for memo-

promontory point tranquil

fountains

is

that

pond and adds to the

a

The pond has provide soothing

setting. that

rial

to save

that

services, weddings, rehearsals

or other special events. That's the scenic tour. However,

ma

on expenses.

may

cause to have to handle to position a dead body in

it

and try your car,

does not occur is

deemed

in

addition to any suspi-

cions this could arouse as you are

"Be sure you understand your loved one's wishes in

this area,"

the funeral

she

1

life." if

services of the coroner's office

costs $75.

Next, a body has to be transferred from the place of death. During the

Kitchener. the

In

process

of cremation,

according to provincial regulations, the remains of the deceased must

be received

in

a casket that pro-

vides a proper covering for the deceased and affords sanitary handling for the crematorium opera-

Under no conditions

tors.

casket to be opened •

in

is

the

the cremato-

bits that

may be

left

how ashes from cremation are siftover from teeth, surgical pins and pace-

ment with

several niches in each

side to hold the urns, a family

mau-

soleum, interment within a grave on a family lot or scattered in a gar-

you choose

If

chamber where

the heat

to scatter ashes,

the scattering garden will have a

bronze marker with an inscription of the deceased and your family

always be able to return to property for visitation.

will

that

Scattering

ashes

anywhere

else

requires consent of the owner, and if in the future the property changes hands, you may not be allowed access for memorials or

visitation in the future.

Fees for burial range from $108 $560 for an adult. This does not include the cost of for an infant to

the lot prices, which vary greatly depending on where in the cemetery the lot is. whether you choose an upright or flat marker and whether the burial is in a family mausoleum. Crypt prices can go

as

high

$10,000.

as

lights,

including ornamental

markers and perpetual care for the

The most common purchase cremation

is

a

approximately $1,750.

about three hours.

the

Two

for

two-person niche,

reaches approximately 1,800 F and the body is reduced to ashes in

additional special areas at

Williamsburg

site are The Crossings, an area with a board-

makers and metal fillings with a magnet or by hand. The remaining bone fragments are ground into

walk and gazebo developed in partnership with the Kitchener Fire Department to commemorate children who have died tragically in the community. Another special area in the cemetery is reserved for war vets.

fine powder and put bag and enclosed in

cemeteries

Families

remove metal

They can also be placed in a columbarium, an outdoor monu-

property.

into a plastic a

temporary

plastic urn. then labeled.

to

loved ones' ashes.

It costs $340 to have adult remains cremated, loss for a child. The cremation process takes place

fragments such as steel pins, pace

ed through a machine makers.

one of the choices where you can put your

proper vases,

Only one body is cremated at a time, and the chamber is cleaned Out after each use. The ashes arc processed further to remove metal

Trisha Yates, a City of Kitchener Cemeteries employee, explains

the

in

niches,

rium.

in a large

(Photo by Lee Evans)

glass-fronted

Only

the caskets.

like

den.

must be declared by a licensed coroner and registered at city hall, or you could have more trouble on your hands than just a dead body. Another factor to consider before removing a dead body from your premises is where it is destined to go, the funeral home for embalming or the crematorium? Approximately 40 per cent of people choose cremation in

your relative does not want resuscitation, you should wait a little while before calling the coroner.

The

to

or hospital.

price just

bronze urns are allowed

All deaths

"because if you call 91 or the ambulance, their mandate is to pre-

So

yourself

The answer was it is not recommended due to the emotional trau-

home

serve

The

warm and simple due to wood floors, walls, pews

provincial flower, the trillium. the property

at

home

to the funeral

making your way

ingly restored beside the pond. is

know home is

thing you should

someone

seminar,

you could transport the

if

for City of Kitchener Cemeteries.

said,

decor

information asked

deci-

suspicious," said Trisha Yates, staff

Mennonite chapel that was recovered and transferred from the Beaches area in Toronto and lov-

and boasts different colours of our

On

first

under long-term care

The dedication centre

some

body

case of a death

"Any death

zom-

cemetery for the

depending on the age, health and circumstances of the death, you may not want to call 911.

Trisha Yates,

cemetery to

at the

sions td make.

in

them.

the cemetery, but they are not bies.

you are

if

usual reasons, you have

deemed

a special-needs class at

Kitchener Collegiate Institute built

them

is

Evans)

(Photo by Lee

Nicholas Rogister reads the inscriptions on the columbarium niches at Williamsburg Cemetery. Most niches are purchased two at a time, for couples, or in a block to reserve for family use.

woods and wet-

natural

the back of the property

at

I

scary place most movies depict a

graveyard to be.

being used for burial plots.

lands

deceased

just for the

tion

they wish, as

il

many

may view is

in

cultures.

After cremation,

placed

in

current is

to

concept

make

it

behind inclusive

of the whole community, not just

the crema-

common

The

the ashes arc an urn, which varies in

deceased and grief-stricken mourners. So go ahead and wander through your local cemetery. You may be the

surprised

at

what you find

there.


News

SPOKE, November

7,

-

*

2005

— Page 15

Students struggle with part-time jobs MCCORMICK

By TIFFANY

McKee

Acquiring a post-secondary education is supposed to help students

knowledge they

the

obtain

will

need for a life-long career. Full-time classes along

homework

and

with

extracurricular

can keep students quite occupied depending on their field activities

how do

So.

who

students

attend

who

student

works

between 18 and 25 hours a week. "It’s overwhelming,” she said. “You can’t do it all at once.” Ian McKay, a first-year woodworking student, said having a part-time job and full-time studies is

pretty tough.

hard to balance the work.”

“It’s

McKay

of study.

a first-year practical

is

nursing

works

at

Sobeys and puts

10 hours each week.

in five to

Shawna

school for six hours a day and complete homework for three

a

Student

Services counsellor, said

when she

hours a night maintain some type life while dealing with

students are

working

of social

part

the added pressures of a part-time job that has them working between 10 and 25 hours each

to feel stress,” she said.

week?

learns

Bernard,

that

time she is concerned and sympathizes with them.

know

“I

these students are going

Bernard said things have changed

random survey of 100

In a

full-

time students. 55 per cent are cur-

working part time. Tabby Leil'so, a second-year

rently

foundations student,

police

said

she doesn’t really have a choice with her job.

the

was

norm

in college.

It

was not

for students to be

work-

ing as well as studying.

She said

it is

unfortunate that stu-

dents do have to

work while

in

school.

would be

“It

“You have to work to pay for school and go to school for a

ideal

if

students

Leifso teaches judo at Kaizen

Judo as well as for the college, averaging 1 6 hours a week. She said keeping up with basic homework is a bit of a struggle,

when she

Adam Dorman,

falls

behind.

UPS

without

the

stress

of finances

would be ideal, Bernard said she knows it can’t work for everybody. “It is

arrive students are not so stressed

said.

and cramming for hours. She said excellent time manage-

stressful.

“Trying to juggle between school

work and a job

“When

is

hard," the

due crunch time comes.” a lab

Dorman

is

that’s

when

home

from school it’s work and when he gets home from work it’s straight to

gets

straight to

his studies.

“Homework

is

done

into the

wee

hours of the morning,” he said.

One way Dorman

said he

is

keep up with his school work and job is by “cutting out all free

time.”

Roberts,

Home

a

Hardware employee, said she

tries

stressed.”

about 20

hours a week, said she worries

when

assign-

Bernard said their

and

make an

appoint-

ment with a counsellor

to

talk

Ashley Labelle, a first-year law and security student, said it’s

see on your own.”

“It interferes

with studying," she

said.

Labelle works

at

Bluenotes, aver-

aging nine hours a week. She said it’s good to have money but having both a job and studies interfere with other activities.

She also said

that

sometimes

hard to get out of work”

“it’s

in certain

Lisa

McKee,

Even though most students

first-year

working student, said

his

a

McDonalds’ man-

ager, said she feels

strapped for lime.

exhausted and

2

OF THE

VISIT:

http://www.wincolleqetuition.com

woodjob

at

Zehrs "feels pretty easy.” He averages fours hours a week. Dan Kobles, an employee of Wiseway Janitorial, said he likes

BETWEEN NOVEMBER 7th AND DECEMBER 9 th 2005

his job.

25 hours a week “doesn't really bother me,” the first-year woodworking student said. to

PART

TO LEARN MORE

overwhelming and stressful, there are some who do not find it as

much of a hassle. Mike Kelly, a

IN

find

full-time studies and part-time jobs

Attending school and working 20

circumstances.

-

FIRST YEAR COLLEGE OUTCOMES

She said sometimes they can "help you see solutions you can’t

attending school.

GIFT CERTIFICATES

NATIONAL STUDY OF COLLEGE STUDENTS, THE COLLEGE EXPERIENCE AND DETERMINANTS OF

overwhelmed with school

their jobs to

she said.

having a job as well as

HMV

PARTICIPATE

“There will be no stress of will I have enough money," she said. Bernard suggested if students are

about their problems.

stressful

-

more out of and be less

education

worries begin again. in a big vicious circle.”

-SONY PSP PLAYERS

students receive

if

feeling

goes

-

loans they “can get

ments are due then relaxes as projHowever, when more assignments come along her

ects are finished.

“It

*

-APPLE iPODS

Bernard also mentioned bursaries and student loans such as OSAP to help students fund their education. She said some students don’t want to apply for loans to avoid a huge debt load at the end of their

support student said.

who works

$ 2,000

accomplish projects on time. “Profs won’t adjust a due date,” she said. “Making your own schedule is the best thing you can

schooling.

about school work

ATTENTION ALL FIRST YEAR STUDENTS, HERE’S YOUR CHANCE TO WIN:

skills help reduce stress. Bernard recommended that prioritizing your schedule and creating your own deadlines can help you

not to get stressed about school work. “I cut things out that are not important,” the first-year personal

Roberts,

of the

do.” able

to

Gillian

and outside

ment

Mondays and said when he

works

through Fridays

in

for stu-

first-

worker,

to school is

Hortons on King Street in Waterloo has installed recycling containers building. The container separates paper, cans, plastic and waste.

dents in terms of adapting to school

year electrical engineering student

a

working and going

Tim Hortons helps environment A Tim

not realistic,” she said.

She offered some advice

and work. “Try to find a balance,” was her key point. She suggested studying regularly and spreading out study time so when mid-terms and exams

said

(Photo by Denise Mutter)

could treat their full-time studies as a full-time job,” she said.

Even though a college experience

career,” she said.

especially

since she

*

Sponsored by the Association

of

Canadian Community Colleges


— SPOKE, November

Page 16

7,

News

2005

Classroom temperatures

More meetingsfor

vary greatly at college By

ADAM HANNON

encouraging the spread of infectious diseases.

conies

It

no

as

surprise

Conestoga college students to see a peer wearing a coat in class in the summer, or a T-shirt in the winter.

As

of yet, there

no conclusive

is

evidence suggesting sonal

abnormality

that this sea-

is

a

students

What

at is

of

result

some chemical imbalance

in

the

Conestoga. conclusive is that class-

rooms vary greatly

in

temperature.

A

series of informal temperature readings conducted throughout the school on Oct. 24 show that some

classrooms are as warm as 24 C, and others were less than 9 C. During the week of Sept. 26, fac1

ulty reported that rooms on the fourth floor of the college’s B-wing were as cold as 15.6 C, or 60 F.

Four weeks later, the temperature in these rooms had only risen to 1

8.5 C.

Kim Radigan,

health and safety olticer for the college, said there is

no section in the Occupational Health and Safety Act specifically "for colleges.

under the category of “industrial workplace.” this

fall

category,

the

only

temperature requirement that the college buildings need to meet is a

minimum There

temperature of

no

is

that

schools

I he complaints during this period are largely based on the weath-

also sug-

maintain

an

optimal temperature of 68 to 70 F. A study done by the University of

erate, that’s

Michigan Architectural Research Laboratory in 1979 found increased temperature leads to

Tim

com-

Schill said that

maximum

C.

18

He

lege a

temperature

set.

^A study by the New York State Commission on Ventilation found that temperatures

above 75 F (23.8 C) decreased the amount of work students got done, as well as

1

i

also said outfitting the college with a system that could run heat-

ing

and cooling simultaneously not be practical because of eneigy costs. Such a system would

resources

outside after the building’s cooling is shut off.

He said there have not been anyreported health problems related to heating issues in the college.

technology, said because of all the positive feedback from stuthe

at

another one January.

is

“We were because

first

presentation,

being planned for

had,”

said

more

allow for better climate control in the building, possibly providing cooling to a hot computer

technology and trades students, giving them an opportunity to

lab,

socialize

while heating a cold classroom. However, he said it’s really not worth it. “You’d be wasting a lot of

outside

the

classroom

and get advice from women who have met the challenge of the workplace.

energy.”

often difficult to recognize and identify emotional abuse because, unlike physical assault there are seldom. is, ble signs of the abuse. Nevertheless, emotional abuse may be the most painful and damaging aspect of an abusive relationship. It is

i

Do

you

affected? your partner controls your

feel that

life?

»

*

Do

*

Will your partner

you

your partner does not value your thoughts or feelings?

feel that

do anything

*

Do

*

Are you told that no one

you

*

Do

*

When

feel that

to

win an argument, such

you cannot do anything else

would want you, or

you have to account for every you

try to talk to

right in

moment of

as put

you down, threaten or intimidate you?

your partner’s eyes? that

you

are lucky

your partner takes care of you?

your time?

your partner about problems, are you called names such as bitch or idiot?

c.r«^ (.uclph Campus, Admin. Office, or Waterloo or

call

748 5220

Campus Room A3 n mn m

3360 for Doon Campus 824 9390 ext 148 or 8X5 0300 ext. 224 fur Waterloo Campus. Information on community support is available through your

ap P° ,ntment

ext.

for <,U ' lph r<a

"'i’ us

Student Services Office.

Sponsored by the Women’s Resource Group

will

be,

hope to incorpo“Something we want to do is

in the morning rather then later on in the day,”

in

before they go to work rather

then take off time.”

“We were extremely pleased because was it

the best turnout that

we’ve had.” Julia Biedermann,

chair of engineering

and

information technology

faculty.”

W.l.T.T. usually holds only one pi csenUition ci year lor female

Emotional abuse

*

presentation

that the planners rate.

the best turnout

WHEN DATING TURNS DANGEROUS

How are you

W.l.T.T.

Biedermann discussed an idea

extremely pleased

was we’ve it

Biedermann. “We had about 50 people at the meeting and many

would

department gets more complaints about temperature if it gets hotter

Biedermann, chair of engineering and information

that

He

more complaints durperiod, but it’s not a huge get

the physical

initially cost

lion.

after the heat is turned on.

said

of money', although it about $ .5 mil-

lot

Julia

dents

said retrofitting the entire sys-

would

difference,” said Schill.

He

summer. a clean bill,”

tem would end up saving the col-

main building may become uncomfortable if the weather gets

Female students in the technoloand trades programs who either attended or wanted to attend the Women in Technology

gy

Although she could not say what the format of the next

she said. “Ihat will help us out because then presenters can come

said Schill.

takes a while

TOM KALBFLEISCH

know that because of the great turnout, plans for another presentation is in the works.

“We've always had

up that much water. During this time, the temperature

By

classroom

reduces the previous maintenance cost and times.”

are serviced during the

to heat

ing that

to socialize outside the

have the get together

He said the college receives yearly insurance inspections and the boilers

Schill said this is because the building uses a heating and cooling pipeline loop of about 28.000 gal-

"We do

and trades students, which provides an opportunity

and Trades (W.l.T.T.) presentation held on Sept. 28, will be glad to

the

older

“It

lakes about

is

main ones

at

which leaked water.

two weeks.

warmer

than the

some new pumps

have been installed building, replacing

The changeover from cooling to heating in the main building of the

it

and

main building.

after Thanksgiving.

lons of water, and

much more quickly

ing

manager of plant

Doon campus

it

for.”

houses except on a larger scale. He said the smaller buildings can switch between heating and cool-

operations and construction at the college, said each year heating at the college is turned on shortly

college’s

away with

are similar to the system used in

and productivity.

Schill,

get

what we hope

held each year for female technology

mod-

fairly

Schill said the smaller buildings

as greater discomfort for the students. Slightly cooler classrooms fort. activity

we

it’s

programs

Usually only one presentation

on the campus, such as the ATS building, use “package units” for heating and cooling. These units

dect eased attention spans, achievement and task performance, as well

create increased feelings of

said Schill. “If

ei,

in the

She said colleges

Under

gested

to

The study

W.l.T.T.

As

for advertising the W.l.T.T.

presentations

Biedeimann

to

the

college,

said as well as post-

ing posters

in

classrooms,

faculty

hallways and in should also remind students when and where the presentation

happening.

is

going to be

I


:

News

SPOKE, November

good healing power

Reiki a

Making

stressed students

for Bv JESSICA

BLUMENTHAL

and the auric fields, which surrounds the body for protection and containment. The two precepts of reiki are there must be a change in consciousness for healing to occur and there must be an appropriate exchange of energy, one that hon-

energy around the body, which recharges and realigns the energy

ours each.

tributes energy,

The time in between midterms and exams is usually stressful for students. Their immune system is lower, tension and anxiety is up and many are on edge. Instead of turning to the usual pharmaceuticals or de-stressing techniques, an alternative is reiki. Reiki, pronounced ray-key, is a Japanese healing technique which reduces stress levels and promotes

Klein explained that reiki can

help lower heart rate, relieve tension,

keep the immune system

incorporates the mind,

strong and stimulate the brain’s production of endorphins along with many other physical bene-

spirit

fits.

with healing.

relaxation along

It

body and by unblocking energy paths

in the body.

a

Klein,

Niki

hi

reiki

“Reiki

master/teacher, instructs the reiki

continuing education course at Conestoga. Reiki is a part of the complementary care certificate

program. It is split into three degrees and Conestoga offers the first

can help lower

heart rate, relieve tension,

keep the immune system strong and stimulate the

are

Dr.

modem

Mikao

Hawayo Takata and

Dr.

Dr.

Chujiro

Hayashi. Usui rediscovered the technique, Hayashi created a guide for the

hand

positions,

and

symbols

degrees and Takata brought

it

to

North America. The technique works with the body's three main components. They are the meridian system,

which

is

the body’s transportation

being

When

translated,

spiritually

which receive, assimilates and

gy.

The

reiki

means

force enerpractitioner utilizes the

guided

life

In

rise.

a

much more

are

likely to catch the

common

or the

flu

stay healthy

it is

cold. In order to

make

important to

flow of energy. They use their notion of highest good, meaning they’re not there to alter their client’s life course, merely to assist

are

the person's progress.

can give treatments after they have received their attunement. The attunement, or initiation, is a process of empowerment that opens up various chakras and connects to the unlimited source that

Only

is

certified practitioners

reiki energy.

titioner to

It

allows the prac-

channel the reiki ener-

gy-

there

is

typically

room with Those

low

make

is to

anced

sure to eat a bal-

The problem with

this is students

always on the go.

Between

part-time jobs,

studying

have a social life, eatis one of the last things on their minds. Also, it seems nowadays it’s getting more and more expensive to eat healthy. So what is a poor student to do?

and trying

our bodies with nutrients, vitamins and minerals,” said Szabo. “Some individuals turn to supplements, but most are just

diet.

school,

buying grocery store food." She said students are not very informed about the nutrition choices .they make. “We must provide

to

ing a balanced diet

Ingrid Szabo, a first-year market-

fillers

and are not

absorbed well into our bodies.” Calcium and omega 3s are essen-_ tial for our health. Try taking some yogurt to school, eating a handful of almonds and using olive oil for cooking.

So how do you make eating healthy cost-effective? Szabo said by watching what you eat, you tend to avoid restaurants

and manufac-

was a health-care Magic counsellor for Herbal Wellness Company. She had some

tured goods which in the end. burn

nutrition facts to give students.

vegetables, but watch out for salt.”

ing

student,

“Vegetables and

a

fruit cost

more than

fast food,” said

“However,

if

little

Szabo.

one person calculates

a hole in your wallet.

“Purchase canned

and

frozen

she said. “Canned tuna or salmon are fairly cheap too. Plus you’re getting essential fatty acids."

light in the

relaxing music.

interested in taking a reiki to www.conestomore information. If

course can go

interested in a treatment

Klein

call

Niki

King Street Wellness (519) 745-5971.

at the

Clinic at

STRESS RELIEF when taking

tests

"The difference between ordinary and extraordinary is that fittfe

"extra".

BELOW ARE SOME PRACTICAL TIPS TO RELIEVE TEST-RELATED STRESS the time and place, and what to bring. Be on time, not too early or too late. questions, Dorrt talk with classmates before the test. As the group talks about possible test participating In this discussion may raise your anxiety levels. beat yourself up during the test. 3. Decide to do your best, accept the time limits, and don't by using ear plugs. distractions; all other block out and try to the test, to attention Pay information that you 4 Do a memory dump at the beginning of the test Write down any acronyms, formulas, think you may forget, and that may be useful for the test. Write down memory. your will jog that and/ or diagrams the point values, estimate time limits 5. Read the test first, and plan your approach. Check writing. for each section, and decide where you will begin let your anxiety build. Ask for If you're unsure about what you're expected to do, don't 1.

to

One

gac.on.ca for

dogma.

starts

classroom environment students

Klein said the practitioner doeshave any magical powers, they serve as a catalyst to channel the

n’t

under the knees or head. An eye cover is usually provided so the person can just let go. The atmosphere is very important so

going to your family doctor where he or she prescribes medicine or pharmaceuticals to help. There are no side effects from reiki and to any religious is not tied it

illness

sure to take the right precautions.

chakras. Clients are responsible for their own healing. So reiki is unlike

temperature begins to

the

amount he spends throughout a whole week of eating out, he will realize that it’s actually more than

the

manipulated.

sage table with their body straight and then is covered with a blanket or a light sheet. Pillows can go

system; the chakras, which are the major energy centres in the body, dis-

isn't

Other benefits are it unlocks the provides conflicts, emotional well-being and balances the

world.

Usui,

massage, the body

so unlike

endorphins.

two.

They

fields. It’s non-intrusive,

An average treatment lasts 45 minutes to one hour and varies in cost from approximately $40 to $55. The receiver lays on a mas-

brain’s production of

Three people are responsible for bringing reiki to the

As drop,

diet cost-effective

ADAM BLACK

By

— Page 17

2005

7,

Know

UNE CARRIERE

A CAREER

ME PRIDE

I’LL

DON! JE SERAI FIER

IN

2.

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Want

a career that’s

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les possibility

a

Take note of windows and doors and avoid sitting near them. some relaxation 11. When you notice that you're not thinking dearly, pause and practice Techniques, like taking several deep breaths.

To make an appointment

un vaste choix de carrieres

professional fields

and technical trades

clarification

7.

offrons

a wide range of careers

temps

plein,

partiel

de carrieres ou a temps

rendez-vous dans un

centre de recrutement des

Forces canadiennes pres

for learning strategy assistance, visit the Student Services

de chez vous.

Office.

A Message from Learning Strategies Visit our website

STRONG. PROUD. TODAY’S CANADIAN FORCES.

DECOUVREZ VOS FORCES DANS LES FORCES CANADIENNES.

http://www. conestooac Qn<<^/isD/ste>gfv/!£3fJ]l!2QM[&!£.g

Canada

1

800 856-8488

www.forces.gc.ca


1

1

— SPOKE, November

Page 18

/!\V •

Entertainment

2005

7,

N

S

nlOfOSeOPE

/#>\

November

of

¥:l;

Dare to be a dreamer

2005

7,

By MELISSA

Aries March

2

Someone's not happy with you now. Oh well, the most you ean do is apologize, and if you've done that already it may take

'tou

right

some

Time

time.

One

September 23 October 22

April 19

•\wX\SVV,VvS\Sv\\\\^

heals

Libra,

it.

whatever

you're

is

it

for. You'll feel

heart; a glow of indescribable warmth will flow through you. Lucky day: 9

all

2

I

lion in

its

Taurus May

v

20

October 23

Wv

November

-

21

tears

your in a

Get back on that horse, Taurus. So things didn't work out so well with your latest experiment or idea; practice makes perfect. And you've had

Lucky day:

lots

of practice

Scorpio, you'll never learn will

is

Wrong

Gemini May

Aim

21

-

Ben Crane

track.

November 22 December 21

You know you can do it, so do the best you can, if only for yourself. Then call for the top.

coming.

It's

mom

ahd dad and brag about it. Then ask them to wire you some money. Lucky day: 10

Don't

-

your

birthday only

means you're no big deal.

a year

older,

And Make

besides,

you

don't feel old.

sure to ride a shopping cart

parking

lot.

in

do just

into

He an

Ben decides not

down

By

a

can almost boggle the

-

Capricorn

July 22

definite

December 22

-

January 19 Cancer, your life is a soap opera. At least you keep yourself busy. Don't take your love life too seriously

right

now.

Your love life will sizzle this week. Don't deny the spicy romance thats on the horizon.

One day

Don't take things too

everything will sink into its place like a puzzle piece. Lucky day: 9

Enjoy the lust Lucky day: 7

fast either.

and

passion.

Aquarius

the leg of the horse

is

your headphones on and block out the world this week, Leo,

at least

when you

any more of the

OK

little

Don’t

that needs mending. Ben’s wife, Lilly (Shue), takes on

extra shifts at the diner

when money

becomes tight while Ben, Pop, Cale and two helpers work tirelessly to

loses. his

job after getting argument with his boss

bring Sonya to her feet again. Cale’s love for Sonya opens the eyes of both her father and grandfather

and they work together

until

annoyances.

enough.

you've Dust

up your put

it

little

nest,

off

long

your shelves, do laundry.

Spruce the place up nice and then throw a parly to celebrate. Lucky 1

those

who

could truly love them. the essence of an

Dreamer has

award-winning film audiences what hope.

it

that can

means

v fATT aliiill

know

that, yes,

true for those

dreams

who

come

will

dare to dream

them.

about failures and fears of being successful and trying to keep his family together. father s

The new film. The Weather Man, stars Cage as Dave Spritz, a TV weatherman, who gets his big chance on a popular morning show in New York City.

While his career takes off, he finds that his relationship with his wife and his "kids begins to fade way. Suddenly, he is in the middle of a divorce and must turn to his

scenes show both the casts’ ability to perform and the crews' ability to

vi

I

translate

from

script

to

the

*

,

The soundtrack for the movie is composed by James Levine, who

w

.

did the score for Madagascar, and

Hans

Zimmer, who has done soundtracks to movies such as Either (Michael Caine) in order to get his life back in order.

The movie

humour and great scene

filled

is

with great

excellent acting.

One

where Caine gives Cage. In the scene is

advice to Caine s character

son subtle hints and tricks about being a good -father and husband. These tells his

Batman Begins. The cinematography of Weather Man was well thought out and shot. The movie lacks' in special effects, but, this does not hinder the film because no special effects are need-

ed.

The movie is a good choice if you need a laugh and to escape the busy world of college for 101 minutes.

FUN FACT About 315 entries were mis in Webster’s 1996 dictionary. Is it time to update your household dictionary? spelled

Spoke can

Pisces

now

-

March 20 Hie winter

don

t

i

coming soon

but

be too quick to snuggle up

to the first

along,

is

warm body

although

c lex I

in

the

it

that

comes

a

natural

is

colder

Maybe you should

just

long joints. Lucky day:

For the latest college, entertain-

climate.

buy some

ment and sports

It)

news, as well as Brandon Walker

is

bis

screen.

that sale so fast,

February 19

have

After seeing this movie, whether you’re a horse lover or not, you’ll look at life with more of a smile and

www. hookedonfacts. com

VA

show

to

Source:

*

work.

films today are put into a category and are never seen by

be read online! to tidy

some vacuuming and

day:

brilliant technical

Too many

feel.

Virgo

Virgo,

and

cast

to

August 23 September 22

T ime

story that can not only be believed, but lived through a magnificent

TOM KALBFLEISOH

It's time to buckle down. Tj-y go a few weeks between major purchases. Lucky day: 9

to

cool dewdrops can be felt and bitter codec tasted, Gatins has captured a

the forecast

in

Aquarius, you aren't as financially comfortable as you sometimes

can't take

ignore the world, at least for a while. Just don't go deaf. Lucky day: 13 It's

jump on

not

all

January 20 February 18 Put

for

leg. There is a between the two

tension

men and

Treasure, has returned to the big screen in a reluctant comedy

a

his

mending Sonya’s

help

v

Cancer

young

lame animal home where he asks lather. Pop Crane (Kristofferson)

(Russell)

Nicholas Cage, who is known for hits such as Face-Off and National

June 22

to put the horse

the track because his

at

daughter, Cale (Fanning), is present. He then takes his daughter and the

that

Laughs

Lucky day: 12

into a horse lover.

writer

result ol the accident.

about a horrific accident that happened on the track which Ben said could have been avoided. He leaves

fret,

it's

of this

was once a great horseman, but ends up wasting his talent as a trainer and helping other men get rich at the race-

1

Sagittarius

June 21

that

will

never too

to end first-time and director John Gatins allows the audience to use all senses while watching the film. With the crack-of-dawn scenes where

the track with a small amount of severance pay and the horse, Sonya, who has a broken leg as a

better times.

it

I

way

Dreamer

and Sonya

From beginning

Viewers are taken on a journey of dreams with a family that has seen

you're trying to cause trouble. Lucky day:

8

face.

family

that you’re

any viewer

turn

triumph streaming down

oi

the

Sonya - short for Sonador, which means dreamer in Spanish - can

mind.

you? Keep your nose where it belongs, in your own business! Meddling in other people's affairs

lately.

faults

for

again.

old to have a dream.

movie is that it didn’t make it to the box office sooner. Rarely can a movie touch your heart and send

Scorpio

\

plate

and grossed $9.3 milfirst weekend.

of the only

horse

race

shows them

theatres

in

the

to

seems well The Breeders’ Cup becomes the home

amaz-

Dreamer, starring Kurt Russell, Dakota Fanning, Kris Kristofferson and Elizabeth Shue, opened Oct.

your

in

it

thing that ean turn an

One

-

one day enough

ing movie into an outstanding movie is knowing that the characters and the storyline are all based on true events

know when you've found

II

looking

wounds. Lucky day: 12

April 20

HANCOCK

Libra

a second-year

journalism student holding fate in the palm of his hand.

(Photo by Melissa Hancock)

Working hard Second-year woodworking student Marcia French is hard is working on a writing desk that will take most

She

of the

ter to build.

work semes-

at

games, puzzles, weather and reference links, visit www.conestogac.on. ca/spoke


Sports

SPOKE, November

Cup

Head-to-head: Who’s the Grey Lions the king of the Sure,

believe

I

miracles.

in

Argos

CFL jungle

would also take a miracle for any team but the B.C. Lions to win the 2005 Grey Cup; the pinnacle of the Canadian Football League. This team has so much going for

Tim Gedcke

This year’s Toronto Argonauts team poised and ready to take

are a

care of business in the playoffs.

Grey Cup appearance. The Toronto Argonauts have won four of their last five games and show' no signs of slowing down,

.

even while having their arch from Montreal breathing

Opinion

their

necks for

first

Grey Cup

year’s

Bellinger

rivals

down

Opinion

Toronto Argonauts, the Lions smelled the sweet aroma of victory lingering inches from their collective noses, only to have it snatched away by Damon Allen

and the crew from Toronto. look

let’s

First,

Lion’s

the

at

offence.

Casey

and

Dickenson

Dave

Printers lead probably the best allaround offence in the league.

Dickenson leads the

CFL

in pass

He

the

major receiving yards and

Argos, has been the leader throughout this 2005 campaign and is the

straight

has had his team focused and playing with playoff-type emotion for

turf.

their offensive impressive-

behind force driving main Toronto’s run at another Grey Cup title.

most of

highest since 1992.

top five

the

in

in the three

in

receptions,

categories:

touchdowns.

And

ness-does not stop there. Antonio Warren led the league in rushing

quarterbacks

Dickenson has struggled

with

injuries this season.

come

ready to go if not,

Casey

probably

He

should be

playoff time, but

Printers,

who would

on almost every

start

other team in the league,

is

an able

Their defence

is

highlighted

by-

tied for

team for most of last year, and he was impressive in his start after returning from injury problems of his own. Geroy Simon is one of the most Printers led this

Bombers

one point,

to

winning 41-1. When everyone was healthy at the beginning of the year, the Lions won their first 1 games. Alter struggling through the last third of the year, the team is once again 1

healthy, and ready

for the playoff

make up

push, eager to

Cup

back-up.

closing

close to his mark.

the Blue

all

is

named

for every interception: an area he

in as well.

who

becoming professional

back, heading into week 20. Fie also throws four touchdowns

masterfully leads

Allen,

touchdowns, with only one other running back, Charles Roberts of the Winnipeg Blue Bombers, even

Brent Johnson, who was second in the league with 1 1 sacks after week 19 action, and their Oct. 22 performance where they held

percentage for quarterbacks, with the closest trailer a frill six per cent

They look confident and have an

Eastern division. Damon Allen, quarterback for the

sits

league

story.

place in the

champs

talented receivers in the league.

loss to the

Last year the boys in blue w/ere underdogs and a surprise to end up in the coveted Grey Cup game against the B.C. Lions. This year, however, is a slightly different*"

Todd

it.

last

for

its

Grey

loss last year.

All the stats say one thing; B.C. is a very good football team. And their competitors are going to

need

to pull off a miracle to stop the

mighty roar of the Lions.

in

CFL's top

contending

and

a

for

second

Coach Mike “Pinball” Clemons

the season.

very tough to beat on their home They are averaging more than

30,000 fans per game, which

he

His stellar performance a lewweeks ago against the Montreal Alouettes all but solidified him as

is

the

That might be the biggest factor Toronto making it back to the

for

Grey Cup. The only stumbling block

“This year’s Toronto

Argonauts are a team

player.

at the Rogers This Argo team will be

outstanding record Centre.

title.

football’s

has never won the league’s outstanding player award.

But

are atop the East division

on

career passing leader, has also won four Grey Cup titles and has been the

— Page 19

go back-to-back

straight

it

2005

favourite?

Don’t look now but here comes the double blue for a second

1

believe Jesus Christ rose from the dead; that was a miracle. But 1 think

Fresh off

will

7,

poised and ready to take care of business in the

can see for the Argonauts

is

that

I

getting

past the Alouettes in the Eastern final.

Montreal has had Toronto's number for years. However, I think the shoe is finally on the other foot this

playoffs.”

going to stop

the favourite for this year's hon-

year and nothing

our.

these Argos from having a spot in

Allen is third in CFL passing this year with 4,754 yards, behind Calvillo Anthony Montreal’s (5,241 ) and Edmonton’s Ricky Ray (5,055).

But Allen

is

tops in

touchdown

with 31, despite having thrown more than 100 fewer passes than both Ray and Calvillo. More importantly, he has led Toronto to the series win over Montreal (2-1) and is a big reason why the defending Grey Cup strikes

Even though

won

the

Argos have title and

the big dance.

Even though

the Eastern division

receive a bye for the

first

round of

the playoffs, the key to the team producing another successful run

is

^ the B.C. Lions have

stumbled in recent w'eeks, they should be pumped for the playoffs.

As

well they should be.

They could

that their star quarterback stays

be playing in the Grey Cup game at B.C. Place in front of their home

sharp.

fans.

in the playoffs is to

make

sure

much

better

off once running back John

Avery

The team

will

be that

But blue

this

when

won’t faze the

men

they arrive in B.C.

in

The

hamstring that he suffered a few'

Toronto Argonauts will win their second straight Grey Cup, hands

w'eeks ago.

down.

returns

from a

slight tear in his left

Corporate Punishment a dominating force have a big lead."

By NICK CASSELLI back and the three-time defending champions, Corporate Punishment (CP),

Men’s

hockey

ball

is

Based on past numbers, it seems Corporate Punishment has done nothing but stroll through the intramural park waving and smil-

have continued their on-floor dominance with a 9-0 trampling over the Free Agents.

ing at opposing teams as they pass

Rookie sensation Kemal Arif led the way with four goals and three

intramural park has been inclined

helpers on route to an effortless victory to

open the season. pick up w-here

“It feels great to

we

left off last season,” said

CP

forward Craig Peters. “We chose our team name. Corporate Punishment, for a reason, simply because we punish

everyone in our path.” Talk of Corporate Punishment is circulating the league and other Conestoga C#lege teams have crit-

CP

icized

for their arrogant per-

formances on the floor. “When our team is already losing 6-0 it isn’t necessary for these guys to pile

on

five

humiliate

more goals

us.”

just to

Blake

said

by.

However, not every team

in the

wave back. The Brew Crew, who were the

to

opponents of

CP

in

both semes-

year, have earned the reputation as CP’s arch

ters’

final

games

last

rivals.

Taking them to the limit in both games and with a victory over CP in semester one, the Brew Crew has proven to be an irritating pest

final

CP

for

to exterminate.

In the fall

semester

Brew Crew held

the

final

of 2004

a three-goal

advantage heading into the second half of the ball hockey final. But. a proud, gritty group of CP players used the last sparks of their fire

to

burn the Brew Crew in a comeback to capture their

thrilling

ter,

second of three consecutive ball hockey titles. “Ever since the final game with the Brew Crew, there has been a taste of blood in the air," said CP veteran Josh Nezni.”

reason in the world to be confi-

this year.”

Schlosser, an opponent.

CP

captain, Justin Kuss, said his

team

isn’t

cocky, just loaded with

confidence.

“We were

undefeated

semes-

last

we outscored our opponents by more than 40 goals, we have every dent.

"Our team plays hard

game

the

full

regardless of the score, we’re

not going to

let

up

just

because

we

“I can’t wait until

we

play them

Fans can catch the healed ball hockey action at the rec centre on Mondays and Thursdays from 4:30 to

5:30 p.m.

(Photo by Nick Casselli)

Not Scott Feddera fights

Conestoga College.

off tight

just

one but two amazing grabs

coverage to make an amazing catch

in

a

game

of

touch football at


Page 20

— SPOKE, November

Sports

2005

7,

Rugby team wins bronze medal By

JON YANEFF

Milbury was named the Condors’ while Andre RoseGreen was named the Hawks game

Assistant coach Geoff

Moskalyk wind affected the kicking in Ihe bronze medal game. Jlieic was a couple ol missed

game MVP, ru'ghy there

In

determination,

is

and heart and soul, while going full force out on the Held. All ol the above could be seen on ihe laces of Conestoga’s men's rugby team during a run for gold at he Ontario College Athletic Association (OCAA) champipride

MVP. “I'm very proud of

onship,

which

Mohawk 29 and

was

College

in

hosted

by Hamilton Oct with

beat

the

wasn

an easy victory as the Hawks came Hying out of the gate by scoring the (li st try of the game. It

t

that it

point

Colin Slroeder up by reaching the end

game was

the

in

He

m

e g a Oct. 30.

s

got a

my time you

in

if

they

the

n

t

“It’s a little bit bit-

a team,

total

team

field

player

said

you.”

said

“One man does-

make

be a the

it

has to

effort

on

with every stepping it

up.” "Lindsay has

Milbury.

“We’d much be walking away

with a gold or at least a silver medal, but we're happy to finish the season with a win.”

with

field

Milbury.

the squad.

rather

have a calibre of

with as much skill as Lindsay your team is going to be in every game.” ’ton can never have enough pure athletes like Lindsay on

the cards for

tersweet,”

of experi-

tmete

didn’t come out of the tournament with a medal but he thought there was

more

lot

ence so he was able to help the guys out when he was on the field,” said Hussey,

Nick Milbury the team would have been

been long

T

(Peterborough) Knights that

won

if

they

they would face the Seneca

Sting in the gold medal

game

Oct.

30 because the Sting defeated the

Humber Hawks

10-0.

The Condors then played on the same field, which was in bad conweek. The team lost their gold hopes after losing 28-12 against the Knights Oct. 29.

leadership.

tain

The team knew going into their matchup against Ihe Fleming

the game-winning try, while Joel Hussey added the convert. Hussey and Milbury said

bronze

said

Moskalyk.

dition

Lindsay provided much needed

Veteran co-cap-

kicks on penalties just because the held the ball up,” said

wind

With IQ minutes left Matt Lindsay drove into the end zone for

medal

disappointed

5-5 at the

half.

Humber Hawks in a gruelling 12-5 victory during a windy day

a

and could have any one of 15 guvs

to

zone, as the

necks after the

Condors

was

it

today.”

stepped

Condors ended up bronze medals around

but

it,

effort

been given

After

30.

Ihe

their

team

total

I

__

said

e

on

the

to

rain

earlier

the

in

Milbury said he was proud of the team s ellort after rebounding from the loss to the Knights.

“We

stepped

it up 110 per cent day before since everybody was performing at their best,”

bom

the

said Milbury. lar

“The team had a stelperformance by veteran Alex

Biubacher.

He was

running great

and opened up a whole bunch of holes, which really set things up for our forward play.” Before the Knights game a green Fleming jacket was hung on the seats on the bus ride to

Hamilton

and in the locker room moments before kickoff to help motivate the Condors' players. The motivation seemed to be working after taking a 12-8 lead

“The team got off to a bad

for

Canada's rugby team as well as

the

half.

Veterans

momentum said

right

third-year

and we gave the back to them,”

veteran

l

“We

How we had in the and we watched everything break down,” said veteran Hussey Ihe gold medals slipped right out of our hands.” Hussey and Milbury were named the Condors’ MVPs at the

lost the

half

first

OCAA

banquet dinner Oct. 29.

Hussey had 42 points on the season including the two converts he had in the championships and Milbury led the team with five tries. Milbury said he sensed people lost

their cool

game “I

after the

it

speaks to a

Humber Hawks

in

Hamilton

Oct. 30.

Veteran Matt Lindsay gets a few extra yards running the ball during the Condors’ 28-12 semifinal loss to the Fleming

(Peterborough) Knights Oct. 29.

The Condors pose

for a team photo with their bronze medals.

Veteran Alex Brubacher tries to avoid a tackle from a Hawks player.

Photos by Jon Yaneff

of the

ple are going to react the way they did when things get ugly. If

we

calmed down things'may have been different because we lost to a team

we

probably should have beaten.”

Fleming pionship -2-7,

to

lost in the

game win

OCAA cham-

against the Sling, the silver medal.

Aaron Graham of the Sting earned championship MVP honours, while

Rookie Tim

Steffler

sfretches for the ball during a line-out.

leading

his

team

to

their

fifth

straight gold medal.

Milbury said next year he is geared up lo compete for the gold. I ve been a part of this team for hi cc years and I vc been saying every year that we have one of l

the

teams

bcsl

Milbury.

in

Ontario,” a

about and have learned

all

pete

at

level,

ready.

the

medal to

is

com-

championship calibre

so next season

We

said

“The younger players

now know what winning

have

all

we

should be

the talent in the

world so there is no reason why we shouldn’t win every given Saturday or Sunday because anything can happen.”

Milbury credits the coach Jeff and assistant coach

Desruisseau

Moskalyk I

for the team’s success. hey have dedicated their time

three to four times a to three

week

for

two

hours a day and both of

them have full-time lot

team’s inexperience,” said Milbury. “We are a very young team so peo-

left:

Veteran John Field runs the during the Condors’ 12-5 bronze medal victory over the

Fleming

got out of reach.

think

and John Field scored tries, while Hussey added a convert. The wheels then fell off. The men

ball

Milbury.

"We were undisciplined and we couldn react to Ihe play when we needed to.”

Nick Milbury

Clockwise from top

start in

the second half and took a couple ol early penallies

at

list

a

Niagara’s regional team.

due

made several menial errors, which allowed the Knights (o dominate the rest of the way.

jobs,”

said

Milbury. “They also take time out of their own lives to teach all

the

rookies a bunch of

When

new tricks. they’ve expanded

the

involvement of the program the way they have, it’s just going to gel stronger by increasing the whole calibre of rugby in the hometowns of every player on the team,” said Milbury. “You learn so much from these coaches then you pass down the knowledge they taught you to future generations.”


Digital Edition - November 07, 2005