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Determined to find a cure

Walk Safe with a

trained escort Program keeps students, staff and faculty safe on campus at night.

Student battles aches, pains and

News

complete the walk to end

blisters to

2

College boasts new technology With 400 new computers in the labs,

breast cancer.

A

Monday, September 26, 2005

learning

newsroom

for

journalism students

Conestoga College, Kitchener, Ont.

old

computers are recycled.

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

37th Year

— No. 17

Construction begins

on student centre By JANET MORRIS

ing the

whole job out

to a general

them

contractor and putting

Construction plans are scheduled

October on the new student centre. It will be built in the B-wing hallway between Door 3 and Door 4. The concrete and steel, footings and foundation will be the first pieces of work completed. to

begin

Site

in early

work

will

start

with con-

back of the school and move towards the front. struction at the

Justin

Falconer,

in

charge of getting the sub-trades,

CSI

do

will

and roof

will

allow bigger control over

there

lems.

"It will

they won’t,” she said. “So,

if

there

some pounding through of a

is

wall to be done trade to

come

we can

in

ask the sub-

on a Friday night

minimize the disruption to students and still get the job done on to

time.”

built first

we have any

“If

before winter to reduce the costs of building the exterior in

snowy con-

ditions.

we can work because then we

hits,

on the inside, won’t have to pay for the heating costs of doing things like bricking outside,” he said. Judy Dusick, CSI general manager and student centre project manager, said they hope the majority of

sort of

centre.

deadline

(of

The

the centre

The

.

The

most

CSI president

accept the best offer submitted.

Dusick said instead of contract-

services that

centre

is set to

open

in the

of 2006, however. Falconer is weather

said a lot of the project “If

located

to

and success. students need

it

a late winter then

it

raises the cost of

heating and stuff on the outside

we

can’t get the building

Falconer said he knows it will be easier for everyone involved if the centre is open before school starts, in

September 2006. “In

sort

all

honesty,

if

we

have any

of delays or bad weather

it

to

be a priority when it determining who gets

space in the new centre. Services that could move include financial aid, peer services, health services, career services, CSI offices

we have

because

will

comes

enclosed,” he said.

completing the project using a bid process. As each piece of work needs to be completed they will take in several offers and is

life

;

winter then

CSI

centrally

enhance student

Justin Falconer

is

the hall

centre will see services for

students

opening.)”

much.”

2006.

the project has been reduced to two floors. This does not mean that the services provided will be reduced.

located where disability services

sucks for getting started again in If we have an early the spring.

May

Instead of the centre being three storeys,

from the new student

driven.

scheduled for

to build

Co-op and career services, which had been scheduled to be housed on the third floor, will now be

“There are people who currently have offices in there and we hope not to disrupt those folks too

is

more

lot

could push back the

months of 2006.

wing corridor

"Things cost a

than one might think,” she said.

down

fall

on the B-

were some floor space prob-

currently located just

the disruption to students will happen in late April or the summer

Interior construction

will not be

delays or bad weather it

“After winter

Dusick said the centre

when people can work and when

Conestoga be

said.

as large as originally planned as

that themselves.

Students Inc. (CSI) president, said the walls

could push back the deadline,” he

New

and the self-serve

area.

services will include a stu-

dent lounge,

retail

area,

a bistro

and nightclub as well as an entertainment centre for movies and performers.

To fund

the

new

building stu-

dents are paying an extra $60 per year for the next 1 0 years on top of

$90 student association $40 CSI capital develop-

the existing fee and

ment fee. The new

(Photo by Jon Yaneff)

Heading toward success A member

Conestoga’s men’s soccer team heads the ball during a practice Sept. 12. See Page 15 for story and photos.

CSI walks the walk for Terry Fox By

fee

came

into effect

student tuition bills this

of

BRANDON WALKER

on

fall.

Maybe was

it

was the rain. Maybe it knowledge about

the lack of

the event or the late concert the

night before.

28, 1981. at the age of 22.

More

son,

than

$360 million has been

raised

for

cancer

Whatever the reano students, besides Terry Fox organizers, showed up for Conestoga College’s first ever walk. Sept

1

6.

Dolly Phan, one of Conestoga Students Inc.’s (CSI) directors,

and Hillary Greb, a self-serve supervisor for CSI, walked the perimeter of Conestoga and around campus collecting donaFox Terry the for tions Foundation from students and Barb Kraler, the co-ordinator of student services, also walked most of the perimeter. staff.

Conestoga

$580

raised

in

donations from the walk and from the dunk tank at the Pond Party, Sept. 8. A dollar from every pasta lunch bought at Chartwells the day of the walk and donations made at the self-

since

his

Conestoga was one of four in schools post-secondary Ontario holding the event this year. The other schools, listed on foundation’s website at the www.terryfoxrun.org. were the Toronto, of University McMaster and York.

Greb

said she

students didn't

was disappointed show up for the

would’ve been better if gotten (awareness about the walk) out there a little more. It was our first shot at it.” Phan said she felt there were a number of reasons as to why no walk.

we

“It

eould've

“The and

class

conflicts (prevented people

from

students

showed

up.

the lack of awareness

rain,

anniversary of Fox’s Marathon of

Hope

ished at about

went

Groundskeepers Barry Gurski (left) and Cory Mather, from physical resources, clear the bricks from the patio behind the B-wing in preparation for the construction of the new student centre. The bricks will be reused in other projects around the Doon campus.

CSI

research

death.

doing it) especially since it’s in the middle of the afternoon.” The walk started at 11:30 a.m. at the recreation centre and fin-

serve area (Photo by Janet Morris)

he lost his right leg to cancer. He planned on running a marathon a day until he had crossed Canada but had to stop after the cancer spread to his lungs. Fox died June

in the

office also

to the foundation.

This

tres in

year

marks

the

25th

wjien he ran 5,373 kilome-

143 days on one leg, after

1

p.m.

Continued on Page 2


Page 2

News

— SPOKE, September 26, 2005

Now deep thoughts

Are you ready By STEPH BA ULK

Conestoga College

...with

questions answered by

What was

random students

the worst

movie

you saw over the summer?

you

if

it

was

Daffy Duck.”

Arthur Krawzyk, second-

year management studies

are a student, faculty

ber or staff

i

to 10:45 p.m., so

member

mem-

Conestoga

at

lot.

you must be a full-timcj student and have valid first-aid and CPR train-

The Walk Sate program provides all members of the college with

each night. “On average

Walk Safe

Carey, supervisor of the

program.

The trained

who

are

specially

do regular patrols of the campus and immedistudents,

also

they’ll

many people from

are

seem

Walk Safe more Currently, services

to use

often,” she said.

safety

and security

work

for the

t

i

,111c

position,

ing.

The position pays $7.45 an hour, plus vacation pay, and the hours are

Monday

to

Thursday, 6:45 to 10:45

p.m.

John Tribe, security representahe thinks the Walk Safe

tive, said

program

is

beneficial to a

number

of students.

looking for students,

is

six girls if at all possible,”

In order to apply for

residence there

are here, because they

“The program has always been viable program and

Walk Safe program. Carey said a jot more males apply for the position than females.

to the parking lot at night,”

female paired up.

a

it

he

said.

male and

"That’s the prime objective of the

we

program.”

at least

try to.

hated Team America. walked out of the theatre “I

I

because the comedy was just stupid.

It

didn’t

make

sense.”

Avery

Morris, first-year

public relations

Heart Huckabees just

“I

didn’t

make any

sense.”

Ryan

Park,

engi-

civil

neering

(Photo by Adam Black)

Caffeine craze

“Deuce Bigelo 2 wasn’t funny at

all.

I

Students wait patiently

didn’t laugh

once and wanted

in line at

chocolate dipped doughnut,

Rez

thing.”

Dianne Garcia,

By AM AN DA KAHGEE

role playing

idence advisers (R.A.s)

“Madagascar was just saw because a bunch of girls were going and was trying to work it.” childish.

it

I

I

Nick Trojanowski, thirdyear management studies

ing

It

way

it

through a careful selection process to become this year’s R.A. team. "There aren’t any real require-

can

session,

attend

who

an

are inter-

information

which informs them about

the duties required of an R.A.

to story.”

From first-year

there the applicants have an

member

interview with a

public relations

of the

college, usually the student life co-

ordinator

“Taxi

was

not funny

the idea of a police

and

and

a

from

person

Campus Living Centres, which is the company that owns the' chain of residence and conference centres.

offi-

who doesn’t know how to drive and needs a

The interview process

consists of

residence activities and can a team environment.

is

ridiculous

him around

Continued from Page Janie Renwick, the CSI office manager, said they spent a couple of days planning the event. She said she felt the weather u'as the reason for the lack of turnout. “That’s exactly what the reason was and (because of) the Thornley

Mike Free, second-year studies

Smile Conestoga, you could be our next respondent!

in

kickoff this year

at residence,

sun-

dae Sundays for those with a sweet tooth, cooking lessons for the cooking impaired and a slumber party.

There are more advantages to being an R.A. than just being part of fun events. Being an R.A. is a good experience to add to a resume and a great

centre this year, to complete their

reporting residents or guests

training for the job.

break the rules. "They’re not actually giving out fines," said Kobylnik. "The fines

week of

way to meet new people. However, being an R.A. also means responsibilities, including

who

like to

“To be honest, when the week over, a lot of people said it was their life,” said

Kobylnik.

actually

come from

the office staff.”

The residence has no

Residence advisers are required to do rounds of the building at night, run residence events, be available for the students on their

tolerance

for those breaking rules. "It’s

just

down on

basically

things

at

clamping

the beginning of

designated floor and counsel residents through roommate conflicts.

the year and just not putting up with stuff from guests,” Ire says. Rule breakers should be aware

This year the focus for the R.A. team is to make residence life fun

very well affect them

with a variety of programs and activities.

A

goal for the team

is

to

gel attendance up at events.

Some

events

planned

month included an

for Terry 1

management

Turnout

work

to

Those who are chosen attend a week long R.A. conference, which was held at the Durham conference

cer

taxi to drive

an R.A.

selects applicants

are enthusiastic about living in

the best

ested

flipped from story

who

looking

for.”

in their duties as

may

residence, are interested in running

was

positions and those

to follow the

Ashley Smith,

where the applicants

The residence

ments where you have to have this that to be an R.A.,” said Conestoga residence general manager John Kobylnik. “It’s more personality and motivation that we’re or

Near the end of the year the residence puts up postings for R.A.

It

was so confus-

and hard

this year.

Andrew, Stephanie, Mike, Devon and Diane all went Caitlin,

encounter

team

R.A.

are given scenarios that they „ Conestoga College Residence and Conference Centre has six new res-

sucked!

morning coffee. Top sellers include the everything bagels and double-double coffee.

for their

new

hires

nursing

City.

Tim Hortons

sesame seed and

to

leave halfway through the

a

provides a sense of security to people who may not feel secure about walking

“We always have

members of the program

do one or two on how

escorts a night, depending

ate surrounding areas.

Staff

home

a couple of people

especially females, to

escorts,

balance of six

a

she sajd.

escort

walk with you to your vehicle, the Conestoga College Residence and Conference Centre and even houses across from the college, said Shannon

have

like to

continuing education students find their classes or the proper parking

yourself.

will

I

guys and

Carey said more people use Walk Safe for information, but they do

who

so

assist

also

to

and have been stuck at school late at night, you may not have wanted to walk to your car in the dark by

escorts,

“The Villain in the Village would have been scarier

on duly from 6:45

they are available If

Random

to Walk; Safe?

for

this

island party bash

that

what they do

in

residence

may

at the college.

Depending on

the severity of ait can be academic penalties from the dean of the program the students is in. and perhaps even expulsion.

incident

there

Fox Run less than expected

concert the night before, there wasn't a lot of students in here on Friday."

Renwick said she hopes the Terry Fox walk will be a yearly event at Conestoga.

CSI held faculty

The draw gave students the chance to win either a gift pack, donated by Chartwells. or Leafs tickets.

Adriana Gardeazabal, a student, the Leafs tickets and Keith Calow, a business-law professor,

won

a

who

draw for students and had the pasta lunch.

won

the gift pack.


News

K-W

SPOKE, September

2005

26,

Alumni Association just keeps on giving

prepares

By

for 1 0-digit dialing

TODD RELLINGER

Is there

tion, police

anything the Conestoga

College Alumni won't do?

By JON YANEFF

Association

foundations and pre-

service

firefighter

medics

programs.

whose

nequin,

code are making their into southwestern Ontario residents’

and college events, having annual golf tournament to

their

right avenues, but

raise

(another)

telephones.

funds or helping first-year stu-

As of June 17, 2006 businesses and consumers will have to dial the 519 area code followed by the

dents with their tuition, the alum-

area

busy.

“We

phone number for all Oct. 4. 2006 a new area code of 226 will be introduced, which will coexist with area code 5 9 and cover the same seven-digit

As of

local calls.

volunteers,”

The Canadian Radio-television Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) first approved these two steps as part of

members giving

and

a relief plan to deal with the

of

phone numbers

in the

tele-

region and

reduce the waste of numbers. The

was developed

relief plan

after a

process of consultation with both

and consumers. “Every area is unique and the relief planning committee takes the best approach for the area where the area code is exhausting,” said Ventura. “The plan calls for 10digit dialing to be phased in over a four-month period before the new area code is introduced.” the industry

(Photo by Jon Yaneff)

Adam

a second-year police foundations student, prepares

Stiles,

the inevitable switch to 10-digit dialing.

for

The relief plan will affect a large number of communities and more than a dozen cities in southwestern

Ontario,

including

Waterloo, Windsor.

Guelph, London and

Kitchener-

Stacey Masson, project manager

of corporate communications

at

Telus Mobility, said existing phone

numbers

and

codes

area

will

remain the same.

“When new

area codes are intro-

October, they will be subscribed to new telephone, wireless

duced

in

and other subscribers,” said Masson.

Ten-digit dialing

duced

was

first intro-

HANCOCK

and

If

e=mc2 and

the square root of

nothing can never be something, then why do certain people constantly attempt to defy

and break

all

Scientists

all

odds

people

who

have made it possible to. flick a switch on a wall to illuminate a gloomy room. Scientists are the ones who can explain

why people on

and evening

events are intended to celebrate 100th year since Albert the

- mira1905 when he

Einstein’s annus mirabilis cle year.

was

It

in

published several papers that led

the rules? are the

the daily

the other

side of the world would not

seem

physics into a

new

Paul Moser, director of

commu-

nications, said he guesses about

30,000 people

will

attend

the

The

love for the violin will be displayed

St.

N.

in

The Perimeter

Institute,

which

is

a facility dedicated to the research

tist,"

lot

Moser

found, along with location inforat

Or

www.perimeterinsti519-883-4480.

call

GED CKE

about (him) .and

immersed

it

this year.

up at the Doon campus over the summer. “The 400 computers which were brought in caused a domino effect of other computers moving within the college with as

many

as 1,300

computers being moved,” said Gilmour, who. along with 13 student employees and two other fulltime staff, made the changes throughout the college.

Every summer, when Conestoga equipment, the new

computers in there and took the 2.8 GHz computers from that lab and put them into 2A304 because that's

enough power in clas-

Gilmour should go.

made

(Internet photo)

“Think about the Bl'ackberry and about time. The global

positioning

theory

is

directly

in

many

addition

to

new computers

other things have

be decided too. “There’s networking gear," he said. “(We) have to keep that up to

an exciting time,” he said.

theories

said

to

beginning

of the second week.

“It’s

Einstein in this

association

also helping

is

Welcome Home

called the

"It’s

year.”

To be eligible for the award you must be enrolled in a diploma or certificate program and one parent must be an alumnus of Conestoga.

shows

his playful side

photo, taken

in

1933.

areas

that

they look after,” said

“There are academic committees that will go through and (prioritize).”

Falkiner.

Falkiner also deals with the budg-

new computers. always come up with more things that we want to do or need to do than we have money for, so then we have to go through and prioritize what is going to get cut,” he said. et that

funds the

“We

“Some of the

things will get cut, but

eventually they have to go back in."

Falkiner said a lot of what his department does is based on what the students need and they try to increase, or improve upon, services that they have.

“We always need more money, there’s always

more

to do,” he said.

With 400 new computers, some computers are not needed in computer labs anymore. "The ones that the students can't use anymore go to faculty, support staff and administration," said Gilmour.

The

college pays

money

to

have

old computers recycled so they are not

harmful

Gilmour

deciding where the

performers and a family concert, called Einstein Rocks, that will

said the scientist

to run that particular

lab.”

music, there will also be jazz

Moser

its

“2A201 is a high-end lab,” he “So we put new P4-3.0 GHz

have been

at the

The

children of past graduates as well.

made by a wider group. “Everybody has their own little

said.

in his life.”

For those not interested sical

the varsity scholarship fund.

sions are

said Gilmour.

said. “I’ve learned a

theories to this day.

enjoy a variety of displays, interactive activities, artwork, music

events can be

live

will be host to the three- week fes-

lic,

all

performances as well. “He really wasn’t just a scien-

through

such an impact on the world that people are still arguing about his

where members of the pubyoung or old, will be able to

of

listing

be given and Einstein's

and development of extending theories of space, time and matter, tival

or by phone to ensure entrance.

Einstein lived.

rock the Institute

Waterloo.

to reserve tickets online

Lectures about religion and poliwill

its sights set on the first Conestoga Alumni Athletic Golf tournament on Sept. 25 at Beaverdale Golf Club. All proceeds from this event will go to

has

new computers

He said the Perimeter Institute is going to “re-create the times”

tics

said

College receives 400

computers brought in go to the high-end labs which need more power to run. The computers from those labs go into lower-end labs,

and South Pole being considered the top and bottom of the planet, it is still suspended in a vast space. And who can say where the universe ends and where it begins? Beginning on Sept. 30 and running to Oct. 23. people from all over will gather at the 100th annuEinsteinFest the Perimeter al Caroline

was

association

approached earlier this year to donate a S3.000 mannequin to the law and security administra-

upgrades

when

Institute, located at 31

that the col-

lege has today.

EinsteinFest over the three weeks.

be standing upside down if we peered through the Earth’s core because despite the North Pole to

However, organizers encourage everyone

tute.ca.

of kindness

John Gilmour, lead hand of the hardware area, said approximately 400 new computers were hooked

musical performances.

mation,

Randy,”

Himmelman. The Alumni Association now

first

gifts

Almost every computer lab at Conestoga College has something

based on Einstein’s theories." The festival is free, except for some concerts, lectures and other

A

era.

the

all

finally got

Alumni Association

served by the 416 and 905 area codes including the Greater Toronto Area and Hamilton. Other regions that will be affected throughout Ontario and Canada include 450 in area code Montreal’s surrounding regions, 514 in the island of Montreal, 613 in eastern Ontario and 819 in northern, central and western Quebec. There will also be a new area code of 438 connected in Quebec’s 514 region.

relative

lectures.

Each of

we

to the school, has turned into the

different about

By MELISSA

had to go through

Ontario in 2000 to regions

in

Einstein theories still

“We

Award,” said Himmelman. "The award is only for students in their

By TIM

are

Monica

said

the alumni relations

and annual fund officer. What used to be an informal fundraising group of faculty

area.

will increase the quantity

12

Himmelman,

1

CRTC media relations officer Cindy Ventura said the relief plan

from the colboard members are

are separate

lege, all

1

dwindling supply of telephone numbers in the 519 area code region.

and volunteers are always

ni staff

para-

Randy, was long overdue for replacement.

new way

and

The mannickname is

Whether it means donating money to scholarships, bursaries

Ten-digit dialing and a

— Page 3

said.

to

the

"We

environment,

ship them off to

professional recycling people.”

New for

monitors were also bought areas of the school. Much

many

of the

lower C-wing computers

have new

LCD

screens this year.

standard. All the servers have to be

“There are two classes of monitors, the LCD and the CRT (cath-

kept up to standard and there is lab layouts and furniture that has to be

“When ode-ray tube)," he said. (the CRT monitors) burn out, they

kept up to standard.”

are

Ernie Falkiner, director of infor-

mation technology services, said his

group

ment

facilitates putting the

equip-

in the labs, but the real deci-

no longer any good. We end up sending them to recycling and they recycle the chasse and then they deal with the tube part so it’s environmentally safe.”


Commentary

— SPOKE, September 26, 2005

Page 4

Sharia interferes with

Canadian values Premier Dalton McGuinty took a step

in the right direction

when he

recently outlawed Sharia, a set of principles the teachings of the

favour of

in

all

Qur’an and the

Canadians

Muslims follow based on Sunnah. McGuinty’s decision was

alike, forbidding religious tribunals to take

precedence over traditional Canadian law in Faith-based arbitration was

first

allowed

court matters.

civil

in

Ontario in 1991 to help

various faiths settle family issues outside the courts. However, the val-

ues ol those faiths were

be the case

will not

this

2004 the Islamic

In

sync with the Canadian Charter of something opponents of Shariah argue

in

still

Rights and Freedoms, which

is

time around.

Institute

of Civil Justice wanted to create

faith-

based panels under the Arbitration Act, which is when Shariah was met with dispute head-on from Canadians. Opponents argue that Shariah law does not view women as being equal to men, which has been the cause of most concern. Various groups such as The Canadian Council of

Women

The National Association of

women

under Shariah,

much

men.

as

If

Muslim Women and

have pointed out that

get the short end of the stick in family issues.

difficult to file for,

and men

their children,

Law

women can only inherit half as they choose to remarry they could lose custody of

though

In divorce,

and the

are entitled to

more inheritance than

their sis-

ters or wives.

married

Sharia also permits polygamy, and allows for girls to get a younger age than Ontarian secular law.

at

Muslim women may

easily feel religious, cultural

and social pres-

sure to take part in this binding agreement because

it

brainwash them into believing the double standard

OK. So

case,

how

will these

women

is

Breakfast, lunch and dinner of champions

continues to

learn to be self-sustainable

if

The Canadian-Islamic Congress, based in Toronto, has said Shariah provides a cheaper and faster solution to family court matters. However,

today’s world

opponents say

pro-Bush

There

provides a loophole for sexism and discrimination.

no formal process

is

also difficult to challenge findings that are based

it is

because there

women

that

no formal system

to

do

so. Therefore,

on

who

religion is

to say

are protected? still

be answering to Canada.

own judgments on

their findings to

correct

in

son.

as hard as getting a

is

going

rally

the Air

at

Firemen,

policemen,

and garbagemen are

all

by

the past, replaced

mailmen

civil matters, but

would

they

an Ontario judge for approval.

still

need

to

send

Mankind instead

so

Nobody

needs.

why

not go with tact avoider.

‘h’

There’s no such thing as being

have

they

disabilities,

ugly,

No

special

handicapped,

is

it's

cosmetically different.

one

is

short or

they are

fat;

challenged.

the consequences of social

now senior citizens. You can no longer wish someone a Merry Christmas either, it’s Happy

nondiscretionary' fragrance.

various countries around the world, where

somebody calls you clumsy, look them in the eye and tell them

women.

Holidays.

you’re uniquely co-ordinated.

Canadian legal system

Shariah has been used

In

In Nigeria,

in

is

a better

judge of law?

the elderly are

misdemeanour have been detrimental for Afghanistan they were forced to cover their entire bodies.

women

are stoned to death for

committing adultery. These are extreme circumstances, but as CBC's Natasha Fatah said in her column One law for all in April 2004, that’s the reality.

These are the types of places where Sharia has not only thrived for the last 1,400 years, but places that are also socially behind the rest of the world. Sharia does not belong here.

Bravo

to

Canadian

McGuinty

for

hopping on board and showing each

that faiths will not interfere with the

of this country or the freedoms each citizen

As

a society that has

deep roots

is

in equality,

Shariah, contrary to

going to lead

to

its

meaning of “a path

such replenishment

it

society.

made our

harder and

harder just to hang out with a group

who you might offend. This is why I have taken

to

promote

it.

country any time soon.

Being lazy just

being

many

bad thing,

motivationally

likes to

now

a

that

or wimin.

of words,

how much

longer will

to

huwoman

or

human

humyn?

The hurricane versus himicane wage forever as they

debate could

Sticking with the double insult,

how about changing

it’s

Avoiding sexist words and terms can also be challenging. However,

cally correct

the non-politi-

menopause

into the

more appropriate femopause?

we will never be so we have to use non-words

Hopefully picky that

the following should help:

like

The chairman of a company can now be referred to as the chairper-

then again, whoever thought saying

himicane or femopause

Merry Christmas would be a

but,

sin?

Spoke fs published and produced weekly by the Journalism students

of Conestoga College

Editor: Paige Hilton

letters to the

Advertising Manager: Janet Morris Production Managers: Steph Baulk,

Spoke Online

Editor:

Circulation Manager:

Brent Gerhart

Jason Sonser

Melissa Hancock

Jon Yaneff

for verification.

Photo Editors: Chantelle Timperley, Mike

be published. Letters should be no longer than 500 words. Spoke reserves the right to edit any letter letters will

Bors, Denise Muller

Faculty Supervisor and Adviser: Christina Jonas

Spoke’s address is 299 Doon Valley Dr.. Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ontario. N2G 4M4. Phone: 748-5220, ext. 3691, 3692, 3693, 3694 Fax: 748-3534

for publication.

E-mail: spoke@conestogac.on.ca

Dr.,

Web

site:

www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke

The views and opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necessarily reflect the views of Conestoga College, opoke shall not be liable for any damages arising out of errors in advertising beyond the amount paid for the Letters space.

to the editor

Letters

it

be before a petition goes around

ders.

seen as a

to

be called rude.

women,

longer

are both insulting towards the gen-

You're not crazy, you’re just

good thing as it means you have alternative wisdom.

chal-

are no

now womyn

asking to change the word

just be

worn' if you were

now be

(a

letters

end up with term which I wouldto

Speaking of changing spellings

able to achieve a deficiency.

Ignorance can

simply add the ‘u’

Women they are

emotionally different.

lenged.

welcome

Address correspondence to: The Editor, Spoke, 299 Doon Valley Room 4B14, Kitchener, Ont.,

isn’t a

be proud

fail,

we

and

by homemakers. no longer acceptable,

be surprised to find obsolete by the time this paper hits the press).

differently logical. Don’t

you

know

commonly used words, just make your day a little easier.

canopy

Never be wrong again,

the time

look up alternatives to

should be signed and include the name and telephone number of the writer. Writers will be

N2G 4M4

getting

of people because you don’t

editor. Letters

No unsigned

It’s

is

If

self-conscious

granted.

Spoke welcomes

contacted

how

political correctness has

Nobody

v Letters are

funny

to

to the watering hole,” is not

in this

find

fundamental principles

Canadians have a social

responsibility to everyone under this cultural

I

Body odour

is

humankind

simply vertically and horizontally

they are mentally challenged and

that the

A bell-

n’t

not admitting

Is that

easy, as

bar attendants.

the past, replaced

firefighters,

People no longer have learning

now

boy should be known as a bellchild. Housewives are a thing of

a thing of

police officers, postal workers and

Barmaids can breath

they are

Canada Centre.

A small group

Toronto created a Shariah arbitration court where they can make

their

politically

correct yet?

(politically)

sanitation officials.

Muslims would

Besides, in

is

Being

men who

using Shariah have no qualifications.

and

someone as being qualified are making the decisions They do not answer to anyone,

that certifies

to interpret Islamic law, so the

we

Are

and when

they are granted a divorce?

it

student poverty

-

in that

are subject to acceptance or rejection and should be must not contain any libellous statements.

clearly written or typed: a

MS Word

file

would be

helpful.


.

News

SPOKE, September

(Photo by Brant Gerhart)

through photos at

Bob

SONSER employees

and

are

invited to give their thoughts

how

to

ence

at

on improve the student experiConestoga College.

The office of student development is holding a number of focus groups to gather information from

them

students to help

try to better

student experience and overall stu-

dent satisfaction

is

the

Sex and the

City poster.

student development at the college, said there

made say

is

to hear

about

a real

effort

being

what students have

to

post-secondary

their

COUNSELLOR’S CORNER: Mature Students

systems can be in place that would

training, adults feel unsure of

(not only)

make

this a place

you can be successful, but also a place where you are having a really good experience and not just passing through.” students at the

for first-year

Doon campus

be

will

held Oct. 4 and

5. Focus groups for second- and third-year students will be held between Oct. 6 apd Oct. 20. Students at the Waterloo campus

and students at the Guelph campus will have one on Oct. 27. Students at the Cambridge and

on developing the student experience, we also (need) to work on a welcoming and a receptive college culture,” she said. “To do that, we want everybody to be engaged and involved and to play a part in it.” Leanne Holland Brown, student life

co-ordinator,

said

the

input

Stratford

campuses

campuses and

the

fulfilling ble,

we

“I

don’t foresee

session,”

Gregory.

said

-

first-year

focus groups for staff and faculty.

“The questions

that will be

used

as the basis for each focus group

similar and revolve around themes of student satisfaction and opportunities for improvement with respect to services, systems and are

life at

the college,” she said.

Gregory said will

have their

first-year students

own

focus groups

because they will be better able to tell how the college-starting experience has been for them.

It can take time to adjust and an

to utilize resources, and an openness to learn

in

learning and study

from peers.

Here are a few observations about mature students that might ease some of the uncertainties about returning to learning:

=>

KNOW THAT MOST ADULTS LEARNING. The

truth

is,

FEEL APPREHENSIVE ABOUT RETURNING

that most adults do very well

before, and they actually enjoy

=>

if

TO

not better than they did

it.

THINK ABOUT WHY YOU ARE RETURNING.

Don't be surprised

if

you find

reasons other than the ones you had anticipated to continue your learning.

DO WHAT IS RIGHT FOR YOU.

better.”

The employee focus groups

are

what

is

important to you and how

There

it will

is

best

no right way to do this. Think about fit

your

life

circumstances and goals.

being held because, “Faculty and

who work

with students also have

categories

skills, a willingness

“What

service areas

three

skills.

what (we can)

is

directly

students, upper-year students and

student

any way,

staff in

from students, faculty and staff at the college,” Holland Brown said. She said focus groups are divided into

this, in

as rewarding,

are interested in hearing

the college environment.

important part of that adjustment includes developing competence

number

and successful as possi-

is

re-learning and re-developing study and research

being a grump session or a critique

do

student experience

in

Many mature students are apprehensive about returning to school and are concerned about how they will perform academically. Their challenges are different than those of younger students, including but not limited to: balancing parenthood and home life with school, and

are not partici-

the small

directly influence future develop-

“In an effort to ensure that the

expected of them

of students there.

we’re looking for

initiatives at the college.

is

pating because of the small size of

received from the focus groups will

ments and

what

have a focus group on Oct. 26

gestions for improvement.

work

is

where

will

are very aware that to

a journey of exploration; one that stretches

graduate,” she said. “(We’re looking for) what services, processes or

experience and find out their sug-

“We

Post-secondary education

comfort zones and embraces diverse ways of thinking and doing. Returning to school after years of being out in the workplace or raising a family can be intimidating, exhilarating, challenging, and sometimes unsettling, and despite a wealth of life experience from work, home, or prior

“We're looking at from the time you enter the college and make that program selection to the time you

The focus groups

at the college.

Gregory, the director of

Carol

art

a second-year management studies student, does his best Christina Aguilera impression. Mike Lindsay, a second-year LASA student, flips the Imaginus poster sale, which was held in the Sanctuary on Sept. 19 and 20. The sales most popular posters always include Johnny Depp and

Making the college a better place Students

— Page 5

left),

Marley, however, this year’s hottest item

By J ASON

2005

(Photo by Vanessa Parker)

Wonderful wall Keith McIntosh (above

26,

:=>

The focus groups

be held from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. or 12:30 to 1:30 p.m., depending on which day students sign up for. Gregory said one thing she’d like to see from the focus groups is students

getting

the

opportunity

DISCUSS YOUR PLANS.

Think about how others

in

your

life

build

them

into

might support you.

Connex website

at

http://www.conestogac.on.ca/jsp/st serv/connex/i ndex .htm

I

Mature students are

also

sometimes concerned about

fitting

in socially.

The Student

Services Office can help, either individually, or through the Mature Student Message

Board by providing a place to meet and exchange ideas. For more information, contact the

Student Services Office.

to

For specific days the focus groups will be held and instructions on how to register for the visit the

Make sure you

well.

will

start getting involved.

groups,

Don't compromise on the things that

your schedule.

=>

this.”

MAKE YOUR WELL BEING A PRIORITY.

keep you physically, emotionally, and spiritually

unique perspectives about what makes an exceptional student experience,” she said. “We want them to be able to provide input on

A Message from Student Services Visit

our website h ttp'.//www. conestogac. on. ca/isp/s tser v/index, jsp


.

Page 6

News

— SPOKE, September 26, 2005

Pay no By DENISE

MULLER

student stops making payments and the government would, in fact, pick them (the payments) up.” Matresky said this is part of the whole OSAP package. Not only does the government give the stu-

"So,

the

interest

If you already have a sludent loan and are a full-time student, hut don't need another loan for this year, there's a form waiting for you

in the

your

OSAP

office that will defer

payments for one year. Paul Matresky, manager of financial aid and student awards, said interest

generally a confirmation of interest free status

who

(CIFS)

is

for a student

has previously had a student

loan, but

is.

in this

academic year,

not taking a student loan.

"So.

maybe two

years ago they had a student loan, but this year they come back to school and say, ‘I can pay for it myself, I don’t need a student loan,'" he said. (the student)

Fill

also takes the

it

burden of interest payments off while the student is in school.

The

National

Student

Loan

One of the

and

out a

fill

is

GERHART

dent development,

Conestoga students have until Sept. 30 to register for a chance to win free college tuition by entering the Pan-Canadian Study of College Students, The

new

at

be processed. at

the

for example,

left

end of April 2005,

very

form

If the

is

not filled out, the

making interest and or principle payments on his or her loan by the end of November. Although students have from student must start

November

OSAP

the

dent's

period.”

cannot

“Now,

offi-

cially started.

OSAP

each student

is

makes sure

registered at the col-

may

they (the students) do

if

after that

it

six-month period, then

they would be responsible for any interest

office

dents

when

and

their

first

experiences

entering college'.

college students, the college expe-

serve the students and help

and determinants of firstyear college outcomes, by The Association of Canadian

successful.”

tial

Community

given permission for his or her

rience

which

is

sponsoring the prize. Carol Gregory, director of stu-

The

results will

until

name

to

them be

these options.

up

he said. form out

until that point,"

Students must

every year

if

fill

the

they do not require a

is

processed correctly,” he

said.

Personal information, such as your name, address, student number and social insurance number, will be needed to complete the form.

win a year of free

is

when the results will be announced. “I’m hoping after Sept. 30, when the survey is done, the (nationwide) prizes will be announced.” she said. “Certainly, we will announce the college winners

remain confidenstudent has

be released. For final veri-

development

will

Students’ odds

as

of winning the depend on the number of students who complete the nationwide survey, however, Gregory said Conestoga students prizes will

have already shown plenty of

inter-

est.

Free tuition

not sure

well.”

a winning

fication. student

Gregory said she

OSAP

reminding them of

record

out that form in between then,

out the

program or course has

students with

then the government will go back and pay the interest for the entire

fill

fill

process the request until the stu-

all

shortly,

“We always advise students to check back with us or check with NSLSC towards the end of September to make sure that their

said Matresky. “So, as long as they

office

to

full-

I

“If a student,

school

enrolled as a

the college.

The academic year starts again on Aug. Matresky said NSLSC will probably send out another follow-up notice to

a full-time student.

firm the status of eligibility.

the first national study of

Outcomes.

Colleges,

still

making payments on their loan until the end of November 2005,”

still

nity to view' profiles of their stu-

"Focusing on the student experience will help the colleges better

First

you do

if

survey gives colleges the opportu-

the

Year

And

CIFS form

be asked to compare the student number with the survey and con-

said

"Colleges are recognizing the need for understanding student population,” said Gregory.

College Experience

to

the

in

loan but arc

lime student

year but are

The a section

come

a tuition pay-

ment or made arrangements for a payment, before the CIFS form can

they technically don’t have to start

form,

In that notice, there

to

is

(located

made

lege and has

not require a loan for this school

April to

loans are going to be due.

office

Student/Client Services Building)

across the country.

Every March or April, the agency

the options

OSAP

Service Centre (NSLSC) is the agency responsible for distribution and collection of student loans

sends out a notice to all students with a loan telling them when their

options the stu-

tuition I

First-year

is

dent a loan, but

listing the different

dent has.

out a survey and you

B y BRENT

This

on previous loans

interest

available.

is not the only prize Registered Conestoga

!

-

;

i

what services have been found and what hits been lacking,” she like,

said.

“That will be

real

valuable

information.”

students are exclusively entered to

Gregory said she believes the

sur-

win four cash prizes of $250 each. Apple iPods, Sony PSP Players and

vey will especially benefit the

stu-

HMV

gift

certificates

are

also

being raffled nationwide.

November,

where

the

win-win situation^ “They have win prizes and the most

“I think it’s a

for students,” she said.

Students will also be asked out another questionnaire

fill

dents.

to

a chance to

in

important thing

same

understand

is

that

who Canadian

we

will

college

nationwide prizes will be avail-

students are.”

able.

To sign up, students must visit www.wincoIlegetuition.com and answer a survey about their own

"The second questionnaire get (colleges) to understand the student experiences have

will

what been

personal experiences.


1

.

1 1

News

SPOKE, September

26,

— Page 7

2005

Students help students online By PAIGE HILTON

buddy

to a

The

of a website that

creators

allows college and university stu-

and use the bulletin

list,

board feature

to advertise for tutor-

away

ing or to give

Levine

said.

Now

their

dents to buy and

a free book,

main goal

sell used textbooks have taken the extra step to

the website and attract

help students with their courses.

bers, he said.

Booksforschool.ca, created two

the

York

Paul Levine,

Ryerson,

and

one from students from across

lets

Canada find other students in their program to network, buy and sell books or even get tutoring. “The mentor feature is students that are older than you, so they can most likely help you with some of the

courses you're

said

in,”

co-

to

expand

more mem-

addition to Michael Levine,

In

years ago by two students from

University

is

two other students involved

who

are

control of

is in

website design, usability and promotions for the site, and Lawson Hennick. who has a background in marketing and is in charge of pub-

The

relations.

lic

three students run

website and Michael Levine

the

wanted

said they

into the students’

to put the

hands

power

terms of

in

founder Michael Levine, who is in charge of web development and system administration at the site.

setting prices for their textbooks.

“The protege feature is students younger than you. They are going to need the books you have or they might need some help. It just basically connects people

through,” he said.

that are

together.

a lot easier than just

It’s

searching at your school, especially for frosh students. It’s intimidat-

year of school so

ing the

first

to help

them out

as best

we

we try

can.”

work

for the students.

sign up, tell

you

us a

bit

little

When you

out a form and you

fill

Levine said the website will even send a notification e-mail to a member when they are searching for a particular textbook. All

about yourself.

Your name, where you go to school, what year you’re in, what program you’re in. We find other users that match those similar qualities and we connect them,” said Levine.

Students can add other students

takes

it

ISBN number

entering the

is

Levine

said, but extra features

adding a picture to a listing or having a sponsored listing, where an advertisement appears above all like

Each student 10 points when they sign up

the rest, costs points. gets

(Photo by Paige Hilton)

David Saiz Perez, a 25-year-old bachelor of business studies student at Conestoga, said he spent about $400 on books for a part-time course at Wilfrid Laurier University last year, and planned to spend at least $500 on new textbooks at the Conestoga bookstore this year.

of the

book and -the system will scan it until the book is put up for sale. The basic features on the site are free,

Levine said the first two years they had the website were used for market research to find out exactly what students wanted in a used textbook service. “We decided that it would be easier if we let the website do all the

all students and we underwhat students are going

“We’re stand

and an additional 10 for each person they refer to the website. If they want more, Levine said, they

can purchase them. Prices range from $6.25 for 25 points to $20 for 100 points, which is the best value. The benefit of a used textbook website that reaches across

Canada, Levine said, is students have access to more textbooks for more programs than if they were searching only within their school.

“We

have students from over

1

was

44

was

it

cumbersome Once we had

for us to facilitate.

There’s a broad range

books go missing off the we had to pay the student.

across

ail

Canada. One of the things that we’ve found is that if books aren’t used anymore in a course in Ontario, they are used in other provinces,” he said. “Your school may offer you $10 for the book because it’s not used anymore. Another school may use that book and you’ll get (better) value.” Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) offered a used book service until a few years ago’ directly out of the CSI office. However, the service

became too much work

for the

CSI

and there were problems wdth books being stolen, said CSI presistaff

dent Justin Falconer. “The problem with that process

shelf, so If

books

weren’t being recorded right

when

said the benefit of using a

w'ebsite endorsed

CSA

by

stu-

is

dents can rest assured the website is

legitimate.

and search it and it would say it in but you couldn't find it on the shelf because it was either

one school has a bad experithem will just drop it. There’s tremendous pressure on any of CSA’s partners to continually address issues that arise and to

marked down

be a good provider,” said Falconer.

they were being sold, you’d type •

He

incredibly

schools registered on the website.

it

in

was

stolen or

when

it

didn’t get

CSI decided to provide a students on their website to

Instead, link for

ence, the rest of

Books4exchange.com does not

sold,” he said.

it

“If

offer a networking aspect, but

once

students are connected on the web-

make

used textbook website, books4exchange.com. “(The website) is a preferred partner of the College Student Alliance (CSA). CSA essentially

site to

endorses the service as a legitimate website that runs well and works,”

the same. “There are

said Falconer.

physically at the school," he said.

a

them how

a purchase,

the

it is

exchange

through the mail or

is

up to made,

in person, said

Falconer.

One

benefit of both sites remains

more buyers

web environment

the

in

than there are

Plans to improve parking underway MOLSON

B y JON

A

security

representative

for

Perhaps the most frustrating change for students has been the transformation of Lot 1 into a 1

pay-to-enter

reducing the competition for daily

but because a significant amount of

parking and help combat

people

congestion

traffic

John Tribe discussed the col-

demand

high

1

1

for

parking

of

lot

make

to

conduct code change was made a pay as you enter lot,

student

So

processes. it

a

“We will have determined how many more (parking passes) we

but you put your

sell,

so a

lot

of those people

go off the waiting

and a great number of the people on the waiting

list

will

daily parking.

list

be utilizing the

It is all

kind of inter-

twined, solve one problem and

it

probably assists with several others.”

Tribe said changes to this year’s

“Mind you,

there

is

does parking enforcement everyday. If a car is parked where it is not supposed to be or a car is parked without a proper permit, it is issued a ticket enforced by

would be

selling

number of

available spaces in a

lot.

However, security

uted towards maintenance and ren-

an equal

proportion of parking permits to particular

tious

being cau-

making sure they don’t

in

oversell passes in any given

lot.

Other changes include purchasing parking permits online, which

was advertised through mailings

waiting

from the

aren’t being sold.

“It is

paid

registrar’s office.

we

are

that the

not fast enough in dis-

pensing the permit to park,” he said. “We are ending up with a lineup down the road of cars.” He said a temporary solution to this problem is staffing Lot 1

The person who the

staffs the lot takes

money and immediately hands

very frustrating

for

list

thoughts

also

of

moving

the

Full” sign in front of Lot 11.

is

A

decision regarding this will

made

and they see spaces

that

Somewhere

in

parking

at the

college as simple as

“It affects

people's ability to get

here and there on time,” he said.

“That

is

why we’ve

taking meas-

Fridenburg,

a

third-year

management studies student, said the first week of parking in Lot was as bad as he has ever seen at 1

Conestoga. “I think that first

ble,”

he

said.

week was

terri-

“The lineup extended

Despite the inconvenience, Fridenburg believes the change to the lot

“Last year the situation was one where people were jumping the curbs, following others out and

Tribe said a cheaper alternative

breaking off the parking barrier.”

moving

the

until decisions

ticket

about

and the meters would be purchasing a weekly parking pass, which can be used in either Lot or “The daily parking rate is $5 a day. but a weekly pass you can purchase for $18, which saves you money,” he said. for students to daily parking

He

1

1

said the best thing students

can do to better the situation is by parking properly. “Park where you have a permit to park,” he said.

“If

you park some-

he

said.

“Something had

to

staffed personnel in Lot

drastically

reduced

waiting

to

“I wonder if the abuse of the lot could have been prevented, if the

first

place,” he said.

Students with questions or concerns about college parking should ices, located in

Room

2B10-6.

Spoke can

now be read online! For the latest college, entertain-

games, puzzles, weather and ref-

also optimistic that the situ-

ation will continue to improve. “It definitely I

had

news, as well as 1

times," he said. is

I

parking

believes

related matters are getting better.

He

1

to this.

ment and sports

Fridenburg

has

unfortunate

be

done.”

"The

come

is

Lot

was justified.

dispenser are

not be

it

contact security and parking serv-

ures to try to correct that.”

Adam

Fridenburg said

that the situation in

daily rate had been lower in the

possible.

out to Conestoga Drive.”

to a better location.

Eventually there will be a “Lot final

where where you have no permit to you may be stealing somebody else’s parking privilege" Tribe is determined to make park,

There are

helps alleviate the line.

1

is

if you have parking and you can’t park,” he said. "It’s also very frustrating to people if they are on a

ovations.

is

is

finalized.

Tribe believes the best case sce-

it

are distrib-

it,

the

in

Security

the

The proceeds

machine

that

moment

at the

machine

last

College council sets the rates for

having

he said.

nario

parking.

system.

the driver a permit to park and that

“Last year an annual permit was $240, this year it is $275,” he said.

$5.”

new

machine and it spits out a ticket, which you put on the dash of your car and that is how you park there,”

the City of Kitchener.

year was $4, has gone up to

no gate on

money

parking system include an increase in parking rates.

“Daily parking while this year

with the

every morning from 8 to 9 a.m.

Tribe said.

will

pay-to-exit,

attempts to escape

spaces, during* a recent interview.

can

was

without payment, this resulted in a

at the college.

lege’s strategy for alleviating this

year’s

lot.

made

Tribe admits there are problems

“The main problem

Conestoga College says selling more parking passes will assist in

Last year, Lot

happy medium.”

that area there is a

don’t think

venient as

it

last

has a ways to go and will ever

year,

true progress can be

but

be as conI

believe

made,” he

said.

erence links, visit www.conestogac.on.ca/spoke


Page 8

News

— SPOKE, September 26, 2005

new

College welcomes By

TARA RICKER

Determination,

“Assessing a need for something and making it happen, that’s w'hat motivates me.” she said.

motivation

and

compassion are what got Jane Douglas, Conestoga's new chair of health sciences and biotechnology, to

where she

today.

is

Douglas, who joined the college on Aug. 2 L), said she is really looking forward to the excitement of her

new

"There’s a

lot

of growth

still

out

she said.

The department of in the

is

health

sci-

process of develop-

and dietetic technician program.. Both programs will launch in the fall of ing

respiratory

a

therapist

2006. “1 think the potential for this is

a registered

“Having a part in someone’s growth and development, that’s success to me,” she said.

nurse,

has a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Waterloo and

Her biggest success

area

Douglas has more than 25 years' in health care and has

“I

in

me

the registered practical

and registered nurse programs at Conestoga College. Most recently Douglas worked w ith Sun Life Financial as a knowledge and learning consultant in Sun Life's capabilities and organizational development areas. Douglas said she chose to pursue health care as a career because she has always loved working with

it.”

think

my

successes

and offering

she

stemmed

me those opportu“My successes

she said.

nities,”

w'ere being able to turn

do

around and

that for others.”

One

of

many

the

Douglas said she had she

to get to w'here

to is

obstacles

overcome today w'as

money. “Finances were very limited in family so 1 knew that whatever

my

I was going to do or achieve, I was going to have to do it myself.” Douglas believes having to get over that obstacle made her

stronger.

“Things

she said.

Douglas said her idea of success is achieving something that makes you happy and by helping others

"I love being at the beginning of something and watching it grow'.”

which

opportunities

out of those people having faith in

nurse

into

most.

so

could grow and develop thanks to the help of a lot of good people.

was always nursing something back to health so it wasn’t a huge surprise to my family when 1 went

Douglas said challenge and change are w'hat motivates her the

so far

with

University.

“I

she said.

in life

blessed

many

soon complete her master of education degree at Brock

people.

almost endless and limitless.”

having been

is

will

taught

and biotechnology programs and I'm looking forward to being a part of

ences

is

along the way.

experience

role,

there for the health sciences

that.”

Douglas

chair

easy, but

don't I

always

come

(Photo by Meghan Kreller)

Pool sharks the Sanctuary

in

is

think you appreciate

Women

them more when they don’t come

learn

more about technology

easy,” she said.

MCCORMICK

An opportunity for w'omen to leam more about technology is offered by DigitalEve, an

KW

international, non-profit organization dedicated to

STUDY SMARTER NOT HARD ELK

Operations

ogy

women

as

it

should be.

“A lot of women don’t consider it (technology employment) as an option,”

Ramsoomair do

said.

“They

it.”

in Toronto, Montreal, all

over

Memorq

the United States as well as Europe.

L resentations

ment, to

KW

to their mission state-

DigitalEve’s purpose

move forward

is

successfully and

The technology industry must also make significant efforts positively.

L rocrastination

T est /Rnxiety

,3tud fjing

L3t ress

~T~est

Managing~j~ ime

Textkook Reading

to integrate, at all levels all

and within

contexts, the active participa-

and the guidance

tion, the voices,

L reparation

of women.

Program

director

KW

Hutchinson says assists

women

in

Jacqueline DigitalEve

taking a

more

proactive approach to technology.

“We

www,conestog;ac.on.ca C.urrent

Students/ Learning

5

management but claimed those lost the technology focus. project

“We were

sharing the inner parts

of being a woman,” Hutchinson said. “We weren't learning anything about technology.”

“They

definitely got

away from

the scope of w'hat DigitalEve

KW

Ramsoomair

DigitalEve,

and Hutchinson both believe more programs should be created to help

women

in the field of technology,

KW WIN

want the focus to be on tech-

(Women

such as Networking). “This

Ramsoomair

said

of

opportunities

that

Kitchener- Waterloo.

Employment

women

KW

of

DigitalEve have

secured are IT professionals, database managers, technical waiting in software companies and self-employment within the Kitchener- Waterloo, Cambridge and Guelph areas.

positions

Anyone

interested

visit their

KW

website

in

learning

DigitalEve can at

www.kwdig-

italeve.com.

Online

Resources/ Workshops bcse

scll-riirer. tc A

circumnavigated advice on live

how

how

up to your to

hr)

workshops

the

minefields

most students, and at the same

to succeed lull

uncover

in

potential;

become more

time, otter a

your academics. Leorn how to

how

to reduce study Lime;

self -motivated;

how

to read faster;

organize information; and most importantly, bow to

that

t^ct

need

mountain of

better grades;

ejrcat

how

how

to score higher

how

to take better notes

become n

he

to

on

to

VISIT THE RING DESIGN

tests;

CENTER

Tuesday & Wednesday

and

lifelong learner.

October -1-

O%

O/

t

”1

In

a growing technology-

is

area,”

jostens

trategies/

is all

Both Ramsoomair and Hutchinson said this season’s focus is going to be completely on the technology aspect. With more than 100 regular community members involved in

more about

nology,” Hutchinson said.

ARE. AVAILABLE. ONLINE. AT

Past projects, she said, were based on subjects such as leadership, emotional intelligence and

about.”

KW

Mapping

[Rote ~Ra king

Anne

says technol-

not as well represented by

is

According

&>

director

Graham Ramsoomair

based

Listening

within the

DigitalEve, which stems from a program called Webgrrls, encompasses Kitchener- Waterloo, Guelph and Cambridge, also known as the Golden Triangle. Other DigitalEve programs are

WORKSHOPS” Learning Styles

women

context of technology.

feel they can’t

Studij (groups

Sanctuary

a favourite pastime for some students at Conestoga. General arts and sciences students, Trevor McCoskey and Danielle Dyce, share a game Sept. 16. Playing pool

By TIFFANY

(/oncentration

in

8 th & 1 9 th

11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Foyer Inside Door #3 Deposit: $25.00


Feature if

SPOKE, September

km

As a 60-kilometre walk rookie. I was there to help support everyone

Sweat, muscle pain, laughter and

were

on display

all

Weekend

Cancer held

to

in

at the third

End Breast

Toronto on Sept. 9. itself, however, began months earlier when each of the 4,800 participants was asked to raise a minimum of $2,000. As one of these participants, I am in

The weekend

here to

was

tell

you

“The Rack

Pack” and

my new

family of fellow

began

at

Exhibition Place

in

Toronto on Saturday and ended at the National Trade Centre on Sunday. I

remember thinking

after the first hour,

myself

to

that this

going to be. and pardon

(Photo by Kristin

Toronto’s

my

was

pun, a

Weekend

participants.

Each

participated

in

Canadian women in 2005 and it has the second highest cancer death rate for Canadian females. While more than 99 per cent of

But no matter how badly wanted to quit, the thousands of volunteers and cheering people kept me walking with my head held high. Besides the walkers, the volun-

men will

Others walked

a 60-kiiometre walk.

ries told

knew

women, an be diagnosed

in the park.

As

was going

I

realized

be much more. talked to women and men who

that I

wore on.

the day it

to

were walking to help save friends and family, walking to save their children and walking to save them-

never

1

existed.

crew members

and

teers

were

show their support. Everyday people came out of their homes with much-needed water and snacks and tearful, heartto

thank ypus.

felt

,

Crew members and volunteer medical staff were stationed

at pit

stops to help with everything from blisters

and back-rubs

outhouse

to

patrol and food duty.

tears in their eyes.

I kept all these facts in my head during each step. Ten kilometres turned into 15 kilometres, and then

selves.

places

in

asked to raise more than $500 each

in silence, their sto-

and the

ache

to

I

through the expressions on

their faces

walk

my body

grew and

began

cer affected them.

Grifferty)

End Breast Cancer had about 4,800

to

steps began to slow as

blisters

Breast cancer was the most frequently diagnosed cancer in

These are all facts that 1 learned from talking with my fellow walkers. Some women and men u'ere walking fact sheets, willing to tell me their story and how breast can-

Foundation to help aid in breast cancer research, I, along with my

walkers, began our journey.

my

with the deadly disease with approximately 45 of them dying from it.

the easy part.

kilometres.

My own

breast cancer patients are

that the fundraising

team, cleverly called

became 20

between.

estimated 150

After $16 million was raised for the Princess Margaret Hospital

We

— Page 9

cancer

for breast

By KRISTIN GRIFFERTY

annual

2005

i

Student walks 60 tears

26,

1

began to

rely

on these people

when

physically and emotionally

my

thought

15 kilometres slowly and painfully

couldn’t

feet

I

take

another step. Thirty-three all

kilometres brought walkers to Downsview Park on

Saturday, where

I was finally given remove my shoes and campgrounds where

the chance to

survey the

I

would be

And

“They’re real. they’re spectacular.”

my

assessing

A

staying,

before

finally

feet.

medical tent proved such a thing as a blister on a blister on a blister, and that a person would do anything for painkillers and a tube of Ben Gay. While a hot meal and the chance to shower seemed like a perk, I limped past the massage and chiropractic tents and collapsed in my tent. I fell asleep comforted, however, that the pain I was feeling was temporary and incomparable to those visit to the

there

is

women who

are

suffering

from

breast cancer.

Day two

of the walk is more of a plodded along with my “family” and tried to ignore my aching body. blur, as

I

If possible, there

were even more

supporters out on the streets and

or,

house porches, encouraging us that the end was near. The medical tents at the pit stops now had huge lines and I walked past the rest stations, fearing that

my body would

give up

if

I

dared

stop moving.

The walk

10 kilometres

last

1

completed

decision

that

1

in

my

made

doctor's orders, but

mined I,

I

of the

flip flops,

a

against the

was

deter-

to finish.

along with 4,800 other

women, entered

men and

the National Trade

Centre grounds with thousands of cheering fans signaling that wc had finally

My

made

it.

family and friends were there

with signs and flowers and

Phones

starting

^Ttelus

as low as $24.99*

much

needed hugs. As I sat on the cold concrete, getting my hack massaged and looking around at the sea of pink around me, knew that the aches was experienced were all worth it. looked at the breast cancer survivors and felt an emotional high that can only describe as inde1

mobility®

I

I

I

the future

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scribable.

am a woman and

healthy 22-year-old because of the journey completed on that September weekend, know one day I may not have to worry about those ugly two words: breast cancer. I

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News

— SPOKE, September 26, 2005

Page 10

College a viable community destination By LEE EVANS

Stratford and Waterloo campuses.

Some

Some of the most grams

important pro-

people wanting to prepare

for a better

Job Connect helps employers as

2004, 61 graduates representing 23

by matching them up with

programs entered college through

well,

job or to re-enter the

pre-screened

applicants.

Some

Conestoga

workforce after a long absence

employers may also be eligible

College aren’t on campus. Spread

receive help through the employ-

a training subsidy.

throughout Waterloo Region are a

ment training readiness program.

by

offered

of community agencies

variety

offering courses through the college to people to get

on with their

“We the

who

are the

college.”

demic

expand

life.

edge of job opportunities and part of

Andrea

hone

their

support and

Waterloo, Guelph and Cambridge

studies

program.

offered

is

at

of the programs co-ordi-

Focus for Change

is

19 years of age and up. receiving

Ontario Works benefits. In addi-

or post-sec-

tion to getting help with

ondary education and help young

literacy skills, assessing strengths

connect with employers

and interests and developing a

adults

who have

suitable jobs.

training

Leis explained that not lege

students

Close

4,000

to

studies program

She has

Yet another program offered off-

who

eventually

campus

to

Conestoga

ages 16 to 24 (up to 29 with a dis-

way

is

Job Connect, for people

who

and keeping employment. To qual-

in

prepa-

upgrading

ify for the

program

Doon campus

Cambridge,

must

is

be

employed

as well

Guelph,

have difficulty finding

this

of

and

school,

not

not

currently

enrolled in a training program.

statistics for the

various funding partners, but

it’s

working with people and helping

them “get on is

“the

warm

and

all

clients

were

to

fuzzy part of

my job.”

achievements

at a

meet-

erwise

May

many

the the

college

who might

be overlooked

for

at the

event, contact the

Doon campus

co-ordinator

Regional

is

519-836-0132, If

to link the college

as

high

after

at

you think might

mentioned, contact Sherri Tryon,

a

manager of Job Connect and Perth

High school teachers, department

If

take part in an informa-

provide

you need further information

about

an

academic

upgrading,

preparatory studies, or Focus for

ing of the board of governors. At

overview of the programs offered

Change, contact Ruth Jensen

convocation ceremonies

by the college and a physical tour

519-748-5220,

What is Career Fair?

in

June

ext.

3671.

Preparation:

An opportunity for students and alumni to network with potential employers from Canada and the USA An opportunity to investigate and research career

Visit

An event that

m

m to obtain information from

helps y

employers 0 Career Opportunities industry Trends industry Growth

Corporate Culture educational Requirements Job Requirements

Salary Expectations

Skits

and

Qualifications

www,partners4efr»ptoymentxa

for a

list

of participating

org epilations and employer profiles

o0om mm diverse sector# f

A'

Pick up an Employer Guidebook in Room 220, Student Client Services BuiWini^ or mi 'the Main Office of the Guelph Campus before the Career Fair (available at RIM Park on the day of the Fair as well) Research employer Information available in Career Services Update your rintmt and take copies to the Fair Prepare a list of question* to ask employers Target potential employers

Presentation: *

Dress and conduct yourself professionally

*

Exude enthusiasm and

self confidence

How to get to Career Fair: * *

*

* For more information, contact

Co-op and Career

Services In SCSB Room 220 Doon Campus, Shirley Dancy zk, sdoncy zk (frconestogac.on ca 748-5220 ext, r

.

3756

,

ext.

3669.

heads and principals are invited to

to

FREE transportation

is

available

from both Doon and Guelph campuses Conestoga College Doon Campus buses will run throughout the day and will pick up and drop off at Door #3 Conestoga. College Guelph Campus students are asked to contact Donna Slater (5X9-824-9390 ext. 135) by Mon,, Sept. 26 to reserve a seat on the bus to Career Fair Guelph Campus transportation will pick up and drop off at Guelph

RIM Park 2001 University Avenue East Waterloo, ON N2K 4K4 (519) 684-5363

at

from any of the services

Youth Link, 519-748-5220,

exchange

519-

Kelly

you have a family member,

benefit

school.

com£ and

this

project

ext. 3.

relative or friend

five area school boards to pro-

destination

Margo Jones

699-5009, or Marion

Planning

mote the idea of college

SCWI

Networking Opportunities at Career Fair *

oth-

post-

secondary education.

School/College/Work

the

tion

about courses

offers to students

six of the pro-

viable

in life” that L,eis said

Leis was proud to present the participants'

participants

year will be a series of

forums held

Initiative

do the administrative

work and prepare

program, Leis said, they out

to

Leis will be on hand to educate

achieve-

For more information on

New by

Doon campus,

preparatory

served through

Leis,

department chair of the academic support andpreparatory

sidies.

ration for further studies.

the

won

students

will take place

the

ing studies.

Two

workshops

need academic upgrading

as

and police foundations.

forum

at

focusing on science and engineer-

serv-

Team. The goal of these daylong

ability)

offered at the

ices

1

as social serv-

also be eligible for assistance with

dropped out of high school and

This

programs such

first

Oct. 9

2005.

Andrea

may

community

ices

of those

The

numbers

highest

transportation and child care sub-

students their

The

grams from April 2004

not just university.”

but

this,

ty”

ment awards.

option to their students,

hear

to start suggesting

dents,” she said, “not just universi-

the college gradu-

at

col-

all

with a high school diploma.

make

participants

to start

like to

college as an option to their stu-

At the 2005 convocation cere-

came on campus

through the traditional channels,

Some

plan,

“They don’t

wc want them

ments.

suggesting college as an

computer

university educated, said Leis.

won

students

outstanding achieve-

for

23 programs

don’t like to hear this, but

women

academic upgrading for training

said Leis.

“(High school teachers)

a 12- to 16-

to

those

enrolled were in

the

people get ready for employment,

further job

my job,”

we want them

week program offered

awards

ated.

campuses.

nated by Leis’s department help

access

love

their job search skills with

This program

Some

"1

of

monies 54 students representing

help from trained staff members.

Leis,

department chair of the academic preparatory

the

Universities.

knowl-

training plan,

through

is

High school teachers arc often

academic upgrading program.

Three

Ministry of Training, Colleges and

assessed, develop a

level

This program

funded provincially

their aca-

are just trying

community said

Here they can have

for

the

of the departments involved.

Doon Campus To Career From Fair

Career Fair

9:30

12:00

10:30

12:00

11:30

2:00

1:30

3:00

Guelph Campus

To Career

From

Fair

Career Fair

9:30

2:00

at


1

News

Pioneer

1914

village’s

By DARRYL TAYLOR

century ago. the

Local residents got a chance to mingle with pioneers and marvel at the wonders of the 9 1 4 Fall Fair at

Region of Waterloo, is also home to the Waterloo Regional Curatorial Centre, which houses more than

Doon

30,000

1

The style

18.

owned

artifacts

Fall Fair, held annually in the

Region. The centre

of a rural

itory

fair

the early

in

1900s. included live period music,

horse-drawn wagon

pioneer days,” said

Norm

Willis of

Waterloo, one of nearly 1,000 visi-

The

facility for the

Doon

largest

Heritage

Crossroads, along with the muse-

um’s traditional Christmas and Canada Day celebrations. The event’s organizer and supervisor of programs,

Wendy

Connell,

of the autumn

tant,

“and I think it’s just a really unique and interesting place.”

of the highlights of the yean” Connell said the Fall Fair would

also> included demonstrations and

festivities

tours of the traditional gardens.

opened under

Doon Pioneer “living history to

name

the

Village in 1957,

museum”

is

a

dedicated

preserving Waterloo County’s

pioneer heritage by recreating a

domestic

village, at 10

and other artifacts from time period, where costumed

furniture

“interpreters” demonstrate

Waterloo County as

it

"It

exhibit

entries

and were

crowds of jubilant visitors any indication. The aim of the Fall Fair in those days, Connell said, was to entertain and astonish people of all ages, and that

is

the

still

object

at

Doon

Heritage Crossroads.

In recent years, she said, Doon Heritage Crossroads has become

that every-

society becomes more urban.” she added, “that becomes more important

and more unique.”

One of the most important things about Doon Heritage Crossroads,

more popular with visitors from around the region. She attrib-

Connell said,

utes the appeal to the simple, rural

residents a better understanding of

atmosphere.

local heritage.

steadily

“This

is

a

little bit

in the city,” said

of the country

Connell.

“We

can

rience,

said.

but also the rural experi-

how-'

people can

cow

a

is

come here and see milked and w'here

that

it

gives area

“Cultural facilities such as this

of

ence. We’re very proud of the fact

is

are very important to the quality

give people not only the 1914 expe-

that

“We’re firm believers

classes.”

in

life

any community,” she

"History

is

very important.

you don’t know w'here you’ve

If

come

from,

it’s

hard

to

know'

where you’re going.”

off your best wares,”

would have been one

life

was nearly

in

a

in exhibiting their

skills in the

category of the quilting,

Ladies

Work

fair,

which includes

knitting,

needlepoint,

embroidery, rug hooking, crossstitch and crochet, to name but a few. “I’ve

Huron Rd., Kitchener, includes more than 20 historic buildings, tilled with that

with

all

have been particularly popular with the women of the community, who

rural village in the year 1914.

The 60-acre

show

took great pride

Heritage Crossroads, which

originally

that’s

what people like to come back for.” This philosophy seemed to be working well, if the tables piled

ages and

your food comes from. "I think as time goes on and our

Fall Fair w'as very imporboth as a social event and as a

she said.

Doon

thing every

tend to keep a lot

1

fair tradition to the

time to

dpg

“We

— Page

2005

hit in

body should come here and get something out of it,” she said. “It’s something that can appeal to all

2005

early settlers of this area.

brought the family out to (Doon

The

same

to seeing the

of the same activities because

said this represents the significance

Heritage Crossroads),” he added,

sheep

ward

a tradition. People look for-

year,” she laid.

high

collections.

one of the

at

“It’s

a

still

26,

“The

the second time w'e’ve

is

events

by the main repos-

the

museum

Fall Fair is

annual

tors at the event.

“This

is

and preservation

municipality’s

rides, a tradi-

penny carnival and an exhibition giving participants a chance to show off their best canned and baked goods, produce, art, cral'ts, woodwork and floral arrangements. “It’s neat to go out and get the experience of a country fair from tional

Fall Fair

entire living heritage experience.

The museum, operated by

Heritage Crossroads Sept

SPOKE, September

had people complain about

that category, say that

it’s

sexist,”

she, said. "But that’s a traditional category from the time period, and it

still is in

many of the

rural fairs.”

Keeping

things

traditional.

Connell added,

is

critical

to

the

success of the Fall Fair and the

CONN EX

(Photo by Todd Rellinger)

The lawn beside the almost over and this

Fall-ing back Conestoga College is a sure sign that summer weather way. The Weather Network is forecasting normal temperatures for

recreation centre at

fall is

on

its

fall.

Your voice, pur experience, Conestoga’s future!

EMPLOYEE FOCUS GROUPS You’re invited to help us understand the gaps and create the opportunities as we develop ihe strategic plan tor the growth and enhancement of services and systems that support student success and promote student satisfaction at Conestoga College.

Suggestions or Input on services, student life opportunities and student experience will be greatly welcomed.

^

~

Co-Op, Career Services, Recreation Centre, Alumni Services

Program Co-ordinators Monday October 17 Tuesday October 18

3:30 - 5:00 p.m. 3:30 -5:00 p.m.

Doon/Cambrtdge Faculty Wednesday October 19

3:30

-

5:00 pm.

Thursday October 20

3:30

-

5:00 p.m.

10:00

- 1

1:00

2:30 pm.

Waterloo/Stratford Campuses

,

CE

Campus, Room D3 - AH Monday October 3

3:30

-

Liaison, Publications, Financial Aid.

the

Student Services (Counselling, Disability, Peer, Learning Skills, Health Services) Tuesday September 27 10:00 -1 1:30 am. Wednesday September 28 l :(X) - 2:30 pm.

Monday September 26 Tuesday September 27

how to improve

1:30 a.m.

Waterloo

Staff -

5:00 p.m.

-

4:30 pm.

Registration

Wednesday September 28 Thursday September 29

9:30

-1

1:00 am.

10:30 -12:00 pm.

Records, Admissions, Information Services Wednesday October 5 10:30 a.m. - noon Thursday October 6 1 :30- 3:00 pm.

Guelph Campus

-

Tuesday October 4

AH

Staff

-

A8 3:00

Open to any Employee - Doon T uesday October 25 1 0: 30 a.m. -12:00 noon

ALL DOON FOCUS GROUPS WILL BE HELD IN ROOM 2E04 Please contact Dareelte Watts (dwatts@eonestogac.on.ca) to register for a group today!

is

.>


1

1

— SPOKE, September 26, 2005

Bage 12

;Kvc .

x

*

.

X**y\\ -4 ^ Ir

;

]

1

^

1

Thornley would ‘Come Again’

:ope

1

;

Entertainment

Week of September

26.

2005

after rocking college

i

j

i

Aries

tKG

1

1

1 :

March

21

September 23 October 22

-

April 19

This week will be a time of

Be cautious drown others out with your

Use your

By JON YANEFF

charms around

natural

careful observation.

the middle of the week, whether

not to

be for a job interview, a date or to talk your way out of a speeding ticket. Smile, it’s what you do

opinion

late

week.

the

in

sometimes a good idea to to others. Lucky day: 26th

It’s

listen

it

Lucky day: 30th

best.

people are just learning about you then they are just watching the con-

“Would you come again? Could you come again?” This line from Thornley ’s hit single and album Come Again is a perfect quote

when

describing the

band’s performance after about 700 students packed the yellow parking

Conestoga College Sept. 15 see the group and the opening

lot at

Taurus April 20

-

to

Scorpio

May

20

October 23

November

you dependable?

of being so

sick

do

week, yourself, even This

something for

if

means putting someone out

it

in a

Try something new.

small way.

Lucky day: 27th

Jealousy

is

Now

is

21

the time to

look outward and approach those

He

feelings of neglect.

may

or she

have any reason for

not

neglecting you. Lucky day: 1st

May

21

-

v

June 2

' '/*

^

down

Put

You

that telephone.

have things to do.

Sort yourself

out before the work really starts

Remember, your plate only so big. Lucky day: 29th

to pile up. is

November 22 December 2

$

And

Stop. Breathe. first.

think about

it

Capricorn

July 22

-

December 22

-

January 19

Lumumba

said he loves playing

Big Wreck Song.

songs such as That

this extent.

“We’ve went all out with fencing, barriers and security at all ends of the parking lot,” said Egleston.

He

said

Thornley was booked an agency called the

get them to

that specializes in

come

it

was

easier to

to the college.

The group has been touring releasing

viously the front

their

man

of popular

band

Big Wreck. Ken formerly of the Watchmen, is on bass guitar and back-up vocals. Tavis Stanley is on guitars and back-up vocals and Sekou Lumumba is on drums. Lumumba said the band has played at colleges and universities a few times each year since they’ve been together. They played at Mohawk College with Hurst Sept. rock

Remember,

if

you don't open up, know what the

problem

Lucky day: 28th

is.

Reach out for things that you want this week. Whether you want a new part-time job or a program more in line with what you want to be when "you grow up.” Lucky day: st

Tizzard,

1

cool

Lumumba.

He added

the school crowds are

usually different from clubs.

Leo July 23

:

C

Aquarius

S.

August

-

January 20 February 18

22

J

- :

“At clubs generally

all

the people

Money may become weekend and

tight

as hard as

it

by

may

go overboard There is a bottom to your wallet and you’ll be seeing it soon if you aren’t careful. Lucky day: 27lh seem, with

try

thrift

not

to

spending.

has

to see

how

to

through.

it,”

said

is

no release

upcoming album

because they are only four songs so far.

“What usually happens is if your album consists of 12 to 15 songs then you’ll write 20 to 24 songs because you can’t write the requisite amount since they might not

make said.

it

to the final product,” he

“Look

for fast, crazy tunes

from us on the way,

it

should be

good.”

Lumumba said some of the Big Wreck followers have crossed over and become Thornley fans. “There’s always Big Wreck fans that have been very faithful and follow Ian around,” he said. “We’re

grateful

Big Wreck

because the

fans could have said 'this isn’t Big

“It’s one of my on the record and it has a nice butt-kicking feel to it which

Wreck' and

favourites

fan base.”

makes it fun to play.” The band also played three new songs called Hard to See, Another Memory and Changes. They may have different names on upcoming

ences between Big and Thornley tunes.

He

just as easily left our

said there are

some differWreck songs

Lumumba said there is another tune that the band hasn’t even done

“Big Wreck tunes are written more of a musical, no holds barred playing and Ian wrote what came from his heart,” he said. “The Thornley songs, while they still come from Ian, they tend to be

the lyrics for yet, but they are real-

more

records.

happy with

ly

it

and

it

could even-

be a single when

tually

it’s

all

done. said often you write songs

you think

and might be you submit them to the record company and they may choose something you didn’t like as much as the other songs you are great

singles, but then

is

604 Records.

“We

the

and

said

single.’’

said there

didn’t

in the

choose All Comes

Wash

as a single,” said

Lumumba. “Radio

it

stations just

it

across

Canada

in the U.S., so

we just

accepted

playing

as a single.

“The record company has

a radio

with

crafted for radio.”

Lumumba

said every Big Wreck and Thornley song is based on Ian’s experiences and they’re really cryptic, so it's difficult for him to open up and discuss what his songs are about.

“There’s

certain

people

who

think that a magician showing his tricks ruins the tricks, so that’s kind of how Ian feels because certain people will get different interpreta-

tions

that

maybe weren’t

what was intended,” he

Mumumba Conestoga

said

show

quite

said.

after

the

went extremely well and Thornley would definitely “Come Again” if that

it

invited.

Greet them with

may come

hidden motives.

Lucky day: 26th

with

Pisces 1

9

-

March 20

for

Is this person pay you back? Is it worth it to say no? Weigh the consequences. Lucky day: 1st it

to

LunTumba

Lumumba.

started

Lumumba. “Sometimes you make

caution as they

February

loan over the next few days.

Think going

dirge

be the band’s next

things are in your neck

of the woods.

Virgo

Be wary of someone asking

nice

a

department and generally what they do is they think what is on the radio right now, what’s hitting and they listen to your tunes and based on them, they decide what should

Be ready for a surprise when someone from your past pops in

August 23 September 22

a

to secre-

also played songs from album including So Far So Good, Come Again, Beautiful, All Comes Out in the Wash and Clever. “Clever is a very dirty song and it

it

new' fans, but then sometimes if

the

me

They

the event that’s hap-

school,”

very sur-

their

out since

at

a

cy (so he can’t reveal the group’s name).”

Out

it’s

It’s

swore

prising, but he

tends to be different because sometimes there’s people who just come

pening

it’s

bugged him me what the

wrote. Thornley’s record label

there are your fans, but at schools

i

a million times, but

like that group.

ly

He usually

is

because people want to get away from class and have some fun,” said

it

1

“The energy

he or she won’t

bad for Ian because he’s

great tune,” he said. “I

13.

Try to be patient around the start of the week as you reach a boiling point with a loved one.

Iff

date yet for their

one time and he told song was actually written about and w'as like, no way, you actual-

said it’s the first time been an outdoor event of

debut CD Come Again in May 2004. The band’s lead vocalist and guitarist is Ian Thornley. Thornley was pre-

hurt.

My

Egleston

since

Lucky day: 29th

Cancer June 22

-

Be careful what you say and how you say it around the middle of the week as tempers can flare and feelings can easily be

from Thornley’s past including Luck is Wasted and That Song.

played

through

Sagittarius

J

The band played songs from their as well as Big Wreck songs

Conestoga Students Inc. (CSI) communications specialist Sam

booking bands so

7

jumping

to

CD

“1 feel

Agency Group

Gemini

opposed

as

around.”

act Hurst.

not an emotion you

deal with well.

cert

-

there’s

Aren't

il

»

-

Although it's nice to give the your back to someone in need remember that you may need just what you're giving

shirt off

away. Ask yourself

if they would do the same. Lucky day: 27th

Brandon Walker

is a second-year journalism student holding fate

in the

palm of

his

hand.

(Photo by Jon Yaneff)

Ian Thornley rocks the stage with his band, Thornley, at

Conestoga College Sept. 15


|

SPOKE, September

26,

2005

— Page 13

Conestoga Students Inc. would like to thank all the volunteers who helped with the “THORNLEY” concert on Sept. 1 5, 2005. The 1 st annual Campus Music Explosion was a huge success, we hope to carry on this tradition of great music and campus life! A special thank you to those who made this event happen: MAHER ALBASEL, SAM EGLESTON, JANIE RENWICK, JUDY DUSICK, NICHOLE JIMINEZ, DOLLY PHAN, HILLARY GREB, JUSTIN FALCONER, LEANNE BIRD, DAN STIPLOSEK,

JON

WOLF, MATT KNAPP, MARK ARUJO, CHRISTINE SMITH, DARIUSZ CZAJKOWSKI AND ALL OTHER VOLUNTEERS!

CSI NEEDS YOU! WE NEED VOLUNTEERS TO PROVIDE INPUT

CSI SERVICES

&

ACTIVITIES COMMITTEES Provide input, suggestions

and comments

to the CSI

General Manager on the services

&

activities offered

Monthly meetings

-

by

CSI.

approx.

I

hr.

PLEASE CONTACT US! Judy Janie

-

-

jdusick@conestogac.on.ca

jrenwick@conestogac.on.ca

Conestoga I

STUDENTS INC


Page 14

— SPOKE, September 26, 2005

Sports

Head-to-head: Keep “The Leafs

Cup

win (he Stanley

will

a

common

Brent

used by Toronto Maple Leal's fans everywhere. However, since 1967, the Leal's and their fans have not been able to celebrate with Lord Stanley. And, unfortunately over-optimistic

constantly

Toronto fans, “next year” will not be this year. “Next year,” will in fact,

not corns any lime soon.

Throughout the excessive offMaple Leafs have done

nothing but take countless steps

backwards and created a mere shadow of their former self. Aside from the new Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA) hurt-

who

once again, when the

Brian Leetch, a 2003 trade dead-

who was supposed

Bruins

in

sign

with

the

agents

Boston

tries

heart and soul of the team. Both

with the Florida Panthers. Although

played a

full

nor Nieuwendyk

2003-’04 season,

it

is

without question that both players

were instrumental team on and off the

in

leading the

ice.

Alexander Mogilny also left Toronto in favour of the New Jersey Devils, a team seasons,

After three

who in

he

won

the Stanley

Cup

w'ith

1999-2000 and could very well

out an exciting prospect such

We wood II

to

improve the

in

Many teams

have question marks going into the season and Toronto is one of them. The Leafs do have the depth at certain positions, but

others.”

lack in others.

threat

Antropov, Alexei Ponikarovsky and Carlo Colaiacovo finally develop into the players Leafs fans have always claimed they will be? This season will be crucial to their careers. Without question Toronto will need all their key players, especially 40-year-old goaltender Ed

Following the loss of such highplayers, the Leafs finally

profile

dipped into the free agent market by signing two of the biggest Band-aids in the NHL.

While Eric Lindros is a former Hart Trophy winner, he has never lived up to his initial hype as being “The Next One.” and is known more for laying on the ice than playing on it. Another Leafs free agent market splash was acquiring Jason Allison. Like Lindros, Allison has no shortage of offensive ability. But, due to

Belfour, to stay healthy for relatively the entire season. If not,

it

be

will

a long year for the Leafs faithful.

Fans,

once again,

this

is

“next year” and “next year” not going to

come

not

is still

for a very long

time.

Rangers.

remains a scoring

but

he stays healthy.

if

Ed Belfour

the

is

number

goalie

1

away from NHL arenas, the Toronto Maple Leafs are back on the ice and ready to com-

on

pete once again for the Stanley Cup.

hasn’t had the chance to play for a

Even though Stanley hasn’t meandered through the streets of

winning team in awhile, spending his time in the NHL with the

Toronto since 1967, the Leafs have tasted success during the reign of

Pittsburgh Penguins.

After a winter

Quinn

is

squad should be no exception. In Quinn’s six years as coach, the Leafs have made the playoffs every year, and advanced to at least the conference semifinals five times.

seen

in

regular

season

w'as

103 points, second

do

will

the deficiencies that can be

other teams that

made

the

playoffs last season.

The Ottawa Senators, coming

off

a fifth-place, 102-point season, are

heavily on goaltender Dominic Hasek. Hasek has not

relying

the

most successful one in They finished with

Leafs’

Aubin

in place.

Another reason the Leafs well

Last

Leafs have a

to injury, the

capable back-up

as coach, and this year’s

Pat

team, but should he suc-

this

cumb

played a

team

recent history.

Can

Nieuw'endyk and Gary Roberts, a

signed similar two-year contracts

wing. Leafs fans

position’s status.

Joe

quite possibly the

at left

must hope head coach Pat Quinn

losses

timeless

the

Roberts

depth chart

August.

but lack

neither

With Darcy Tucker and Nik Antropov leading the way on the

as Kyle

market.

who was

scratching their heads.

only playing 28 games (including playoffs) with the team, Leetch

depth at certain positions,

player

extremely (alented Mariusz Czerkawski will have fans

Toronto over the top, is also no longer with the Leafs. After

to

help

will

yet

tent,

to put

chose

Hurricanes,

York

especially with con-

in his career,

Opinion

gritty goal-

replace Gary Roberts, an inconsis-

playoffs arrive.

Cup every season, Toronto also lost many key players to the free agent

include

Carolina

New

the

Lindros has struggled with injuries

scorer, Jeff O’Neill, formerly of the

contend,

attempt to (unsuc-

free

with

cussions,

Although acquiring a

Opinion

“The Leafs do have the

key

Tim Gedcke

the

schedule.

cessfully in this case) purchase the

Two

led the Philadelphia Flyers into (he

playoffs four times, before signing

that

former Los Angeles King can remain over (lie 82 game

Gerhart

line acquisition

season. the

ing teams

forced

only play 26 games in 2003’04 season, there is no telling how to

healthy

phrase

for

neck injury

his serious

him

become

has

This

Leafs have a great shot

waiting, Leafs fans!

next year.”

Cup?

Leafs take the Stanley

Will the

full

since

season with any

2001 -’02,

and

NHL has

in the northeast

struggled greatly with injuries in

one point back of the Boston Bruins. The Leafs have made a number of valuable additions from that marvelous season, including the

few years. The Detroit Red Wings took a chance with Hasek in 2003-’04 and only got 14 games

division, just

the past

first-place

out of him, due to a groin injury.

Another team

forwards Jason Allison and Eric Lindros and goalie Jean-sebastien Aubin. Allison has averaged at least one point-per-game in every season since 1999-2000, while playing for the Bruins and the Kings. Lindros has been a valuable commodity in the NHL since he came out of junior hockey in 1992. He acquisitions

of

talent

is

Neither

the

that lost significant

New

Jersey

hard-hitting

Devils.

defenceman

Scott Stevens nor their most reliable defenceman, Scott Neidermayer, will be with the team this year, leaving huge holes in the defence. With Belfour, the Leafs have one

of the finest goalies in the league,

have a solid defence corps and will score their fair share of goals.

Networking Opportunities at Career Fair What is Career Fair?

Preparation:

An opportunity

for students and alumni to network with potential employers from Canada and tfie USA An opportunity to investigate and research career options from diverse sectors An event that helps you to obtain Information from employers on: Career Opportunities Corporate Culture industry Trends Educational Requirements industry Growth Job Requirements Salary Expectations Ski Is and Qualifications

cmuA ,

mm

few. C.

wm&em. oa

mt

V

•%

«**

Visit

mww,pmnmers4^mpk>ymm%t.m for a list of participating and employer profiles Employer Guidebook in Hoorn 220, Student Client

organisations Pfck.

up

m

Services Guiding or at the Main Office of the Guelph Campus before the Career Fair (available at RIM Parte on the day of the Fair

A A

as well)

Research employer information available m Career Services Update your r£sum£ and take copies to the Fair Prepare a list of quest ions to ask employers Target potential employers

Presentation:

:

i*crr9 r(K# ftad-copduct yourself professionally

and self confidence

How to get to

%

&

\

0mm

Career Fair: A

5 A

T

‘V* I

/

V

* * 1

For more information, contact Co-op and Career Services in 5CSB Room 220, Doon Campus, Shirley Doncyzk, sdoncyzk@oonestogac.on.ca, 748-5220 ext.

3756

FREE transportation

is

available

from both Doom and Guelph campuses Conestoga College Ooort Campus buses will run throughout the day and will pick up and drop off at Ooor #3 Conestoga College Guelph Campus students are asked to contact Donna Slater (519*824-9390 ext. 135) by Mon,, Sept. 26 to reserve a seat on the bus to Career Fair Guelph Campus transportation will pick up and drop off at Guelph

RIM Park 2001 University Avenue East Waterloo, ON N2K 4K4 (519) 884-5363

Doon Campus To Career From Fair

Career Fair

9:30

12:00

10:30

12:00

11:30

2:00

1:30

3:00

Guelph Campus

To Career

From

Fair

Career Fair

9:30

2:00

|


.

.

.

Sports

teams ready

Varsity u :w.

He is

Conestoga

College’s

varsity

all

The men's and women’s soccer teams, the men's rugby team and the

team are underway with tryouts, practices and fastball

games already completgames are on the horizon. The men’s soccer team is coming off a season in which they missed the playoffs, but coach Geoff exhibition ed, while

who

Johnstone, tion for

34 years

he expects to

said the team’s only

his strikers are

more

The

first

game of

was

the season

Cambrian Oct. 1 The women’s soccer team

didn't

win a game last season with seven losses and one tie, but third-year coach Rebecca Miller said she expects more from this year’s squad. “I have strong expectations from the level of play I’ve seen really confident that we’ll

well,” said Miller.

more depth on

the playoffs this

weakness

natural mid-

this

all

and I’m do really

“We have a lot ends of the field

time out.”

a realistic goal to get to the

She said she’s seen a high level of play from both the seven returning

playoffs

because we have 13 returning players, talented rookies

players as well as the rookies coming in, who are all going to add to

and a solid core on defence,” said who has won 26 Ontario Colleges Athletic Association i(OCAA) rhedals as coach including six gold medals. “I’m reallyi pleased with the work ethic of the; team.” Third-year veteran Barry Rouke

the team’s style of play.

Johnstone.'

i

said the

whole team would be

appointed

if

they didn’t

dis-

make -the

playoffs this season.

“We’ve

had

a notch,”

Rouke

core

said.

they filled the major holes in the bench from last season.

and

is

very strong,

we can

avoid injuries and suspensions while still putting a lot of if

Veteran outfielder Sarah Thomson gets ready to swing at a during a women’s fastball practice Sept. 1 3 at the college.

ing to learn,” she said. “If we put everything together 1 think it will

players

translate into a playoff berth, so

sized, so

be very disappointed achieve our goal.”

The team

if

lost their first

we

I’ll

don’t

game of

Oakville.

The women’s soccer team's next is against Cambrian

home game Oct.

Johnstone said the team is experienced on all fronts and believes

“Our starting lineup

“The team’s touches, fitness and game all show that they enjoy playing soccer and are willzest for the

the season 5-0 against Sheridan in

group together for a while so it would be disappointing if we don’t step it up this

season

for

against

at the college, said

year. “It's

— Page 15

rained out against Sheridan College in Oakville. Its next home game is

has held that posi-

make

2005

fielders.

geared up and ready for another exciting season full of action.

women’s

26,

i

By JON YANEFF

sports teams are

SPOKE, September

emphasis on schooling, we will be extremely strong,'' he said. “If you’re failing your classes you’ll be

on the sidelines come game time.”

1

at

3 p.m.

The men’s rugby team

finished

year

with a 5-2 win-loss record, but stumbled at the OCAA championship, finishing fourth in the tournament. Fourth-year coach Jeff Desruisseau said six of his eight last

returning players are starters so he believes the team has what it takes to make the playoffs once again.

“We have

a

bunch of new,

fast

(Photo by Jon Yaneff)

who are incredibly we are a very small

lobbed by volunteer Brittany Proud

under-

game

team,”

Cambridge Oct. 1 The women's fastball team is coming off a season where they

“We’ve got to play to our strengths by moving the ball and supporting it instead of said

ball

Desruisseau.

is

didn't

Bill

at

make

Struck field

the

playoffs,

in

but

The two returning fielder

Sarah

player Jen

er/utility

they are optimistic with

Fawn Day work

more solid than last season. "We have all the tools, so now it’s time to make the pieces fit together,”

ing the college.

cation as a team,” said French.

“There seems to be more commitment on the field,” said Day. “As long as players try their best

year,” said

you can ask for as a coach. She said if the team focuses on pitching and catching then they

key situations.” Signs of improving were noticed in the teams’ double-header Sept.

said second-year veteran

John

Field.

The rugby squad lost their first game of the season 15-5 against Fleming College

in

Peterborough

Sept. 17.

out for practices

Friday

they

as a

said

team

should be a fun season represent-

that’s all

should gel quickly.

Desruisseau said if new players are interested in playing they can

come

it

if

until Oct.

Monday

to

1

The rugby team’s next home

“I think as the

“I think everyone is really improving since the first tryout which will lead to better communi-

“I

put

think we’re far better than last

it all

and how

but then

came out on

ond game

The

last!

STUDENTS - DOON CAMPUS

12:30-1:30 p.m. (upper years)

Room 2E04 Room 2E04 Room 2E04 Room 2E04 Room 3E01 Room 3E01

11:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m.

Room D3

11:30 a.m. -12:30 p.m.

Room A19

12:30-1:30 p.m. (upper years) 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. (upper years)

WATERLOO CAMPUS A19 i

top in the sec-

8-2.

fastball

team plays

at

home

against Seneca College Sept. 29 at

5:30 p.m.

Suggestions or input on to improve the student experience

11:30 a.m.- 12:30 p.m. (first years) 12:30-1:30 p.m. (first years) 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. (upper years)

to

18 where they lost a nailbitter, 7-5,

season goes on

we’re definitely going to see improvements on both sides of the field which could lead to our team goal of a .500 record,” she said.

Register in the Student Services office (2B04) while spaces

Thomson. “We have

together as one and utilize

You’re invited to share your input, enjoy some FREE PIZZA and help shape the future of Conestoga College... don’t miss your chance to participate in one of the following Student Focus Groups! Get involved!

GUELPH CAMPUS

new

she expects

services, student life opportunities will be greatly welcomed.

Thursday, October 27

the

fourth-year coach

We want to hear about your experience at Conestoga.

Wednesday, October 26

all

crashing the ball up the field.” Desruisseau said his players are harder hitters and the defence is

Your voiee, your eiqperience, Conestoga’s future!

Wednesday, October 19 Thursday, October 20

pitch-

French, said

players on the team.

CONNEX

Tuesday, October 4 Wednesday, October 5 Thursday, October 6 Tuesday, October 18

players, out-

Thomson and


Page 16

— SPOKE, September 26, 2005

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Spoke20050926