Page 1

Time for some program pride!

New program

Spoke

Conestoga College's bookstore offers personalized clothing, allowing students to

show

off their spirit.

Feature

Mon day,--October

newsroom

learning

for

coming

to

in fail

Conestoga College.

News

Stage legend performs

final

3

show

William Hutt plays the role of Prospero

journalism students

in

The Tempest,

his final Stratford play.

7^

2005

24,

A

launches

Respiratory therapy program

Entertainment

Conestoga Col ege, Kitchener, Qnt.

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

l

13

— No. 21

37th Year

Busing to Oktoberfest a no go this year By DENISE MULLER

grammer, said he thinks there’s been a change in the legislation in

Conestoga College students had

own means

arrange their

to

transportation

and from

to

year's Oktoberfest at

tickets

this

for

when bus

can

drivers

companies

“You could keep someone on and have them continue to bus, but for someone to come in at one or two o’clock in

CSI president

Justin

Falconer

(after their shift)

bus companies in the area gave four reasons why they wouldn’t offer the college their

the’

services.

morning,” Falconer said. CSI also contacted the city to charter a bus, but with no luck.

said local

“First of

all,

the obvious liability

like something could go wrong, and insurance,” he said. stuff,

Two

other reasons included the

rowdiness of students and the mess left behind at the end of the night.

“But the fourth, and most compelling reason, that they’re giving us is (he way the driver’s workload worxs out, ne said. 'They told us' a "

morning, they essentially couldn't have enough time off to get. them back on their route in the

“The

issue

with that is that beefed up their

service for Oktoberfest,” Albasel said.

“So, to spare us the buses

wasn’t even feasible for them.” “This year is just unfortunate that

we

couldn’t get anything^ Albasel

'said.

Some

unfortunate too.

2 a.m., he or she cannot

ing student, Joey Putschli, said

ing again until 10 a.m. regardless.

Maher

CSI event

Albasel,

CSI By

pro-

students

thought

it

was

said students

might end up

way to get there. “Everybody should

enjoy Oktoberfest because it’s like Christmas, it’s the best time of the year,” Putschli said.

Falconer said he hopes students plan

will

transportation,

whether

with friends, or at the veryleast, they should call someone at 2 a.m. to pick them up. “At this point, there’s not a lot we can do aside from encouraging people not to drink and drive,” it’s

Falconer

said.

CSI would have

they’ve already

bus driver needs eight hours off work to work the next day.” That means if a driver finishes at start driv-

He

good time because they have no

told the bus

have been driven

and from the

getting non-stop

eight hours,” Albasel said.

the nighttime shift.

to

week of

not going, and missing out on a

event, but in past years, students

event by bus. This year, CSI was unable to get any buses.

a

sloppy."

don't have enough people to cover

the

Oktoberfest,” Putschli said.

“It’s “It’s

"Because of the time that we need them at, they won’t have that

CSI was

(CSI)

Inc.

students

to

of

Queensmount

Arena - Lions Club. Conestoga Students sold

terms of work.

drink and drive.

liked to have

buses, but, he said, people find a

way

to

get

home from

bars

throughout the rest of the year. “We certainly understand and we recognize it’s an inconvenience and it’s something we would have liked to have offered, but the service was just not available to us.”

Third-year mechanical engineerpretty stupid because people

Tickets were $10 through CSI and online, and $15 at the door. The prices did not change to reflect

go

the lack of buses.

Idol

to

it’s

might have a good time and then

winner chosen

BRANDON WALKER

Get into the Halloween spirit The Kitchener Market was host to the Great Pumpkin Carve-off on Oct. 12, where 10 local celebrities competed for the title of master carver. Oktoberfest president Henning Grumme (above) it was a stiff competition. The Kitchener Fire Department walked away with first prize. said

What’s happening with the Student Centre?

Imagine a little girl sitting in front of the TV singing along to commercials. Skip ahead a few years' and imagine that same girl, a little

(Photo by Meghan Kre/ter)

By JANET MORRIS

older, singing in church, but

terrified.

As she

ishes her ability

but the fear of

singing in

of an audience

front

imagine that

girl all

While

whim

Some

CSI Idol. And she wins. Diana Villatoro, a second-year had a

chance to win CSI Idol. But during the tryouts and the semifinal, she was the one who kept improving after every performance. However, although she looks confident on stage singing, smiling and dancing, she’s terrified.

which took place Oct. 13 in the Sanctuary around noon, both Villatoro and her competitor, Jason Gillespie, performed their songs equally well, but what put her ahead was how comfortable she appeared on stage. “I’ll always be scared, even if I In the finale,

is

not look like

much

happening on the there

are

in prepara-

can be

(Photo

Dolly Phan,

one

by Brandon

Walker)

self-serve

and Hillary Grab, a supervisor, celebrate Diana Villatoro’s CSI Idol victory.

become

(professional)

a

of CSI’s directors (from

singer,”

always be scared.” One of the judges at the finale, Matt Ruiss, a graduate of the broadcasting program at the college and now working at 91.5 the Beat, said Villatoro won because of her confidence on stage. “Diana has a presence on stage,” Ruiss said. The deciding factor, he she said.

“I’ll

left),

with Ruiss about Villatoro’s pres-

They were equally good singers, he said, but what made her the winner was how she performed on stage. “She made eye contact, ence.

smiled and danced.” Villatoro performed mostly R&B throughout the competition but also sang Ben E. King’s song, Stand by Me, in the semifinals. Gillespie sang mostly country but

was who the better all around performer was based on stage presence, vocals and desire to win. Another judge, Pernelle Richards, the assistant manager of

performed Eric Clapton’s Wonderful Tonight. Villatoro will compete against Idol winners from other schools in

food services

Ontario later

said,

at the college,

agreed

in

the

finale

this year.

back of the school behind the B-wing hallway between Door 3 and Door 4 are trees at the

being relocated to other areas of

make room

the college to

soon-to-be construction

Also,

place to determine soil

it

is

extract-

ed during construction. Judy Dusick, general manager of Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI), said there

is

a

fair

amount of work

underway. “There’s a lot of site work going on right now in anticipation of the Student Centre construction (and)

groundskeeping have

lifted

the

brick patio.”

According

that

we

able

don’t destroy whatever

to

be

reclaimed,”

The bids

for the foundation arid

concrete structure have gone out anticipates

choosing

Dusick

ples are being taken to

samdetermine

a

contractor soon.

Building the Student Centre is a complicated process said Dusick. “More than your own home, digging a basement or that kind of thing,” she said.

"We

rely

on the Walter Fedy

Partnership to give us information

and insight into what’s happening.”

The Walter Fedy Partnership company who is consulting on Student Centre project.

to

is

added

Dusick.

and CSI taking

is

the current

if

can be reused after

for the

site.

sampling

soil

Dusick said any materials that can be reused will be. “They have been moving trees and cement blocks, trying to reorganize whatever’s back there so

tion for construction.

to try out for

lege, said she didn’t think she

may

new Student Centre, many changes going on

grown

general business student at the col-

it

construction

up and attending college. This year she decides on a

soil

reused during construction.

never goes away.

Now

whether or not the

gets older she pol-

soil

Continued on Page 2

is

a

the


Page 2

News

— SPOKE, October 24, 2005

Now deep thoughts Conestoga College

...with Random

Student Centre slowly coming along

questions answered by

“What

are

some

random

students

superstitions

Continued from Page

you or people you know have?” “That

I

must egg

all

Fedy Partnership has completed additions and renovations throughout Conestoga College’s Doon and Waterloo campuses, working on an

my

electrical skills facility,

teachers’ houses for fear

me

that they’ll give

Fs.”

Blake Lymburner, leisure

“Never wash your for a hockey game.”

underwear

Cody

an infor-

mation technology centre at Waterloo campus, improvements to the nursing wing, and recently, the E-wing addition. Dusick said they are not quite ready to talk about what the interior is going to look like. “But that’s one of the things we will be looking at as soon as we get the bids and the construction underway; we will meet with the architect and talk about interior

first-year recreation

and

past decade, the Walter

the

In

1

finishes,” she said.

A groundbreaking ceremony has been scheduled for Oct. 24 at 1 1 :30 a.m. to mark the opening of

Dietrich,

second-year business

construction.

management

Everyone

.

at

the

college

is

encouraged to attend the ceremony taking place at the site of the new student centre.

have this chip that says luck, and always have that out with me.” Matt Pearce, second-year materials “I

Dusick said all students are welcome. “We hope to see lots of

I

them out

there.”

Entrance to the groundbreaking will be through Room 2A105 in the A-wing.

management

A

reception will be held in the

Sanctuary following the ceremony.

moon

is full

are weird.

I

Allin,

make room for the Student Centre construction. The varieties moved include one Colorado blue spruce, one harlequin maple, one columnar maple, two crimson king maples and three ivory The sod-turning ceremony for the Student Centre is Oct. 24 at 11:30 a.m. silk lilacs.

Welcome home award

“That weird thing where the

(Photo by Janet Morris)

from Fast Forest, relocates eight trees at the Doon campus,' some of which were moved from behind the B-wing to Lucin

and people

believe that.”

deadline fast approaching

Tania Placido, first-year practical nursing

By TODD RELLIN GER

“We had

a segment on the on Connex.” “There is no official application form for the award,” she added. “We want people to apply but they will have to do a little work for

she said.

radio and

“My mother believes

when people

First-year students listen

that

listen

are laying

up

fast.

about to give

up and

When someone

money away

is

to help

pay for school you better pay close attention. There is just over a w'eek

down, you shouldn’t walk over their feet or they won’t grow any taller.”

deadline to apply for

left until the

the

Conestoga College Alumni Welcome home award

Association

Pearl Lylyk,

has

first-year nursing

come and

To be

gone.

eligible for the

award

stu-

dents must be enrolled in a diplo“if

you

spill

the salt at

your hand and throw it over your left side.”

current contact infor-

Applications can be sent either the student or the

and Nov.

will

only be accepted

until

1.

The awards

it.”

in by alumnus

will be distributed at

Any first-year student interested or who qualifies should send a let-

the alumni’s annual general meet-

including their stu-

For more information, contact Monica Himmelman at 519-7485220, ext. 3459 or e-mail mhim-

ter or e-mail,

dent number and program of study for both the student and the alumnus. The note should also

ing in November.

melman@conestogac.on.ca

said Monica Himmelman, development and alumni relations offi-

Vicky Hussen,

cer.

childhood education

“We have

only

received eight

we can accommodate up to 30,” said Himmelman “We had one student who had applicants, but

“My roommate

is

already graduated from the school

pretty

and came back and was able

convinced that breaking a mirror causes seven years’

all

mation.

ma, certificate or degree program and must be in the first year of their program in 2005. The student must also have at least one parent or guardian be an alumnus of the college to qualify,

your table, you have to take some of the salt in

first-year early

include

bad

apply since she was in her year,” she said.

A

luck.”

Andy

may

student

award

Herteis,

to

first

only receive the

once,

explained

Himmelman.

third-year materials

"We

had another gal who transfrom woodworking into the public relations program and she qualified because it was her first

management

ferred

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!

year," said

Himmelman.

“We’d love J

to see people apply,”

(Photo by Todd ReWngdr)

Resting before a long journey Canadian geese make a

pit stop in the Conestoga College pond before continuing their journey down south.


News

SPOKE, October

24,

2005

— Page 3

Respiratory therapy program coming next year By If

TARA RICK ER

you are interested

in a career as

a front-line health-care professional,

becoming a respiratory

with heart and lung problems, they also maintain safe

of lung disease

and effective functioning of

life-

ing from asthma, chronic bronchi-

be very technical

ratory distress, croup, chest trauma,

treat. patients

saving equipment.

“You have

therapist

to

tis,

could be the perfect career choice. Conestoga College will be offer-

nical skills is crucial because

ing a respiratory therapy program

have

for the first time in the

of equipment.”

“The

health-care

anticipating a

fall

of 2006.

industry

is

mass shortage of res2009 due to

piratory therapists by the aging population

advances

logical

orientated,” she said.

be able

“Having techyou

troubleshoot a

all

underdeveloped lungs, victims

patient populations-, right from

They

often treat patients through-

out the hospital, working in acute

of the respiratory therapy program

gency and neonatal units (premature babies). During the SARS crisis,

currently offered at five other col-

many

being Toronto and London. “There is a need for this program to

come

K-W

home because

closer to

growing

rapidly

is

in

the

health-care industry,” said Peppler-

Beechey.

it’s

lot of variety in the never the same day twice.”

After respiratory therapists graduate they must pass a registration

examination and become members of the College of Respiratory Therapists of Ontario (CRTO) in

Many

respiratory therapists

work

12-hour shifts and the majority of the time is spent on their feet walking between patients’ rooms.

The

new'

three-year respiratory

program

therapists

will

meet the

accreditation requirements set by

the

CRTO

and the Council on

Accreditation

for

Respiratory

patients experience respi-

complications, respiratory

serves to ensure high professional

the scope of practice as respiratory

Canada’s health-care

work

order to

in

Ontario.

They

quality assurance

When

therapists are often the first health-

professionals

scene.

“There’s a job.

problems and diseases. “The toughest part about working as a respirator)' therapist and the part that scares most people away is the fact that they work shifts,” she said.

must then participate in an ongoing program provided by the CRTO. This process

gral part of

system.

care

were on

who

Therapy Education (CoARTE). The program is designed to prepare students with the knowledge, skills, attitudes and judgment necessary to perform their role within

Respiratory therapists are an inte-

ratory

respiratory therapists

the front-line treating patients.

leges in Ontario, the closet ones

They

almost drowned, car accident victims and people with spinal cord

areas such as intensive care, emer-

Respiratory therapy programs are

failure,

Respiratory therapists deal with

in treatment,” said

Conestoga College.

pulmonary fibrosis, heart strokes and head injuries.

respi-

also care for premature infants with

to

Lori Peppler-Beechey, co-ordinator

at

emphysema, pneumonia,

lot

to

neonate to the elderly.

and techno-

and respiratory

therapists care for patients suffer-

They

called

to

the

not only use a wide

and allows respiratory

standards

range of respiratory therapeutics to

One

in five

Students

program

the

in

acquire the knowledge

Canadians has a form

necessary to

manage

and

equipment respiratory therapists use

contact Lori

will

therapy, assist the anesthesiologists

748-5220,

skill

in the operating

ventilators,

room and

at the

delivery of high-risk infants.

By

Conestoga’s articulation agree-

ments are giving students new opportunities

that

wouldn’t have

been thought possible before. Students who complete a diplo-

ma program can go degree

rare

diploma program. They love and graduate their third year with a 75 per cent average. This will allow them to branch off into

tage of this bridging

it,

(into a degree),” said

a degree program.”

is

“Everyone learns

ect-based learning.

at differ-

ent times and speeds.”

e-mail

Paul Osborne

able.

Paul Osborne, director of marketing at Conestoga College, said this

who took the applied high school a new oppor-

director

ofmarketing

gives students

stream

tunity that wasn’t available before,

Janeen Hoover, the registrar at Conestoga College, said this does-

a chance for a diploma and degree.

n’t just benefit current

in

“Everyone learns

at

different

component “So

estogac.on.ca.

Conestoga

students, but past ones as well.

times and speeds,” said Osborne.

“When

“Say someone comes to Conestoga and takes the architec-

got calls

was first introduced w'e from past graduates ask-

it

ing if they, too, could take advan-

So not only do students get apply

something

it

scheduling. Create your

but they

their

projects,

in

that doesn’t

happen

say

great,

it’s

don’t

I

.Get if

&

1-888-334-9769

Call

www.paguide.com

Guelph

|

start today.

office (519)

Cambridge Oh)

sit

at

.

t<

t irit)

Onhh

341-0944

office (519) 624-

4460

have to

anything to them,” said

Osborne. “Not only do they the

Weekends Full or part-time available.

in a

“Our students go out on their coop work terms and the employers

own

hours. Mom./After./Even./

the

theory,

regular university level degree.

explain

Wanted

experience necessary. Flex

also the only post-secondary insti-

also

ext. 3948 or by lpeppler-beechey@con-

spare cash? Full training, no

Hoover.

they can.”

level

at

Students

According to Osborne, Conestoga

university

program Peppler-Beechey at

respiratory therapy

Book expensive? Money tight? Need groceries and

tution in Ontario that provides proj-

for a bachelor’s

at a university if it’s avail-

now

situation.

CLASSIFIED

opportunities for students

ADAM BLACK

Ricker)

For more information about the

new

Degree agreements provide

new

an emergency

in

perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation, conduct patient assessments and evaluations, administer oxygen

therapists.

therapists to maintain their licence to practise.

(Photo by Tara Co-ordinator Lori Peppler-Beechey demonstrates the use of

book

part,

know

but they apply

right away, so they ly well received in

it

have been realthe community.”

Get Involved Watch and get

for

upcoming events involved. Your support and

contributions will

make

a difference.

The Conestoga College United Way 2005 Campaign will take place October 24 - November 4.

CORRECTION In

the

Oct.

17

edition

of

Spoke incorrect information was supplied for a story on CSI barbecues

at other campuses. Dolly Phan, one of CSI’s directors, said leftover food was

given to the school where the event was held or brought back to the college. In fact,

CSI usu-

donates the food to House of Friendship. ally

the

CONESTOGA Connect

Life

and Learning


Page 4

Commentary

— SPOKE, October 24, 2005

Thief lacking

common decency The motives of thieves are not always clear. It makes a person curious about what’s going through their mind, what drives them to steal and why they would harm an innocent stranger. most cases involving muggings, the victims lose things they can-

In

not replace, such as items of sentimental value, heirlooms, cherished

family items and the

On

they require to get

Oct. 5 Karen Shepard had her purse stolen

apartment complex ring

As well, they lose things money and medication.

like.

through the day, such as

in

from her outside her Cambridge. Inside her purse, besides a family

which held the birthstones of her four children and a necklace she

received from a friend intended to keep her safe during her chemotherapy,

was her medication. Medication

better

to ease the pain

and allow her

to

cope with her chemotherapy.

According to an Oct. 7 article in' The Record, a number of Shepard’s neighbours formed a search party, hoping to find the stolen purse. They

were successful

in finding

in a

it

dumpster, although the contents,

including her medication and jewelry, were gone.

Arguably, the most disturbing and shocking fact of

this case,

howev-

Shepard had pleaded with the robber to leave her medication. She told him he could take her money, just leave behind the medication. er, is

The robber didn’t listen to her pleas. Many would describe this act as cold-hearted. Some would say this act was horrible. It is unfathomable that a person would not, at the very least,

leave medication which

Why

wouldn’t he have the

would be of no use

common

Black outfit: check. Denture: check. Complete lack of human compassion: check.

Distance

to him.

my

is

decency to leave a chemothera-

How many

kryptonite

py patient her painkillers? Everyone knows that money can be spent and jewelry can be pawned. Medication, on the other hand, is meant to alleviate pain and

the words, “I’ll call

because

but,

listen.

suffering.

and your phone has yet

If the thief stole

Shepard’s purse for the money, then he got what he

wanted. Shepard also had sentimental jewelry in her purse which the thief could easily sell to a

pawn shop

Someone going through chemotherapy and

some

for

is

extra cash.

What happens

to ring?

when

people

to

becomes an obstacle and becomes so

distance

already going through hell

least

am

I

guilty.

could be convicted

mine and so many other people’s heads. However, my that lingers over

reason

Time.

Spoke can now

I

I

many

not as so

is

have

lots

of

and

it

claim.

my

fin-

and

to listen. let

distance

my

myself from

my

been

is

to say, “I miss you.”

are

become

my

kryptonite

has

roots

My

solution.

mistake as a person

to

my

A

biggest

being afraid

Those words that

burn

for

in

my

the face

and

mother and

Opinion

versation

I

the only

my way

to talk about

it

their hearts

that

came

make

it

I

me, and

are

wondering

I

was

could do was

there to

me

and

com-

my

and

feel-

I

just

I

got home. lot

my

has

phone.

should

call, but

my

knowing

every time

heart

that

homesickness. ing

stay

I

I

do

in that

most people

call

an aching

feel-

It’s

that

drowns

I

can’t be there in

person.

you’re

at all like

me. don’t

be.

because after the sadness wears off regret takes

I

its

place.

of Conestoga College

Editor: Paige Hilton

letters to

the

Advertising Manager: Janet Morris Production Managers: Steph Baulk,

Editor:

Circulation Manager:

Brent Gerhart

Jason Sonser

Melissa Hancock

Jon Yaneff

for verification.

Photo Editors: Chantelle Timperley, Mike

be published. Letters should be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter letters will

Bors, Denise Muller

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr., Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534 E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

for publication.

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

Spoke Online

Dr.,

Web site:

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College. Spoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the space. Letters to the editor are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be clearly written or typed; a MS Word file would be helpful. Letters

must not contain any

libellous statements.

I

staring

kryptonite

laughs

know

is

thought

I

-

If

a great lesson.

it.

A

me.

me

have for them

I

miss you”

them when

I’d see

a piece of

Being an aspiring journalist has taught

their

un-rung.

left

happened but here

I

comes to family and friends. You might say that 1 can easily overcome this by calling more often. 1 have tried but each

my kitchen

home

say, “I’ll call

That was three years ago.

at

it

in

1

at

could hide and people w'ould forget

ing towards everyday phone use

at

why

as hard as hearing

feeling of such anguish has

almost overridden

I

-waiting

is still

loved ones

that saying, ”1

is

fort her.

when

my

for

phones are

her seem half a world

1

know

I

end of the day

at the

personal phone

The only answer

away, was crying. All

The

an end

to

have to hear them say the

you tomorrow,” and then

that

to

my own

on the end of a phone

and wish

inter-

of their

But when the con-

comes

However,

my

to the dis-

would succumb

made

and the

tell-all

words, “I miss you.”

Is published and produced weekly by the Journalism students

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

N2G 4M4

it

to

Spoke

welcome

editor. Letters

No unsigned

I

day the phone

heart.

rough time has smacked

family

contacted

know

listen

have

I

through the veins that go straight

Spoke welcomes

view becomes a

tance and hard times. Little did

biggest problem and estrang-

ing

Letters are

when

strange

My mother,

my

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

1

worst enemy.

But,

visit

Conestoga

my

one

links,

who open

home to come to knew it would be

touch-tone or even a rotary phone.

bum for the words from a friend who is searching for some-

weather and reference

left

I

strangeness and

ears

For the latest college, entertainment and sports news, as well as games, puzzles,

Melissa

over the phone.

When

gers are quite capable of dialing a

Stories, I’ve got lots to tell

be read online!

is

one

have interviewed people

I

will not

future career

will always be the

1

intricate lives.

of the never-call-you-back crime

my

going to love

Hancock

apparent.

suffering enough. is at

am

you tomorrow” tomorrow becomes yesterday

the sacredness of time

She didn’t need this; no one does. one thing we can gather from this incident; just when we think we've seen it all, someone stoops to a whole new low and redefines what it means to be truly heartless. is

There

times have you heard


Commentary

SPOKE, October

24,

2005

— Page 5

Society needs

more downtime much

since then? Although I really wouldn’t know because for as long as l ean remember, Sunday shopping has been the norm. I’d like to think today’s socie-

Meghan Kreller

ty

could survive without the five

extra hours of shopping time.

In my days of working in malls Sunday was more like a day when parents would take their children out, not to buy, but for something to do; teenagers would hang out and wander the halls because they were “bored;” and the elderly would stroll around, getting their weekly exercise. Sure, an easy cure for the weekend blues is to go to a place where you are hounded with ads to spend more of your hard-

Opinion hard to get excited about the

It’s

weekends because for me, like most students with a part-time job, the word “weekend” simply means two more days of work.

me

Call

old-fashioned

but

I

would gladly give up my Sunday earnings to go back to. the time when shopping on this day did not exist. Not only to give myself a rest, al

but for the sanity of the gener-

public.

Everywhere whether

it

-you

go

Tim Hortons, it seems everyone is in a rush. Maybe if this rush came to a halt once a week people could

relax at

life that

I

Have

some loved ones

home

...

know, however,

ter.

This decision

of

the

or just

couldn’t they?

not up to them, or

prime to begin ... It almost sounds too good to be true, but at one time it was reality. is at

who (Photo by Jon Mo/son)

Conestoga’s trades

arrange their schedule to go to the

One mandatory day of rest to ensure that once Monday comes

First-year general

make sure

it

machining student, Nathan

Litt,

sets the feed rate and blade depth on a lathe to

cuts properly on Oct. 13.

this decision is

me

for that mat-

lies in the

money-hungry

hands

business

owners of Ontario w'hoT doubt will give up this precious day they

their

new week

a fresh,

time?

course, there are people

park, visit

being hurried away.

everyone

but whatever hap-

save the necessary shopping for this day but surely, they could re-

street or waiting in line at the local

is

money to faniily

Of

today,

be driving down the

take a bit of time to enjoy a

earned

pened

fought for years ago. For, in their

one more day of business means one more day of profit. eyes,

things really changed that

Chartwells

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EWing “Pizza Pizza

Combo

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Sun

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46 Princess Street

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only $6.00 (tax

proceeds

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included)

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E.

Ont.

United W^y SGRVING KITCMewea-WATEJUOO

A/w t»>*

i

*v

Kf>r,


Page 6

News

— SPOKE, October 24, 2005

Building with Best Start MCCORMICK

By TIFFANY

most important

cussion as Best Start, a program to

She government is realizing if they spend money now they won’t have problems such as illiteracy and learning disabilities

rather, will

get day cares into the school sys-

in the future.

eral

the

said she feels

Early child learning skills contin-

ue

to

be a topic of government dis-

By 2007-2008

tem, begins to evolve.

On May

6,

2005 Ontario signed a

agreement-in-principle

historic

with the federal government outlining

the

commitment

to

it’s

butter

Doon Heritage Crossroads,

demonstrates how to make apple cider Festival on Oct. 10.

at the

Apple Butter

Defence

they tran-

when

they do.

munities so they are convenient for

many people

a long-term process expected

she

Nous vous

offrons:

in

un vaste choix de carrieres

professional fields

and technical trades

dans des domaines

specialized training

professionnels et

subsidized education

techniques

une formation specialist

To find out more about

a

“It’s

were

if

provin-

set,

wages

is

a

good thing

for

is

it

it is

to say that

it’s

a

anymore.”

ECE

student,

it

when

is

not such

She

as well

as parents

test areas

Until

pour vos etudes visit

your local Canadian

for

Forces recruiting centre.

Pour en savoir plus sur les

a

possibles de

temps

plein,

partiel

carrieres

ou a temps

rendez-vous dans un

1

VIP/CIP 2005

On Tuesday November 1 st and Wednesday November 2"d

Forces canadiennes pres

de chez vous.

STRONG. PROUD.

D^COUVREZ VOS FORCES DANS LES FORCES CANADIENNES

Contact Jan Stroh at CANADIAN FORCES

Canada

1

800 856-8488

www.forces.gc.ca

jstroh@conestoqac.on.ca

iHaalagwwls >n K'XJ'ihl

AMtlMk'm

Hjk)u1ViU

ultortHUVn

or

748-5220 x3279

have already estab-

action

McNamara

www.childrensinfo.ca.

centre de recrutement des

TODAY’S CANADIAN FORCES

eligi-

what

occurs with

said.

For more information regarding Best Start visit www.children.gov.on.ca or

une aide financiere career opportunities,

is

will look like in their

more

Volunteers

our part- and full-time

who

Start,

happens,”

when

d

considering a slid-

day cares continue with their current ways. Both McNamara and Schenk are uncertain of what the future holds but are hopeful something good will come of this program. “We’ll have to wait and see what

creating and expanding centres.

OOfl Mi B ^vvll

is

use to decide

program

Best

dren’s services providers, municipalities

said the years zero to five are

for child-

are to be completed this October.

The

health units, child-care and chil-

in a

eligibility

communities. Plans for these centres

said she believes the

themselves.

eliminated

are developing their plans for the

services because they cost money.

be

determine

The

government has taken so long to initiate Best Start because of funding and research. “There was not enough research done in the past,” she said. “More is being done now.” Best Start is community-driven and will be developed by each for

As of November

province

lished their Best Start networks and

transition.

community

the

Currently, three test centres have been implemented in the communities. Hamilton’s east end, rural areas of Lambton and Kent and the District of Timiskaming are all Best Start trial towns.

she

said

She said

well as a place to go that

McMurran

2004

ble to receive child-care subsidies.

important to get day cares

Business people don’t like social to

the financial aspect, namely,

parents unable to afford day-care

ties will

province will be working with school boards, educators, public

want

issue revolving around child is

ing scale income test municipali-

overdue.”

easier for children to learn

huge

An

The province

they have a routine to follow as a

been so easy

way

she said.

are expected with 55 to be imple-

to

long time coming,”

into the school systems.

it.”

like that,”

care based on a person’s income.

Steph McMurran, another secfeels

“Politicians don’t

a wide range of careers

she said.

tance of early childhood education

business that costs money.”

been

ond-year

in

money

Grey County 155 new spaces

In

on child-care subsidies for parents with RRSPs and RESPs. Ontario is working on a new way

workers

the

is

restrictions

would be more equal.

said.

respect for the child-care industry.

canadiennes, c’est plus

said

money and

standards

“Politicians recognize the impor-

McNamara said there is not a lot of

qu’un simple emploi.

why

for the workers.

can’t ignore

Forces offer you:

is

coming.

Schenk explained within the last five to eight years more research on brain development has been done with more research presented about learning development “so people

than just a job? The Canadian

recognized or

leave the profession.

deserve more cial

said the Waterloo region

for their children. feel

She also said if a pension plan was created it would be really great

time,”

Schenk seen

valued,” she said, adding that

“It’s

about

child care.

receiving $33 million. “We’ve never

thing.

Shelley Schenk, manager of Conestoga’s day-care centres, said this program has been a long time

“It’s

Forces

good

a

McNamara

mother’s job,” she said.

les

doing by creating

is

“They don’t

to create a

said Best Start

dans

is

they reach Grade 1 and network of early learning and care hubs located in com-

excel

child care.

carriere

Ontario

care

when

Kim McNamara, supervisor of the Durham Kids N’ Us daycare,

Une

for

care centres.

and are investing

more

provided

currently

Schenk said Best Start is a program that looks at recognition for work, paying the staff for the work

to

elementary school. The goals of Best Start are that children will be ready to learn and

“It’s

that’s

2003 Multilateral

Framework on Early Learning and Child Care. The money will be added onto the $570 million that is

“There’s so

centres.

Want a career

funds from the agreement-in-

principle and the

to do.

designed

is

implemented in 10 years with immediate expansion of child-care

JE SERAI FIER

fed-

mented by January 2006. Bruce County is expecting 135 new day-

It

to be

DONT

but

new

much work to do,” she said, adding the wage increase shows people are recognizing how much work day-care workers have

It is

UNE CARRIERE

the

Best Start

Defense nationale

municipalities,

come from

programs like Infant Development and Ontario Early

(ECE) she thinks what the

student, said

families. National

for Best Start will not be

early intervention initiative, as well

port they will need

can’t believe

Funding

provided by

government

sition into

I

Ashley Thomas, a second-year

choice

Best Start builds on Healthy Babies Healthy Children, Ontario’s

help provide children with the sup-

historical interpreter at

workers.

first

early childhood education

Years Centres.

Jenn Hale, a

government

be the

will

for day-care centre expansion.

early learning and child care.

as

(Photo by Mike Bors)

the

hopes to have funds to support the increase of wages for child-care

progress

Schools

for a child.

the


News

Show By KRISTIN GRIFFERTY

that advertise all

new

the Practical nursing, civil engineer-

ing and graphic design.

— Page 7

line

can be personalized

of these options for

can take from the bookstore

tatives

pride.

The bookstore’s manager, Mary Andraza, has been meeting with

samples of the clothing so students can see the colours and styles and

representatives from

them on for size. However, the items do not have any logos or lettering.

to

Conestoga’s bookstore

is

now

giving programs, clubs and teams the opportunity to show their

to discuss the

2005

clothing line that represen-

show their group or program. “We hope to have four binders in circulation by the end of this week," Andraza explains. The bookstore also has a bin with

grams

24,

your program pride

new clothing

Bookstore’s

SPOKE, October

various pro-

new program

specific line.

try

Andraza says the new clothing line is surprisingly popular, consid-

ering she just recently e-mailed the incentive to teachers last week. a

"It’s

good way

to

show you’re

proud of your program and team spirit within your program,” says Andraza. "Also, it generates more

a good way to show

“It’s

you’re proud of your pro-

gram and team

Mary Andraza,

sales for the bookstore.”

The new clothing

bookstore manager

line is a first for

the bookstore, which gives students the option to purchase T-shirts, golf

spirit with-

your program.”

in

shirts

and hoodies specific to their program. There are, however, some

So far, practical nursing and civil engineering are some programs that have shown interest in the new

restrictions.

line.

A

from each program or group must organize a representative

minimum

of 12 other students that wish to order clothing.

Those students must then decide on the same colour, logo and word-

As

ing that they wish to have put on

says,

the clothing.

gram)

Currently, there are

Rez

two binders

for pricing?

That depends on what type of logo or lettering each group wants. “Because of the volume of the order, our mark-up isn’t going to be as substantial as the bookstore," states Andraza. However, she also

“A

sale

is

a sale. (The pro-

will generate

more

sales for

the bookstore.”

(Photo by Steph Baulk)

Nicole Deak, 20, models a personalized nursing sweater from the bookstore. program line will give students the opportunity to show their program pride.

The new personalized

woes

Internet

frustrate students f

By AMANDA KAHGEE

who

Boris,

Boris Students at Conestoga Residence

and

Conference

Centre

have

become

is

business

and

is

new

to the job.

a second-year general

student

at

the

college

a resident at the conference

increasingly frustrated with the Internet service provided. A lot of the students at the con-

centre.

He

will

have to go through

ing to learn

how

train-

to troubleshoot

ference centre rely on the Internet

problems on the computer and

to

keep in touch with friends and family from home and to do school

virus problems, etc.

work.

used to Internet problems while he was living at residence, he switched to a differ-

Boris

and

"Be

patient,”

says

conference

is

last year,

general manager John Kobylnik. “We’re trying our best

ent Internet service provider.

and

the Internet here

centre

it

will get better.”

The conference

centre

is

current-

under contract with an Internet service provider called Golden Triangle and also uses a program which equalizes bandwidths called Logi sense. ly

The problem

many

is

that there are too

students on the network

who

are using high bandwidths.

The

is

difficult.

“There was actually an incident year where the college had to shut down a student’s port because spam e-mails were being sent out,” says Kobylnik. this

“It

was a case where

didn’t even

know

the student

they were doing

this.”

The

it

was

really unreliable.” Boris

says.

He adds that it’s a better deal going with Rogers and it’s also easiest because there are no installation costs

centre

is

because the conference already hooked up with

Rogers cable. “I

monitored by the college and an IT staff member there has to determine where problems are occurring, which can be Internet

switched to Rogers because was really slow

“I

and

recommend

college usually hires an IT at the

conference

centre. This year they hired

Andy

that

if

you are

going to switch to Rogers that students get the high speed lite package because it’s the best deal you can get,” he says. "It’s only $22 a month and if you split the cost with your roommate it’s very affordable.”

The residence provides student with the Internet and the cost of that is included in the residence fee.

Be forewarned

that if you choose Rogers you will not receive a refund for the cost of the Internet provided by the conference centre.

to switch to

person to work

fix

(Photo by Melissa Hancock)

A Taking a

historic hike

season is a great way to exercise and take in some of the region’s historic sites. The Pioneer Tower is one location with great scenery and also tells a story of importance about K-W’s first settlers. The tower was built in 1926 and serves as a memorial to pioneers who travelled about 700 kilometres from Pennsylvania to the Grand River near Doon in stroll

during the

fall

it

the spring of 1800.


Feature

— SPOKE. October 24, 2005

Page 8

Myths about funerals dispelled EVANS

By LEE

the

details

legal

a

after

death

occurs, such as correctly filling out

We've

all

gol to go sometime,

right? Preferably in our sleep, in

our late 90s. with family gathered around us. Cut to cemetery scene, with mourners gathered about while the coffin

slowly lowered

is

into the grave.

What

you die

If

happens behind

actually

someone you died suddenly, would

you know what steps to take next? If you were to die suddenly, would your family know w'hat you wanted to happen at your funeral? At a funeral pre-planning and

another country,

in

insurance should cover the

travel

the scenes at a funeral? If

close to

forms for insurance claims. Other expenses that may be included are newspaper notices and the labour at the cemetery to open and close the grave.

body home,

cost of returning the

any

necessary certificates, the flight casket, and airfare. For example, if you should die suddenly while partying

spring break in

at

Cemeteries, four presenters shared

around $3,000 your body home. The cost of an average funeral can range from a very modest $2,900 up to $9,000. Two of the most expensive items are the pro-

information necessary to prepare

fessional fees of the funeral

and respond to a death in the family, w'hether sudden or expected. An audience of approximately 30 people, mostly seniors, heard presentations from Kitchener Cemeteries, Edward R. Good

and the cost of the casket,

information seminar recently host-

ed

by

Home,

Funeral

Kitchener

of

City

Group

Investors

and Dianne Bauer, funeral celebrant (the one who says the funer-

Florida,

it

will cost

to fly

is

home

if burial

requested.

Cremation is another option. Urns for the ashes start at $179 and go up from there. Preplanning saves money and guarantees the cost of a funeral

The

against future price increases.

money from prepaid

(Photo by Lee Evans)

The

meditative labyrinth

in front

work through the grieving process.

the adjoining crematorium are in a

is

what you paid, the money refunded back to the family. If

and friends and make arrangements for out-of-town guests. You will also need to decide who will officiate the service, and if it is to be religious or secular. Don’t forget, someone has to

park-like setting of 50 acres located

the funeral costs more, the funeral

arrange the reception after the

Cemetery on Fischer Hallman Road in the south

home pays

funeral and finally,

Mennonite chapel

that serves as a

dedication center.

The center and

less than

They

were

gathered early 19 th

restored,

in

the

century

Willliamsburg

at

end of Kitchener.

Some

interesting

the difference.

Prepaid funerals are arranged through the funeral

statistics

that

common myths

transferable if

home and

you move

al

pay the funer-

home.

are

Just like weddings, funerals can

bring out the worst in people, espe-

community. There are several different payment plans available, and

Good Funeral Home

funeral

they include the cost of insurance.

One suggestion

ily

to another

about dying were provided by advance planning funeral director Rob Wintonyk, from the Edward R. dispelled

make

when discussing

Wintonyk has worked 13 years in the industry and acknowledged that most people don’t want to talk

achievements in your life. Memory planner books are available from

attended a funeral service, most of

less stressful for

organize includes creating a with information about major milestones and

the funeral

home.

You should

about funerals.

your relatives

“Refusing to talk about it won’t make death go away,” said Wintonyk.

tion

I checked, we still had 100 per cent death rate in Waterloo Region,” he said, causing (he audience to chuckle. Not planning ahead for your funeral arrangements means your family will be forced to make tough decisions under stress. Planning ahead can guard your family against “emotional over-

mation to your executor, the person who you have chosen to carry out your funeral arrangements and

“Last time

a

spending.”

Lack of planning can also cause your family to loose out on all your hard-earned cash. Billions of dollars lays unclaimed

Canadian banks because families were not aware of the accounts or did not have the correct informain

tion necessary to access them.

over

safety deposit box.

box

at a critical time,

even be aware

for

taking

many al

families

steps required to

through

make

the

funer-

planning less chaotic and stressThey help with filing the legal

memorial service about the

A

popular choice

rites.

sentations for any special interest

“We

plan for

life’s special

sions,” said Bauer, “so

occa-

why would-

n’t

we

fied

by

the University of

is

certi-

Oklahoma

about the deceased, with therapeu-

over the memorial service, but

many people do

now

not have a church

have a

provided.

people usually chose to have

clergy from their church preside

to

deceased for people who do not wish to have traditional religious

us have not had to plan one. In the

While many of us may have

is

Powerpoint presentation set to music using pictures the family has Bauer also does educational pregroups,

including

as both a funeral director, (the

tic

value for the bereaved.”

Bauer meets with families to plan the service, including choosing the

schools.

tackles questions like what to

She tell

young children when someone what

es and

If

is

how

new

in funeral servic-

to

handle grief in a

you would

like further infor-

mation about preplanning a funeral service, contact Dianne Bauer, at 5 1 9-570-9802 or on her cell at 5 1 9-

572-0073.

For further information on what services are offered by a funeral

home, contact Rob Wintonyk. Edward R. Good Funeral Home

may

or

that all that

not

informa-

is

the funeral, the director will ask

from 75 up

to

120 questions of the

family to get the necessary information. die

a close family

suddenly,

the

member were

to find their legal

if

to

would you know

coroner’s office?

papers for

Would you

they wanted cremation or

interment (burial)?

Do you know which

cemetery

may have made prior arrangements with? Would you know they

where

documents necessary when a death occurs, making arrangements for the funeral itself and linking with

cial

cemetery for burial arrangements. They also provide aftercare to help families to work through

of the music, the newspaper notices and the floral arrangements?

to find insurance

and finan-

papers?

What type of memorial did they want?

Someone

will

Who

have

service

will take care

to notify

lam-

(Photo by Brandon Walker)

It’s a bird, it’s a plane, It’s a ... bus? gas Oct. 5 at the Pioneer gas station on King Street, pictured above, was 99 cents per litre. Are you tired of paying high gas prices? Grand River Transit buses, like the one shown whipping by in this time-delayed photo, make regular stops at the college. You won’t have to worry about gas or polluting the environment and the bus will drop you off right at the school.

The

price of

at at

519-745-8445, or e-mail advanceplanning @ edwardgood.com.

this infor-

ful.

the

•Bauer, trained to present a person-

read poetry or to sing a tribute.

need to process insurance locked away at the bank. Many of us have attended a funeral or two, but few of us realize the myriad details required to plan the average funeral service. Before

know responsible

Dianne

to speak,

tion they

claims

their wives.” is

Give

like

inviting

members

Otherwise, your family may not have access to the safety deposit

where

funeral director

and

prefer to use a

readings,

will.

us, guys,” he joked, “because HO percent of husbands die before

A

your financial

insurance matters, but not in a

If

“The women have an advantage

about

celebrant,

one who arranges the funeral), and a funeral celebrant (the one who says the ceremony). “The service can be religious or secular,” she said, “and should be

past,

also leave informa-

special

healthy way.

departed's personal effects.

are

and

The family may funeral

alized,

music,

friends or family

the In-Sight Institute and

memory book

deaths

the

religious

dies,

to

all

to

more meaningful

or traditional

plan a meaningful goodbye for a loved one?” Bauer received her training from

sudden and unexpected,” said Wintonyk. “and 33 per cent of families have never planned a funeral.”

“Forty-five percent of

service

affiliation

beliefs.

ho.w to divide up personal belongings. If this has not been decided ahead of cially

time and set out clearly in a will, it can cause a lot of hurt feelings and confusion for those left to decide how to dispose of the dearly

in Waterloo.

Cemetery helps people

funerals goes

into a group annuity fund to pay for your funeral and the fund increases over time due to compound interest. If the funeral ends up costing

al.)

of the dedication centre at Williamsburg


News

TV students By JASON

SPOKE, October

put

can’t

so we’re here

sleep,

very

early,” Parr said.

Imagine your alarm clock taking

you from slumber

the

in

Going

early

hours of Thanksgiving Monday. Like a zombie, you slowly and tiredly get yourself ready,

feine as

down

much

as

you can and

start

caf-

gathering

up your equipment. Cringing

at the

thought? This was

He

of Conestoga College’s broadcast-

is

films their project in

to

Thanksgiving Monday, people were dressed for it and were excited about the parade. “Initially,

when we

got

here,

(Photo by Jason Sonser) left, and Lee Millman, both second-year broadcasting students, fight for clean-up duty after covering the K-W Oktoberfest Thanksgiving parade.

Adam

Krulicki,

second-year

a

broadcasting student, said he was one of the anchors covering the

parade and he felt excited and of high energy.

“I’m feeling,

make

let’s

do

full

this parade,

hot, let’s

it

we’re reaping the benefits of just relaxing before the parade starts. Everybody who wants to be here is out today,” she said.

gram covers

it.”

Krulicki said the broadcasting pro-

Millman said she was involved in making pre-produced events for the parade, which were intended to be used as filler video in case there were gaps in the parade.

casting student,

sides of the parade that

Eric Leece, a second-year broad-

was

the director for

the live-to-hard drive shooting of

parade

the

and

responsibility

said

his

to

make

was

main sure

everything was organized.

“Kitchener-Waterloo has the second-largest Oktoberfest parade in the world, and this is where it’s at,

“There was a lot of pressure because there’s a lot of stuff going on and you have to be really organized,” he said. “The people in the truck really helped out, everybody was calm and giving suggestions. It’s a pretty good feeling once you're done and you do a good

right here today.”

job.”

Conestoga, meet your

new

president of student affairs,

vice-

Mike

who came

Dinning,

to

Conestoga

from a position

at

University,

Conestoga does

said

Simon Fraser

success

at

what

it

Dinning. “And what to

do here

is

to

does,”

we

said

are trying

improve on what

is

already a very good product.”

As

“All the research indicates that

somewhere where they connect,” he said. “So what is students stay

important

vice-president

Student Services at the college, Dinning sees his job as doing whatever he can to assist the students in acaof

demic success. “The role of Student Services is to supply a platform upon which a good education can be built, and to create the support services that are

necessary,” he said.

is

to connect students to

the college in a

more demonstrable

way.”

things well.

“Conestoga has had tremendous

Parr said when the one anchor’s microphone went dead, everyone felt the need to communicate.

a

campus. However, the centre

is

not

just about fun, because, according

Dinning, there are also plans

the

second-year

a

mix

he said.

wasn’t too bad, although

I

missed

they needed visuals.

the entire parade because

I

was

was

“Our

in

several pre-recordto go, just in

case

a gap in the parade and

priority is what’s

happening

the truck the

in front

it

dents worked on these pre-recorded

through the truck walls.”

was responsible for putting all the. graphics up onscreen, including the whole layout said he

and look of the video, the credits and so on. “It’s hectic, you know. You’ve got 30 people all trying to work together and it’s all our first time doing a big production like this,” Pancer said. “We had our professors supervising, but other than that,

produced,

it’s all

performed, written, everything was all done by directed,

the students.”

Steve Parr, a media studies pro-

was 5 a.m. but was

by

up since

1:15

4:

1

a.m.

because he

we

it

goes on parade

pumped about

get very

gel very excited and usually

it,

stu-

of those things

all

that are Oktoberfest,” he said.

it and the people on the ground are scrambling to get it

notices

fixed.”

During a situation like that, the crew has to have a smooth show going on because it’s live-to-hard drive.

a

matter of trying to be

smooth and trying not

to

potential viewer notice.

Of

let

the

course,

when a microphone goes out. you kind of notice,” he said. Parr said

how

it’s

really nice to see

students have

far the

come

because they only started learning television mobile in September.

“Two of our

rehearsals were can-

celled by weather so they didn’t

Parr and

Tom

good portion of

the time prior to

when

the parade,” he said. “Really,

you take

and consider there are 33 students involved in this and you take a look at how the team is working, it’s very satisfying.” Parr

it

all in

budget

for

the

broadcaster’s coverage parade was $250.

of

the

said

the

“About $ 1 00 of that went to cofand doughnuts, another $100 went to fill up the tanks in the truck and $50 went to our set. It’s a minimal budget, but we do it every year and it works fine,” he said. The fee

money

allocated into the course’s

is

budget.

Bilandzic, a broad-

Parr said the whole crew gave up

cast technologist at the college, had

part

up to speed on the various technical elements of the mobile truck used to cover the

family to do the project, “and we’re

parade.

for everyone involved.”

to bring the students

“By parade

we

day,

stand back

and enjoy the parade and the dents do the show.” Parr said.

He

way

“That’s the

The

from Oktoberfest, some compeand fest halls. Basically,

colour pieces on

couldn’t sleep. day,

Street.

titions

fessor with the college, said he at the location

of us on the

items right up until 1 a.m. (Thanksgiving morning),” he said. The pre-recorded items included features on various events at Oktoberfest, such as, “interviews and backgrounders on the key people

“At that point, the director notices the audio person in the truck

have the chance to use the truck a

there

whole time watching on-screen, but it sounded cool

gone

for the future,”

it

ed items ready

stu-

said there are always a few

technical issues to

overcome when

shooting a video.

we

“We had one

dents in having success in their col-

because there’s

'They are all specific types of programs that we’re look-

takes.”

ing

a

lege career.

at,

but are

all

rooted

eral principle that

in

the gen-

a student

who

is

more connected and engaged in the college will be a more successful

in

to include a student learn-

Dinning, formerly employed

Simon Fraser

at

as associate dean of

student services, said the college responsibility

is

different than that

of a university.

“One difference is the size,” he “Simon Fraser had about

said.

es and a testing centre.

22,000 full-time students and Conestoga is in the 6,000 range.” Another difference between working at a college rather than a

“The learning centre is to facilitate student academic success.” he “It’s

supplying

support;

a

place where students can go and get help,

which allows them

more successful Dinning said these

by and they have

goes

it

into their archives of parades

whole day where as everyone else was outside freezing. For me, it

ing centre, enhanced health servic-

said.

Oktoberfest committee and

The crew had

student.”

The college has plans to open up new student centre on the Doon

to

Pancer,

it.

of our anchor’s

more

of their Thanksgiving than

because

happy

“Part of that, though,

Tom

and

I,

do

to

this is a great

with that,

experience

is

that for

neither one of us can

sleep before these events.

You

just

hope everything comes together, and part of that is a little bit of stress and anxiety and just wanting it to go right,” Pan- said.

helps direct students to success

One of Dinning’s main goals is to connect students to the college.

Dinning.

many

“There’s also a community aspect to it as well. (The video) goes to the

the

we

New VP GEDCKE

Matt

He

the parade every year.

“We’re going to show the best we can and really give something back to the community and say that this is what we do and we want to represent you,” he said.

By TIM

great.”

“It’s

Parr said the main thing, from a professor’s point of view, is the

be critiqued by everyone involved so the students can learn.

broadcasting student, said he was lucky enough to be doing the graphics for the shoot. “I got to stay in the truck

have some fun,” he said. “We’re going to talk about what’s happening in the parade and (the others are) going to let’s

record

happening throughout the week and that was my job, to produce and edit those,” she said. Millman said she was excited about the parade because,

it

project goes into the classroom to

Jamie Niemela,

everybody was pretty tired, but we got to wmrk right away, so now

“I’m in charge of doing all the pre-produced events that you’ll be watching during the parade of all the Oktoberfest festivals that were

to switch

try

viewer.”

fill

broadcasting student, said although the weather was damp

happen-

is

and direct it and have the whole team co-ordinate it so it works for a

fact.

while covering the parade, from an anchor describing the parade as it passed to camera operators and graphic editors. Lee Millman, a second-year role

a parade

it.

angles right,

like a live-

Situated outside the Brick Brewery, located on King Street South in Waterloo, each secondyear broadcasting student had a

when

“(However,) you can try to be smooth, try and get your camera

which a crew one shot with-

out any editing after the

said

control

These students, as part of their TV mobile class, were assigned to cover the Thanksgiving parade and go live-to-hard drive. Live-to-hard drive

the best possible

is

ing live in front of you, you can’t

radio and television program.

to-tape recording, in

microphones go dead, the receiver went dead. So we just had the other anchor talk while we fixed that on the spot,” Parr said. “The cameras worked well. We were concerned about the drizzle and rain but the truck worked

together.”

a reality for second-year students

ing

cover the Oktoberfest

mobile television. “Mobile is a way of doing TV very different from the studio and this is the best experience they can have,” Parr said. “They have to bring all of the elements of it

You

— Page 9

battery

experience the students can get in

grum-

bling about being up at 4 a.m. eat breakfast,

to

parade, he said,

2005

work

skills to

SONSER

24,

new

to be

hope

is

is

the funding issue.

“Universities have generally been better funded than colleges,” said

as a student.” his

university

that

projects will assist stu-

Dinning. “I think you have to be better at

what you do

at

a college.

Although

new

he

is

it’s

less

a

room

new

for mis-

position and

school. Dinning said he feels

ready for the challenges. “I’ve

gone from being a coach

member

to a facul-

an undergraduate coordinator to being a manager of a ty

to

and very complex administramy last 30 years have been getting me ready to do this.” Dinning said his first month has large

tive

group, so hopefully

included a

lot

of getting to

people and getting to tem at Conestoga. “It’s

been a

lot

know

know

the sys-

of learning about

the programs and meeting with the

student government to try to con-

he said. “And to get an understanding of what they view to be successful and what they view to be the challenges that need to be

Mike Dinning, vice-president of affairs, says he’s here to help students be more suc-

addressed.”

cessful.

nect,”

student


Page 10

— SPOKE, October 24, 2005

hmi oween movles ALL WEEK IN THE SANCTUARY

11:30AM

THE ONDEAD

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PLEASE NOTE: CONTEST QUESTION WAS CHANGED TO ENSURE FAIRNESS AND ENCOURAGE FULL

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^CONTEST EXCLUDES FULL-TIME CSI STAFF AND DIRECTORS

Conestoga

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STUDENTS INC

I


News

women

Programs encourage MOLSON

By JON

pre-apprenticeship training in gen-

shortage,

This is the third year that general carpentry has

the

eral carpentry.

A

job developer for

Women

in

Trades (WIST) at Conestoga’s Guelph campus says the goal of their programs is to provide women with marketable skills through post-secondary trade and Skilled

been

Conestoga’s

Leigh skills

Ferguson believes the gained from WIST programs

will result in higher paid jobs for

women

in “non-traditional”

occu-

them achieve eco-

pations, helping

nomic independence.

Doon campus

does not offer any grams. ly

apprenticeship training.

WIST.

through

offered

current-

WIST

pro-

some

programs is to offer a well-rounded form of training that is respected and in demand by local employers.”

Ferguson

is

primarily responsible

for recruiting

WIST

students

programs

into

the

Conestoga as well as establishing and monitoring the paid work placements for enrolled students. Ferguson also follows up with all students after a six-month and 12-month postgraduation period

at

to find

they are working and training

is

“Unfortunately, 20

is

the

maximum

higher in

all

exempted from

gram

Conestoga has offered WIST programs at both the Doon and Guelph campuses since 2001 This year the Guelph campus is offering WIST .

WIST

is

is

tuition-free

are also

two inde-

pendent certifications in rigging and fall arrest,” she said. “These certifications are granted by Construction Safety Association of Ontario.”

take years before

“It will

women

It’s

represented

in

these

have been long undertrades,”

Ferguson said. “When considering our current and impending skills

WIST program

occupations

apprentices are sub-

all

a career in the trades. ple

...”

who

Leigh Ferguson,

job developer for WIST

She

is satisfied

made by

with the progress

the current and past

WIST

programs. “It will take

years before

women

traditional occupations

as

like

WIST

WIST

ber of

will

and

initia-

certainly

with increasing the num-

women

in the trades.

“The general carpenter program been helpful for

specifically has

Wants

*

to

know where you

are

are considering

Has

often

fail

because a poor match

between

what men and

women

Has ever

hit you,

increasing

women

“gender

friendly” businesses.

“Perhaps an incentive

in the

form

of tax breaks to those companies that integrate

women

some of

in

the non-traditional roles,” he said.

White believes some companies are doing a lot better job than others

accepting

at

women

into the trades.

doesn't seem to matter about

“It

the size, location or type but rather the attitude of the floor supervisors

and upper management determine ing to

if

a

company

that

will

welcom-

is

women and able to women as

the advantages of

realize

trades-

people,” W'hite said. is

confident a more equal pro-

portion of gender participation

in

the skilled trades can be realized.

“Certainly over time,

I

believe

the laws, training and acceptance

women

there,"

in the

White

workplace will be “This will help

said.

convince parents about encouraging their daughters into the trades and establish the fact that the trades are the third pillar of post-second-

skills

are successful in the

abuse.

on time

should be and do

you recognize these behaviours

Guelph Campus, Admin. Office, or Waterloo Campus, Room A3. Drop in to make an appointment, or call 748 5220, ext. 3360 for Doon Campus, 824 9390 ext. 148 for Guelph Campus, or 885 0300 ext. 224 for Waterloo Campus. Information on community support is available through your Student Services Office.

provide both

and confidence and showcase

women who

in

or con-

sidering the trades as a career

is

to

persevere.

“Get involved, stand up for your and enjoy the advantages of

rights

being involved in the trades,” he said.

Women in trades

looking to get involved

and apprenticeship or who

are interested in finding out

“WIST programs

no matter how sorry afterwards

Sponsored by the Women’s Resource Group

participation in

the trades.

in your partner, you may be in a dangerous relationship. Counsellors are available in the Student Services Office, Doon Campus, Room 2B04, If

and

Greg White, chair of the trades and apprenticeship programs at Conestoga’s Doon campus, said WIST is a great help towards

Makes threats about hurting you, hurting your friends, or commiting suicide if you don’t obey or decide to leave

^

employer

is

apprentice.”

times

things, like not being ready

more

create

and worthwhile.” His advice for women

he or she: at all

to

provide training opportunities for these trades. Apprenticeships

your friends.and asks you to stop seeing them

traditional ideas about

appren-

should be

also said efforts

ary education, being both viable

new relationship. some of the early signs of

and who you are with

Becomes very angry about trivial or wearing the “wrong” clothes Criticizes

if

— Page 11

“Also, research the companies that

made

are truly represented in these non-

He made

of

“Don't give up, when one door closes, two will open,” she said.

signals to look for:

Your partner may be abusive

to begin

ticeships to be persistent.

Often, this exhilaration prevents us from detecting

some warning

will face similar

when attempting

early signs of abuse

are

don't quali-

She advises apprentices and peo-

non-traditional

encourage

into the trades.

the

2005

trades,” he said.

He

so easy to get carried away with the excitement of a

Here

who

from other government sources, participation in WIST programs would certainly

WHEN DATING TURNS DANGEROUS The

limited

is

fy for assistance

jected to

speed up the process,” she said. Ferguson credits initiatives such

skilled

available to those

obstacles

are truly

tives

in

OWD

increase.”

to

based on educational and finanbackground. Ferguson said it is important to

“Women

“Funding from

such as living expenses, must be secured from another source,” she said. “If funding could be made

(HVAC). There

cial

represented

limits participation in the.program.

as heating ventilating and cooling

first-

qualify. Qualification

women

2005) are working in the industry and three have been registered as apprentices (two in carpentry and one in plumbing).” She believes inadequate funding in

to tuition alone, all other funding,

theory.

program. The pro-

offered

women who

program

as well

core apprenticeship

apprenticeship

from the

obtaining a higher paid entry-level position within the skilled trades.

plumbing

women gaining entry into the renovations and carpentry industry,” she said. “All the graduates (from the

24,

to enter trades

Ferguson admits graduates from

Students graduate with a certificate

Directorate (OW’D), under the Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration. It provides women with assistance towards

isn’t a typi-

program.

ically electrical,

Programs in WIST consist of a 30-week in-class training period, which is followed by a 10- week paid work placement. Successful completion of the work placement and achieving a mark of 60 per cent in all subjects is what students need to graduate. However, students who have 70 per cent or subjects are

Women’s

encouragement.” Ferguson said WIST

training for at Guelph.”

year

created by the Ontario

realized without this

number of students we can provide

out where

going.

WIST was

less participants,” she said.

how

their

would be

introduction to other trades, specif-

full.

Ferguson said participation in the program determines how much funding Conestoga can

more or

WIST

skilled trades workers

classes have been

a lucrative and worthwhile career,”

the

in

naturally

will

“Our program goes beyond the core subjects and includes other training such as computer skills,

time that skilled trades can provide she said. “Conestoga’s goals with

mean more

cal college

request.

has been recognized for

trades

The general carpentry program receives annual funding for 20 participants. This year and in 2004 the

“Other colleges or other programs could receive funding for

“It

more women involved

skilled

than

SPOKE, October

information about tact

9390

WIST

Leigh Ferguson “ ext. 182.

at

more

can con519-824-


Page 12

News

— SPOKE, October 24, 2005

Photography By JESSICA

BLUMENTHAL

really turns

phy which

You shouldn't be conned into buying unnecessary digital camera features when purchasing a camera advised a North American

Unless you are a professional photographer and are printing 8-

Olympus

lecturer.

xl

Norm

Dutcher,

Conestoga Oct.

who spoke

at

informed the of digital

12,

audience about the •

you on about photograimprove your story-

vitals

photography.

To

camera, a

you need

good memory card and to

get started

a

telling. Pictures are all

I

camera with

what

on a picture, each individ-

mega-pixel

is

a

is

a pixel.

bunch of pixels

A all

together.

a lot of

cameras

Digital

use

memory

cards to store the pictures’ information.

mega-

They come

from 128

MB

to

in

4 GB.

question that people should ask themselves when buying memory

you’re printing off a standard 4-x6-inch picture, you would need If

cards

around a 3 to 3.9 mega-pixel camera Dutcher said.

make up

little

a picture. If

how many

cards can you

all

your eggs

one

in

One thing that a lot of people do when taking a picture is they still shoot as

mm

they’re using a 35

if

camera, he

said.

“One of

the

beautiful

things

about digital photography is it costs nothing to take a picture, only to print a picture.

So shoot away and

experiment since

doesn’t cost

it

you anything.” "It's better to buy more smaller Photography is all about experiflash memory cards than one larger menting with different angles. one, otherwise if you lose the card 'Every picture has 360 degrees to it. By changing the angle you change the perspective of the

to

Suicide

He

are going through

difficult

times,

may seem

hard to believe the pain will ever end. Suicide may seem like the only answer to problems. People who have considered suicide may feel helpless, desperate, or that there is no hope in their lives. If you are thinking that

are

it

when

said

unbearable, or you are wondering warning signs to consider:

some Talk of

life is

- escape, having no

future,

if

a friend

may be

being alone, feeling hopeless or helpless,

Feelings of

Situation

-

-

work problems,

the law, family breakdown, sexual/physical abuse;

Phy sical Changes -

disturbed sleep, loss of sexual interest, loss of appetite; Be haviours - alcohol/drug abuse, fighting, lawbreaking, emotional outbursts, dropping out of school, prior suicidal behaviour, putting affairs in order, giving

lack of interest/pleasure

in all

things, lack of physical energy,

and family, telling final wishes to someone close, a sudden and unexpected change to a cheerful attitude, behaviour that is out of ’

(i.e.

a cautious person

who suddenly becomes

reckless)

it

you suspect that a person may be suicidal, ask them about it, encourage them to share what is happening with them. Talking about suicide with someone does not support suicide;

it

only

shows

that

someone cares about what they are going

through.

permanent solution to a temporary problem. that any of this information applies to you or someone you know, ask

is

a

you feel speak to a counsellor If

in

Student Services.

demonstrated

Visit

When

possible try and find some-

America

24/7, to audience

mem-

“You also need to find out

what

you on about photography which will improve your really turns

storytelling.”

Norm Dutcher, North American Olympus lecturer

The

was the third one at Doug Wood, the co-

lecture

the college and

light.

photography program, hopes year’s will have a better turnout and more audience interac-

ordinator of the continuing education

an ExpoDisc which is a white balancing tool that produces is

more accurate and pleasant colours than an everyday automatic setting. Another

is

enriches

a polarizing

colours

by

next

tion.

filter that

Approximately 60 people showed up for the lecture, which was open

reducing

to students, teachers

and the gener-

reflections.

al

Behind his PowerPoint presentaDutcher set up a mini studio where he took an audience member and showed the rest of the audience how flash can change the mood of

There was a $2 donation at the door for entry and S 35 was raised, because some people gave more

a subject. is

like

during his demonstration with various types of flashes.

must-have in everyone’s camera bag is a reflector, even if it’s lit-

Student Services our website http://www.conestooac.on.ca/isp/stserv/index.isD

free to use the

is

feet

At the end of Dutcher’s lecture he gave out six photography books,

some

A

A Message from

hand Your

thing that’s stable like a wall, table or tree, for extra stability.

for

paint to a painter,” said Dutcher

to

you

conneed to be shoulder width apart and your ami tucked in your chest. trols.

I

“Light to a photographer

Suicide

right

was refresh-

new perspective so

tion

if

available

isn't

additions available for cameras that are used to enhance the colour and

One

away

prized possessions to friends

character

week

Dutcher

school/failing grades, trouble with

tle.

public.

1

the money went to Victim Services of Waterloo Region, a not-for-profit organization that provides on-scene assistance. practical and emotional assistance in emergency situations,

than $2. All

information, referrals and safety planning to victims of crime in Waterloo Region. If

“The smallest amount of light reflected from the sun or another light

source can add that extra

bit

you’re interested in learning

more about photography or digital cameras go to www.dpreview.com and www.123di.com.

Reminder: To gain

access

any

to

facilities at

Intramural Sports

Intramurals have

check

started,

schedule

for

game

Start this

week

Hockey: Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday 4:30 -

Fee:

$200 cash team bona

Ball Hockey: Monday & team bond

Thursday 4:30 - 6pm

Fee: $30 cash

Co-ed Volleyball: Wednesday 7 -

times

Varsity Sports

Ice

Fee:

$30 cash team bond

Basketball: Tuesday 4:30 Fee:

$30 cash team bond

-

6pm

1

0pm

Good 6pm

It

step ladder.”

desperation, hopelessness, disconnection from family and friends;

relationship problems,

tripod

a

If

went around crawling on my knees shooting everything from a lower angle,” said Dutcher. “Then the next week I went around shooting everything from a three-foot

suicide, death, or plans for suicide; •

from underneath and a

a tripod.

should be using the right stance. Your left hand should be holding the body of the camera while your

forgot what things looked like

ing to get a

here

suicidal,

is

helps get a sharper image.

was

his daughter

took pictures of the underside of doorknobs. “I

a picture,” he said.

bers as a door prize.

five or six years old she

When we

life to

all

The other must-have

object.

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER:

of

keep track of?

squares that

you were

is

you just put

basket,” said Dutcher.

various sizes,

A

pixels.

Pixels are the

also need to find out

about telling

-inch prints, there isn't a need

for a

in

ual coloured square

a story,” said Dutcher.

study photography he said.

“You

zoom

will

accessible for

is

luck to our Men's

the

of the

Rec

Centre you must present your student card at the front

desk. Rugby team as they compete at the provincial 748-3565 ext. 3565 finals October 29th and Activities posted daily Recreation Centre Hours 30th at Mohawk. Monday - Friday

7:00

am

-

11:00

pm

Saturday & Sunday 7:00

am

-

8:00

pm


Entertainment

SPOKE, October

Tempest showcases legend

Horoscope Week of October

William Hutt, a 39-season veter-

Aries

an of the Stratford Festival, chose

performance on stage. As Prospero, the former Duke of Milan and current magical lord of the island where The Tempest takes place, Hutt should barely have to act at all to have the rest of the cast look at Plus

it

a

21

illfSP

this

distance, but reality can crush those eggs like a bug. Lucky day;

25

William

m

The story starts off with Prospero conjuring up a storm from the on in daughter, Miranda living

with his (Adrienne Gould), for 12 years. A boat is caught in the storm and the passengers are marooned on the exile,

Hang

in

Taurus.

there,

Life

island.

seems rough right now, whether it’s from the strain of living with a

The castaways include Prospero’s brother, Antonio (Sean

family

Arbuckle) and the King of Naples,

and laugh. Lucky day: 24

Alonso (Barry MacGregor), who worked together to usurp Prospero’s dukedom and send him out to sea in the

first

place.

Alonso’s son, Ferdinand (JeanMichel LeGal), is separated from the

rest

of the passengers and

believes his father to be dead.

taken to Prospero’s

meets

and

lair,

He

is

where he

love

in

falls

with

Miranda. Other inhabitants of the island Prospero’s include magical spirit/servant Ariel (Jacob James), who has been promised freedom after he helps Prospero deal with the island’s intruders,

and the half

human,

half fishlike creature, Caliban (Anthony Malarky), whose

evil intentions drive

whimsical energy throughout the way he looked at Hutt’s Prospero as a father figure entire play, but the

opposed

fascinating to watch a charac-

It’s

ter

to an overbearing lord

fitting.

that

is

involved with almost

every scene, but goes unseen to everyone except Prospero, because it

gives the audience a feeling of

as

(left)

as Prospero gives instructions

Ariel in the Stratford Festival production of

deeper connection to this enigma than almost any other character. Ariel

is

was amount

a pivotal role

that

played with just the right of childhood whimsy and spiritual

wisdom. Antonio was one of the few problems. Arbuckle had the scowl of a

man down

bitter

made him look more

like

an

ancient samurai warrior than a usurping scoundrel. his

made

it

hard to concentrate on

performance when you keep

expecting him to stroke his goatee before unleashing a flurry of martial arts

Overall, however, the costumes

and makeup were

great. I especial-

forget

tribulations of our

and just enjoy

the

main characters the sights and

Now

man

for the

hits

such as

is

known

watch him up

to

him on

that stage.

As

of the cast was,

rest

it

never lost his look of superiori-

On

the

when he

other hand,

final curtain call for himself.

delivered Prospero’s final speech,

showing

In

this

as

its

audience on the edge of their seats until the end of the movie.

The movie is based on Firefly, one of Whedon’s earlier television series that only survived a few seasons before it was dropped. The story takes place 500 years in the future and focuses on Captain Malcolm Reynolds, played by Nathan

make

Fillion, and his crew, who a living by commiting petty

crime and transporting people throughout space. After they pick

Play hard to get with your interest,

latest

Cancer. There's no rush.

don't give

him or her every

second of your day. Look busy, seem busy, if even you aren't. Lucky day: 30

The stars have it in for you this week, Capricorn. But don't worry, things will get better. You have to take the good with the bad, and this week, it's going to be prettybad. Lucky day: 27

Leo July 23

Aquarius

August

-

January 20

22

cal score.

sound musi-

Whedon chose

Sit up straight, Leo. Show your happy and confident side, if only with your posture. Good things come to those who wait, and sure, you've been waiting a while. But slouching won't make you feel any better. Lucky day: 29

James Dean once said, "Dream you could live forever but live as if you could die today." Take his advice. Let loose a little and live. Smile, be joyful, enjoy your life while you're here. Lucky as though

day: 25

the origi-

nal

film

is

well done.

Km

Virgo August 23 September 22

V fim (/

,

\

Like all of Whedon’s titles such as Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Serenity embodies the

up their latest passengers, a doctor and his mentally unstable, telepath-

now

they realize that they’re being hunted by the Alliance,

an

out-of-control

sister,

ic

government

out to bring the rogue sections of the galaxy under control. that’s

The

flick is filled with lots

cial effects

of spe-

and computer graphics

alike, but, the use

of

all

the effects

are subtly used and bring life to the

movie.

The music

Thomas

score,

Newman,

movie scores such

conducted by

known as

for

American

-

February 18

self.

inspired Serenity

Whedon’s new blockbuster flick Serenity, hit movie theatres on

-

January 19

audience his appreciation, he didn’t need a cloak and robe: he was able to be him-

in the

length, the sci-fi thriller leaves

December 22

his

Beauty, added emotion and struc-

in.

food for thought. Lucky day: 25

his

his original television series, taking

19 minutes

match. Take that thought and run with it, see where if takes you. Focus on it as much as you can but don't forget to breathe, it's

Capricorn

And

ty.

was obviously using

to the big screen.

idea will spark in your head

was obvious

whenever any of them were opposite Hutt, he was the better actor.

Stephano (Brian Tree), the drunken butler, provide the comedic relief in the play, with Tree and Sutcliffe especially catering to the funny bone of the crowd.

has recreated

1

some time into preparing yourLucky day: 27

self.

November 22 December 21

like a

great as the

and revamped yet another one of

Sept. 30. Sitting at

the occasion. be for a date or a job interview, you'll arrive looking confident and classy if you put

fM

t

there.

actors from the television shows to reprise their roles in the motion picture. The overall acting

it

An

for

it

Sagittarius

._

On one hand, nobody could touch

court jester. These two, along with

Buffy the Vampire

Slayer and Angel,

Dress

fire off

presence on the stage that one can’t help but revere. It was bittersweet

in which Prospero says his goodbye to the audience and asks to “let your indulgence set me free,” Hutt

for

June 21

tJJr

Whether

-

21

84, has a

at

ly liked the sub-human grit of Caliban and the tattered clothing and washed away makeup of Trinculo (Steven Sutcliffe), the

TOM KALBFLEISCH

Whedon, who

of the hour,

William Hutt, who,

ture to the film with a

Joss

and

trials

sounds.

He

action.

w-e

-

talents

were truly able to shine through during the play’s lone musical scene. In a flood of colour and lights,

21

November

this

t

:

May

Scorpio October 23

your tongue like week, Scoipio. Be careful what you say and whom you say it to. Remember, your friends haven’t always been there for you. Lucky day: 27

Gemini

Jacob James the Tempest. to

The production designer’s

to a tee. but the

production designers went a little overboard in his makeup, which

TV show By

Words

daggers

(Internet photo)

William Huff

It

was giving 1 10 per cent. Kudos to Jacob James’ Ariel, not only was he able to keep up a

as

member or a roommate. One day you'll look back at it all

him.

The production was a marvellous culmination of efforts from the performers to the lighting; everyone

was very

-

Do some people watching this week, Libra. Put your mind at ease, you're as normal as everyone else. Smile at little babies and old people with enthusiasm and confidence. Lucky day: 24

Shakespeare.

had been

September 23 October 22

i

of your eggs

all

Libra

Ifglg

;

-

in one week, Aries. Optimism can carry you a great

star in a

by

written

island that he

2005

24,

April 19

Don’t put

basket

well respected master.

can never hurt to

play

March

if3P

his role wisely for this, his final

as

— Page 13

BORS

By MIKE

him

2005

24,

script

humorous

writing that only

Whedon

himself can come up with. Subtle jokes here, the odd looking fellow there,

the

humour

is

well deliv-

Stop looking for love

and

bars.

Make

It's

it

really

is.

Stop gazing into his or her eyes as a friend and

The cinematography of Serenity was well thought out and present-

day: 29

make

a

Now’s

clubs

the effort to see one of your

friendships for what

ered.

may not be in keeping with monster hits such as Star Wars, but they were also well planned and presented.

in

right in front of you.

move. Lucky

#

TAV

Pisces February 19

March 20

the time to hit the books.

Focus as much energy as possible.

Look

for loans or bursaries

you spend more time focusing on school and less time keeping food in the fridge and gas in the car. Lucky day: 27 to

help

ed, the special effects

The movie is an excellent film to some laughs and an excellent 19 minutes for some rest and see for 1

relaxation.

Brandon Walker

is

a second-year

journalism student holding fate in the

palm of

his

hand.


Page 14

— SPOKE, October 24, 2005

Sports

Head-to-head: Visor debate make hockey safer,

Visors

When Mats Sundin was sprawling to the

NHL’s opening

ice

but they won’t be enforced

sent

on the new

All facial injuries

was. once again, brought to the fore-

all

NHL players be forced

wear visors?” Since the mandatory helmet rule was passed for all players drafted in 1979 and after, such a topic in

become all but blind in one eye and miss more than a year of hockey.

ilar

he

ed into his face as he lurked around the Calgary net. The 40-year-old

ers has not

play-

their

been more debated.

As Toronto Maple Leafs

fans

cringed with fear as their fallen captain hit

covered his left eye after being by an errant shot from Ottawa

Bryan Smolinski,

Senators centre countless

NHL enthusiasts, especial-

ly in the

“Leals Nation,” demanded

something be done

to prevent a sim-

injury from happening again. While Sundin is the most recent, is

certainly not the first

Maple

Leaf to be on the receiving end of an eye injuiy. Most recently, during the 2003-'04 season, forwards Darcy Tucker and

Owen Nolan

required

surgery

to

repair detached retinas after being

weeks

centre now' wears a visor.

now former defenceman A1 Maclnnis was

Unlike “Stevie Y,”

NHL

not so lucky. After a detached retina

limited

defenceman

left

hard-shooting

the

only three games in

to

apart

the 2003-'04 season, and he had an

from one another. However, the Leafs most serious eye injury came when defenceman Bryan Berard, w'ho now plays for the Columbus Blue Jackets, was

extended vacation due to the cancellation of the 2004-’ 05 season, the 42-year-old future hall

mistakenly

to deal

struck in the eye, three

by Ottawa Senators forward Marian Hossa. Such an unfortunate event caused the former first-overall pick to struck

two,

of lamer

mandatory visors

one’s

Many more players

have also had

with eye injuries

such as former

in the past,

Atlanta Thrashers

and

St. Louis Blues forwards Dany Heatley (now with Ottawa) and

for the next

few

days.

On the Oct. 15 edition of Coach’s Corner on CBC’s Hockey Night In Canada, Don Cherry stated he believes within the next five years visors will

become mandatory.

NHLPA

the

is

If,

in

ing

it

up

“We’ve revamped our day-care

room and Association held

charity

a

ball

rebuilt

our basketball

court with help of the city,” said Muller. “We also give to Christmas

tournament hockey at the Conestoga rec centre on Oct. 15. “The association provides sport and educational programs to the

Miracle, a charity that helps the

community,” said the association’s volleyball co-ordinator and ball

ment

hockey

“But

“Some

organizer,

of the

Pat

money

usually goes

back into the programs prices as reasonable as

The

association

building strong

is

Muller.

we

keep

to

can.”

dedicated to

community by

pro-

viding and assisting in recreational

programs for the Doon Pioneer community. An executive of volunteers decides what to do with any proceeds from any programs or sporting events.

lady

first

MURPHY

This

is

the

first

time the tourna-

didn’t sell out said Muller.

“Bali hockey it’s

is

huge,” he said.

early in the season and

didn’t advertise early

one of the teams

of

ball

hockey

on Oct. 5. Rachel French, 25, took on the males in the Doon Pioneer Park 1

Community

Association ball hockey tournament. “It’s the first time a woman has played in the tournament,” said Pal Muller, the association’s vol-

co-ordinator

and

ball

hockey organizer. “I don’t know what the reaction will be.”

The association provides and educational programs

sport

to build

we

enough so we

of discussion

Sundin

suffered

diction,

still

I

believe the rule will

not change. Although helmets were forced upon new players in

NHL

1979, they obviously did not affect a player’s vision. I simply do not see a

mass amount of

As of

NHL

dawn

ing others to

players forc-

a visor.

Angeles Kings, has already unanimously rejected the implementation of the rule.

would be

it

safer if everyone

wore one, but these players are some of the greatest athletes in the world and

I

highly doubt

we

will

be seeing

every player wearing a visor within tire next five years.

facility is really

“It’s for

said

injury will keep him out of the lineup for two to six weeks and he is lucky he will not need surgery. In January 2004, the Leafs

had

players say they don’t wear

because they inhibit

vision, but

NHL Players Association

including

NHL, but there are also eye injuries because of taking a puck in the face. I think after seeing so many serious injuries, captains on NHL

their

makes more

lets

ers decide for themselves,

third

Many players and coaches have complained eye injuries are rampant because of high sticking in the

it

make sure your vision is always safe by wearing a visor. The

two forwards, Darcy Tucker and

suffered by former Leaf Bryan Berard that almost cost him his eye and his NHL career. He is legally blind in one eye.

believe

sense to

Owen

Nolan, both suffer serious eye injuries because of high sticks. There’s also the disastrous eye

I

of

the

league’s

some of

play-

and a

players,

goal

best

its

wear them. Sixteen of the top 30 goal scorers in the NHL wear visors according scorers, already

to the

National Post’s

Cam

Cole.

Cole said on www.smartrisk.ca that visors should be made mandatory, just as helmets were 25 years ago. Helmets have saved many players from concussions and other head injuries. Visors will do the same. Visors need to be made mandatory', and the sooner the better.

hockey fans

nice and

a good cause.”

Crunch

goalie, Darrell Deserpa,

good place

was a

First-year pre-service firefighting

leyball tournaments at the rec cen-

to

For information on future vol-

stronger

Bouwmeester was

first

Doon Pioneer Park

go

tre

www.conestogac.on.ca.

to

female player "But I’ve been playing for three years with

Muller said these types of tournaments are usually co-ed but this particular one has always been just

and male friends, and there have never been any problems.” French was just looking forward

men

since the association has

organized the event. “It was a lough decision to make but it’s about breaking barriers,” he said. "Her teammates are all very confident that she can handle herself.” Rachel French, who has never played women’s hockey, hasn’t

any resistance when playing amongst men. “It’s the first time I have played received

this

5.

Some visors

Bouwmeester.

community.

in

when

one.

great.”

for

visor.

lots of people last year so it should be good.” The Crunch is a summer ball hockey team that usually plays in a men’s league in Waterloo but enters tournaments such as this

is

facility

injury

face Oct.

ball

make safe by

“We’re back to repeat,” said Bouwmeester, a forward for last year’s tournament winners. Kitchener Crunch. “There were

hold a tournament. “It should be good, we had a great time last year.”

“They allow

wearing a

to is

looking forward to the tournament.

“The

and the

in the

that

injury

Oct. 17. one team, the Los

also thought the rec centre

sticks

eye

The

he took a puck

makes sense

sure your vision

Mats

captain

an

Leafs players have injury such as

injuries.

met rule. However, even with Cherry’s pre-

at the rec centre.

wooden

NHL

against the Ottawa Senators

kept clean,”

portive,” said Muller.

the

have been affected by eye recently

Muller said there will be other ball hockey tournaments and some volleyball tournaments to be held “Conestoga has been very sup-

in

are just

be whether or not it will be grandfathered in, similar to the hel-

only have six teams.”

a

brought her talents to the rec cen-

leyball

during Christmas

hockey welcomes

By ERIC

tre

fortunate

student Tyler

Ball The

less

holidays.”

It

to the players.

The Toronto Maple Leafs

an

Sundin’s up close, the whole team should learn from it and not want to end up like him.

visors mandatory, instead of leav-

Most

will

in

in

fife, so why isn’t the National Hockey League (NHL) making

supportive of

visors, a serious topic

Sure,

that the

witnessed

Eyes are not only essential hockey, but they’re essential

retired.

MURPHY

Doon Pioneer Park Community

Now

Opinion

Players can voice their opinion in an online vote for their preference of

fact,

teams.

Sundin said he would probably wear a visor after suffering his serious injury.

Yaneff

Berard and

Conestoga rec centre praised by By ERIC

NHL

Jon

serious,

career.

Although the Leafs have had share of high-profile eye injuries, other teams have had problems, as well. Most notable are longtime Detroit Red Wings captain Steve Yzerman and former Conn Smythe and Norris Trophy winner A1 Maclnnis. Yzerman had both his left iris torn and cheekbone broken during Game 5 of the 2004 Western Conference semifinals when a puck was deflect-

NHL

only

may be

Maclnnis, being forced to miss seasons, one has yet to untimely end a

to

regards to the safety of

with

but

front.

"Should

teams should step up and try and convince players to wear them, which would then spread to other

ple.

NHL

the ice

Visors are essential for safety

Pavol Demitra (now with the Los Angeles Kings) just to name a cou-

night (Oct. 5), a re-

occurring question of the old

hits

tournament.” said French.

my

three older brothers

to playing.

“I’m

no

more nervous than good

usual,” said French. “It feels

to be out there, the surface is good, it should be good.” Older brother. Matt French,

thinks the

it's

great to have his sister on

team.

“She's played hockey through childhood,” said

with us

all

the 27-year-old. “I'm not nervous at

all.

own.”

she can definitely hold her

(Photo by Eric Murphy) First-year pre-service firefighting student Tyler Bouwmeester

was hoping to repeat as champions nament at the rec centre.

at the ball

hockey

tour-


Sports

Champs By TIM

SPOKE, October

take chilling victory

By JON YANEFF Cheering, singing and other celeis all that could be heard or seen on the bus ride back to brating

Kitchener after Conestoga’s men’s rugby team clinched a playoff spot for

and marshmallows. But there was a baseball game going on. In fact, that game was Conestoga’s intramural slo-pitch championship featuring Station One and the Slo-Pitch Champs. The game, despite the cold, was a classic, as the team named the “Slo-Pitch Champs,” became the slo-pitch

Dan

champs with

(Photos by Tim Gedcke) celebrate their 7-6 victory against their intramural competitors, Station One, on Oct. 17. Below, they wait anxiously for the end of the game, and pose for a photo.

Lee, a mechanical engineer-

ing student, knocked in the

game-

winning run with two outs in the bottom of the seventh inning, to give his team the victory.

was

"It

maybe,” he

said.

to hit

“I

pulled

switch up the tactics.”

Team

captain Eric Bender, a third-

year business administration

man-

agement student, said he was really happy with how his team performed. “We had our worst inning all year,

but

away

all

battled

back, chipped

game and

had a guy

was Aaron Erwin, a second-year computer numerical con-

heard the secwas going

down the first baseline, so I it down the third baseline to

in the

trols

machining student.

Erwin,

played with the SloPitch Champs, said he does not get cold when playing sports. “When I played baseball in the

summer, I rolled my pants up so they were shorts because it just got too hot,” he said. “The adrenaline from being around great guys keeps

me warm

in

my

firing

“It

was

a

solid

game because

everyone played with ambition and really wanted to win,” said Miller.

upside this year has been that the weather has been consistently

won

better than previous years.

Gomes

each individual as a whole. “We have to take each experience and grow from what worked and

out of a rut

that to the

next game,” she said. “The stats

may

look negative, but you take the positives and learn from them.” Miller said the team’s main weakness throughout the season has been the lack of depth on the

“A few of the

rookies quit and did-

from 21 players

why, so

come

medium between them and

the

Ontario

College

we went

to 15, so that leaves

us with only four substitutes. That’s a

huge concern, especially when you

have

six veterans

rookies, so

said.

and the

we had

“We

rest are

to find a

happy

that took

longer this season.” in

Athletic

The coach

scheduling is always an issue because you have said

and stop

line-outs

many

The

penalties.

Condors had more than 20 penalties in the game. "We have to recognize what kind of game the referee is calling and react to

it.”

“We had

to win this

to clinch

a playoff spot, so

we came

firing

game

on

all

cylinders.”

Nick Millbury,

Condors co-captain

way

Petan, Millbury and rookie winger Jon Young each lead the team with three tries and 15 points each. Veteran inside-centre Joel

Hussey converted on three of his seven opportunities in the game. During the Condors’ 21-12 victory over the Mohawk Mountaineers Oct.

co-captain Hussey

1,

made

three penalty kicks,

which set two OCAA records for most penalty kicks in a game and most penalty kicks in a season with six. He has also made six converts after tries and has 30 points.

The

victory

record

to

puts

3-2

for

the team’s 14 divisional

points (two bonus points) on the

season, one game over the .500 mark. The team has scored 110 points and has allowed 58 points during the season. They have a chance to be ranked second going into the

the

OCAA

finals if they beat

Humber Hawks

Hespeler

High

Cambridge Oct.

“We

can’t

let

at

School

Jacob in

22.

up.” said Millbury.

“Hopefully with the victory today we proved to the league and ourselves that our team is a force to be reckoned with.”

An

back-to-back championships in 1991 and 1992. Miller said every game improves

only play with 11,” she

was too late,” she said. The Condors are in last place

“Now we

feels beating the Grizzlies the

women’s soccer championship the two seasons. Conestoga last won the championship when they

one point on the season. Goalkeeper Nicole Istifan said towards the end of the season the team started to improve. “The team chemistry started to it

total

she said.

OCA A

the

past

n’t give a reason

standings

was a

The team lost 13-5 to Fleming and 27-8 to Seneca, so the team

everybody’s heads were held high,” The Condors’ record stands at 0-

tire

and assisting

“It’s hard when the team doesn’t have the support from teachers,”

won

has

bench.

together, but in

cylinders,” said co-

overall.

“They performed at the level of play that’s expected of them, so

6-1, for

all

games.

what didn’t and apply

ing the team’s draw.

on

game to we came

Durham College

Durham

on the season.

this

Fanshawe College leads the division with a 6-1 record and 18 points. sion with a 7-0 record and 21 points.

Third-year coach Rebecca Miller said everything came together dur-

win

put together a team within a week and players start to miss classes to make practices and

women’s soccer team had

five goals

to

are set up to contend, so the Fleming Knights and the Seneca Sting each have something coming to them during the championship.” Seneca and Fleming are ranked one and two as of Oct. 16. Seneca won last year’s OCAA championship and have won 39 straight games

leads the East divi-

their

so

selfish play,” said Petan.

highs and lows during long, eventful seasons, but Conestoga’s

improve taking

Harris.

team effort today because there was plenty of support and assists, which means no

to

picking

great discipline, but they have to

fullback

Petan said he is happy with his three tries, but enjoys the team win more.

while

and

Moskalyk.

and rookie winger

sive running the ball

Association West division,

Forward Kelly Lewis nearly doubled Conestoga’s scoring output by scoring two goals, giving the team

Millbury,

rucking

Millbury said the team showed

Alex Brubacher, eight-

for tries.

“It

said

did a great job with ball

veter-

for the game.” The Condors beat Guelph University in an exhibition game, 19-12, which really prepared the team after a two-week gap between games. The men of the match were Petan and John Field. Field was impres-

Women’s soccer team comes together

The Condors played their best game during a 2-2 draw against Redeemer College at the Doon campus on a cold fall day Oct. 1 1

at

captain Millbury. “The coaches did a great job all week preparing us

heart.”

single digits on the Celcius scale, and some spectators bundled up in their tuques and parkas to help avoid the chill, there were players on the field wearing typical July weather attire: shorts and a T-shirt.

son high towards the end of their short, eight-game season.

game 26-0

game came from

Ball

“We had

Despite temperatures dipping into

their sea-

in

clinch a playoff spot, so

us a great game for seven strong innings and in the end we were lucky that we came out on top.”

the

led the

Nick

Andrew Andrew

mostly of first-year firefighting stu dents, played well too. “They gave

experience

The team

man

for us.” he said.

teams

Complex

the half and didn’t look back; scoring three more tries during the sec-

ans, flanker

Bender also said the opponents, Station One, a team comprised

Sports

Sports

Barrie Oct. 15.

tries in the

who

end we

By JON YANEFF

Community

ing three tries (two in the second half) for a total of 15 points. Other

that usually plays soccer

come through

being hosted by

half. Veteran outside-centre Richard Petan led the team by scor-

students without extra

clothing

call that I

it

holes in the defensive-back line,”

is

ond

One of the

a single: bit of a fluke,

ond baseman

Champs

"We

onship, which

pummelling the Georgian Grizzlies in their 41-0 shutout victory during a rainy day at the Barrie Slo-Pitch

team’s play. retention,

Park in Hamilton Oct. 29 and 30. The Condors clinched the spot by

The

for

championship. Last season Conestoga finished fourth at the championship. Assistant coach Geoff Moskalyk said he was impressed with the

Ontario College Athletic Association (OCAA) champithe

Mohawk College at Mohawk Sports

a 7-6 win.

them

OCAA

the

with a cup of steaming hot cocoa

— Page 15

they did really prepares

It

only comfortable place to be is snuggled up around the television

2005

Men’s rugby team nabs a playoff spot

GEDCKE

was not the kind of weather for a baseball game. It wasn’t even the right weather for a football game. It was the kind of weather where the

24,

Miller

said captain Christine has been the team's leader on the field, but the team can’t rely solely on

one player

when

to get the

team

things are going

bad. “It’s

hard enough for a team to

stay focused but for a player such as

Gomes

to

be relied to bring the

team back up is even harder.” She said she expected more out of the team because the level of skill as a whole was better than other seasons in which she has coached. “It

was

because

getting

frustrating

could see the team falling apart. We have to work on the consistency

I

now

that

we know what

we’re capable of as a team.” The team’s last game of the season was against Fanshawe at the

Doon campus Oct. women’s soccer team

19.

The

also has an

indoor schedule to look forward to during the winter semester.

(Photo by Jon Yaneff)

Conestoga’s men’s rugby team battled the Georgian Grizzlies, winning 41-0 in Barrie on Oct. 15, and are headed to the playoffs.


Digital Edition - October 24, 2005  
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